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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hands on with the Pinebook Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:19pm
Story OpenELEC 8.0.3 Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:15pm
Story Linux, Graphics, and Tonight's Release Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:11pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:05pm
Story Leftovers: KDE and Qt Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:03pm
Story Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 12:45pm
Story Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 12:41pm
Story KDE vs. GNOME Design Philosophies Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 12:37pm
Story Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu! Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 3:22am
Story A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 3:12am

Hands on with the Pinebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The Pine A64 was a 64-bit Quad-Core Single Board Computer which was kickstarted at the tail end of 2015 for delivery in the middle of 2016. Costing just $15, and hailed as a “Raspberry Pi killer,” the board raised $1.7 million from 36,000 backers. It shipped to its backers to almost universally poor reviews.

Now they’re back, this time with a laptop—a 11.6-inch model for $89, or a 14-inch model for $99. Both are powered by the same 64-bit Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 as the original Pine A64 board, but at least Pine are doing a much better job this time around of managing user expectations.

Read more

Linux, Graphics, and Tonight's Release

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11 Set To Be Released Today

    After it was postponed last weekend, the Linux 4.11 kernel is set to be officially released in a matter of hours.

    As of writing, the Linux 4.11 codename remains the "Fearless Coyote", but there is the possibility that Torvalds may rename it when tagging the official 4.11.0 release today.

  • Linux Kernel 3.18.51 Released with MIPS, ARM, and CIFS Changes, Updated Drivers
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.65 LTS Is a Small Patch with Networking and File System Fixes
  • USB Type-C Port Manager Coming To Linux 4.12

    Another feature to look forward to with the Linux 4.12 kernel for those using newer hardware featuring USB Type-C is a port manager.

    The "TCPM" driver is queued as a new staging driver via usb-next for entering the Linux 4.12 kernel in the next two weeks. This USB Type-C Port Manager driver implements a power delivery state machine for source/sink ports. This driver serves as a state machine while other USB Type-C drivers are responsible for the rest of the functionality.

  • DirectFB Is Back To Being Dormant

    Back in August of 2015, DirectFB disappeared with its project site and code vanishing. Last November DirectFB re-appeared along with a new site and renewed focus on the project. Unfortunately, it's once again gone silent.

    With all the news this month about Ubuntu dropping Mir / Unity 8 and the continued work by many different desktop/compositor teams on Wayland, I was curious this weekend to check on how DirectFB is doing in 2017... Sadly, DirectFB.net as the new DirectFB site launched last November is now down again. The original DirectFB (dot) org web-site remains squatted. I've been unable to find any other "new" DirectFB website.

  • Sway Wayland Compositor Adding Proprietary NVIDIA Driver Support

    The Sway Wayland compositor that aims to be i3-compatible continues picking up new features.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME's JavaScript Component Will Be Seeing More Improvements For 3.26

    GJS -- the GNOME JavaScript system that allows for GObject introspection and other capabilities via JavaScript on the desktop -- is planning for further improvements with GNOME 3.26.

  • Show desktop icon in Gnome 3 - Where and how

    Despite my recently found liking for Gnome 3, largely because of Fedora 24 and Fedora 25, plus some rigorous work with extensions like Dash to Dock, it is still a highly inefficient desktop environment. The unnecessary touch emphasis is there, regardless of what anyone says, and it makes things difficult.

    For instance, Show desktop. This is an action slash widget in pretty much every other desktop, and despite occasional setbacks and regressions, it's always been there, a loyal companion in the moment of need. Not so in Gnome 3. Not just hidden. Not there at all. And what if you want it? Far from trivial. Hence this tutorial.

  • There's a script that makes the GNOME launcher a bit more organised

    I follow a great many sources for news and one that popped up in my feed is the 'gnome-dash-fix' script. It sorts out the mess that is the GNOME application launcher.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation

    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.

  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results

    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.

  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!

    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.

  • LaKademy 2017 just started!

    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.

  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?

    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right?

    Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.

  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare

    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you Smile

  • QNX as a desktop operating system

    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!

  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick

    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.

  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!

    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game.

Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look.

Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use.

Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily.

