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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Snap speed improvements with new compression algorithm! Roy Schestowitz 1 27/10/2020 - 8:23pm
Story Python Programming Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 8:05pm
Story Chemtool: Open-source Chemical Structure drawing program Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 8:02pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 7:51pm
Story Cosmo Communicator’s Linux OS gains new cover screen features Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 7:44pm
Story Best Linux server distributions of 2020 Rianne Schestowitz 1 27/10/2020 - 7:35pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 6:01pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 5:54pm
Story Tor, Proprietary Software, DRM, and Security Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 5:54pm
Story Programming: PHP, Raku and Python Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2020 - 5:51pm

IBM/Red Hat: Mainframes History, Fwupd 1.5 Released, and Lots of Stuff Outsourced to Microsoft (GitHub)

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The First Mainframe Computer: Harvard Mark I

    The mainframe computer, or ‘big iron’ in the computer industry, is the longest-running computer system in history. This technology has been substantially useful since the World War II era. In fact, the first mainframe computer was used mainly by the US Navy during the war. Like supercomputers, the mainframe computer addressed the need for an automatic, large-scale calculator as a more efficient and error-free way of computing. It was the invention of such machines that redefined the term ‘computer’ to refer to devices that can carry out automatic calculations of mathematical operations, a term that used to refer to humans who performed the manual calculations of such operations. Today, the importance of this technology in large-scale transaction processing remains unparalleled. Large industries in both the public and private sectors, from government and banking to aviation and healthcare, are in constant need of faster large-scale mainframes with higher stability and reliability. Consequently, big irons continue to evolve, as they remain at the core of every IT infrastructure.

    Inspired by Babbage

    Howard Aiken was a graduate student at Harvard when he came up with the concept of a device that can automatically calculate differential equations, after encountering difficulties in solving mathematical physics problems in his research. He envisioned a machine that could take in loads of mathematical inputs and produce precise and reliable results in a short time. After coming up with an initial design, he approached some manufacturers, but none were interested. Unabashed, Aiken explored other technological advances to improve his design. He eventually came upon Henry Babbage’s demonstration of his father’s Analytical Engine at Harvard, performed 70 years prior. Noticing the similarities between his design and that of Charles Babbage’s, Aiken studied Babbage’s work on the Analytical Engine and used his principles in the development of a new conceptual design. Aiken finished the design in 1937 and obtained the support of the Harvard faculty, who were impressed by his efforts. He presented his design to several manufacturers. Aiken eventually gained the nod from IBM in 1939 after Thomas Watson, then chairman of IBM, saw it as good publicity for the company and as an opportunity to showcase the company’s talents.

  • New fwupd 1.5.0 release – Technical Blog of Richard Hughes

    Today we tagged the 1.5.0 release of fwupd. Quite a bit has changed since the last release and I figured a blog post probably made sense to explain things.

    From a firmware engineer point of view, the most useful is the ability to build composite images, for instance building a firmware.dfuse file from different A.dfu and B.dfu images. At the moment there are commands in fwupdtool to convert one file format to another, but not to merge or alter them. Many firmware files are really just containers which can store multiple images, each with optional id, index and addresses. This new fwupd feature also allows us to create very small complicated container binaries for fuzzing.

  • Fwupd 1.5 Released With Expanded Hardware Support, New Capabilities

    Version 1.5 of the Fwupd utility is available for updating various component firmware/BIOS natively on Linux and integrating with the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) for the easy distribution of said firmware images.

    [...]

    Some of the hardware plug-in additions were motivated by Lenovo's increased support for Linux on their systems, which is great to see continuing.

  • Red Hat Publishes Open Source Participation Guidelines

    Red Hat’s Brian Proffitt says the guidelines “reflect the values and culture of Red Hat in the most appropriate way possible: a collaboration of many associates working toward a common goal, documenting how Red Hat is committed to contributing to any free and open source project in the most collaborative ways possible.”

  • Linux in the enterprise as seen from IBM

    It’s hard to imagine now, but 20 years ago, enterprise support and use of Linux was a controversial choice. Executives had trouble seeing the value of investing resources in an unproven, open-source operating system when mainstream options achieved the same results with less perceived risk.

    With the benefit of hindsight, so many enterprise clouds are run on Kubernetes containers with Linux that the initial concerns seem silly. The changes gave developers the capabilities to produce more agile, robust and innovative work than ever before. The success of the modern Linux cloud is due partly to IBM’s decision to support Linux on its mainframes 20 years ago.
    We spoke to Javier Perez, open-source program leader at IBM, about why and how IBM made this decision and what trends he thinks are going to influence the next 20 years for developers.

