Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 27 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story PDF Arranger 1.7.0 Released With New Features And Enhancements Roy Schestowitz 1 26/01/2021 - 11:12pm
Story NPU-equipped Rockchip RV1109 debuts on dev boards and cameras Rianne Schestowitz 1 26/01/2021 - 11:09pm
Story Kernel: Moorestown, Nintendo 64, Corellium and Oracle Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 10:53pm
Story Debian: Ease of Use, Lomiri and More Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 10:33pm
Story Getting Started with Raspberry Pi Pico using MicroPython and C Rianne Schestowitz 2 26/01/2021 - 10:23pm
Story Tails 4.15 Anonymous OS Released with Tor Browser 10.0.9 and Thunderbird 78.6 Marius Nestor 1 26/01/2021 - 9:59pm
Story The first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4 is now available! Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 9:28pm
Story Mozilla Firefox 85.0 Now Available As First 2021 Release Rianne Schestowitz 3 26/01/2021 - 9:21pm
Story The Demise of Chromium as Free Software Roy Schestowitz 3 26/01/2021 - 9:19pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 8:41pm

GNOME 40 Alpha Released for Public Testing with New Activities Overview Design

Filed under
GNOME

After about four months since it entered development, the upcoming GNOME 40 desktop environment series, due for release at the end of March 2021, now has an initial development release that anyone can test it to get an early taste of the new features and improvements.

The biggest new feature in GNOME 40 looks to be a reimagined Activities Overview that promises better overview spatial organization, improved touchpad navigation, more engaging app browsing and launching, as well as better boot performance.

Read more

Graphics: GPUOpen, Vulkan, and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Celebrates Five Years Of GPUOpen

    Today marks five years since AMD began the GPUOpen initiative for providing more open-source Radeon GPU code projects, code samples, and more for better engaging GPU/game developers in the open.

    As any longtime Phoronix reader will know, AMD's open-source Linux driver initiative is going on for more than a decade while the celebration today is just over their GPUOpen initiative turning five years old. The three principles that continue to guide GPUOpen are providing code and documentation to PC developers to exert more control on the GPU, a commitment to open-source software, and a collaborative engagement with the developer community.

  • Vulkan 1.2.168 Released With Two New Extensions

    Today's Vulkan 1.2.168 specification update brings the usual specification corrections/clarifications while also introducing two new KHR extensions.

  • VKD3D-Proton Begins Working On DirectX 12 Ray-Tracing Atop Vulkan

    Those working on VKD3D-Proton as the Direct3D 12 implementation atop the Vulkan API are beginning to work on DirectX Ray-Tracing support but it isn't yet ready for gamers.

    Hans-Kristian Arntzen has opened the initial pull request for enabling ray-tracing extensions with VKD3D-Proton.

  • NVIDIA release the Vulkan Beta Driver 455.50.03, new extensions supported

    Need to be on the bleeding edge of what NVIDIA have to offer? They just released driver version 455.50.03, as part of their Vulkan Beta Driver series. This is actually the second driver released this month, with 455.50.02 appearing on January 19. Here's a look over all that's new in them together.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (crmsh, debian-security-support, flatpak, gst-plugins-bad1.0, openvswitch, python-bottle, salt, tomcat9, and vlc), Fedora (chromium, python-pillow, sddm, and xen), Gentoo (chromium, dnsmasq, flatpak, glibc, kdeconnect, openjdk, python, thunderbird, virtualbox, and wireshark), Mageia (blosc, crmsh, glibc, perl-DBI, php-oojs-oojs-ui, python-pip, python-urllib3, and undertow), openSUSE (gdk-pixbuf, hawk2, ImageMagick, opera, python-autobahn, viewvc, wavpack, and xstream), Red Hat (dnsmasq), Slackware (seamonkey), SUSE (hawk2, ImageMagick, mutt, permissions, and stunnel), and Ubuntu (pound).

  • Apache Software Foundation Security Report: 2020

    Synopsis: This report explores the state of security across all Apache Software Foundation projects for the calendar year 2020. We review key metrics, specific vulnerabilities, and the most common ways users of ASF projects were affected by security issues.

  • Apache Software Foundation Saw Assigned CVEs Up 24%, Security Issues Up 53% For 2020

    The Apache Software Foundation that oversees 340+ Apache projects saw a measurable rise in security related issues during the course of 2020.

