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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LinuxCon & 25 Years, New Slack Live, Gentoo's Demise Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:32pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.2.82 LTS Is Out with Btrfs and x86 Improvements, Updated Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:14pm
Story NGINX’s Plan to Create a $1 Billion Business from its Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:10pm
Story In Memory of Jonathan “avenj” Portnoy Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:05pm
Story “Thin Mini-ITX” Skylake board has 20mm profile Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 7:58pm
Story Schools that #GoOpen should #GoOpenSource Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 7:42pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:23am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:22am
Story Paid-for Microsoft Openwashing at LinuxCon Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:21am
Story Android/Google Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:20am

The Big Android Dev Interview: Paul Lammertsma

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Android
Interviews

That's a really interesting question. I started in 2010, I think it was. I was actually in a molecular biology startup, and we were doing software for scientists, virologists, to basically plan experiments about cloning and genetic research and stuff like that. And a colleague of mine, he came into the office one day and he had bought an HTC Desire. He was really excited about it, and said "hey, over the weekend I made this app."

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Security News

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Security

Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 25 Linux OS to Arrive on November 15, Ship with Wayland by Default

    The Fedora Project is currently working very hard on the next major version of the popular GNU/Linux computer operating system, Fedora 25, bringing you all the latest and modern technologies.

    Wayland is a modern technology, the next generation display server designed as a drop-in replacement for the old X.Org Server or X11 as many of you out there might want to call the display server almost all GNU/Linux distributions are currently using by default. But there are many security-released issues with X11 that for some reason can't be fixed, so it's time for the open-source ecosystem to adopt Wayland.

  • New role as Fedora Magazine editor in chief

    Today, I am pleased to announce my new role as the Fedora Magazine editor-in-chief. After deciding to shift focus to other areas of the Fedora Project, I am receiving the torch from Ryan Lerch. Ryan has helped lead the Magazine, edit pieces from other contributors, contribute his own pieces, and decide strategic direction for the Magazine.

    He leaves big shoes to fill, but I hope to offer my own leadership, creativity, and direction in coming years as well. I’d like to thank both Ryan, Paul Frields, and Remy DeCausemaker for their mentorship and guidance towards becoming involved with Fedora and the Magazine. I’m excited to have the opportunity to help guide the Fedora Magazine in how it fits with the rest of Fedora.

  • FOSS Wave: Delhi, India

    After the introductory session on FOSS, we went ahead with our agenda and introduced the Fedora Project and the community behind it: what the Fedora Project is, what its mission is, and how the participants can get started with Fedora. The participants were guided upon how they can create their identity on the Fedora Project by signing up on FAS. They could then use that identity to get access to various Fedora applications and resources. The session on Fedora moved on with the introduction on how the contributors can get to the mailing list and introduce themselves to the community. There, they can get help about starting their contributions. The main focus during the session on Fedora was to introduce the participants to the Fedora Quality Assurance (QA) team and release validation testing.

Android Leftovers

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Android

How IBM’s LinuxONE Has Evolved For the New Open Source Cloud

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Interviews
OSS

LinuxONE is IBM’s Linux Server. The LinuxONE server runs the major distributions of Linux; SUSE, Red Hat and Canonical’s Ubuntu. The server also runs open source databases like Mongo DB , PostgreSQL and MariaDB allowing for both horizontal growth and vertical scale, as demonstrated by running a 2TB Mongo database without sharding. Several of the features built into this system support the constant innovation inherent in the open source movement while maintaining the performance and reliability required by Enterprise clients; for example, Logical Partitions (LPARs) allow clients to host a development environment on the same system as production with zero risk.

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Mozilla Logo

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Moz/FF
  • Johnson Banks reveals first designs for “open-source” Mozilla rebrand

    Johnson Banks has unveiled seven potential brand identities for Mozilla, as part of its ongoing “open-source” rebrand.

    The search for the not-for-profit software company’s new identity was first announced in June, and it has been taking feedback from the Mozilla community and members of the public since then.

    Seven initial themes were created by Johnson Banks, all exploring different facets of Mozilla’s advocacy for shared and open-source internet access and software.

  • Mozilla's new logo ideas

    The folks over at Mozilla (makers of Firefox) are redesigning their logo—because apparently just having a wordmark isn't good enough. That said, maybe it's time to retire the dinosaur head.