  • Open Source AI and Data: Keep up with rapid advances with LF AI and Data – IBM Developer

    The Linux Foundation Artificial Intelligence Foundation (LF AI) is merging with ODPi, which has a focus on big data in the enterprise, including governance, business intelligence, and data science education. The merged foundation will be called LF AI and Data. IBM believes this move is great for the AI and data open source space and that the new LF AI and Data Foundation will pave the way for stronger, safer open source AI and data projects.

    Why is this important?

    The world’s technology increasingly runs on open source software and data. Open source AI software development has led to advances in AI pattern recognition, including image recognition, speech recognition, and entity extraction in text, that were only possible because researchers were able to use open data sets and open source software to benchmark and compare systems and approaches.

    The data you or your organization create influences and is influenced by AI. Increasingly, both productivity and quality of service depends on data-driven AI systems across business and society. And those AI systems are largely based on open source software and data sets at their core.

  • How IT consultants can build trust with clients

    As a consultant, I’ve learned that consulting requires forming a customer relationship built upon trust. The client and the consultant usually establish trust through shared experiences. The most common shared experience is working through contract delivery. However, only focusing on contract delivery may cause the clients or clients to miss additional opportunities.

    I’ve laid out some low-cost or free opportunities for building trust below. These are not just for one party or the other to initiate! If you are the client, I encourage you to engage your consultants to find mutual interests. Likewise, if you’re the consultant, look for ways to add value for your customer by sharing your expertise.

  • The Red Hat Accelerators Wear Many Fedoras

    With Red Hat Accelerators, there’s a strong community feel with benefits for practitioners to expand their expertise, offer a voice to influence offerings and a seat at the table during industry events. Check out a few examples of how Red Hat Accelerators have been involved since the program’s inception.

    [...]

    Red Hat Accelerators have the opportunity to join briefings and other sessions, hearing from and sharing with teams from across the company, including engineers, marketing, product managers, executives and more. These in-depth discussions and forums have included opportunities to engage with Red Hatters like Chris Wright (senior vice president and CTO), Stefanie Chiras (senior vice president and general manager of Red Hat Enterprise Linux), and Paul Cormier (Red Hat’s president and CEO).

    Forming deeper relationships with customers means engaging Red Hatters from every direction, so customers in the Accelerators program can pick their brains and access candid, unfiltered information on any topic, big or small (or hybrid).

Latest Security Patches and Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (fastd, freetype, openjdk-11, phpmyadmin, and thunderbird), Fedora (ant, firefox, freetype, kde-partitionmanager, kpmcore, mupdf, python-PyMuPDF, singularity, suricata, and zathura-pdf-mupdf), Mageia (claws-mail, nss, firefox, pdns-recursor, and thunderbird), openSUSE (atftp, chromium, firefox, freetype2, gnutls, hunspell, kleopatra, and opera), Oracle (firefox, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), Red Hat (firefox and kpatch-patch), SUSE (bluez, firefox, glibc, libcdio, rmt-server, and SDL), and Ubuntu (freetype, pam-python, and perl).

  • Reproducible Builds: Second Reproducible Builds IRC meeting

    Please join us on the #reproducible-builds channel on irc.oftc.net — an agenda is available. As mentioned in our previous meeting announcement, due to the unprecedented events in 2020, there will be no in-person Reproducible Builds event this year, but we plan to run these IRC meetings every fortnight.

Exploring Vim: The 18 Best Vim Books To Improve Your Vim Fu

Filed under
Software

Vim is only content or text editing tool. That is it. In case you’re accustomed to utilizing Sublime Text for Windows/Mac, Notepad for Windows, Nano for Linux, Atom for Windows/Mac, or any content tool, Vim is simply one more program that permits you to compose and alter the text. Contrasted with other word processors, 2 viewpoints make Vim stick out are proficiency and universality. Vim is all about productivity. What’s more, there are two or three points from which it approaches productivity. Vim permits you to be proficient by driving you to utilize the console, and indeed, that implies no more using the mouse! Therefore, a perfect set of Vim books is undecipherably crucial to learn Vim.

Universality is likewise a pretty cool part of Vim, which is that it’s all over. It’s accessible on essentially every significant stage you can consider. Regardless of whether you’re utilizing a Mac, Windows, or some Linux conveyance, Vim has you secured. Specifically, if your everyday work includes working in the terminal meetings, Vim is your lone content manager accessible.

Read more

Also: Zeit - A GUI Front-end To Crontab To Schedule Jobs In Linux - OSTechNix

Joplin and webdav

Filed under
Software

Joplin is a cross-platform note taking app that I use a lot to keep track of my projects, and to organize my notes and thoughts. Joplin allows you to create note books, and add an infinite number of notes to them. You can link between notes, link to external sources, add images, tables, etc. Everythin in markdown, very easy to learn and use. It’s basically an Evernote clone, without the subscription, and without one other thing that I’ll talk about later.