  • This new botnet is targeting Linux servers running enterprise apps [Ed: TechRadar foolishly perpetuating ZDNet garbage]

Open Source Google Docs Alternative CryptPad 4.0 Releases With New Look and New Features

Filed under
Software

CryptPad is an impressive encrypted Google Docs alternatives that we’ve covered previously. Even though it does not offer all the features and goodies that you get with Google Docs, it is a usable privacy-friendly option for many.

Recently, they deployed a major upgrade (CryptPad 4.0) to their platform that involves a new logo, refreshed icons, and more new features.

In this article, I shall highlight some of the key changes with the latest major release.

Read more

Movim: An Open-Source Decentralized Social Platform Based on XMPP Network

Filed under
Software

Just like some other XMPP desktop clients, Movim is a web-based XMPP front-end to let you utilize it as a federated social media.

Since it relies on XMPP network, you can interact with other users utilizing XMPP clients such as Conversations (for Android) and Dino (for Desktop).

In case you didn’t know, XMPP is an open-standard for messaging.

So, Movim can act as your decentralized messaging app or a full-fledged social media platform giving you an all-in-one experience without relying on a centralized network.

It offers many features that can appeal to a wide variety of users. Let me briefly highlight most of the important ones.

Read more

Revive Classic Nintendo DS Games on Linux With Emulation

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Want to play Nintendo DS games on your Linux system but can't figure out how? Back in the day, Nintendo DS was a very popular handheld console with a huge collection of games. But over time, advanced consoles were launched in the market that rendered DS obsolete.

Luckily, several emulators are available that allow you to play classic Nintendo DS games on your system. DeSmuMe is a great example of a stable Nintendo DS emulator for a Linux machine.

Read more

Patched Linux 5.11 Continues Looking Great For AMD Ryzen/EPYC Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While the initial AMD Linux 5.11 performance regression written about at the end of last year was of much concern given the performance hits to AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 processors with the out-of-the-box "Schedutil" governor, with a pending patch the regression is not only addressed but in various workloads we continue seeing better performance than even compared to Linux 5.10. Here is the latest from several more days of extensive performance testing.

Read more

DIN-rail gateway offers dual LAN and dual RS485

Filed under
Linux

The Unipi Gate G110 and G100 are PLC-ready DIN-rail gateways that run Linux on a quad -A53 SoC with 16GB eMMC, GbE and 10/100 LAN ports, and up to 2x RS485 ports with modular extensions.

Czech based Unipi, which started out in 2014 with a Raspberry Pi based UniPi automation controller board and followed up with products including an Allwinner H5-based Axon automation controller, has now launched the $243 Unipi Gate G100 and $272 Unipi Gate G110 DIN-rail gateways.

Read more

Telematics gateway connects with Iridium, GPS, 4G, WiFi/BT, and 433MHz RFID

Filed under
Linux

Appareo’s IP67-rated, -40 to 75°C tolerant “Gateway 370” telematics gateway runs Linux on a Cortex-A9 SoC and supplies Iridium SBD, 433MHz (RFID), 4G LTE, WiFi/BT, and GPS plus LAN, BroadR-Reach, DIO, and CAN links.

Fargo, ND based Appareo has launched a wireless telematics control unit (TCU) for heavy machinery in applications such as construction and agriculture. The Gateway 370 is based on a Gateway 270 that Appareo announced last May. That earlier model similarly provides Yocto-derived Linux with Docker container support on an unnamed dual-core, Cortex-A9 SoC — probably the i.MX6 Dual or DualLite.

Read more

PDF Arranger 1.7.0 Released With New Features And Enhancements

Filed under
Software

PDF Arranger 1.7.0 has been released with new features, like the ability to crop white borders, allow export to individual files, allow selection of odd or even pages, support for editing more PDF metadata tags, and more.

Initially forked from the popular PDF Shuffler, PDF Arranger has gain many new features since then. The application can merge, split, rotate, crop, and rearrange PDF document pages using a simple GTK3 user interface. It's available for Linux and Windows.

There are also various other smaller features in this PDF editor, including the ability to edit PDF metadata, merge double-sided scanned documents, cut / copy / paste PDF pages even between multiple PDF Arranger instances (and thus, between documents or to a new empty instance), duplicate PDF pages, and much more.