    In the spirit of openness, Mozilla has posted a series of logo concepts to their blog and invited the public to review and share their opinions. I am doing so here.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Powerful Rhythmbox 3.4 Music Player Arrives with New Web Remote Control Plugin

    Rhythmbox developer Jonathan Matthew announced the release of the Rhythmbox 3.4 open-source music player and organizer software for GNU/Linux operating systems, a version that introduces several enhancements and a bunch of bugfixes.

    The biggest new features of Rhythmbox 3.4 are a new plugin that promises to let users remotely control the application via a web browser, a much-improved SoundCloud plugin that now fetches more search results and supports pausing, and the playback keyboard shortcuts were slightly improved.

  • How to organize your scholarly research with Docear

    The Docear academic literature suite blends Freeplane and JabRef to make a comprehensive academic paper-writing application, with support for mind-mapping, citations, notes, and many other features.

    Writing a major scholarly paper can be a daunting undertaking. Turning a collection of scholarly research into a coherent paper requires a great deal of organizing and planning. To simplify that task, there are many tools available to assist a researcher with keeping track of their bibliographic citations, and there are also plenty of tools to help a user organize their thoughts. Often those programs are distinct pieces of software that do not always work well together. One exception to this Docear, a single, well integrated, tool that handles mind-mapping, works as a citation manager, and does even more.

    Docear describes itself as "The Academic Literature Suite," and works by combining the Freeplane mind-mapping software and the JabRef reference manager into a single cohesive tool. By leveraging the power of these two open source applications, Docear creates something that is greater than the sum of its parts. Researchers can keep track of their citations and notes, and easily include them when mapping the structure of their paper. Docear provides a single platform that can support almost every aspect of the research process.

  • AppRecommender - Last GSoC Report

    My work on Google Summer of Code is to create a new strategy on AppRecommender, where this strategy should be able to get a referenced package, or a list of referenced packages, then analyze the packages that the user has already installed and make a recommendation using the referenced packages as a base, for example: if the user runs "$ sudo apt install vim", the AppRecommender uses "vim" as the referenced package, and should recommend packages with relation between "vim" and the other packages that the user has installed. This work is done and added to the official AppRecommender repository.

  • Simple Weather Indicator Adds Hide Location, Temperature Rounding Options

    Another month, another update to the simple weather indicator we first featured back in July.

Development: GCC, KDevelop, and GNOME Beta

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Development
  • GCC 6.2 Compiler Released

    GCC 6.2 is now available as the first stable update to this year's GCC 6/6.1 compiler release.

    GCC 6.1 shipped earlier this year as their first stable version of GCC 6 (per their unique versioning scheme...) while GCC 6.2 is out this morning as the first point release.

  • KDevelop 5.0 Appears Ready For Release

    We haven't yet seen any official release announcement, but since yesterday a source package and AppImage binary have been out in the wild for KDE's KDevelop 5.0 integrated development environment...

  • GNOME 3.22 Beta Released

    The first beta of GNOME 3.22 beta is now available for testing ahead of the planned official desktop release around this time next month.

    Some of the recent package changes for the GNOME 3.22 Beta include sharing support for GNOME Photos, various Mutter and GNOME Shell improvements (including Wayland improvements!), and GTK improvements.

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical and QTS Team on Private, Managed OpenStack Cloud Solution

    For several years running, OpenStack Foundation surveys have revealed that Ubuntu is the most common platform for OpenStack deployments to be built on. Organizations report that they choose OpenStack and Ubuntu to save money and avoid vendor lock-in. These themes have been emphasized by Canonical at OpenStack Summit.

    Now, responding to what they describe as "increasing demand for flexible, open source and cost-predictable cloud solutions, QTS Realty Trust, Inc. and Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, have announced a private, fully managed OpenStack cloud solution. It will be available from any of QTS' secure data centers in mid-September.

    Built on Ubuntu OpenStack and using Canonical's application modeling service Juju as well as Canonical's Bare Metal as a Service (MaaS), QTS' OpenStack cloud will be fully managed. Essentially, organizations can treat it as a turnkey cloud solution.

  • Rotate Screen on Ubuntu Easily With This Indicator Applet

    Sam, our backend web hamster, makes occasional use of a portrait monitor. He says it makes reading long terminal sessions easier.

  • Peppermint OS explained

    In the childhood many of us must have eaten peppermint tablets. Well, just the name gives us some nostalgic moments. So today on the 12th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro" we are having Peppermint OS as our guest. Peppermint OS is a lightweight option for those with old machines or those who loves fast and light OS.

