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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life. Read more

July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the July 2016 issue: * Seven Years Later: A Look Back * Installing A Seeburg 1000 On PCLinuxOS * ms_meme's Nook: Anytime * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: tuxlink * GIMP Tutorial: Engraved Text * Game Zone: Funklift * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: A Simple HTTP Server * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Meemaw. Download the PDF (8.3 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-07.pdf Download the EPUB Version (6.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (7.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Mageia 6 Is Getting Closer to a Final Release, Could Ship with Linux Kernel 4.7

Filed under
Development

The Mageia development team announced just a few moments ago that they'd released the first stabilization snapshot (sta1) of the upcoming Mageia 6 Linux operating system.

Read more

Also: Mageia 6 "Sta1" Release Ships, Finally Switches To GRUB2

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

UEFI Blocking GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • “Secure Boot” Strikes [Ed: obviously trouble all along]

    Remember the fears rampant when “Secure Boot” appeared? M$ could prevent installation of GNU/Linux? Well, we were told that the user/owner of the PC could disable it and normal installation would ensue. Well, there’s a case in Mexico where a model from Lenovo wherein “Secure Boot” could not be disabled….

  • In Defense of Free Software: My Case Against Lenovo in Mexico

    This article gives the history of a purchase of a personal computer. In November 2014, I bought the Lenovo Yoga 2 for its operational functions, capacity and price. I intended to install GNU/Linux, a free and open source operating system which allows for users to run, study, redistribute and improve computer software so that the whole user community benefits.

Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life.

Read more

July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

Filed under
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system.

Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Not Love

    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.

  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM

    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.

  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over

    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture.

    And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.

  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit

    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment.

    The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.

  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux

    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.

  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux

    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.

  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster

    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source

    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct?

    That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.

  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney

    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.

  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project

    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up.

    First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”

  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools

    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations.

    This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.

  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big

    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.”

    [...]

    Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.

  • Understanding open source licenses

    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process.

    There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?

  • Build your own open source solar panels

    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source.

    The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.

  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance

    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies.

    Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.

  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange

    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Pitivi 0.96 — Cogito Ergo Proxy
  • Pitivi 0.96 Released With Proxy Editing Support

    In addition to proxy editing, Pitivi 0.96 also has timeline changes, transformation box, setting changes, user interface improvements, the start of allowing custom keyboard shortcuts, and support for Flatpak packages.

  • Calamares 2.3 Universal Linux OS Installer Released with Full-Disk Encryption

    Today, June 30, 2016, the Calamares team was proud to announce the final release and immediate availability for download of the Calamares 2.3 distribution-independent system installer.

    Calamares is currently being used in numerous popular operating systems, including, but not limited to, KaOS, Apricity OS, Chakra GNU/Linux, Netrunner, Sabayon, and OpenMandriva. It is the universal installer framework that many GNU/Linux distributions should adopt as it's now one of the most advanced system installers.

  • etcd3: A new etcd

    Over the past few months, CoreOS has been diligently finalizing the etcd3 API beta, testing the system and working with users to make etcd even better. Today etcd v3.0.0, the distributed key value store developed by CoreOS, is available.

    In practice, etcd3 is already integrated into a large-scale distributed system, Kubernetes, and we have implemented distributed coordination primitives including distributed locks, elections, and software transactional memory, to ensure the etcd3 API is flexible enough to support a variety of applications. Today we’re proud to announce that etcd3 is ready for general use.

  • Zend Framework 3 Released!

    After 17 months of effort, hundreds of releases, tens of thousands of commits by hundreds of contributors, and millions of installs, we're pleased to announce the immediate availability of Zend Framework 3.

  • ANNOUNCE: virt-viewer 4.0 release
  • Virt-Manager's Virrt-Viewer 4.0 Released

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Mint Coverage

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Asian firms must embrace 'open innovation' to remain competitive

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

Businesses in Asia should embrace the "open source way of innovating" to gain agility and speed, and ensure they are delivering services that their customers want.

That was the key message delegates should take away from the Red Hat Summit here this week, said Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen, Red Hat's Asia-Pacific senior vice president and general manager, who underscored the need for a collaborative platform and apply the concepts of open source to the world's markets,.

Read more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 Release
  • Enlightenment 0.21 Released With Its Much Better Wayland Support

    Another Enlightenment release, another round of significant Wayland improvements.

  • Enlightenment 0.21.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Wayland Support

    Today, June 30, 2016, Mike Blumenkrantz from the Enlightenment project has had the great pleasure of announcing the final release of the Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 desktop environment.

    Enlightenment is a free window manager/desktop environment distributed under an open source license for all and any GNU/Linux operating system that wants to either adopt it as the default user interface or include it in the software repositories.

    The main goal of the Enlightenment desktop environment is to be as lightweight as possible, but at the same time beautiful, and last but not least, provide users with the latest, cutting-edge technologies.

Transcend Wifi SD Card Is A Tiny Linux Server

Filed under
Linux
Server

He read a post about these cards on the OpenWRT forums. They’re all a similar configuration of a relatively large amount of memory (compared to the usual embedded computer), a WiFi chip, and an ARM processor running a tiny Linux install. The card acts as a WiFi access point with a little server running on it, and waits for the user to connect to it via a website. It also has a mode where it will connect to up to three access points specified by the user, but it doesn’t actually have a way to tell the user what its IP address is; which is kind of funny.

Read more

Atom-based gateway taps new open source IoT cloud platform

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
OSS

Eurotech’s rugged, IP40 protected “ReliaGate 20-26” IoT gateway runs Red Hat Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and has cellular, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth options.

Eurotech’s ReliaGate 20-26 is the latest in a line of Internet of Things gateways, such as the ReliaGate 10-11, based on a TI AM3352 Sitara SoC, and the Intel Atom Z510-based ReliaGate 50-21. For the ReliaGate 20-26, Eurotech advances to a more modern “Bay Trail” Atom E3800.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life. Read more

July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the July 2016 issue: * Seven Years Later: A Look Back * Installing A Seeburg 1000 On PCLinuxOS * ms_meme's Nook: Anytime * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: tuxlink * GIMP Tutorial: Engraved Text * Game Zone: Funklift * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: A Simple HTTP Server * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Meemaw. Download the PDF (8.3 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-07.pdf Download the EPUB Version (6.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (7.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.