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Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The Qt Company Details The Graphics Stack Changes With Qt 6.0

    If all goes well Qt 6.0 will make its official debut in December. One of the areas much talked about for Qt 6 development has been the graphics architecture changes and better supporting more APIs besides OpenGL.

    Qt developer Laszlo Agocs has written a blog post outlining some of the fundamental graphics changes that have made the cut for Qt 6.0...

  • Javascript Confirm Method – Linux Hint

    Javascript is the most known language of the web. Javascript is widely used in front-end development as well as in the back-end. Javascript provides a lot of built-in objects, functions, and methods to help in web development. In this article, we are going to learn one of the javascript’s built-in confirm() method, which is used to show pop-ups over the screen and get the user’s response. The confirm box is a bit different if we try to compare it with the alert box. It is a pop-up that contains a message/text with two buttons, “OK” and “Cancel”. The user won’t be able to do any task while a confirm box is over the screen, and he/she clicks the “OK” or “Cancel” button. This is the reason behind not recommending it’s often used. So, let’s have a look at what is a confirm box and what are the different ways to use it.

    The confirm() is basically a method, which is used to show a pop-up box over the web page, and it contains a message or text and two buttons, “OK” & “Cancel”. On the click of the “OK” button, the confirm method returns “true”. Similarly, on the click of the “Cancel” button, it returns false.

  • Applying JavaScript’s Splice Function – Linux Hint

    JavaScript is a lightweight programming language, and as with any programming language, when developing JavaScript programs, we often need to work with arrays to store data. In this article, we will introduce JavaScript’s built-in splice function and discuss how we can use it to manipulate an array. As data are generated, the structures used for storage must be updated. For this reason, a programmer must often add elements to or remove elements from an array.

  • Javascript Trim String – Linux Hint

    Javascript is a scripting or programming language, which is used both on the client-side and back-end of the web. Just like any other language, strings are an important type of the variables, and we often need to manipulate or alter strings as per our needs. While getting data from the user in the form fields, a programmer has to take care of a lot of things. In this article, we will have a look at javascript’s trim() function. We will learn how this function helps in beautifying the strings in javascript and how can we get rid of extra spaces. So, let’s take a look at what is a string and how we can trim the strings.

  • Exploring ELF files using pyelftools | by Roman Storozhenko | Oct, 2020 | Medium

    There are many tools for exploring executable files of ELF format. Most of them intended for providing sole piece of information extracted from a binary in the mentioned format. They are great, but sometimes we need a kind of an universal and yet highly specialized tool allowing to do much more than standard tools are able to. This is a moment when pyelftools come into play.
    In this article I would like to show some usage examples of of pyelftools. I don’t show how to use pyelftools itself, that is, its classes and other features, as you can find it in the documentation and source code itself. Instead I concentrate on applications of this tool for particular purposes.

  • How to Get Current Date & Time in JavaScript? – Linux Hint

    Javascript has become a massively used programming language due to the expansion of the internet and the web at an unbelievable pace. In the modern world of the web, we can do almost every task in one single browser, and Javascript is used in every single website we see in our daily routine life. We frequently used to see the date and time at almost every website. In this article, we are going to have a look at how we can get the current time in Javascript and what are the different ways to get the date and time according to our requirement.

    Javascript provides a built-in object Date, which helps in managing all the date and time. Later, we can extract whatever we want according to our needs using different built-in methods. So, let’s just straight jump into the process and learn the different techniques to extract the current date and time.

  • How to use PHP Null Coalescing Operator – Linux Hint

    The null coalescing operator (??), one of the new features of PHP 7, can be used as an alternative to the ternary operator and isset() function. It is used to check whether a value is assigned to a variable, and it returns a default value when no value is defined for a variable. This operator can also be used to see if $_GET[] and $_POST[], which receive user inputs, are set. Furthermore, it can check the value of more than one variable via chaining.

    In this article, the differences between the ternary and null coalescing operators are discussed, and the null coalescing operator is used as an alternative to the ternary operator and isset() function.

  • Seaborn Scatter Plot - Tutorial and Examples

    In this tutorial, we'll go over how to plot a scatter plot in Seaborn and Python. We'll go over simple plotting examples, as well as multi-faceted plotting of multiple plots and 3D plots using Seaborn and Matplotlib.

  • What Does "if __name__ == __main__:"" Do in Python?

    if __name__ == "__main__" is used to control the behavior of our Python code when it's executed directly or imported as a module. This tutorial explains how.

