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Monday, 22 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU/Linux for Security Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2017 - 9:24am
Story Pi Desktop: This kit turns your Raspberry Pi into a Linux desktop Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2017 - 9:18am
Story [Review] Antergos Is More Than Just A Noob’s Arch Linux Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2017 - 9:14am
Story Events: QtCon, Akademy, Free and Open Source Software Compliance, Linux Plumbers Conference Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2017 - 12:19am
Story Fedora Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2017 - 12:11am
Story PCLinuxOS Roll-Up Release: Another Linux installed on my new notebook Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 11:30pm
Story SUSE EOL and Tumbleweed Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 11:22pm
Story GNOME News Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 11:14pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 11:00pm
Story OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 Distro Is Being Prepped with KDE Plasma 5.9.5 and Mesa 17.1 Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2017 - 10:52pm

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Out-of-Control CIA Continues to be Exposed in WikiLeaks’ Vault 7

    After installing a small file, the operators would then be able to instruct the computer to kill any use of a web browser on a set schedule. For instance, the software could be instructed to shut down Firefox every 25-35 seconds. Similarly, the example included a measure to “lock up” PowerPoint files 10 minutes after they were loaded. It would also allow operators to create a delay when PowerPoint files were attempting to load.

    While the examples they used are simple and relatively harmless, the software could perform virtually any assigned task. Because the data is encrypted with a key stored outside of the machine, the code would be extremely difficult to detect and/or decipher.

    After installing the software, the documentation instructs users to “kick back” and “Relax – After Midnight will take care of the rest.”

    The second piece of software detailed is similar to “AfterMidnight” and is called “Assassin.” That piece of software is a relatively simple way of collecting data remotely and then delivering results to a listening post on a schedule.

    Through screenshots in the documents, it can be seen that the author is named “Justin,” is working from a Dell computer, and desktop shortcuts to an encrypted chat program called ‘Pidgin,’ as well as a folder entitled “drone.”

  • Global ‘Wana’ Ransomware Outbreak Earned Perpetrators $26,000 So Far

    However, I find it depressing to think of the massive financial damage likely wrought by this ransom campaign in exchange for such a comparatively small reward. It’s particularly galling because this attack potentially endangered the lives of many.

  • Ransomware: Microsoft can no longer claim to be 'proactive'

    Microsoft's reaction to the Windows ransomware crisis that occurred on Friday and Saturday has shown one thing: no longer can the company continue to use the business buzzword "proactive" when it talks about itself. It was caught unawares and left looking very old and tired in the way it responded to the situation.

  • Cyber attack: Hackers {sic} in China try to seize control of WannaCry ransomware's 'kill switch'

    “What you can follow is the money,” Mr Raiu said. “You can follow the Bitcoins [although] following the Bitcoins is kind of an art in itself.”

  • [Old] The Software Industry IS the Problem

    The question is how to introduce product liability, because just imposing it would instantly shut down any and all software houses with just a hint of a risk management function on their organizational charts.

  • [Old] Why Not Use Port Knocking?

    The robots currently at work knocking around for your guessable password could easily be repurposed to guess your Unicode password currently known as your port knocking sequence, and quite likely have been already.

Comparison of all Tizen smartphones so far: Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 vs Z4

Filed under
Linux

It has been over 2 years since the launch of the first Tizen smartphone– The Samsung Z1. The Z1 was a major attempt by Samsung to prove that Tizen is a capable platform to even run smartphone applications. With the device being launched in the 2nd largest population-India initially the word about Tizen mobile spread instantly. Fast forward to May 2017 and now we have 4 Tizen smartphones released so far- Z1, Z2, Z3 and now the Samsung Z4.

Read more

Linux and FOSS Events: Open Labs Hackerspace, FOSS4G Boston 2017, GSoC 2017 (for Krita), and LaKademy 2017

Filed under
OSS
  • What I discovered in Tirana, Albania

    The past few months have brought many changes for me. I traveled throughout Europe to experience some of the open source conferences and communities across the continent. Along the way, I met incredible people with powerful stories about their own communities. However, there is one community that I knew about before I came to Europe. The Open Labs Hackerspace in Tirana, Albania is a special community that I was fortunate enough to discover and meet. Together, they have helped set in motion the open source way in their own city.

    [...]

    I am privileged and honored to be an official member of this community. However, I am mostly an observer in my role. The passion and interest are at the heart of the hackerspace. The members from Tirana have invested so much of themselves into this community, its mission, and its values. From reading, visiting, and talking with the people involved with Open Labs, you see many of their hearts dedicated to what they’re doing. And when you see someone else who invests their heart into something, it’s challenging to not lend some of your own too.

