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Thursday, 27 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story QEMU 2.2-rc3 Released, Final Release Pushed Back By Couple Days Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:34am
Story NSA partners with Apache to release open-source data traffic program Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:29am
Story Expensive "Free/Libre Software Laptop" Uses A NVIDIA GPU Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:21am
Story Docker Update Fixes Pair of Critical Security flaws Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:17am
Story Linux-based AUV maps Antarctic sea ice thickness Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:10am
Story DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:05am
Story Step by step to install OwnCloud server on Ubuntu 14.04 gamblisku 26/11/2014 - 2:32am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 10:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 10:09pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 10:08pm

Ubuntu Mate 14.10 Review: For GNOME 2 lovers and offers awesome performance

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I am not sure if Ubuntu Mate 14.10 is an official release from Canonical yet. It is still to be listed in distrowatch. But, never-the-less I came across this distro as a reference from a couple of readers from my blog. I used the distro for a week and I am writing down my experience with the distro. It has the same specifics as Ubuntu 14.10 - the desktop environment is different here: Mate 1.8.1, with it's typical GNOME 2 looks.

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Netrunner Rolling 2014.04 - This time, we need the goats

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Reviews

Netrunner Rolling distro release is a very interesting concepts, on many level. It's a KDE desktop, based on Arch and Manjaro, the latter also being partially based on Arch itself, plus it comes with a rolling update model. A far cry from the typical asterisk-buntu philosophy that pervades most of the market.

In the canonical notation, Netrunner Rolling is actually an Arch-Arch-Manjaro distro, and this actually sounds like Ice Ice Baby, only geekier. Arch, Arch, Manjaro. Tam dam dam da da dam dam. Sort of. Anyhow, we have a new edition out there. 2014.09. So let's see if it's any good. The previous one surprised, immensely.

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Observing Scientific Linux 7.0

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Scientific Linux is an operating system sponsored by Fermilab and built using the source code from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). The distribution is lightly customized, making it similar to RHEL in most respects, but with different artwork. The current release of Scientific is available for the 64-bit x86 CPU architecture only. There are several editions to choose from, including a regular installation DVD (3.9 GB), an "Everything" double-sided installation DVD (6.2 GB), a net-install minimal CD (394 MB), a live CD (690 MB), a GNOME-flavoured live DVD (1.1 GB) and a KDE-flavoured live DVD (1.2 GB). I opted to download the live KDE disc.

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Manjaro Xfce 0.8.11 RC2 Is a Beautiful Experience like No Other – Gallery

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro Xfce 0.8.11 RC2, a Linux distribution based on well-tested snapshots of the Arch Linux repositories and 100% compatible with Arch, has been released and users can now test the new version and see what's new for themselves.

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A Go Front-End Could Soon Be Landing In LLVM

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Development

The "llgo" Go front-end to LLVM could soon be accepted as a new sub-project. This Go front-end is written in the Go language itself.

Going on for a while has been llgo as a Go front-end for LLVM written in Go. This LLVM Go compiler front-end works on 64-bit Linux and works for most code-bases and now the developers are willing to relicense it under the LLVM license and move it upstream as an official LLVM sub-project.

Those interested in LLVM for Go can find the details via this mailing list thread where there's been generally favorable feedback thus far.

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GTK+ INSPECTOR UPDATE

Filed under
GNOME

GTK+ Inspector is a debugging tool that is built directly into GTK+ and is available in every GTK+ application by using of the shortcuts Ctrl-Shift-d or Ctrl-Shift-i.

Since I last wrote about it, a number of things have changed, so it is time to give an update on the state of GtkInspector as of GTK+ 3.15.2.

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Thoughts of Thanksgiving for All That Is FOSS

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OSS

Well Thanksgiving week is upon us here in the land of stars and stripes, and in anticipation of all the social events soon to besiege us, more than a few Linux bloggers have been practicing keeping their favorite barstools warm down at the blogosphere's Punchy Penguin Saloon.

How chilly would those stools get if we were all flitting here and there from this party to that? It would be truly unkind. Much better to stay put and keep to ourselves in a comfortable place where inane small talk is frowned upon.

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Lollipop's Encryption Takes a Hefty Toll

Filed under
Android
Security

The new full-disk encryption feature that's enabled by default in Android 5.0 Lollipop comes at a hefty price in terms of performance, according to a recent benchmark report.

In fact, when full-disk encryption is enabled, random read performance drops by 62.9 percent, while random write performance falls by 50.5 percent, AnandTech reported late last week. Sequential read performance, meanwhile, drops by a whopping 80.7 percent.

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Mint's the Best, Less Malware, and Debian vs Ubuntu

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-s

The Register's Scott Gilbertson today said that Linux Mint 17.1 was the best distribution "hands down." Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield compares and contrasts Debian and Ubuntu to see which is right for you and Lucian Constantin reports on a new vulnerability found in less programs. There were several reviews in the feeds and Katherine Noyes tallies FOSS Thanksgivings. Linux.com has Linux gift ideas and Serdar Yegulalp summarizes rebootless kernel patching.