Read more

Mozilla Outsourcing to Microsoft and New Hubs

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • Welcoming Open Web Docs to the MDN family [Ed: Mozilla outsourcing to Microsoft is a colossal mistake]

    Collaborating with the community has always been at the heart of MDN Web Docs content work — individual community members constantly make small (and not so small) fixes to help incrementally improve the content, and our partner orgs regularly come on board to help with strategy and documenting web platform features that they have an interest in.

    At the end of the 2020, we launched our new Yari platform, which exposes our content in a GitHub repo and therefore opens up many more valuable contribution opportunities than before.

    And today, we wanted to spread the word about another fantastic event for enabling more collaboration on MDN — the launch of the Open Web Docs organization.

  • Mozilla Announces "Open Web Docs" Following Last Year's Layoffs

    Last year during the big round of layoffs at Mozilla the entire Mozilla Developer Network (MDN) writers team was laid off. That was a particularly sad blow considering how valuable the MDN documentation has been to web developers as a very useful resource. Today the Mozilla folks are announced Open Web Docs in seemingly looking to have the community take over.

    Following those unfortunate layoffs last summer, they exposed all of the Mozilla Developer Network documentation to GitHub. Now they are announcing the Open Web Docs organization.

  • A New Year, A New Hubs

    An updated look & feel for Hubs, with an all-new user interface, is now live.

    Just over two years ago, we introduced a preview release of Hubs. Our hope was to bring people together to create, socialize and collaborate around the world in a new and fun way. Since then, we’ve watched our community grow and use Hubs in ways we could only imagine. We’ve seen students use Hubs to celebrate their graduations last May, educational organizations use Hubs to help educators adapt to this new world we’re in, and heck, even NASA has used Hubs to feature new ways of working. In today’s world where we’re spending more time online, Hubs has been the go-to online place to have fun and try new experiences.

    Today’s update brings new features including a chat sidebar, a new streamlined design for desktop and mobile devices, and a support forum to help our community get the most out of their Hubs experience.

Best Way to Split Your Linux Terminal

Filed under
Linux

If you’re a programmer or developer, you probably feel that one terminal window is not enough. You need to open a new tab or new terminal window and constantly switch between them while working on something. It eventually makes the work quite hectic.

The same problem is also faced by system administrators as well as database administrators because they need at least five terminal windows to carry out respective work.

Terminal does have tabs, but they don’t make work any more comfortable, so some terminal multiplexers are introduced. These multiplexers help split the terminal window horizontally as well as vertically. So, in this article, we’re going to have a look at some multiplexers that will help you split your Linux terminal.

Read more

GeckoLinux Does OpenSuse Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux is a US-based Linux distribution. Its focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop is a time-honored draw for using this Linux choice.

OpenSuse is among the easiest Linux distributions for new users. However, openSuse does not focus on the absolute ease of use.

Instead, the open-Suse community prefers to offer users flexibility and choice. That openSuse style can add some complexities along with providing some easy-to-use graphical tools to configure system settings like YaST.

Swapping GeckoLinux in place of openSuse mitigates the suitability of use question for newcomers. As I noted previously, my usual go-to Linux platform is Debian/Ubuntu based. But GeckoLinux puts the best features of the openSuse Linux family front and center.

Read more

Alder Lake S Support Added To Intel's Open-Source Media Driver

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Last quarter Intel began upstreaming their open-source Alder Lake S graphics support for Linux. It hasn't been too big of a feat or revealed many details since it's still Gen12 / Xe graphics seen since Tiger Lake. But it's been coming along and over the past month is now wired up into Intel's open-source Media Driver stack too.

Merged back on Christmas was the initial decode patch for Alder lake S (ADL_S) that was just a few hundred lines of code thanks to largely re-using the existing Gen12 driver code paths.

Read more

Also: Intel Alder Lake S Graphics Support Nearing The Mainline Linux Kernel - Phoronix

Best Game Console Emulators for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

This article will list popular game console emulation software available for Linux. Emulation is a software compatibility layer that emulates hardware components of game consoles, instruction sets and related APIs. Emulation software can emulate CPUs, GPUs, audio hardware and many other such physical components available in real game consoles. Emulation allows you to play console exclusive games that are otherwise unplayable on PCs. Games running on these emulators see emulated components as if they were parts of a real game console and they cannot see the underlying platform (PC) on which the game is running on.
Developing an accurate game emulator for PC is an extremely difficult task, involves reverse engineering and many times developers have to sacrifice accuracy to improve compatibility. Emulators require original file system dump from game consoles. Some emulators emulate these components as well making it easier to play games. To play games on emulators, you must have game files, typically called ROMs.

