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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Linus is right (as usual)

    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable.

    This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs.
    The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.

  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes

    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies.

    One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

Filed under
Software
  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting

    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download.

    VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon.
    Why Vidcutter?

    If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily.

    VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More

    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases.

    The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.

  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows

    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux.

    It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.

  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements

    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Reveal.js presentation hacks

    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it.

    Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.

  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know

    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.

  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon

    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed.

    The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.

  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development

     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Filed under
Linux

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors.

Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Filed under
Security

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC.

Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75.

Read more

With government approval, OpenStack adoption continues apace in China

Filed under
Server
OSS

Deployments of OpenStack cloud are growing faster in China and the APAC region than anywhere else in the world, backed in part by the Chinese government's vocal support for the open source infrastructure.

It is China in particular where some of the biggest deployments are running. China UnionPay recently overtook Visa for the largest volume of card payments in the world. The state-operated railway network China Rail oversees billions of passengers every year. By total number of subscribers China Mobile tops the list for biggest mobile phone operator globally. And the massive utility organisation the State Grid Corporation of China employs 1.5 million people.

All of these enormous enterprises are running OpenStack clouds. Why?

Read more

Also:

The Fox Hunt - Firefox and friends compared

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

So what should you use? Well, it depends. You want extensions, the entire repertoire as it's meant to be? Go with Pale Moon, but be aware of the inconsistencies and problems down the road. However, another piece of penalty is less than optimal looks. If you are more focused on speed and future development, then it's Firefox, as it offers the most complete compromise. The add-ons will make it or break it. Waterfox makes less sense, because the margins of benefit are too small.

My take is - Firefox. It's not ideal, but Pale Moon does not solve the problem fully, it combines nostalgia with technicals, and that's a rough patch, even though the project is quite admirable in what it's trying to do. Alas, I'm afraid the old extensions will die, and the new ones won't be compatible, so the browser will be left stranded somewhere in between. But hopefully, this little comparison test gives you a better overview and understanding how things work.

Finally, we go back to the question of speed. We've seen how one flavor of Fox stacks against another, but what about Chrome? I will answer that in a follow-up article, which will compare Chrome to Vivaldi, again based on popular demand, and then we will also check how all these different browsers compare using my small, limited and entirely personal corner of the Web. Stay tuned.

Read more

Also: Firefox Private Browsing vs. Chrome Incognito: Which is Faster?

OnePlus 5T review: Come for the value, not the excitement

Filed under
Android
Reviews

OnePlus isn't interested in holding back on specs, features or capabilities to make a big reveal of a new phone just once a year. The scrappy company has settled in on a refresh cycle every six months, with a big release followed by a mid-cycle bump to bring in the latest things it's been working on. The OnePlus 5T isn't meant to be an innovative leap of technology that blows your socks off — and honestly, none of its predecessors have been particularly groundbreaking, either.

Nope, the 5T is still about value, simplicity and being tuned for what the Android enthusiast crowd craves from its phones. At $479 there wasn't much about the OnePlus 5 you could find a flaw with. Now six months later with a bigger screen, new secondary camera, neat Face Unlock feature and a $20 price bump, it's a pretty easy equation to figure out.

Read more

DragonBoard gains a camera kit

Filed under
Linux

Arrow’s DragonBoard 410c Camera Kit combines the 96Boards SBC with D3’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 and a 5-megapixel camera module.

D3 Engineering’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 is a 96Boards mezzanine add-on designed to work only with the Arrow Electronics/Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c. Arrow and D3 have now launched a kit that provides a DragonBoard 410c with the D3 board and a miniature 5-megapixel autofocus camera module. The kit’s Linux software runs on the 96Boards CE SBC’s quad-core Cortex-A53 based Snapdragon 410 SoC.

Read more

OnePlus 5T review—An outstanding combination of specs, design, and price

Filed under
Android
Reviews

After launching the OnePlus 5 earlier this year, OnePlus is back with an end-of-year upgrade for the device. The OnePlus 5T takes a winning formula—high-end specs with a low price tag and a metal body—and reworks the front of the phone to dedicate as much space as possible to the screen. This device has a new screen, a new button layout, a new fingerprint reader, and a new camera setup. It almost feels like a totally new device.