  • Python round() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is a very versatile high-level programming language that is most widely used in Data Sciences, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence. Python provides great support through built-in modules and functions where we need to play with the numbers. The Python round() function rounds off the floating-point number to the stated number of decimals and returns it.For example, we have a floating-point number 6.677, and we need to round it off to the 2 decimal points, then the round() function will do the job and round off the number to 6.68.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Is Coming on November 4th with Better Support for Android 9 Devices

Filed under
Linux

Coming hot on the heels of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 update, which arrived last month with support for the Sony Xperia X family and the OnePlus 3 and 3T devices, the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 software update is currently scheduled for November 4th, 2020.

In this release, the UBports development team focused their efforts on improving support for Android 9 devices, most specifically for the forthcoming Volla Phone, which will start shipping to backers next month and will also offer a variant powered by Ubuntu Touch.

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Samsung 980 PRO PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The Samsung 980 PRO PCIe 4.0 NVMe solid-state drives are now available from Internet retailers. For those wondering how these SSDs compare with EXT4 under Linux against other PCIe 4.0/3.0 drives, here are a variety of benchmarks.

While Samsung hasn't sent out NVMe SSDs for Linux testing at Phoronix, we continue purchasing the new models due to their high performance state and needing some additional drives for various systems in the lab. When the Samsung 980 PRO reached retail channels this month I picked up the Samsung 980 PRO 500GB and 1TB drives and ran a series of benchmarks on them prior to commissioning.

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My Open Source meltdown, and the rise of a star

Filed under
OSS

There comes a time when you feel that you don’t fit anywhere. Where your ideas, principles, motivation and struggles simply don’t align with anyone else. For years, I felt part of something that was larger than myself, had the motivation to use a huge part of my free time to contribute to projects and in several cases, make personal sacrifices to help others, and even envisioned a future for myself in places where I thought it was impossible.

It’s that struggle trying to find our place in this huge Open Source world what usually ends up in personal meltdown and professional burnout. It’s not a secret that as fast as technologies evolve, the faster we end up being obsolete, unless we dedicate most of our time to keep up to date on every break through.

I’m not the exception to this, and after being an active contributor for almost 15 years, and then have my “time off” to be a full time mom and employee, what happened in the Projects I used to Contribute left me feeling way far from my comfort zone. I’m grateful that most of the places where I’ve contributed has been because people asks for my help, and even after a long absence it was not different from before.

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What Linux needs to make it a better mobile desktop

Filed under
Linux

I have a bit of a confession to make. Although Linux is my operating system of choice on the desktop, I tend to skip over my open source-powered laptop in favor of either a MacBook Pro or Chromebook when I'm working beyond my desk. I know...blasphemy, right? I've reached a point in my career and life where I need the tools to be able to get my jobs done as efficiently as possible and without frustration or headache.

To be absolutely fair, primary reasons why I overlook my one Linux laptop are because it's too big and the keyboard is absolutely terrible. Given I am a writer by profession, a bad keyboard can be a deal-breaker. Once again, in favor of honesty, the 2016 MacBook Pro keyboard isn't much better. The "butterfly" keys are loud and way too prone to sticking. My 2015 Pixel was, at one point, an absolute dream machine, but the battery life is waning, and sometimes ChromeOS can be a bit flaky with the trackpad.

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Linux and open-source jobs are hotter than ever

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation and , the leading online course company, released the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report on October 26. Once again, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for open-source technology skills is growing. 37% of hiring managers say they will hire more IT professionals in the next six months.

Specifically, 81% of hiring managers say hiring open source talent is a priority going forward. 56% of hiring managers plan to increase their hiring of open source pros in the next six months

Why? The answer to that is simple. As a recent Red Hat survey found, 86% of IT leaders said the most innovative companies are using open-source software, citing higher quality solutions, lower cost of ownership, improved security, and cloud-native capabilities as the top reasons for usage. So, even in these bad times, the demand for open-source savvy is higher than ever.

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Vote for the Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” Desktop Artwork Now

Opened to submissions since early August, the artwork proposals for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye,” the next major release of the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system, has reached its deadline last week on October 15th, and now the community can vote for the winner.

Jonathan Carter announced today that it’s time for the Debian community to choose the desktop artwork to be used in Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye.” The review period for the final proposals starts today, October 26th, until November 9th, and winners will be unveiled in mid-November.

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Games: AntiMicroX in Linux, GOG, Life of Delta, 9 Monkeys of Shaolin, Gravity Ace

Filed under
Gaming

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing Anbox on Linux to Run Android Apps – Linux Hint

    Anbox is an Android emulator that is available for any GNU/Linux operating system. An android emulator offers the environment necessary for installing and running Android apps. Such emulators do not offer the portability of an Android smartphone, but in exchange, more powerful hardware can be used.In this article, we will show you how to install Anbox on Linux.