Read more

Also: Best Linux Distros for Gaming in 2021

Best Dictionary Apps for Linux

Filed under
Software

GNOME Dictionary is a minimal and straightforward dictionary app for Linux. GNOME dictionary is one of the official GNOME-3 applications and it is available in almost all major Linux distributions. It can query definitions of words and phrases from a number of online sources. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have any mechanism to download offline dictionary databases.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora: Chromium, Cloudwashing, Chris Wright and CentOS 'Damage Control'

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora preemptively turns off Chromium usage of private Google Sync APIs

    Fedora has jumped seven weeks before Google ends the Linux distribution's use of the Google Chrome Sync service within the Chromium browser.

    The Sync service allows users to keep data such as browser history, login details, and bookmarks synced between different devices.

    Earlier this month, Google said it completed an audit, and was restricting the open source version of Chrome from accessing those APIs "that are only intended for Google's use".

    Notifying Fedora users over the weekend, Chromium maintainer for the distribution Tom Callaway said the change will make the program "significantly less functional".

    [...]

    To that end though, by closing off the service, Fedora is able to fix 26 security vulnerabilities. Version 88.0.4324.96-1 of Fedora Chromium will be the first to have Sync disabled, and landed as an update in repositories over the weekend.

    Google said it would be locking down access to the Sync service on March 15. Some Chromium-based browsers do offer a non-Google sync solution.

  • IBM Cloud Now: GitLab Ultimate for IBM Cloud Paks, Security Insights, and WebSphere Hybrid Edition
  • Technically Speaking: Season 1 Trailer

    Join Red Hat CTO Chris Wright and a rotating cast of experts and industry leaders for the first season of the all-new Technically Speaking. In each episode, Chris will explore what's on the horizon for open source and topics like cloud, AI/ML, edge, 5G, blockchain, and more. The first episode drops on January 27, 2021. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to tune in.

  • To plug gap left by CentOS, Red Hat amends RHEL dev subscription to allow up to 16 systems in production

    Red Hat, which is killing CentOS Linux in favour of CentOS Stream, will extend its developer subscription to allow free production use of RHEL for up to 16 systems.

    CentOS Linux is a community build of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and therefore suitable for production use. CentOS Stream, which will remain available, is a preview build of what is likely to be in RHEL – great for testing but not ideal for production use.

    The popularity of CentOS, which drives 17.7 per cent of Linux-based web sites, according to W3Techs, has meant a strong response to Red Hat's decision, including alternative free builds such as Rocky Linux and Project Lenix, which is now known as Alma Linux.

    Red Hat said in December that it would work to plug the gap left by CentOS with new ways to license RHEL and today's statement is said to be "the first of many new programs."

Raspberry Pi: Boot to BASIC

Filed under
Hardware

40 years ago this Christmas, I got my first “personal computer”. It was a Sinclair ZX81 with 1KiB of RAM and a tape deck for storage. Every time I powered it on, like all ‘81 owners, I was greeted with this.

A couple of taps later, and I had written some code!

Ok, not a super auspicious creation, but it’s a start. It’s likely the same first program you wrote if you had one. Perhaps with rude words, who knows, they were fun times back in the ’80s. Through the following years I had a Sinclair ZX Spectrum 16K (later upgraded to 48K), a Spectrum +2 128K and an Amstrad CPC 464. All of which also booted directly to a programming language - BASIC.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • An Introduction to Bash Brace Expansion - Putorius

    The Borne Again Shell (BASH) has a lot of great features that it borrows from other shells and even from some programming languages. It was created in the late 1980s in a response to a lacking in the current available shells on Berkley Distributions (BSD), and the predecessor to Linux, GNU. BASH features numerous in-built features such as in-line scripting capabilities like brace expansion, which we are going to examine today.

  • How to Convert PDF to Image in Linux

    For many reasons, you often need to convert PDF documents to different image formats. You can find many online sites that easily convert PDF to images, but there is no guarantee your file will be secure always. You can easily do it in your own Linux system.

    This article is going to show you to convert pdf to other image formats (jpg, png, gif, tif) using the following two popular methods.

  • How to Install Gitea on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Gitea with Nginx as a reverse proxy on an Ubuntu 20.04 VPS.