  • Linux Mint Rounds Out 18 'Sarah' Releases With Beta KDE Edition

    Earlier this month, the Linux Mint developer team released the Xfce edition of Linux Mint 18 'Sarah', which followed the main release at the end of June. But now it's time for some Plasma action, with a beta release of the upcoming Linux Mint 18 KDE edition.

    It's worth noting that all three Linux Mint 18 editions are LTS releases (long-term support), with a promise to be supported until 2021. For that reason, these releases don't include bleeding-edge software, but instead software that can be assured to be stable right-out-of-the-box.

Desktop Linux Absent from Zemlin’s LinuxCon Pep Rally

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GNU
Linux

“As all of you may know, Thursday, August 25 is the 25th anniversary of Linux,” he said during the opening portion of the address. “It’s the day when Linus Torvalds, 25 years ago, sent out his note introducing this funny little operating system that wouldn’t amount to much of anything.”

“Linux at 25 is a big thing,” he added. “Most things in life just don’t last as long and are as enduring as Linux. And Linux has gone so far beyond what anyone who has participated in this community could have ever expected. Linux today really is…the most successful software project in history.”

After this opening, he pointed to the enormity of the Linux project by citing numbers, like its 53,000 source files and 21 million lines of code, and the fact that each day 10,800 lines of code are added to Linux, 5,300 lines of code removed and 1,800 lines of code modified.

“This pace is only accelerating,” he said. “Linux now changes seven [or] eight times an hour. There is no single software project by any single person or organization that rivals the breadth, pace, depth and adoption of Linux. What an incredible run.”

As with any good pep rally, Zemlin gave the fans plenty of reason to be happy to support the home team by pointing to Linux’s wins. Trouble is, all of those wins had to do with making “billions of dollars” — a phrase he used often — for the enterprise.

“Linux has become the world’s most widely adopted software,” he said and rattled off a list of uses that included high performance computing, weather forecasting, climate modeling, economic modeling, mobile devices and embedded systems. “It runs the global economy. Quite literally, it runs the vast majority of stock exchanges. It runs the vast majority of the Internet and powers things like Google, Facebook, Amazon and much, much more.”

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Openwashing

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OSS

Almost open: BIOS and firmware update tips for Linux users

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Linux
Red Hat

I suppose I'm lucky in that for more than 10 years my primary work environment has been Linux-based, yet all to often I've been forced to dig out a DOS or Windows image because I need to patch some BIOS device firmware. These days I don't own anything than has a valid Windows license, and even my 2008 white MacBook has spent most of its life running either Ubuntu or Fedora. Luckily most hardware manufacturers have started to provide bootable images for patching system firmware, and for enterprise-grade hardware they even provide Linux-ready tools. In this article, I'll walk through my recent firmware update on Linux, and I'll share a few recommendations based on that experience.

In the consumer/prosumer landscape there has been a shift toward UEFI-based systems for desktops and laptops, and along the way many manufacturers appear to have removed the option for the BIOS to update from a USB Stick. Historically we'd only see firmware updates for enterprise-class spinning rust (hard drives), but many SSD manufacturers are also providing regular firmware updates for consumer-class devices. Whilst we often should stand by the old adage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," I'm a strong believer when standing up a new environment to make sure all my firmware is current. So begins my journey...

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Also: THE BIG LIE About Operating Systems

Linux Kernel News

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Linux

Linux rules the world. Where to next?

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Linux

From Android phones to supercomputers to clouds to car, it's all Linux all the time. Linux is the poster child for the open-source revolution.

The latest Linux kernel report, Linux kernel development - How fast it is going, who is doing it, what they are doing, and who is sponsoring it, details just how quickly Linux changes. In the last 15 months, more than 3 million lines of code have been added to the Linux kernel. For those of you coding at home, that's 7.8 changes per hour.

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The Linux Foundation Gives Microsoft (Paid-for) Keynote Position While Microsoft Extorts (With Patents) Lenovo and Motorola Over Linux Use

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

This morning's reminder that Nadella is just another Ballmer (with a different face); Motorola and Lenovo surrender to Microsoft's patent demands and will soon put Microsoft spyware/malware on their Linux-powered products to avert costly legal battles

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Artist Sylvia Ritter Painted All 25 Ubuntu Linux Mascots and They're Astonishing

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Ubuntu

Artist Sylvia Ritter happily informs Softpedia about the availability of 25 wallpapers for mobile phones and tablet devices illustrating her vision of the mascots used for all the Ubuntu Linux operating system releases.

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GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Maps is fast again!