  • How to set Timers, Alarms, and Stopwatches on CentOS 8

    In this article, I will show you how to set timers, alarms, and stopwatches on your CentOS 8 system. We will perform these actions using two different ways.

  • How to Install Docker on Raspberry Pi 4 – Linux Hint

    In this article, learn everything you need to know to get started with Docker and Docker Compose on Raspberry Pi 4.

  • How to Create Two Panel Layout in GNOME Shell Us – Linux Hint

    “Dash to Panel” is a GNOME Shell extension that can be installed in Ubuntu, Fedora and other GNOME Shell based Linux distributions. It aims to provide an alternative and much more customizable application dock / taskbar for managing pinned and running apps.

    Until recently, Dash to Panel was limited to a single panel that combined application menus, taskbar and system tray. However, a new update for Dash to Panel was released a couple of months back, allowing users to create two panels. Using this new option, you can now emulate the classic GNOME2 layout, featuring a two panel setup for managing system tray and taskbar. This article will explain how to create this two panel layout using Dash to Panel GNOME Shell extension.

  • How to Install LinuxFX Windowsfx 10 on VMware Workstation - SysAdmin

    This video tutorial shows how to install LinuxFX Windowsfx 10 on VMware Workstation step by step. This tutorial is also helpful to install LinuxFX Windowsfx 10 on physical computer or laptop hardware.

  • How to Install Heat Sinks on the Raspberry Pi – Linux Hint

    There is a relation between temperature and performance in every electronic device. The lower the temperature, the better the performance. The higher the temperature, the lower the performance. Within a certain boundary, this effect is visible in electronic devices like a Raspberry Pi. So, it is essential to keep the temperature of the Raspberry Pi within a certain boundary.

    Heat sinks are metal objects that are usually placed over the chips and processor of Raspberry Pi. The heat sinks help transfer the heat generated on the processors and other chips to the air. That way, the temperature of the processors and chips remain within a certain boundary that won’t hamper the productivity of the device.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to install heat sinks on the Raspberry Pi. So, let’s get started.

  • How to Create Hard Link and Soft Link in Linux? – Linux Hint

    In the Linux operating system, all the information about a file is stored in its respective inode. These inodes allow you to know all the metadata of a file. There is a concept of creating links to a file in Linux, just like we create pointers to the files in most of the popular programming languages. These links are basically of two types: the hard and the soft links. A hard link to a file is essentially an exact copy of the file, which means that a hard link to a file and the actual file will share the same inode. The biggest advantage of creating a hard link is that even if you accidentally delete the actual file, you will still be able to access its contents via its hard link.

    On the other hand, a soft link or a symbolic link works exactly like a pointer or a shortcut to a file. It is not an accurate copy of the file but only points to the original file. A soft link to a file and the actual file will have different inode values. Moreover, if you delete the actual file at any time, you will not be able to access its contents via its soft link. Today, we will share with you the methods of creating a hard link and soft link to a file in Linux.

    Note: We have used Linux Mint 20 for walking you through the methods shown below.

  • How to install VirtualBox on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux LTS - nixCraft

    Explains how to install the VirtualBox app on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux for trying out new guest operating (Virtual Machines).

  • How to fix: Connection refused by port 22 Debian/Ubuntu – Linux Hint

    SSH provides a secure way to access and manage Linux servers. Sometimes while connecting to SSH servers, users often encounter “Connection refused” error by port 22. It happens because of several reasons like SSH service is not running, the port is blocked by the firewall, or the server is using a different port. It can also occur because of the IP conflict issue. In this article, we will discuss some of the solutions that you should try in order to fix the error.

  • How to clone an object in PHP – Linux Hint

    Object cloning can be very useful for object-oriented programming. In this tutorial, we show you how to clone an object in PHP.

  • How to clear command history in Linux – Linux Hint

    The bash history stores the records of all terminal commands which are executed by a user on the command-line Linux system. Using the history feature, you can easily locate the previously executed commands on your Linux system through the arrow keys navigation. In this article, how to clear command history in Linux is explained.

It’s Official: Linux Kernel 5.10 Will Be an LTS Release

Filed under
Linux

According to a recent tweet from renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, the next LTS (Long Term Support) kernel release will be Linux 5.10, which recently entered development with a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone already available for public testing.

This means that Linux kernel 5.10, which will probably see the light of day near the Christmas 2020 holidays, will receive updates for at least two years. But, as it happened with previous LTS kernel series, support could be extended to up to six years, probably until December 2026.

