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original content

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Linux Tycoon: Design and Manage Your Own Distribution - March 31, 2012
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 2 Arrives for Testing - March 29, 2012
  3. GNOME 3.4 Released with Lots of Improvement - March 28, 2012
  4. Greg K-H Updates Tumbleweed Status - March 27, 2012
  5. LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released - March 22, 2012
  6. openSUSE 12.2 M2, Better Late than Never - March 21, 2012
  7. Mitchell Baker Says H.264 is About User Experience - March 19, 2012
  8. LibreOffice 3.5.1 Released with Fixes - March 18, 2012
  9. Mageia 2 Beta 2, Still No Live Images - March 16, 2012
  10. KDE Spark Tablet Renamed to Honor Classical Composer - March 15, 2012
  11. Final Debian 5 Update Released - March 13, 2012
  12. Arch Turns Ten - Mar 12, 2012
  13. Raspberry Pi Orders Now Being Accepted - Feb 29, 2012
  14. Upcoming GNOME 3.4 Previewed - Feb 28, 2012
  15. Fedora's Beefy Miracle Sizzling with Alpha 1 - Feb 28, 2012
  16. Amnesia, Scariest Game Ever, to Get Sequel - Feb 24, 2012
  17. Intel Joins TDF, Adds LibreOffice to AppUp Center - Feb 23, 2012
  18. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report - Feb 21, 2012
  19. The Document Foundation Incorporated in Germany - Feb 20, 2012
  20. KDE Spark Tablet Pre-Order Registration Open - Feb 16, 2012
  21. LibreOffice 3.5 Released - Feb 14, 2012
  22. Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 Reaches End of Life - Feb 10, 2012
  23. Pardus Future Uncertain, Fork Probable - Feb 07, 2012
  24. PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released - Feb 02, 2012
  25. openSUSE has a Dream - Jan 31, 2012
  26. Mandriva Bankruptcy Crisis Averted, For Now - Jan 30, 2012
  27. GhostBSD 2.5 - Now with an Easy Graphic Installer - Jan 26, 2012
  28. Gentoo-based Toorox Releases 01.2012 GNOME Edition - Jan 25, 2012
  29. Mandriva Decision Delayed Again - Jan 23, 2012
  30. Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke - Jan 20, 2012
  31. KDE 4.9 to get a New Widgets Explorer - Jan 19, 2012
  32. Meet Bodhi's Bulky Brother: Bloathi - Jan 18, 2012
  33. Mandriva Delays Bankruptcy Decision - Jan 17, 2012
  34. LibreOffice 3.4.5 Released - Jan 16, 2012
  35. Fedora Running Beefy Contest - Jan 13, 2012
  36. Mageia 2 Inches Along with Another Alpha - Jan 12, 2012
  37. Linux Mint 12 KDE Almost Ready - Jan 11, 2012
  38. Greg KH Posts Status of Kernel Tree - Jan 10, 2012
  39. Unused LibreOffice Code Expunged - Jan 9, 2012
  40. Is Mandriva Finished This Time? - Jan 5, 2012
  41. New aptosid Fork, siduction 11.1 Released - Jan 4, 2012
  42. Lefebvre Introduces GNOME 3 Fork - Jan 3, 2012
  43. Gentoo Gets New Year's Release - Jan 2, 2012










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My Open Source meltdown, and the rise of a star

There comes a time when you feel that you don’t fit anywhere. Where your ideas, principles, motivation and struggles simply don’t align with anyone else. For years, I felt part of something that was larger than myself, had the motivation to use a huge part of my free time to contribute to projects and in several cases, make personal sacrifices to help others, and even envisioned a future for myself in places where I thought it was impossible. It’s that struggle trying to find our place in this huge Open Source world what usually ends up in personal meltdown and professional burnout. It’s not a secret that as fast as technologies evolve, the faster we end up being obsolete, unless we dedicate most of our time to keep up to date on every break through. I’m not the exception to this, and after being an active contributor for almost 15 years, and then have my “time off” to be a full time mom and employee, what happened in the Projects I used to Contribute left me feeling way far from my comfort zone. I’m grateful that most of the places where I’ve contributed has been because people asks for my help, and even after a long absence it was not different from before. Read more

What Linux needs to make it a better mobile desktop

I have a bit of a confession to make. Although Linux is my operating system of choice on the desktop, I tend to skip over my open source-powered laptop in favor of either a MacBook Pro or Chromebook when I'm working beyond my desk. I know...blasphemy, right? I've reached a point in my career and life where I need the tools to be able to get my jobs done as efficiently as possible and without frustration or headache. To be absolutely fair, primary reasons why I overlook my one Linux laptop are because it's too big and the keyboard is absolutely terrible. Given I am a writer by profession, a bad keyboard can be a deal-breaker. Once again, in favor of honesty, the 2016 MacBook Pro keyboard isn't much better. The "butterfly" keys are loud and way too prone to sticking. My 2015 Pixel was, at one point, an absolute dream machine, but the battery life is waning, and sometimes ChromeOS can be a bit flaky with the trackpad. Read more

Linux and open-source jobs are hotter than ever

The Linux Foundation and , the leading online course company, released the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report on October 26. Once again, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for open-source technology skills is growing. 37% of hiring managers say they will hire more IT professionals in the next six months. Specifically, 81% of hiring managers say hiring open source talent is a priority going forward. 56% of hiring managers plan to increase their hiring of open source pros in the next six months Why? The answer to that is simple. As a recent Red Hat survey found, 86% of IT leaders said the most innovative companies are using open-source software, citing higher quality solutions, lower cost of ownership, improved security, and cloud-native capabilities as the top reasons for usage. So, even in these bad times, the demand for open-source savvy is higher than ever. Read more

Vote for the Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” Desktop Artwork Now

Opened to submissions since early August, the artwork proposals for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye,” the next major release of the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system, has reached its deadline last week on October 15th, and now the community can vote for the winner. Jonathan Carter announced today that it’s time for the Debian community to choose the desktop artwork to be used in Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye.” The review period for the final proposals starts today, October 26th, until November 9th, and winners will be unveiled in mid-November. Read more