Read more

KDE vs. GNOME Design Philosophies

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

The days are gone when the Linux desktop was dominated almost entirely by KDE and GNOME. However, the influence of their design philosophy remains, with KDE favored by a third of users, and many modern desktop alternatives, from GNOME itself to Linux Mint’s Cinnamon and MATE using applications originally designed for GNOME. Broadly speaking, KDE’s design philosopy can be described as completist, and designed for users of all levels of experience, while GNOME’s is minimalist, and aimed particularly at new users — although all levels of users can appreciate GNOME design as well.

By “completist,” I mean that KDE applications try to include every function that could possibly be included in a task. Confusion is limited by the setting of intelligent defaults, but more functions are still visible than most everyday uses require. Perhaps the ultimate example of this design is digiKam, which over the year has calved new windows the way that polar ice caps calve glaciers.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, GNOME applications tend to include only the features for the most common use-cases. This choice makes GNOME apps easy to use, but can leave users stranded if any problems emerge. A typical example is Simple Scan, which is so uncluttered that at first it can almost seem confusing.

Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today.

And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking?

Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

Filed under
Android
  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated

    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both.

    After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets.

    I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.

  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Anonymous Open Source Projects

    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this.

    I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets.

    Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces.

    Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements.

    Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.

  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead

    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing.

    Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left.

    Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.

  • This Week In Creative Commons History

    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.

  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards

    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution

    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users.

    The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.

  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell

    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0!

This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated!

We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult.

Read more

Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

SparkyLinux Now Powered by Linux 4.10.13, Budgie Desktop Removed from Repos

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Polish developers of the Debian-based SparkyLinux operating system are ending the month of April by informing the community about everything good or bad that happened to their open-source project during the last few weeks.

First thing first, the distribution is now powered by the latest stable kernel, Linux 4.10.13, so you are urged to update your SparkyLinux installation as soon as possible, and remember to reboot the machine after installing the new kernel. Enlightenment's EFL libraries were also updated, to version 1.19.0.

Read more

Raspbian PIXEL Fork Lets You Install and Run the Operating System on a PC or Mac

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the availability of new builds of his AndEX Nougat 7.1.1 Android-x86 fork that lets users run Android 7.1.1 on their PCs, now Arne Exton released a custom build of Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspbian PIXEL image.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Won't Ship with Upstart and CGManager as Unity 8 Is Being Dropped

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov informs the Ubuntu Linux and Ubuntu Touch communities that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system will drop support for the Upstart init daemon and CGManager project.

Read more

Benchmarking Various Linux Distributions With Amazon's EC2 Cloud In 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

After carrying out the recent Amazon EC2 Cloud benchmarks vs. Intel/AMD CPUs I also decided to run some Linux distribution tests in the Elastic Compute Cloud with not having done any such comparisons in a long time. So for those wondering how different Linux distributions compare in Amazon's cloud, this article is for you.

Read more

This Custom Android-x86 Build Puts Android 7.1.1 on Your PC, with Linux 4.11 RC7

Filed under
Android
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton was happy to announce the release of a new build of his custom built Android-x86 project that lets uses runs the latest Android mobile operating system on their personal computers.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • GNOME's JavaScript Component Will Be Seeing More Improvements For 3.26
    GJS -- the GNOME JavaScript system that allows for GObject introspection and other capabilities via JavaScript on the desktop -- is planning for further improvements with GNOME 3.26.
  • Show desktop icon in Gnome 3 - Where and how
    Despite my recently found liking for Gnome 3, largely because of Fedora 24 and Fedora 25, plus some rigorous work with extensions like Dash to Dock, it is still a highly inefficient desktop environment. The unnecessary touch emphasis is there, regardless of what anyone says, and it makes things difficult. For instance, Show desktop. This is an action slash widget in pretty much every other desktop, and despite occasional setbacks and regressions, it's always been there, a loyal companion in the moment of need. Not so in Gnome 3. Not just hidden. Not there at all. And what if you want it? Far from trivial. Hence this tutorial.
  • There's a script that makes the GNOME launcher a bit more organised
    I follow a great many sources for news and one that popped up in my feed is the 'gnome-dash-fix' script. It sorts out the mess that is the GNOME application launcher.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation
    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.
  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results
    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.
  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!
    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.
  • LaKademy 2017 just started!
    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.
  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?
    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right? Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.
  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare
    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you :)
  • QNX as a desktop operating system
    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!
  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick
    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.
  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!
    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game. Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look. Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use. Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily. Read more