  • Bringing together the best minds in open source geospatial technology

    FOSS4G Boston 2017 is shaping up to be a very diverse conference. We have a diverse set of keynote speakers including Holly St. Clair, Chief Digital Officer of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation, and other open source and geospatial leaders. There are also a variety of workshops and presentations this year. Topics will include R, 3D, analytics, artificial intelligence, routing, big data, drones, GeoNode, GeoServer, image processing, QGIS, PostGIS, projections, and much more! To see the full lineup, visit the full list of accepted presentations and workshops.

  • Introduction for GSoC 2017 with Krita

    I’m here again and I will talk about my accepted GSoC proposal, but how every history, I have to start from the start, so sit down, drink a coffee or a hot chocolate(I like) and have fun.

    I’m from Brazil, to be more specific from Salvador, Bahia. I’m an undergraduate student in Analysis and System Development. I’m not like so many other people that code since their 9 years old or something like that. I just wrote my first line of code with 20 years old and now I have 23, but like my mother says, “It’s never late to do something, no matter what” (Yeah, my mother is amazing. By the way, Happy Mother’s Day).

    In first years in the college, I had the opportunity to work in a software house, that works with proprietary software. I didn’t like that experience for so many reasons, but I was holding myself for money (I’m poor). Someday a teacher from my college invite to a course about Qt and C++ and told to us that we can choose what we want to do and presented KDE and Open Source. I quit my job and started to go to the college in my free time. In this time I studied python and read some books about that and I loved it.

  • LaKademy 2017

    I’ve aways been an introspective person and when I was approved to Analysis and Systems Development Course, I thought that I don’t would need to talk with people anymore (while working at least) and I was happy with this xD. Things were going well, until the day that I met the open source concepts and KDE, through my professor, Sandro Andrade (yes, it’s your fault Tongue). It was love at first sight, I liked the idea to share knowledge and help another people or I was just thinking that I could work with my shorts, I hate pants. I will never know the truth xD.

Kernel and Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Kernels 4.10.16, 4.9.28 LTS and 4.4.68 LTS Are Out Now with Many Changes

    Immediately after announcing earlier today the availability of the first point release of the Linux 4.11 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman is informing the community about the launch of new maintenance updates to the Linux 4.10, 4.9 and 4.4 kernels.

  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux 4.12 with First Release Candidate

    Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of the Linux 4.12 kernel series by announcing the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) a day early than expected due to the Mother's Day celebration and last-minute pull requests.

    According to Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 4.12 RC1 is a pretty large patch that contains numerous additions, including support for AMD's next-generation Radeon RX Vega GPUs, along with a new driver for Intel Atom IPUs (Image Processing Units).

  • Mesa 17.0.6 Released with AMD Polaris 12 GPU Support for Radeon Vulkan Driver

    As expected, the sixth point release to the Mesa 17.0 stable graphics stack was officially unveiled by Andres Gomez, and will soon be available from the software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

    Containing a total of 55 changes, which include both new functionality and fixes for recently discovered bugs, we can say that Mesa 17.0.6 is a hefty maintenance update that all users of the Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library series should install, that, of course, if they didn't already upgrade to the newer Mesa 17.1 stable branch.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Elastic twangs in snappy machine learning

    Elastic is of course the company behind the open source Elasticsearch and the Elastic Stack products.

    Into the Elastic 5.4 release then… (as a result of the recent acquisition of data anomaly detection business Prelert) Elastic’s machine learning features will work on any time series data set to automatically apply machine brain intelligence.

  • Open Source On IBM i: Let It Grow

    The evaluation of open source software is nowhere near conclusive when it comes to enterprise grade application development. Decisions remain in the exploratory phases. Roadmaps are incomplete. Most are without clear routes to a destination. Some are without destinations. However, it would be wrong to assume roads are not being built.

    There is no way that the future of application development – on IBM i or anywhere else – can handle everything that is coming down the pike without open source. That’s not a mandate to jump on a band wagon. It’s an awareness wake-up call. The IBM i community should not be napping.

  • LFNW 2017!

