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Thursday, 21 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft Lobby Denies the State of Chile Access to Free Software Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 7:33pm
Story LaKademy 2014 - KDE Latin America Summit Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 7:29pm
Story Linux Growth Demands Bigger Talent Poo Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 6:17pm
Story Linux Foundation to offer new certification for IT workers Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 6:15pm
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 7.0 Test 1 Is an Interesting Debian and GNOME 3.12 Combination Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 6:13pm
Story Linux Founder Linus Torvalds 'Still Wants the Desktop' Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 6:09pm
Story Thanks For Making Games Faster: Top 10 Quotes from the Linux Kernel Developer Panel Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 6:03pm
Story The Many Things You Can Build With A Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 5:56pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Raspberry Pi Devices Spread in Schools, Help Teach Programming Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 5:35pm

Btrfs Gets Talked Up, Googler Encourages You To Try Btrfs

Filed under
Linux
Google

This week at LinuxCon North America in Chicago is a presentation by Google's Marc Merlin that's entitled "Why you should consider using btrfs, real COW snapshots and file level incremental server OS upgrades like Google does." The presentation does a good job at looking at the state of Btrfs on Linux and comparing it to ZFS.

Marc Merlin, a Linux admin at Google for more than one decade, is presenting on Thursday at LinuxCon Chicago about Btrfs. His slides are already available for those that can't make it to the windy city or are looking for an overview of what he'll be discussing.

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We have C++14!

Filed under
Development

Following the Issaquah meeting in February, we launched the Draft International Standard (DIS) ballot for the next C++ standard. That ballot closed on Friday.

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Is the Firefox-based Chromecast Competitor to Be Called Matchstick?

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF

Google has made quite a splash with its Chromecast dongle, which performs many of the tasks that set-top boxes do, but Chromecast may be headed for some competition. Android Police has reported that Firefox for Android has gained support in nightly builds for Chromecast, and GigaOM reports that Mozilla is continuing to work on a Chromecast competitor possibly called Matchstick.

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Why the operating system matters in a containerized world

Filed under
OS

Applications running in Linux containers are isolated within a single copy of the operating system running on a physical server. This approach stands in contrast to hypervisor-based virtualization in which each application is bound to a complete copy of a guest operating system and communicates with the hardware through the intervening hypervisor. As a result, containers consume very few system resources such as memory and impose essentially no performance overhead on the application.

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Ubuntu and Xubuntu Power First Mercedes-Benz S 500 Autonomous Car

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mercedes-Benz is one of the first companies to experiment with autonomous driving and it succeeded. It also looks like the engineers are using Ubuntu and Xubuntu to do the job.

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Krita At Siggraph 2014

Filed under
KDE
Software

For the first time, Krita has been present at Siggraph! Siggraph is the largest conference on computer graphics and interactive techniques and it has a big trade show as well as presentations, posters, book shops and animations. While Krita has been presented before at the Mobile World Congress, Siggraph really is where Krita belongs!

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Mesa Now Supports Another OpenGL 4.5 Extension

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While Mesa is still racing towards OpenGL 4.0 compliance, another OpenGL 4.5 extension can now be crossed off the Mesa TODO list.

Some Mesa developers have already started tackling some of the easier OpenGL 4.5 extensions and today another can be crossed off the list. Thanks to Tobias Klausmann. GL_ARB_conditional_render_inverted is now supported by Mesa. The core work for GL_ARB_conditional_render_inverted is complete and is implemented currently by the Gallium3D-based Nouveau NVC0 (Fermi+), Softpipe, and LLVMpipe drivers. Support will surely come in time for mainline Mesa with this extension for the RadeonSI Gallium3D and Intel drivers.

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LibreOffice 4.3 (PC) review: A powerful but dated Office clone

Filed under
LibO
Reviews

LibreOffice is an excellent Microsoft Office alternative that'll do just about everything you need it to, quickly and efficiently. And in a world without WPS Office, I wouldn't think twice about recommending it. But while LibreOffice has championed mimicking and even one-upping Microsoft's apps, the competition was busy marching ahead, developing tools to address the new ways we get to work. The most crucial of these is cross-device support.

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Open source forms the backbone of the most significant projects

Filed under
OSS

Companies increasingly understand that open source allows them to create faster, cheaper, and more secure products than they did by constantly reinventing the wheel in closed-source development environments. And the drivers of OSS adoption go beyond cost cutting and time savings. Participating in open source communities is a goal in itself—one that gives companies a competitive edge and helps them to attract top talent and influence project direction.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Kids Are Learning to Code With a Slice of Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Development
Linux

Raspberry Pi is a credit card-size computer that can function like a basic PC when plugged into a monitor and keyboard. It can record videos and power drones, but developer Eben Upton says his goal was to teach basic programming skills to students as young as 8.

The small computer, sold by the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation, is a small green board covered in metal ports. It’s light, delicate, and fits in the palm of your hand. Once it’s plugged into a keyboard and monitor, a user can write and tweak code as with any PC. The latest model, B+, has 10 operating systems to choose from, with varying learning curves.

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Need a Cheap Chromebook? Here’s How to Pick One

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Instead of running Windows, these lightweight, inexpensive notebooks are based entirely on Google’s Chrome web browser. So while you can’t install traditional programs such as Office and Photoshop, you can use web-based substitutes like the free Office Online and Pixlr. In exchange, you’ll get a computer that boots up quickly, is safe from viruses, doesn’t have any obnoxious bloatware and is optimized for browsing the web.

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Raspberry Pi was created to solve talent crisis at Cambridge: Eben Upton [Interview]

Filed under
Development
Hardware
Interviews

Raspberry Pi needs no introduction. It is one of the most popular credit card sized single board computers which has become a revolution in its own right. The $25 (and $35 for B model) hardware is being used in so many fields that it’s hard to keep a tab on it.

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We interview Michael Hall, Ubuntu app development liason

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael: I had been an Ubuntu user for nearly a year before I learned about the community and LoCo teams. It was through my LoCo team that I got involved in community activity, met Canonical employees, and ultimately got involved in the LoCo Team Portal (http://launchpad.net/loco-team-portal) development, and from there the Summit project. In fact, when I interviewed for a web developer position at Canonical, being able to show my work on those projects was probably a big contributing factor to my getting hired.

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Choose your Look and Feel experience

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.1 will make way easier to fine-tune their workspace to their needs.While already very powerful, it was not always trivial, so now on one hand it will be possible choose between plasmoids that offer the same feature with a very simple UI.
On the other hand, ever wanted to set themes, look and feel of your desktop, but was discouraged by how many places you had to change themes to make the experience as you wanted? being icon theme, widget style, plasma theme, cursors etc…
Plasma 5.1 will support the concept of Look and Feel packages (or “mega themes” if you like) Basically an one stop place to set the look and feel of the whole desktop.

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As DBMS wars continue, PostgreSQL shows most momentum

Filed under
OSS

It's hard to tell which database management systems (DBMB)s are the most popular. DB-Engines gives it a try every month. And, by its count, Oracle is still the top DBMS, followed closed by Oracle's open-source DBMS MySQL, which is just noses ahead of Microsoft SQL Server.

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Also: MongoDB tosses support lifeline to open source downloaders

Sharp to launch thinnest and lowest-bezel smartphone ever

Filed under
Android

Sharp (yes folks you heard right) have announced they are launching two new handsets in Japan and there is rumors circulating one of them will eventually hit stateside. Of the two handsets the Aquos Crystal is the handset that very well make it to the US market.

Yes, yes, another handset being released…so what are the specs?

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