  • How to Search, Install, Remove Snap Apps in Command Line | UbuntuHandbook

    This simple tutorial shows how to search for, install, remove, and list installed Snap applications in Ubuntu from command line.

    Snap is an universal Linux package format developed by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu. Though many users hate the Snap apps, it’s hard to keep away from it since many popular applications (e.g., VLC, Spotify, VS Code, Android Studio) offer official Ubuntu binaries through Snap rather than classic deb package.

    As Ubuntu Software still sucks and does not load application pages quite often, you can run followings command instead to search for & install snap applications.

  • How to install Jellyfin Media Server on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - Linux Shout

    When it comes to creating your own Medis server, the first name would be Kodi or Plex, however, these are not only out there. Jellyfin is another popular open-source project that lets us create quickly a modern media server with an interactive web user interface to manage videos, images, and music from any device.

    We can browser media content using Jellyfin on various devices such as computers, apps on your Roku, Android, iOS (including AirPlay), Android TV, or Fire TV device, or via your Chromecast or existing Kodi. Whereas when it comes to installing the Jellyfin server platform it doesn’t limit to Linux only, we can set it up on machines running Microsoft Windows, macOS, or in a Docker container.

  • Why you need to drop ifconfig for ip | Opensource.com

    For a long time, the ifconfig command was the default method for configuring a network interface. It served Linux users well, but networking is complex, and the commands to configure it must be robust. The ip command is the new default networking command for modern systems, and in this article, I'll show you how to use it.

    The ip command is functionally organized on two layers of the OSI networking stack: Layer 2 (data link layer) and Layer 3 (network or IP layer). It does all the work in the old net-tools package.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenBSD KDE Status Report

    But today we can be happy about an up-to-date KDE stack in OpenBSD. Currently - at the end of January - our stack is very up-to-date: [...]

  • Beneath the code: SUSE Enterprise Linux construction mechanics - Open Source Insider

    As every good developer knows, when you want to learn more about what a platform or tools provider is bringing through the release pipeline: ignore the news, delete the press releases, don’t look at the advertisements… read the coder blogs instead.

    Microsoft’s MSDN has adopted this approach for most of the last decade and it is – very arguably – where the real meat (or plant-based protein substitutes with soya-enrichment) is.

    Also well versed in this practice is German open source operating system softwarehaus SUSE.

    [...]

    Last but not least, Moutoussamy talks about the openSUSE community and how SUSE wants to share more than just code.

    “So next we will talk about some of the underlying processes glueing everything together but also about the great tool we are using: Open Build Service (build) and openQA (test),” he concludes.

    Can we imagine that one day, all technology vendors will talk about the way they actually build code and perform rollout cadence and express the need to balance open source community and commercial requirements in a product that still, ultimately, progresses forward year-on-year? We can dream, surely.

  • Easy Version Control rollback device-tree files

    It is still a mystery to me how they work, but they are needed by the Raspberry Pi, and, as I discovered, getting the latest is important.
    However, with Easy Version Control, if we roll back to an older version of Easy, we should really roll back the device-tree also. Ditto when roll forward.
    The current device-tree files are in /boot/device-tree, which you can view in a running Easy. These are actually located inside easy.sfs. So, if roll back or forward to a different easy.sfs, then extract the device-tree files out of easy.sfs and copy them to the boot partition.
    That is what Easy Version Control now does. The modified scripts are /usr/local/easy_version/easy-update and easy-version-control.

  • Iustin Pop: Raspbian/Raspberry PI OS with initrd

    While Raspbian, ahem, Raspberry PI OS is mostly Debian, the biggest difference is the kernel, both in terms of code and packaging.

    The packaging is weird since it needs to deal with the fact that there’s no bootloader per se, the firmware parses /boot/config.txt and depending on the setting of 64bit and/or kernel line, it loads a specific file. Normally, one of kernel7.img, kernel7l.img or kernel8.img. While this configuration file supports an initrd, it doesn’t have a clean way to associate an initrd with a kernel, but rather you have to (like for the actual kernel) settle on a hard-coded initrd name.

  • Open-Source Apache CloudStack 4.15 Gets New Look

    The mature open-source cloud infrastructure platform project gets a major update, boasting a new user interface and improved storage subsystem features.

  • Perceived Relations Between Gopher Gemini and HTTP

    This piece is written with the expectation that it will attract:

    * Those who are Gopher and Gemini enthusiasts,
    * Those who are the above and have the opinion I'm wrong,
    * Or those who have heard the two and want to know a bit more about them and their relation to the current web.