    LinuxFest NorthWest was a fantastic time for me, our Ubuntu booth had Valorie (Kubuntu), Simon (Kubuntu/Lubuntu) and over at the Jupiter Broadcasting we had the awesome Martin Wimpress (Ubuntu Mate). One top question was “what about that Unity news” which we gave a clear answer about Unity development ending and the move to GNOME. Since we were also burning DVD’s and dding usb drives we would recommend that users try out GNOME Shell if GNOME was there preferred Desktop.

  • US District Court Rules GNU GPL is an Enforceable Contract

    https://www.xda-developers.com/us-district-court-rules-gnu-gpl-is-an-enforceable-contract/

New Neptune Linux Plasma 5 ISO Snapshot Lands with KDE Applications 17.04, More

Filed under
KDE

Neptune Linux developer Leszek Lesner proudly announced this weekend the availability of a new ISO snapshot for the Neptune Plasma 5 edition of the Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution.

Read more

Also: It's Now Possible to Access Your Google Drive Account on KDE Plasma 5 Desktops

KDE Frameworks 5.34.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Users with 83 Changes

KDE Frameworks 5.34 Released

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.34.0

Linux Kernel 4.11 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.5

Filed under
Linux

Dominique Leuenberger reports this weekend on the latest updates that landed in the software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, which were brought by a total of six snapshots released in the last two weeks.

Read more

The Alpha Litebook

Filed under
Reviews

elementary OS Despite desktop Linux becoming more popular over the years and the GNU/Linux family of operating systems gaining more mainstream support from software and hardware creators, there still are not a lot of big name hardware companies selling Linux computers. Even those which do, such as Dell, tend to tuck their Linux options into a back corner, shinning the spotlight on their computers that ship with Windows pre-installed.

This has left the Linux hardware market relatively open for smaller players. Many smaller shops have appeared over the years, specializing in selling computers with Linux pre-installed. One of the most recent arrivals in the Linux market is the Alpha Litebook. The Litebook, which was launched in early 2017, is a $249-$269 USD notebook computer which ships with elementary OS. elementary is based on Ubuntu and the distribution uses the Pantheon desktop environment by default.

Happy with the price-to-specifications ratio featured by the Litebook and curious to see how the device would perform, I ordered one of the laptops at the start of March. This review of the Alpha Litebook will consist of four sections: acquiring the Litebook and dealing with Alpha's customer support; the hardware of the Litebook; my thoughts on elementary OS as a default distribution; and the process of installing another Linux distribution on the Litebook.

Read more

New Kernels and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • A pile of stable kernel updates
  • Linus Torvalds stops personally signing Linux rc tarballs

    Linus Torvalds might just be a big softie after all. The Linux Lord, infamous for his occasional foul-mouthed criticism of those who don't meet his standards, has just popped out release candidate one for Linux 4.12 a day early so he could give his undivided attention to Mother's Day.

    “So I'm doing this one day early, because I don't like last-minute pull requests during the merge window anyway, and tomorrow is mother's day, so I may end up being roped into various happenings,” Torvalds wrote on the Linux Kernel Mailing List on Saturday. Torvalds' release announcements are usually made on Sundays.

  • Dying Light & Dead Island Definitive Edition might soon work on Mesa

    There's some activity on the Mesa-dev mailing list with patches that will enable both Dying Light & Dead Island Definitive Edition (and it seems Dead Island Riptide Definite Edition too) to work on Mesa.

  • Mesa 17.0.6 released with AMD Polaris 12 support in the 'radv' Vulkan driver

    Mesa 17.0.6 is the latest bug-fix release for the 17.0 series, but it also comes with AMD Polaris 12 support for the 'radv' Vulkan driver that has been back-ported.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • A Small improvement, A Big reason

    I have always had a special inclination towards Linux. Privacy, Security, Simplicity (GUI) and Power (Shell). It has its issues but it has its strengths as well. However, sometimes you find that in a software, when that one thing that makes or breaks your workflow is absent, you find yourself unable to continue using it.

    In my case, it was Evince.

    For many reasons I had to use Windows for a couple of months. Dual Booting on my laptop failed despite many tries and my college project required exclusively Windows-only software and the Microsoft Office Suite. They are just 2 reasons of many. However, one big reason I used Windows was the lack of the exact PDF reader I wanted. Silly? Let me explain.

  • Calibre 2.85 Ebook Manager App Adds Support for Kobo Aura H2O Edition 2 eReader

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal released this weekend yet another maintenance update to his popular, free, cross-platform and open source ebook library management software for all supported operating systems.

