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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Basic Image Editing With GIMP In Linux Mohd Sohail 27/03/2017 - 10:12am
Story Debian Packages and Derivative Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 8:55am
Story Linux/FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 8:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 8:43am
Story Software: LibreELEC 8.0.1 (Kodi), MKVToolnix 10.0.0, Claws Mail 3.15) Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:57am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:53am
Story Ubuntu-Based LXLE 16.04.2 Gets an RC Build, Promises to Be the Best Release Ever Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:50am
Story These Are the Default Wallpapers of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Linux Distro Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:46am
Story Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 Review: Finally, an Android tablet built with enterprise users in mind Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:40am
Story Ubuntu 17.04 inches closer to production Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:29am

Basic Image Editing With GIMP In Linux

Filed under
Linux

GIMP is an acronym for GNU Image Manipulation Program, is a raster image editing program for Linux, OSX, Windows and other OS/es. This is not a free photoshop program as many say so. Graphics enthusiasts and professionals rely on GIMP for image retouching or complete creation of images for artwork (which is a daunting task for novice). And yes GIMP is open source that means you get to keep it on your PC or laptop for free without legal hiatus.

Read<br />
more

Debian Packages and Derivative

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian package dependency browser

    The Debian package browser is great but it is somewhat limited. As an example even though you can get dependencies and build dependencies for any package but not reverse dependencies (i.e. list all packages that depend or build-depend on this package).

  • Proxmox VE 5.0 to Be Based on the Great Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch," Linux 4.10

    Martin Maurer, the Proxmox VE (Virtual Environment) project leader, announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first Beta of the upcoming Proxmox VE 5.0 series of the Debian-based operating system.

Linux/FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • Ten years of Codethink

    Spring is here and it is the 10th anniversary celebration of Codethink. Nobody could have orchestrated it this way but we also have GUADEC happening here in Manchester in a few months and it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME. All roads lead to Manchester in 2017!

    The company is celebrating its anniversary in various ways: cool new green-on-black T-shirts, a 10 years mug for everyone, and perhaps more significantly a big sophisticated party with a complicated cake.

  • Arranging Install Fest 2017

    Next Thursday at the auditorium of the School of Computer Science, we are going to install in more than 200 new students of the university FEDORA + GNOME, since during the first year they study algorithms, C programming and GNU/Linux in general.

  • Moving OpenStack beyond borders (and possibly to Mars)

    The inaugural OpenStack Days Poland event drew more than 300 users, upstream developers, operators and vendors to the Copernicus Science Center in the heart of Warsaw, Poland on March 22.

    Although Warsaw is Poland’s capital city—and according to “Forbes,” a hotbed of startups and multinational tech companies’ European branches—this meetup traces its roots west to Wroclaw, the Silicon Valley of Poland, according to some event speakers.

  • Pay it forward: Sign up for Speed Mentoring at the OpenStack Summit Boston

    After a successful launch at the Austin Summit, Speed Mentoring is back in action in Boston.

    Organized by the Women of OpenStack, it’s designed to be a lightweight mentoring initiative to provide technical or career guidance to beginners in the community. Mentees should already be part of the community; they should have gone through, or be familiar with Upstream Training.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Software: LibreELEC 8.0.1 (Kodi), MKVToolnix 10.0.0, Claws Mail 3.15)

Filed under
Software
  • LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.0.1 MR

    LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.0.1 MR is available bringing Kodi v17.1, hardware support for the Raspberry Pi Zero W, improved software HEVC decoding on RPi3/CM3 hardware, driver support for Fe Pi audio cards, and support for Cirrus Logic DAC audio cards (thanks to @HiassofT). The bump to Kodi v17.1 resolves several upgrade and user-experience issues we have seen with the initial Kodi v17.0 release, and happiness is enhanced for users wearing an official LibreELEC tee-shirt or hoodie.

  • LibreELEC 8.0.1 Is Out Based on Kodi 17.1, Adds Support for Raspberry Pi Zero W

    LibreELEC developers announced the release and general availability of the first maintenance update to the major LibreELEC 8.0 stable series of the Linux-based operating system built around the Kodi open-source media center.

  • NetworkManager 1.8 to Support Handling of PINs for PKCS#11 Tokens as Secrets

    Lubomir Rintel announced that the development of the NetworkManager 1.8 major release has kicked off with the availability of the first snapshot, versioned 1.7.2, for public testing.

  • MKVToolnix 10.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulator Improves H.264 and H.265 Parsers

    MKVToolnix developer Moritz Bunkus released a new major branch of his popular, open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software, versioned 10.0.0.

  • Claws Mail 3.15.0

    Claws Mail is a GTK+ based, user-friendly, lightweight, and fast email client.