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Ubuntu 21.04 Is Slated for Release on April 22, 2021

Filed under
Ubuntu

Following the Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) release, there will be Ubuntu 21.04, whose codename will start with the word “Hirsute” followed by an animal name, which will probably be voted by the community soon. If you want to give the Ubuntu developers some suggestions on the H animal, check out this Ubuntu Discourse topic.

Until the codename is decided, development on Ubuntu 21.04 will kick off later this week on October 29th with the toolchain upload, based, of course, on the current release, Ubuntu 20.10. And, as its version number suggests, the final release will be expected in April (04) 2021.

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Linus Torvalds Announces First Linux Kernel 5.10 Release Candidate

Filed under
Linux

As expected, Linus Torvalds announced the first Release Candidate (RC) of the upcoming Linux 5.10 kernel series, which looks to be yet another big release with almost 14k commits, but not as big as Linux kernel 5.8 was. However, Linus Torvalds assures us that the merge window didn’t cause any unusual issues and things went “fairly smoothly.”

The most interesting change in Linux kernel 5.10 appears to be the removal of setf_fs() function, which was used to set the FS segment register of an x86 processor. For now, it was only removed from the x86, PowerPC, s390, and RISC-V architectures, with the rest to follow soon.

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Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • Graphics in Qt 6.0: QRhi, Qt Quick, Qt Quick 3D

    Last year we had a three part blog series about Qt's new approach to working with 3D graphics APIs and shading languages: part 1, part 2, part 3. For Qt Quick, an early, opt-in preview of the new rendering architecture was shipped in Qt 5.14, with some improvements in Qt 5.15. With the release of Qt 6.0 upcoming, let's see what has happened since Qt 5.15. It will not be possible to cover every detail of the graphics stack improvements for Qt Quick here, let alone dive into the vast amount of Qt Quick 3D features, many of which are new or improved in Qt 6.0. Rather, the aim is just to give an overview of what can be expected from the graphics stack perspective when Qt 6.0 ships later this year.

  • Multi-Layer Perceptron & Backpropagation - Implemented from scratch

    Writing a custom implementation of a popular algorithm can be compared to playing a musical standard. For as long as the code reflects upon the equations, the functionality remains unchanged. It is, indeed, just like playing from notes. However, it lets you master your tools and practice your ability to hear and think.

    In this post, we are going to re-play the classic Multi-Layer Perceptron. Most importantly, we will play the solo called backpropagation, which is, indeed, one of the machine-learning standards.

    As usual, we are going to show how the math translates into code. In other words, we will take the notes (equations) and play them using bare-bone numpy.

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  • PyDev of the Week: William Horton

    This week we welcome William Horton (@hortonhearsafoo) as our PyDev of the Week! William is a Backend Engineer at Compass and has spoken at several local Python conferences. He is a contributor to PyTorch and fastai.

    Let’s spend some time getting to know William better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    A little about myself: people might be surprised about my educational background–I didn’t study computer science. I have a bachelors in the social sciences. So by the time I finished undergrad, the most programming I had done was probably doing regressions in Stata to finish my thesis. I decided against grad school, and instead signed up for a coding bootcamp (App Academy) in NYC. The day I’m writing this, September 28, is actually 5 years to the day that I started at App Academy.

    Since then I’ve worked at a few different startups in NYC, across various industries: first investment banking, then online pharmacy, and now real estate. I’m currently a senior engineer on the AI Services team at Compass, working on machine learning solutions for our real estate agents and consumers.

    I like to spend my free time on a few different hobbies. I’m a competitive powerlifter, so I like to get into the gym a few times a week (although with the pandemic in NYC I didn’t lift for six months or so). I’ve actually found powerlifting to be a pretty common hobby among software engineers. Every time someone new joined my gym, it seemed like they came from a different startup. I love to play basketball. And I’m passionate about music: I’ve been a singer almost my whole life, and most recently was performing with an a cappella group in NYC. And in the last year I’ve picked up the guitar, after not touching it since I was a teenager, and that has been very fulfilling.

  • Malayalam fonts: Beyond Latin font metrics | Soliloquies

    This year’s annual international conference organized by TeX Users Group — TUG2020 — was held completely online due to the raging pandemic. In TUG2020, I have presented a talk on some important Malayalam typeface design factors and considerations.

    The idea and its articulation of the talk originated with K.H. Hussain, designer of well-known fonts such as Rachana, Meera, Meera Inimai, TNJoy etc. In a number of discussions that ensued, this idea was developed and later presented at TUG2020.

    Opening keynote to TUG2020 was delivered by Steve Matteson, about the design of Noto fonts. He mentioned that Noto was originally envisaged to be developed as a single font containing all Unicode scripts; but that was changed due to a couple of reasons: (1) huge size of resulting font and (2) the design of many South/South-East Asian characters do not fit well within its Latin font metrics.