    Calibre 2.85 arrived on Friday, May 12, 2017, exactly one week after Calibre 2.84, bringing an updated Kobo driver that now supports the recently unveiled Kobo Aura H2O Edition 2 eReader device, along with a bunch of new features like the ability to right-click on the Book Details panel to search the Internet for the current ebook or other works by that author.

  • Mo Morsi: RetroFlix – A Weekend Project

    It was built as a Sinatra web service, simply acting as a frontend to a popular emulator database, allowing the user to navigate & preview app for various systems, and download / run them locally. The RetroFlix application itself is offered as a lightweight Microservice simply acting as a proxy to the required various underlying components. It's fairly simple to setup & install (see the README), and builds upon existing emulators & components the user has locally.

  • PuTTY SSH Client And Telnet Client

    ​PuTTY as an SSH and Telnet client was originally developed by Simon Tatham for the Windows platform. It is the most popular SSH client on Windows. It is also available on Linux and other operating systems as a direct port of the Windows SSH client. It is also able to use as a client for rlogin and raw TCP computing protocols.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

5 Tips To Master Linux

Filed under
Linux

​So here we are fans of Linux! But are we up to the bar? To get our hands a little dirty and maybe do what a surgeon do Tongue Well if that disgust you then I didn’t mean cutting up your favorite distro and operating on it. I meant a minor thing like stitches and tending to some easy commands.

Read<br />
more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • For the LAS Time | Linux Action Show 468
  • Best Games To Play In Linux Terminal

    Linux lovers spend most of their time in the distro is with a terminal. The terminal is just like one of our friends which we know can almost do anything. Delete files, copy files, tell the weather, send emails, kill the system processes and much more. Then why not play some games in terminal too? Today I am going to cover some of the best games I love to play in Linux terminal which you will definitely enjoy.
    ​The list is not exhaustive, which means It may happen that some games may be missed, but I will try my best to cover top games for terminal in Linux. The commands will be for Ubuntu based distro using “sudo”. Replace “sudo apt-get” with your respective command like “yum” or “dnf” as per requirements.

  • [Video] Plasma 5 layout - my most productive desktop configuration
  • This Week In Solus - Install #44

    Our old git infrastructure will continue to live, read-only, for a month. After such point it will be removed. This ensures any latent projects or packages definitely make the migration over to Diffusion.

    If you’re a package maintainer, maintain a clone of the repository, etc. you will need to either update your common’s git remote to, or re-clone, the HTTPS url from the new common repo. After that, run make pull -jN (N here would be how many repositories you want to be cloning at the same time and would depend on your connection) in your repository folder and you should have your existing cloned git repositories receive updated remote addresses.

  • [Video] Deepin 15.4 - See What's New

    Deepin 15.4 is the latest release of the Debian-based deepin Linux distribution. This release features Control Center that makes it easier for users to set up various general settings for the desktop and the rest of the system, and a brand-new installation UI that offers smart detection for existing installation, helpful tips, and a QR code if you want to give feedback.

  • First Release Candidate of Grml version 2017.05 available

    For detailed information about the changes between 2014.11 and 2017.05(-rc1) have a look at the official release announcement.

  • Red Hat (RHT) Earning Somewhat Favorable News Coverage, Report Shows

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Insomnia Is Now Open Source

    Today, I’m happy to announce that the Insomnia desktop app is now open source software under the GPLv3 license! The source code is hosted on GitHub for your viewing pleasure.

  • Coreboot Ported To Another Core 2 Era Motherboard: G41C-GS

    If you happen to have an ASRock G41C-GS still in use or tucked away in your closet, this older motherboard for Intel Core 2 CPUs now has support for Coreboot to free the proprietary BIOS of the motherboard. Or if you don't but still have other parts available, this motherboard is still available from a few online shops.

  • pfSense 2.5 and AES-NI

    We’re starting the process toward pfSense software release 2.3.4. pfSense software release 2.4 is close as well, and will bring a number of improvements: UEFI, translations to at least five lanuguages, ZFS, FreeBSD 11 base, new login page, OpenVPN 2.4 and more. pfSense version 2.4 requires a 64-bit Intel or AMD CPU, and nanobsd images are no longer a part of pfSense as of version 2.4.

  • John Sullivan, Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation - Recorded at LinuxFest NW, 2017

    A discussion (plus Q&A) with the Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), John Sullivan - Recorded live at LinuxFest NorthWest. May 6th, 2017.

