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Updated: 1 hour 3 min ago

4 of the Best Screen Recorders for Ubuntu

Monday 22nd of April 2019 10:00:00 PM

MakeTechEasier: You have plenty of choices when it comes to screen recorders for Ubuntu.

Creating a Self-Signed SSL Certificate

Monday 22nd of April 2019 09:00:00 PM

Linuxize: A self-signed SSL certificate is a certificate that is signed by the person who created it rather than a trusted certificate authority.

Improve your toolbox with git-pw, a python-based tool that integrates git & patchwork

Monday 22nd of April 2019 08:00:00 PM

A well-known Linux kernel developer once said, a poor craftsman famously complains about his tools, but a good craftsman knows how to choose excellent tools.

3 Ways to Install Atom Text Editor in openSUSE

Monday 22nd of April 2019 07:00:00 PM

Tecmint: Atom is a free, open-source, hackable, easy to customize and cross-platform text editor, that works on Linux, OS X, and Windows.

Monitor Your Network with Zabbix

Monday 22nd of April 2019 06:00:00 PM

 LinuxProMagazine: Zabbix is a network monitoring application that lets you stay on top of all your network activities.

KDE Applications 19.04 Open-Source Software Suite Has Been Officially Released

Monday 22nd of April 2019 05:00:00 PM

More than three months in development, the KDE Applications 19.04 software suite is here

View Detailed Laptop Battery Report on Ubuntu

Monday 22nd of April 2019 03:00:00 PM

Learn how to get a detailed laptop's battery report through the Ubuntu graphical user interface and through the Ubuntu command line.

FOSS Project Spotlight: Drupal

Monday 22nd of April 2019 02:00:00 PM

Linux Journal: Drupal is a content management framework, and it's used to make many of the websites and applications you use every day.

Condres OS Conjures Up Pleasing Arch Linux Transition

Monday 22nd of April 2019 01:00:00 PM

LinuxInsider: Condres OS, a distro much like the defunct Apricity OS, could be a speedier replacement for Linux OSes that have turned slow to no-go in recent new releases.

DPL elections 2019, congratulations Sam Hartman!

Monday 22nd of April 2019 01:00:00 AM

The Debian Project Leader elections just finished and the winner is Sam Hartman!

Linux v5.1 rc6

Sunday 21st of April 2019 09:00:00 PM

Linus Torvalds: It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow.

How to Start, Stop or Restart Services in Ubuntu

Saturday 20th of April 2019 01:00:00 PM

Learn different methods to start, stop and restart services in Ubuntu.

LibreOffice 6.2.3 Office Suite Released with More Than 90 Bug Fixes

Saturday 20th of April 2019 02:00:00 AM

softpedia: LibreOffice 6.2.3 is here about a month after the release of LibreOffice 6.2.2 to add another layer of bug fixes and improvements

Install The Latest OpenJDK 12, 11 or 8 in Ubuntu, Debian or RHEL Using Zulu OpenJDK Builds

Friday 19th of April 2019 10:00:00 PM

LinuxUprising: Azul Systems provides tested, certified builds of OpenJDK, under the name of Zulu.

Creating SWAP partition using FDISK & FALLOCATE commands

Friday 19th of April 2019 09:00:00 PM

Swap-partition holds the memory which is used in case the physical memory (RAM) is full .

HTTPie - A Modern Command Line HTTP Client For Curl And Wget Alternative

Friday 19th of April 2019 08:00:00 PM

2DayGeek: Learn how to use httpie tool to make CLI interaction with web services.

How To Remove Plank Shadow On Xubuntu?

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:00:00 PM

Plank is a simple dock application that is widely used by Linux users.

How to Generate a Random Number in Linux

Friday 19th of April 2019 06:00:00 PM

Learn how to generate a random number from the Linux command line.

Echo Command in Linux with Examples

Friday 19th of April 2019 05:00:00 PM

 Linuxize: The echo command is one of the most basic and frequently used commands in Linux.

State of enterprise open source: 5 telling stats

Friday 19th of April 2019 04:00:00 PM

EnterprisersProject: How are IT leaders using open source, and what are their future plans?