    Once your distro of choice picks up one of these stable releases you should be back to at least the old Mapquest speed of Maps. And if your distro upgrades to latest libchamplain when it arrives you will see even greater speeds.

  • GTK Scene Kit Isn't Happening In Time For GNOME 3.22

    With GNOME 3.19 there were plans for a GTK scenegraph and this GTK Scene Kit (GSK) was then planned for 3.20 and then most recently hoped for 3.22. But it's not happening.

    One of the big user benefits to the GTK Scene Kit will be offloading more work to the GPU and while it looked like GSK may finally be a reality for GNOME 3.22, this morning we found out it's not going to be merged in time.

  • GSoC: final evaluation

    This blog-post contains the final evaluation of my Google summer of Code 2016 project for the GNOME organization. More precisely, I’ve been working in the Games application under the mentorship of Adrien Plazas implementing multi-source/multi-disc games and offer support to the PlayStation platform.

  • GUADEC

    I arrived at GUADEC a few days early to participate in the Board and AdBoard meetings.

  • GSoC Summary

    The goal to be achieved was to be able to play both single player and multiplayer emulated games using a gamepad in GNOME Games

Android Leftovers

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Android
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Uganda's Move to Free/Open Source Software

  • Uganda: Govt to Cut Costs With Open Source Software
    The private sector and government departments have been urged to adopt Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) to increase their efficiency and competitiveness, writes ALI TWAHA. FOSS is software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance to suit their needs, something that is not possible with commercial software currently being used in most government departments. Speaking during the seventh African conference on FOSS at Speke Resort hotel in Munyoyo, ICT minister Frank Tumwebaze said government departments will gradually integrate the use of FOSS to reduce the cost of public service delivery. "Presently, government has been spending over $40m (Shs132bn) annually on commercial software from the like of Oracle systems and Microsoft Cooperation. [Using] FOSS will result into enormous savings that can be re-injected into other under-funded areas," Tumwebaze said.
  • Uganda: New Software Policy to Boost Innovation in Offing
    A Science, Technology and Innovations driven economy may soon be a reality in Uganda if Cabinet approves a free and open software being developed. Speaking at the 7th Africa Conference on Open Source Software at the Commonwealth Resort in Munyonyo on Monday, Mr James Saaka, the executive director of National Information and Technology Authority Uganda, said there is a lot of registered software being used but is very costly. He said globally, people develop Free Open Source Software (Foss) which Uganda would emulate for national development. Mr Saaka said the country is in the initial stages to develop Foss, adding that the software can spur investment in research and development. "We see that the Proprietary software is still expensive and if we are going to develop more online services, we can't afford but use alternative means to develop our e-government service," Mr Saaka said. He also added that in Uganda, there is an advent of talent skilled in Foss and can help in innovations.

Linux Turns 25 Exactly Today. More LinuxCon and Anniversary Coverage. Plus Microsoft Interjection PR.

Red Hat Virtualization 4

  • Red Hat’s gunning for VMware with virtualization platform update
    Open-source Linux vendor Red Hat Inc. has thrown in support for OpenStack Neutron and other new technologies with the latest release of its software virtualization package, in what looks like a bid to steal customers away from VMware Inc.’s more widely-used solution. Targeted at convergence, Red Hat Virtualization 4 is the first version of the platform that doesn’t include the word “enterprise,” in a move that suggests the company is hoping its virtualized stack will become the platform for convergence, rather than a server density product. OpenStack Neutron is the open-source networking project used by Software-Defined Networks (SDNs), which up until now has only been available as a preview. Many have criticized Neutron’s development for lagging behind the rest of OpenStack’s code base, and Red Hat was one of several vendors to concede that things could be sped up a bit. With the inclusion of the software in Red Hat Virtualization, the company says its Linux platform can be used to run both cloud-enabled and “traditional” workloads in concert.
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 woos VMware faithful
    It's easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn't forgotten about you. RHV (Red Hat Virtualization) 4.0, released today, refreshes Red Hat's open source virtualization platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat's product line. It's a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat's virtualization efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company's intention to woo VMware customers.

NOAA Breaks Weather Apps, Slackware Updates, Valve @ 20

The LinuxCon headlines continue to dominate but, more importantly, our desktop weather apps are broken thanks to NOAA decommissioning the site. Liam Dawe looked back at 20 years of Valve and Sebastian "sebas" Kügler introduced new KDE kscreen-doctor. Slackware rolled out some updates including a rare kernel upgrade and The VAR Guy wants to hear about your first time. Read more