  • Machine learning for lawyers

    Machine learning is a technique that has taken the computing world by storm over the last few years. As Luis Villa discussed in his 2017 Free Software Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) talk, there are legal implications that need to be considered, especially with regard to the data sets that are used by machine-learning systems. The talk, which was not under the Chatham House Rule default for the workshop, also provided a simplified introduction to machine learning geared toward a legal audience.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open Source Electrospinning

    Electrospinning is the process of dispensing a polymer solution from a nozzle, then applying a very high voltage potential between the nozzle and a collector screen. The result is a very, very fine fiber that is stretched and elongated down to nanometers. Why would anyone want this? These fibers make great filters because of their large surface area. Electrospinning has been cited as an enabling technology for the future of textiles. The reality, though, is that no one really knows how electrospinning is going to become a standard industrial process because it’s so rare. Not many labs are researching electrospinning, to say nothing of industry.

  • Oracle crushed in defeat as Java world votes 'No' to modular overhaul

    The database goliath has lost a Java Community public-review ballot by 13 to 10 that was to have approved its Java Platform Module System (JPMS) specification as a final draft. Executive Committee members ignored dire warnings from Oracle spec lead Mark Reinhold in an open letter where he claimed that a “no” vote would not only delay Java 9 but also be a “vote against the Java Community Process itself”.

    The JSR, number 376, needed a two-thirds majority to pass.

    In that bluntly worded letter, Oracle’s Java platform chief also chastised IBM and Red Hat for suggesting that they might vote against JPMS.

Linux Devices and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

GNOME/GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Making Granite a Better Library

    To this end, the next release of Granite will include an almost entirely re-written Granite Demo with better navigation and comprehensive examples for every non-deprecated widget available in the library. A decent amount of work has already been done to this end with new views like a CSS demo.

    [...]

    With AppCenter, we’re entering a new major evolution in elementary’s role as a development platform. We’re happy to continue making improvements to that platform and in the future we’ll be taking a good hard look at projects like Granite to make sure we’re meeting developer’s needs and helping them to build the great apps that their users want to see. Granite began as a way to make it easier to ship consistent, feature full apps and we’re confident that we can continue to deliver on that promise.

  • Federico Mena Quintero

    Of the ones I did create and maintained, my motivation was the same as for the rest of GNOME: because I agree with the FSF’s motivation for free software. I also agree with the “secondary” derivations of the four freedoms: I live in Mexico, where proprietary software is terribly expensive and always seems to come from other countries, so it doesn’t help ours. I like that free software can be made more secure and trustworthy than proprietary software. I also like “giving back” to the free software commons at large, since I have gotten so many things out of it.

  • GNOME Recipes for Linux comes to Apple macOS

    GNOME is not just a desktop environment, but a collection of apps too. Some are useful, while others... not so much. Case in point, GNOME has a new program called "Recipes." It is quite literally a searchable database of cooking recipes. While there is nothing really wrong with creating such an app, it sort of duplicates the functionality of a search engine, like Google or Bing. If resources were unlimited, I'd say more power to the developers. The open source project largely relies on donations, however, and it could be argued that Recipes is a bit unnecessary.

  • Flat-Plat-Aurora Theme Is Modified Version Of Flat-Plat for Ubuntu

    There are many themes available which are flat design and target people who prefer flat themes for their desktop. This theme Flat-Plat-Aurora is based on Flat-Plat which is material-design flat theme and it was released in 2015. It is compatible with GTK 3.22+ and Gnome Shell 3.22/3.24 and available for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety and 17.04 Zesty. It support almost every desktop such as Unity, Gnome Shell, Xfce, Cinnamon, Mate and so on but not compatible with KDE. If you encounter any issues with the latest version of the theme 3.20/3.22 then report it to developer and hopefully it will get fixed in the next update If you are using other distribution you can directly download theme from its page and install it manually. Pop Suite icons used in the following screenshots. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change icons.

  • Perforated-Edge Icons Brought Different Look Of Vibrancy-Color Icons

    There are plenty of icon themes available from our site, many creators put their free time to create these eyecandy stuff for Linux users and give us free of cost, we should at least appreciate them. You may have tried various icons and you may have your favorite one right now on your desktop but there is no harm to try something new. Perforated Edge icons are modified version of Vibrancy Color icons, which looks quite different and nice with some themes, its initial version was released back in 2015 and most recent update brought 1000 new icons to the theme. This icon theme is compatible with most of the desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Xfce, Cinnamon, Mate and so but it is not compatible with KDE, it contains more than 4000 icons. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change icons.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.

Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
more

Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements. The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay. Read more