  • Jérôme Gardou hired full-time to work on the memory manager

    I proudly announce that ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired Jérôme Gardou to work full-time on the ReactOS kernel’s memory manager for the next 3 months.

    Jérôme is a ReactOS veteran who has been contributing to the project since 2009. He has deep expertise into nearly all parts of ReactOS, ranging from various user-mode components (mostly related to low-level graphics) over their kernel-mode counterparts and down to bare-metal components like the kernel memory manager.

    During the upcoming months, Jérôme is going to overhaul the Mm (Memory Manager) and Cc (Cache Controller) components of the kernel. Both of them are core parts of the operating system, which are involved in every memory request and file operation. Improving them is expected to have a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS.

  • "Open-Source Windows" ReactOS To See Improved Memory Management - Phoronix

    ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired one of their long-time contributors to work full-time on the "open-source Windows" implementation's memory management for the next quarter.

    ReactOS is funding longtime contributor Jérôme Gardou to work full-time for the next three months on the open-source operating system's memory manager and cache controller code within its kernel.

    ReactOS hopes this overhaul to the MM/CS code will yield "a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS."

Corsair Power Supplies May Soon See Sensor Support Exposed Under Linux

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Linux
Hardware

Select high-end Corsair power supplies such as their RMi / HXi / AXi series are able to expose various sensor metrics via USB interface to the system. To date this sensor functionality has only worked under Windows with their proprietary software but now an open-source driver is seeking mainline inclusion for supporting these sensors under Linux.

Independent developer Wilken Gottwalt reverse-engineered the micro-controller found on the Corsair RMi/HXi/AXi power supplies and found it to be a proprietary but simple USB HID protocol. The controller exposes temperatures, current, and voltage levels along with other information like power uptime, power used, and power supply fan speed. This protocol on select models can also allow configuring the fan mode and mono/multi-rail voltage handling, and over-current protection.

Read more

Also: Qualcomm QCS610 micro SoM and devkit to power AI and ML smart cameras

Games: Nonsense Soccer, Bound By Blades and Halloween at Humble Store

Filed under
Gaming
  • Nonsense Soccer is a highly amusing local multiplayer platformer-soccer-hybrid | GamingOnLinux

    After your next local multiplayer game? Nonsense Soccer is out in Early Access and it's already a huge amount of fun if you're the competitive type.

    Nonsense Soccer takes the classic sport and turns it into a side-on platformer-soccer-hybrid and the result is chaotic. Simple enough for anyone young and old to pick up their favourite gamepad and get kicking. It's actually been available for a little while already, with the new Steam release being their second major update.

  • Check out the fresh demo of Bound By Blades and take down some fierce monsters | GamingOnLinux

    Bound By Blades might look welcoming with the sweet colourful style and wonderful music, but this action-RPG gets quickly intense.

    Inspired somewhat by Monster Hunter, it originally tried going through Kickstarter to gather funds back in 2019. It failed but the development has continued anyway. The idea is that you go through increasingly tough battles, slaying big creatures in the unique four-corner combat arena where you run between four corners, dodging enemy attacks and unleash your own. After a year of work, the new demo is out now.

  • Humble Store has a big Halloween sale on right now | GamingOnLinux

    Prepare for Halloween with some new games? It's not like you're able to go out much with the COVID19 disease still raging on so staying in and playing games sound great to me.

    To help with that you can check out the Humble Store Halloween Sale, which has a number of big hits going on some pretty high discounts. While it's a Halloween sale, the majority of the titles oddly aren't really scary or much related to the event, still it's another good chance to build up your collection.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 21.04 Is The "Hirsute Hippo", Releasing On 22 April

Following last week's Ubuntu 20.10 "Groovy Gorilla" release, Ubuntu 21.04 development is now getting underway as the Hirsute Hippo. Succeeding the "GG" series is Ubuntu 21.04 the Hirsute (Hairy) Hippo in following their usual naming convention. This is now the third time of Ubuntu seeing a "HH" release following the Ubuntu 5.04 Hoary Hedgehog and Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron releases. The release schedule for Ubuntu 21.04 puts the official release on 22 April, the beta on 1 April, and the feature freeze on 25 February as the prominent dates of the cycle. The Ubuntu 21.04 toolchain upload is beginning tomorrow and expect more Debian changes to begin flowing into the Ubuntu Hirsute archive shortly. Hirsute uploads can be monitored via Launchpad. Read more Also: Ubuntu 21.04 gets the codename ‘Hirsute Hippo' The Ubuntu 21.04 Codename Revealed — It’s Hairy ‘n Huge! And We’re Off: Ubuntu 21.04 Development Begins