  • 3 stress-free steps to tackling your task list

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 14 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

    [...]

    Even then, I had to break these tasks down into smaller pieces—download the software, configure NGINX, validate the installs…you get the idea. And that's OK. A plan, or set of tasks, is not set in stone and can be changed as needed.

  • Taking The Full Measure Of Power Servers - IT Jungle

    It is with that in mind that we turn to IBM’s server sales in the fourth quarter of 2020, which were reported on late last week. IBM’s overall revenues continue to slide as it shrinks and it divests itself of businesses, and even as it adds Red Hat to the mix. Sales across all product lines and geographies were off 6.5 percent to $20.37 billion, and after a $2.04 billion restructuring writeoff, net income was down by 63.1 percent to $1.36 billion. By the time IBM has spun off its NewCo managed infrastructure services business, which has about $19 billion in sales later this year, it will pare down to about $59 billion in sales for the remaining company.

    Overall sales of servers, storage, switching to IBM’s direct end user customers and its channel were $2.5 billion, down 17.8 percent, and internal sales of this stuff to other IBM divisions accounted for another $196 million. Total System group sales, therefore, were just under $2.7 billion, down 16.8 percent, with the hardware being $2.09 billion and operating systems being $408 million. The System group had a pre-tax income of $455 million, off 43.3 percent year on year. Not a great quarter, but there was a tough compare to the System z15 launch at the end of 2019 for one thing and a global pandemic for another. Neither Arvind Krishna, IBM’s chief executive officer, nor James Kavanaugh, the company’s chief financial officer, had much to say about the Power Systems line, although as usual they did chat a bit about the System z mainframe. Power Systems sales were off 16 percent at constant currency, and System z sales were down 24 percent, with storage down 17 percent.

  • Dissecting the Apple M1 GPU, part II

    Less than a month ago, I began investigating the Apple M1 GPU in hopes of developing a free and open-source driver. This week, I’ve reached a second milestone: drawing a triangle with my own open-source code. The vertex and fragment shaders are handwritten in machine code, and I interface with the hardware via the IOKit kernel driver in an identical fashion to the system’s Metal userspace driver.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

AMD Schedutil vs. Performance Governor Benchmarks On Linux 5.11 Shows More Upside Potential

With a pending patch, the Linux 5.11 AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 performance is looking very good as far as the out-of-the-box performance is concerned when using Schedutil as is becoming the increasingly default CPU frequency scaling governor on more distributions / default kernels. With the previously noted Linux 5.11 regression addressed from when the AMD CPU frequency invariance support was first introduced, the Schedutil performance from small Ryzen systems up through big EPYC hardware is looking quite good. But how much upside is left in relation to the optimal CPU frequency scaling performance with the "performance" governor? Here is a look at those benchmarks on Ryzen and EPYC for Schedutil vs. Performance on a patched Linux 5.11 kernel. Read more

today's howtos

  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions. Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself. But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast! So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective. I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021. OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction. There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20. Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only). Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos. It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software? Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.

10 Best Linux Distros for Developers

While Linux might not be the favored operating system for casual users, it’s the go-to choice for most developers and programmers. Linux is a more practical OS that was explicitly designed with programming and developers in mind. There are over 600 Linux distros to choose from, so even experienced users may seldom struggle to find their current project's ideal flavor. Linux distributions can vary hugely from one another, even though they are based on the same source. And if you’re looking to learn more about Linux distros, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 best Linux distros for developers. Read more

Puppy Linux Review and its Status Quo in the Linux Community

If we had 30 seconds to describe Puppy Linux bluntly, we would classify it as an OS under the light-weight Linux distro family with a functional objective of creating a smooth and easy user experience while simultaneously minimizing the memory footprint usage as much as possible. In this context, the memory footprint refers to the RAM, or Main Memory is used while software like an Operating System is active or operational. This 30-second assumptive description on Puppy Linux characterizes it as a Linux distro suitable for personal or home-user computers. If we are to assign it a birth year, then it would be 2003, and its creator being Barry Kauler. Puppy Linux stands out in the Linux community despite its name not being hailed on regular occasions as other Linux distros like Ubuntu, Fedora, Centos, and Kali Linux. The respect it has in these user communities is due to its outstanding positive attributes on display. Read more