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Ubuntu Governance Reboot: Five Proposals

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Ubuntu

A little while back I wrote a blog post that seemed to inspire some people and ruffle the feathers of some others. It was designed as a conversation-starter for how we can re-energize leadership in Ubuntu.

When I kicked off the blog post, Elizabeth quite rightly gave me a bit of a kick in the spuds about not providing a place to have a discussion, so I amended the blog post to a link to this thread where I encourage your feedback and participation.

Rather unsurprisingly, there was some good feedback, before much of it started wandering off the point a little bit.

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Tizen based Samsung TV SDK 1.0 has been released

Filed under
Linux

The Tizen based Samsung TV SDK 1.0 has been released today. This follows the beta that was previously released at the start of July.

The SDK provides developers with the tools they need to begin developing for the Tizen-based Samsung TV platform. The toolset includes an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and a Web Simulator for testing TV apps on a PC.

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There's New In-Fighting Over The Future Of Compiz

Filed under
Development
Misc

Unless you're a user of Ubuntu with Unity 7, you probably haven't heard much about Compiz in quite some time. However, some developers are looking to further revive its development but not everyone is in agreement.

There's been an uptick in bickering amongst developers on the Compiz mailing list lately. A controversial developer often involved in these fights, Scott Moreau, declared himself the maintainer of upstream 0.8 stable branches.

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PC-BSD 10.1 review

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Reviews
BSD

The last PC-BSD release I reviewed was the 9.1 edition, and that was back in December 2012 (see PC-BSD 9.1 preview). That’s almost two years ago, But that’s because I’ve been very disappointed with subsequent releases after that, so I never bothered to write another review, though I was each testing each release privately.

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Android game console runs on quad-core Cortex-A17

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Android

Ugoos announced a “micro game console” spin-off of its Android-based quad-core Cortex-A17 UT3 media player, and released an Ubuntu 14.10 build for the UT3.

The Ugoos “G-box” micro game console appears to use the same design as the company’s Android-based, 4Kx4K ready UT3 media player, which sells for as low as $130. The G-box follows another similar, but OEM-focused UG-CX-998 media player with 4Kx2K resolution announced in September (see farther below).

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How the Linux Foundation's CII Is Securing the Internet

Filed under
Linux

The Heartbleed flaw that was first publicly disclosed in April of this year, was in some respects a black eye on the open-source community. Heartbleed is a flaw in the open-source OpenSSL cryptographic library that had wide ranging impact across the infrastructure of the Internet. In the aftermath of Heartbleed, a new effort emerged called the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) to help fund developers wanting to improve security across critical open-source infrastructure technologies.

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JVC KENWOOD Corporation, Linaro and OpenSynergy Join the AGL – Automotive Grade Linux

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has announced that the JVC KENWOOD Corporation, Linaro and OpenSynergy are joining the Linux Foundation to collaborate on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). This brings the total amount of companies working on AGL to forty six.

The AGL is a collaborative open source project developing a common, Linux-based software stack for the connected car. The members are committed to the goal of developing a common and open automotive platform for OEMs and suppliers to utilize, contribute to and build commercial products and technologies upon. The AGL reference model is based on Tizen.

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Top 10 Linux Holiday Gifts for 2014 (Slideshow)

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Linux

In 2012, the Top 10 Linux Gift Guide set the upper limit at $500, and last year it dropped to $400. This year, the cut-off dips to $350, reflecting the ongoing price reductions in consumer electronics, as well as my not entirely successful attempt to live up to Mr. Money Moustache's guidelines for living on the cheap. (Click the Gallery link below to see a slide show and descriptions of the Top 10 Linux gifts.)

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Cutelyst 0.5.0

Filed under
KDE

A bit more than one year after the initial commit, Cutelyst makes it’s 5th release.

It’s now powering 3 commercial applications, the last one recently got into production and is the most complex of them, making heavy use of Grantlee and Cutelyst capabilities.

Speaking of Grantlee if you use it on Qt5 you will get hit by QTBUG-41469 which sadly doesn’t seems to get fixed in time for 5.4, but uWSGI can constrain your application resources so your server doesn’t go out of memory (worth the leak due to it’s usefulness).

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Professional Samsung NX1 Tizen Smartcamera hits the US

Filed under
Linux

The Tizen based Samsung NX1 Smartcamera is the company’s answer to DSLR Professional shooting in a Mirror-Less Compact Systems Camera (CSC). The NX1 is capable of shooting 4K video and a staggering autofocus time of only 0.055sec. Originally the NX1 was supposed to hit the US last month, but that clearly didn’t happen.

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Sponsored Tiles now live in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

That Sponsored Tiles program from Mozilla, which I first wrote about in Mozilla to sell ads in Firefox browser via the Directory Tiles program, has gone live.

To refresh your memory, back in February (2014), Mozilla announced that some of the tiles in a new tab page in Firefox will be sponsored. In other words, ads from Mozilla partners. Note that you need to be using Firefox 33.1 to see sponsored tiles. They’re not available in Firefox 33.0 and earlier.

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