We liked the OnePlus 5 from earlier in the year, but, with the more modern design, OnePlus has fixed OnePlus 5's biggest downside. The result is something that is extremely compelling—a $500 phone that makes you question exactly why you'd give $800 to those other OEMs when this has nearly everything the more expensive phones have.

Read more

Linus Torvalds: 'I don't trust security people to do sane things'

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds has offered his thoughts on Linux security approaches, branding some security professionals as "f*cking morons" for focusing on process-killing rather than debugging.

Torvalds, the creator and principal developer of the Linux kernel, does not often pull his punches when it comes to the kernel's behaviors and security.

The engineer carried on the tradition over the weekend, as Google Pixel developer Kees Cook submitted a pull request for hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1, which according to Cook, narrows areas of memory "that can be copied to/from userspace in the face of usercopy bugs by adding explicit whitelisting for slab cache regions."

Read more

Also: Linux creator slams security bods

Sustainable Open Source is About Evolution as a Group

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

The role of a CMO in a software company is fundamentally different from that in any other category. We have a really interesting role in marketing and technology, and it’s one of education and guidance. There used to be a place 20 years ago where, as a marketer, you would come up with a simple pithy message and buy a bunch of advertising and people would believe it.

That’s not true anymore. Now we have to position ourselves alongside the architectures and the thought leadership that our customers are interested in to prove our value.

Read more

Games: SuperTuxKart, PAWARUMI, Radar Warfare and More

Filed under
Gaming

GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu: -ENOFIRMWARE is now available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu sources and tarballs are now available at
http://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/4.14-gnu/ .
It didn't require any deblobbing changes since -rc6-gnu. Binaries are
expected to show up over the next few days.

The biggest change in this release is that the firmware subtree was
removed upstream (thus the codename -ENOFIRMWARE), removing from the
Linux kernel distribution a few pieces of Free firmware, and a number of
non-Free ones. Alas, there are still a few pieces of non-Free firmware
remaining in Linux 4.14; hopefully this problem will be addressed in a
future release, and Linux will then be Free Software again. For the
time being, it still requires some cleaning up to be Free Software, and
plenty of additional cleaning up to meet the GNU Free Software
Distribution Guidelines.

The larger problem, that several drivers in Linux will not work at all
unless you provide them with pieces of proprietary software, is not
affected by this move: the drivers still refuse to work, a number of
them for no good reason, and the non-Free firmware is still demanded by
the upstream drivers, it is just distributed separately. This avoids
legal problems for distributors of the kernel Linux, who refrain from
distributing the non-Free firmware. However, that a number of drivers
and corresponding firwmare are updated in lockstep suggests that they
might actually be a single program, in spite of running on separate CPUs
and having pieces distributed separately, and it might even be the case
that the firmware happens to be a derivative work of the kernel. If
that is so, those who distribute them together, or even just the
firmware by itself, might be in violation of the terms of the GNU GPL,
the Linux license, and thus losing their license to distribute Linux!

Read more

Also: GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu Released, Still A Battle Deblobbing Driver Firmware

SparkyLinux 4.7 "Tyche" Out Now with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Updates

Filed under
Linux

Powered by a recent kernel from the long-term supported Linux 4.9 series, version 4.9.51, SparkyLinux 4.7 is now available for download (see link below) with all the updates pushed upstream in the software repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series as of November 17, 2017.

This version comes with the Xfce 4.12.3, LXDE 0.99.2, and Openbox 3.6.1 graphical environments, the latest Calamares 3.1.8 graphical installer, as well as Mozilla Firefox 52.5.0 ESR, Mozilla Thunderbird 52.4.0, LibreOffice 5.2.7, VLC Media Player 2.2.6, Pidgin 2.12.0, Transmission 2.92, HexChat 2.12.4, and DeaDBeeF 0.7.2.

Read more

LVFS makes Linux firmware updates easier

Filed under
Linux

Traditionally, updating a BIOS or a network card's firmware in Linux meant booting into Microsoft Windows or preparing a MS-DOS floppy disk and hoping everything would work correctly after the update. Periodically searching a vendor website for updates is a manual and error-prone task and not something we should ask users to do. A firmware update service makes it simpler for end users to implement hardware updates.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more