More in Tux Machines

Security: Curl, Two Factor Authentication (2FA) and Hacking With Kali Linux

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl + hackerone = TRUE
    There seems to be no end to updated posts about bug bounties in the curl project these days. Not long ago I mentioned the then new program that sadly enough was cancelled only a few months after its birth. Now we are back with a new and refreshed bug bounty program! The curl bug bounty program reborn.
  • Liz Fong-Jones on how to secure SSH with Two Factor Authentication (2FA)
    Liz mentions that by adding passphrase encryption, the private keys become resistant to theft when at rest. However, when they are in use, the usability challenges of re-entering the passphrase on every connection means that “engineers began caching keys unencrypted in memory of their workstations, and worse yet, forwarding the agent to allow remote hosts to use the cached keys without further confirmation”. The Matrix breach, which took place on April 11 showcases an example of what happens when authenticated sessions are allowed to propagate without a middle-man. The intruder in the Matrix breach had access to the production databases, potentially giving them access to unencrypted message data, password hashes, and access tokens.
  • Hacking With Kali Linux
    Before I talk about the series that I am going to start, let us briefly talk about who should follow this series. I know there are so many people out there who are very curious to learn hacking just to hack their partner's social media account. Well, if you are such a person, please listen to me. Hacking is not about getting into somebody's personal life and steal their information. It is illegal. Somebody well said - “We need to have a talk on the subject of what's yours and what's mine.” So you should not hack information that is not yours. ​But if you are a tech enthusiast who wants to make a career as a penetration tester or white hat hacker, this series can be really a good way to start. So for such enthusiasts, I am creating a page where you can follow the series. You can also follow our social media pages so you get a notification when a new informative article comes out.

Mozilla: VoxelJS, AiC and Mozilla B-Team

  • Mozilla VR Blog: VoxelJS: Chunking Magic
    A couple of weeks ago I relaunched VoxelJS with modern ThreeJS and modules support. Today I'm going to talk a little bit about how VoxelJS works internally, specifically how voxels are represented and drawn. This is the key magic part of a voxel engine and I owe a tremendous debt to Max Ogden, James Halliday and Mikola Lysenko Voxels are represented by numbers in a large three dimensional array. Each number says what type of block goes in that block slot, with 0 representing empty. The challenge is how to represent a potentially infinite set of voxels without slowing the computer to a crawl. The only way to do this is to load just a portion of the world at a time.
  • AiC: Collaborative summary documents
    One of my goals was that we could, at least for a moment, disconnect people from their particular position and turn their attention towards the goal of achieving a shared and complete summary. I didn’t feel that we were very succesful in this goal. For one thing, most participants simply left comments on parts they disagreed with; they didn’t themselves suggest alternate wording. That meant that I personally had to take their complaint and try to find some “middle ground” that accommodated the concern but preserved the original point. This was stressful for me and a lot of work. More importantly, it meant that most people continued to interact with the document as advocates for their point-of-view, rather than trying to step back and advocate for the completeness of the summary. In other words: when you see a sentence you disagree with, it is easy to say that you disagree with it. It is much harder to rephrase it in a way that you do agree with – but which still preserves (what you believe to be) the original intent. Doing so requires you to think about what the other person likely meant, and how you can preserve that. However, one possible reason that people may have been reluctant to offer suggestions is that, often, it was hard to make “small edits” that addressed people’s concerns. Especially early on, I found that, in order to address some comment, I would have to make larger restructurings. For example, taking a small sentence and expanding it to a bullet point of its own. Finally, some people who were active on the thread didn’t participate in the doc. Or, if they did, they did so by leaving comments on the original GitHub thread. This is not surprising: I was asking people to do something new and unfamiliar. Also, this whole process played out relatively quickly, and I suspect some people just didn’t even see the document before it was done. If I were to do this again, I would want to start it earlier in the process. I would also want to consider synchronous meetings, where we could go try to process edits as a group (but I think it would take some thought to figure out how to run such a meeting). In terms of functioning asynchronously, I would probably change to use a Google Doc instead of a Dropbox Paper. Google Docs have a better workflow for suggesting edits, I believe, as well, as a richer permissions model. Finally, I would try to draw a harder line in trying to get people to “own” the document and suggest edits of their own. I think the challenge of trying to neutrally represent someone else’s point of view is pretty powerful.
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
    Bugfixes + enabling the new security feature for API keys.

Programming Leftovers

Devices: Radiant Software, ASRock and Microsoft

  • Radiant 1.1 Lattice FPGA Design Tools Release Accelerates Design Reuse
    In addition to supporting Windows, Radiant Software 1.1 adds support for the popular Ubuntu LTS 16.4 distribution of Linux. Radiant Software 1.1 is now available for download from Lattices website and currently can be used with a free license.
  • ASRock spins Whiskey Lake-U in thin Mini-ITX, 3.5-inch, and NUC formats
    ASRock announced four products based on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U: a thin Mini-ITX “IMB-1216” board, a 3.5-inch “SBC-350,” and a NUC 4×4 form-factor “iBox-8365U” mini-PC and NUC-8365U mainboard. ASRock Industrial has been busy lately tapping the latest embedded-oriented x86 chips in products such as the Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U based iBox-8265U mini-PC, as well as the iBox-R1000 industrial PC and NUC-R1000 mainboard built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000. Now it has announced four more Whiskey Lake-U products aimed at the embedded market.
  • Making Sense of Microsoft’s Acquisition of Express Logic [Ed: Windows is worthless, so Microsoft is buying the competition. Microsoft also bought Danger, Sidekick etc. and it never ended well. Anything Microsoft touches turns to dust. When it bought Skype it was (back then) near-monopoly, but not anymore. Microsoft sometimes announces financial losses.]
    Even the Linux Foundation, home of the Linux kernel, hosts a project called Zephyr, which is an RTOS designed for use-cases, beyond the reach of Linux.