  • Claws Mail 3.15 Open-Source Email Client Brings New Hidden Preferences, Bugfixes

    Claws Mail, the lightweight and open-source GTK+ based email client for Linux, UNIX, and Windows operating systems, was updated recently to version 3.15.0, a maintenance update that adds new functionalities and addresses a lot of bugs.

    Claws Mail 3.15.0 comes more than four months after the first point release to the 3.14 series of the application, and among the new features implemented we can mention a bunch of options that should help users configure Claws Mail when opening a selected message, such as checkboxes on the Display and Summaries page of Preferences.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • It looks like we may be getting a Planescape Torment Enhanced Edition

    Back in January Beamdog was looking for testers on a new game. Now the Planescape website has a countdown timer. It's legitimate too, as tweeted by the Beamdog and the D&D twitter accounts.

  • RTS game 'Deadhold' could come to Linux, considering an experimental Beta

    The developers of Deadhold [Steam, Official Site] want to support Linux and they are thinking about releasing an experimental Linux Beta.

  • Ten amazing Linux games you can play without WINE

    Those of us who have taken up the mantle of a Linux gamer know that our path is rarely easy. For a long time, few games were released for our chosen platform. Those that were shipped riddled with bugs, compatibility issues and rarely worked out of the box. Getting games to work require using WINE and deeply complex almost arcane workarounds to force windows games to work on our quirky systems. Unfortunately, games rarely worked well and usually required hours of complex tweaking in order to get them to function properly. To top this all of, there were graphics driver problems, optimization issues, peripherals rarely worked out of the box and our lives were generally difficult.

Ubuntu-Based LXLE 16.04.2 Gets an RC Build, Promises to Be the Best Release Ever

Filed under
Ubuntu

LXLE 16.04.2 is on its way to becoming the best release ever of the Ubuntu-based distribution built around the lightweight LXDE desktop environment, and it just received a Release Candidate (RC) build.

Continuing to get all the goodies from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus), LXLE 16.04.2 Release Candidate is here only two weeks after the last Beta milestone, and adds quite a bunch of improvements and bug fixes. These include a reconfigured menu layout to be less cluttered for navigation, and a revamped Control Menu to act as a dynamic Control Panel.

Read more

These Are the Default Wallpapers of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Linux Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu member Nathan Haines is proud to inform Softpedia about the availability of the new community wallpapers for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

Ubuntu 17.04 just got its Final Beta release at the end of last week, and now that Final Freeze stage is approaching fast, it's time for us to have a look at the default wallpapers shipping with the final release, which have been contributed by various artists and photographers from all over the world.

Read more

Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 Review: Finally, an Android tablet built with enterprise users in mind

Filed under
Reviews

Show me an Android tablet and I'll show you a device that has yet to live up to its full potential. Google's Play Store lacks a wide selection of apps that support a tablet's larger display, with most apps only expanding the phone interface, in turn looking horrible on the smaller screen.

In addition to the lack of quality apps, Android tablets have lacked key accessories such as a keyboard.

For the most part, Android tablets have been relegated to a device used to catch up on Netflix or to entertain kids with games.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 inches closer to production

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu's final beta for version 17.04 has landed.

Zesty Zapus covers Ubuntu desktop, server and cloud editions, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Gnome, MATE, Studio and Xubuntu flavours.

It's not a huge feature boost, but the release is using the Linux 4.10 kernel, useful if your iron runs Intel Kaby Lake or AMD Ryzen silicon.

If configuring the Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS) is on your hate-list, there's good news: the release includes support for driverless printing.

Read more

Also: Getting Better Radeon Polaris Performance On Ubuntu 17.04 With Mesa 17.1, Linux 4.11

Linux 4.11 RC4

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11-rc4

    So last week, I said that I was hoping that rc3 was the point where
    we'd start to shrink the rc's, and yes, rc4 is smaller than rc3. By a
    tiny tiny smidgen. It does touch a few more files, but it has a
    couple fewer commits, and fewer lines changed overall. But on the
    whole the two are almost identical in size.

    Which isn't actually all that bad, considering that rc4 has both a
    networking merge and the usual driver suspects from Greg, _and_ some
    drm fixes - and those tend to be the big areas.

    So on the whole things look fine. There's changes all over, and in
    mostly the usual proportions. Some core kernel code shows up in the
    diffstat slightly more than it usually does - we had an audit fix and
    a bpf hashmap fix, but on the whole it all looks very regular: mostly
    drivers, networking, arch fixes and some filesystem noise. Shortlog
    appended as usual for people who want to skim the details.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Fourth Release Candidate of the Linux 4.11 Kernel

    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his regular Sunday announcement to inform us about the availability of the fourth Release Candidate (RC) development release of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel.