What the growing OEM support means for the future of Linux

When I first started using Linux in the late 1990s, getting Linux to successfully run on a laptop was the stuff of legends. You might be able to get a distribution installed, but having functional wireless connectivity or sound might well be beyond your skill level. Sometimes it'd mean compiling a custom kernel or installing/patching firmware. No matter what route you took, it required time and effort enough that when you did finally get everything working as it should, you felt like a rock star. Those were the days. These days, Linux just works. It's a rare occasion that I run into a piece of hardware that Linux cannot handle. Sure, you might have to install a driver now and then, but even those bits of software are readily available. Read more

today's howtos

  • Introduction to Blender for Beginners – Linux Hint

    If you are a 3D computer graphics or animation enthusiast and are in search of some 3D modeling software, then you have come to the right place. There are many 3D modeling software programs available, many are good and are doing their jobs quite well, but they all come with a hefty price tag and high subscription fees. There is no need to pay heavy subscription fees when you have a free and powerful 3D creation tool at your fingertips, known as a Blender. Blender is a popular and open-source 3D creation software that can be used in 3D printer designs. It is a robust program that supports the entire pipeline of 3D creation, which includes modeling, shading, rigging, animation, and rendering. There is no need to get any supplementary programs because Blender lets you make games and edit videos. Blender is quite easy to learn and has a great community to support you. This article introduces the basics of the Blender software to beginners. We will discuss the Blender user interface and some essential shortcut keys. If you are a beginner and want to start 3D modeling in Blender, then this article is for you.

  • How To Install Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How To Use Dockerfiles In Docker - Anto Online

    This post will explain how to use Dockerfiles in Docker. Learn how to launch Wordpress and MariaDB using your own Dockerfile.

  • How To Install Wine on Linux Mint 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Wine on Linux Mint 20, as well as some extra required package by Wine

  • How to Extract and Open a .gz File in Linux Command Line – Linux Hint

    We know that a file in a computer system can be as small as a few Bytes or as large as a thousand Gigabytes. When you want to transmit a file from one end to another, its size plays a very important role in deciding whether you want to send it as it is or compress it. The .gz file format is a very commonly used compressed file format for the Linux operating system. Today, we will explore the methods of extracting and opening a .gz file in Linux.

  • How to Install and Configure an FTP server (vsftpd) with SSL/TLS on Ubuntu 20.04

    In this tutorial, we will learn how to install and configure an FTP Server using vsftpd on an Ubuntu 20.04 based server. We will also learn how to sec...

  • How to Reset Forgotten Root Password in Ubuntu? – Linux Hint

    In any UNIX or Linux system, the root account is the top in the hierarchy. It holds the utmost power over the system. For any system change, the root has to grant permission. The root user can also override any user’s permission and read or write data. Because the root account holds so much power, it is important to protect it from unwanted access.In the case of Ubuntu, the root account is disabled by default. However, you can still perform system changes. To do so, you need to know the root password. The problem arises when you have forgotten the root password.

Games: Caesar III, Moonshell Island, The Last Relic

  • Julius, the open source re-implementation of Caesar III has a new major release | GamingOnLinux

    Caesar III continues to live on and get improvements on modern systems thanks to open source, with the Julius game engine continuing to mature. On October 27, Julius 1.5.0 was released continuing to upgrade the experience. The current status is that it should be fully playable, with it largely focused on accuracy with the original game but with plenty of UI enhancements.

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  • Upcoming RPG 'Moonshell Island' will have you fight giant tomatoes with a whisk | GamingOnLinux

    You've faced monsters before aplenty but what about nomsters? Moonshell Island looks and sounds like a delightful and rather quirky upcoming RPG. Set on a whimsical island, Moonshell Island will feature a cast of charming characters, a "satisfying" action-battle system, plenty of mini-games and a "heartwarming tale of achieving dreams, supporting friends, and building a community". On a peaceful island these strange nomsters threaten the peace so "you must journey to find the source of the trouble and recruit the islanders to a safe haven, Crabby’s Cabana Club. As the club population grows, more services become available to aid you on your quest to uncover not only the secrets of the island, but also of yourself".

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  • The Last Relic is an upcoming RPG inspired by Earthbound and Chrono Trigger | GamingOnLinux

    Enjoyed classics like Earthbound and Chrono Trigger? Take a look at The Last Relic, an in-development RPG from developer Christopher Hall Guay. "The Last Relic follows the tale of a young girl named Ellie who is transported from her cozy, American life to a foreign realm of magic and monsters. Lost and alone, she wanders this new land aimlessly, wishing only to get back home. She's attacked by monsters only to be rescued by a young man named Dorian. It's here Ellie learns that she is far from Earth, in the land of Relics and Relic Hunters. Why was she brought here? And will she ever make it back home?"