    Coming one week after the third Release Candidate, Linux 4.11 RC4 appears to be just a bit smaller than the previous build, updating the networking stack and many of the supported drivers to be on par with what was changed earlier this week in the stable Linux kernel branches.

  • Linux 4.11-rc4 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has announced the Linux 4.11-rc4 kernel this evening.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”

    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.

  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop

    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them.

    It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.

  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus

    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.

  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux

    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.

  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017

    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader!

    The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04

    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.

  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers

    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…

  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?

    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days.

    In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up

    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!

  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser

    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs.

    There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.

  • Sex and Gor and open source

    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life.

    [...]

    I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.

  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament

    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament.

    While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.

  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find

    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.

  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series

    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL.

    [...]

    With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.

  • NextCloud, a security analysis

    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement.

    As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.

  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash

    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Filed under
GNOME

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Software: LibreELEC 8.0.1 (Kodi), MKVToolnix 10.0.0, Claws Mail 3.15)

  • LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.0.1 MR
    LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.0.1 MR is available bringing Kodi v17.1, hardware support for the Raspberry Pi Zero W, improved software HEVC decoding on RPi3/CM3 hardware, driver support for Fe Pi audio cards, and support for Cirrus Logic DAC audio cards (thanks to @HiassofT). The bump to Kodi v17.1 resolves several upgrade and user-experience issues we have seen with the initial Kodi v17.0 release, and happiness is enhanced for users wearing an official LibreELEC tee-shirt or hoodie.
  • LibreELEC 8.0.1 Is Out Based on Kodi 17.1, Adds Support for Raspberry Pi Zero W
    LibreELEC developers announced the release and general availability of the first maintenance update to the major LibreELEC 8.0 stable series of the Linux-based operating system built around the Kodi open-source media center.
  • NetworkManager 1.8 to Support Handling of PINs for PKCS#11 Tokens as Secrets
    Lubomir Rintel announced that the development of the NetworkManager 1.8 major release has kicked off with the availability of the first snapshot, versioned 1.7.2, for public testing.
  • MKVToolnix 10.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulator Improves H.264 and H.265 Parsers
    MKVToolnix developer Moritz Bunkus released a new major branch of his popular, open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software, versioned 10.0.0.
  • Claws Mail 3.15.0
    Claws Mail is a GTK+ based, user-friendly, lightweight, and fast email client.
  • Claws Mail 3.15 Open-Source Email Client Brings New Hidden Preferences, Bugfixes
    Claws Mail, the lightweight and open-source GTK+ based email client for Linux, UNIX, and Windows operating systems, was updated recently to version 3.15.0, a maintenance update that adds new functionalities and addresses a lot of bugs. Claws Mail 3.15.0 comes more than four months after the first point release to the 3.14 series of the application, and among the new features implemented we can mention a bunch of options that should help users configure Claws Mail when opening a selected message, such as checkboxes on the Display and Summaries page of Preferences.

Games for GNU/Linux

  • It looks like we may be getting a Planescape Torment Enhanced Edition
    Back in January Beamdog was looking for testers on a new game. Now the Planescape website has a countdown timer. It's legitimate too, as tweeted by the Beamdog and the D&D twitter accounts.
  • RTS game 'Deadhold' could come to Linux, considering an experimental Beta
    The developers of Deadhold [Steam, Official Site] want to support Linux and they are thinking about releasing an experimental Linux Beta.
  • Ten amazing Linux games you can play without WINE
    Those of us who have taken up the mantle of a Linux gamer know that our path is rarely easy. For a long time, few games were released for our chosen platform. Those that were shipped riddled with bugs, compatibility issues and rarely worked out of the box. Getting games to work require using WINE and deeply complex almost arcane workarounds to force windows games to work on our quirky systems. Unfortunately, games rarely worked well and usually required hours of complex tweaking in order to get them to function properly. To top this all of, there were graphics driver problems, optimization issues, peripherals rarely worked out of the box and our lives were generally difficult.

Ubuntu-Based LXLE 16.04.2 Gets an RC Build, Promises to Be the Best Release Ever

LXLE 16.04.2 is on its way to becoming the best release ever of the Ubuntu-based distribution built around the lightweight LXDE desktop environment, and it just received a Release Candidate (RC) build. Continuing to get all the goodies from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus), LXLE 16.04.2 Release Candidate is here only two weeks after the last Beta milestone, and adds quite a bunch of improvements and bug fixes. These include a reconfigured menu layout to be less cluttered for navigation, and a revamped Control Menu to act as a dynamic Control Panel. Read more