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Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat named as visionary in Gartner's 2016 Magic Quadrant Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 1:50pm
Story Qt Creator 4.2 Beta released Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 1:45pm
Story 6 Best Linux Desktop Environments [Part - 2] Mohd Sohail 27/10/2016 - 12:49pm
Story OpenStack in the Headlines Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 11:55am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 11:01am
Story Build open source clouds with 4 OpenStack guides and tutorials Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 10:49am
Story Reusable theme to fix accessibility sites Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 10:32am
Story Alpine Linux 3.4.5 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.27 LTS, Latest Security Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 10:29am
Story DebEX Distro Now Lets You Create an Installable Debian 9 Live DVD with Refracta Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 10:19am
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2016 - 10:16am

6 smart settings to make your Android phone anticipate your needs

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There's no denying that our smartphones have made our lives so much easier, putting our contacts and schedules, our driving directions, the whole internet, right at our fingertips. But if you're using an Android phone you might be leaving even more convenience on the table.

There are a bunch of super-smart settings in Nougat and Google Now that’ll make your Android device feel like it’s 10 steps ahead of you. Your Android phone can be proactively telling you how long it’ll take to get to work in the morning, and nudging you when your favorite team is about to take the field. Your device can keep itself unlocked whenever it’s on you, and those snapshots you just took can automatically be arranged into beautiful collages. Battery running low? Android can know to dial down background activity to keep your phone alive. And if you love the idea of asking Google questions without ever touching your phone, you can train your phone to do that, too.

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Android and Tizen Leftovers

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Update: Convictions Upheld, Sentences Extended In Romanian Microsoft Bribery Trial

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According to the blog post, the trial ended on October 3rd, and investigators found that more than 100 people, including former ministers, the mayor of Bucharest, and various businessmen were involved in this latest corruption scandal involving Microsoft. More than 20 million euros were paid by Microsoft there as bribes.


These bribery convictions are just the tip of the iceberg. Multiple news outlets are reporting on investigations of bribery in other countries as well as separate investigations by the US Department of Justice and the US Securities And Exchange Commission.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat


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  • New features in GNOME To Do

    Some of you might have noticed that GNOME To Do wasn’t released with GNOME 3.22. There is a reason for that: I didn’t have enough time to add new features, or fix any bugs. But that changed, and in fact big things happened.

  • CUDA 8, cuDNN, Nvidia drivers and GNOME Software metadata

    The Nvidia driver repository has been updated with AppStream metadata. From Fedora 25 onward, you will be able to search for Nvidia, CUDA, GeForce or Quadro to make the driver, control panel and other programs appear in the Gnome Software window.

    As far as I know, this should be enabled by default on Fedora 25.

  • Builder Rust

    With Federico’s wonderful post on Rust’ifying librsvg I guess it makes sense to share what I’ve been doing the last couple of days.

    I’ve been keeping my eye on Rust for quite a while. However, I’ve been so heads down with Builder the last two years that I haven’t really gotten to write any or help on integration into our platform. Rust appears to take a very pragmatic stance on integration with systems code (which is primarily C). The C calling convention is not going anywhere, so at some point, you will be integrating with some part of a system that is “C-like”. Allowing us to piecemeal upgrade the “Safety” of our systems is much smarter than rewrite-the-universe. This pragmatism is likely due to the realities of Rust’s birth at Mozilla. It’s a huge code-base, and incrementally modernizing it is the only reality that is approachable.

  • Librsvg gets Rusty

    I've been wanting to learn Rust for some time. It has frustrated me for a number of years that it is quite possible to write GNOME applications in high-level languages, but for the libraries that everything else uses ("the GNOME platform"), we are pretty much stuck with C. Vala is a very nice effort, but to me it never seemed to catch much momentum outside of GNOME.

    After reading this presentation called "Rust out your C", I got excited. It *is* possible to port C code to Rust, small bits at a time! You rewrite some functions in Rust, make them linkable to the C code, and keep calling them from C as usual. The contortions you need to do to make C types accessible from Rust are no worse than for any other language.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Rblpapi 0.3.5

    A new release of Rblpapi is now on CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg Labs (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).

  • Flatpak 0.6.13

    These used to take an application id and an optional branch name as two arguments. This meant you could not specify multiple apps to install in a single command. So, instead of having the branch as a separate argument we now support partial references. If you only specify an id we try to match the rest as best we can depending on what is installed/available, but if this matches multiple things you have to specify more details.

  • New features on Hosted Weblate

    Today, new version has been deployed on Hosted Weblate. It brings many long requested features and enhancements.

  • A Wild Desktop Reddit App for Linux Appears

    Reddit is …Well it’s Reddit: there’s little else like it on the internet.

    Thos of us who use Reddit probably do so a tab, in a browser, because that’s how the site works best.

    Many desktop Reddit apps exist, but few translate the unique experience of using the service to the desktop in a way that really works.

  • Opera 41 Browser Brings Performance Improvements

    For those still using the Opera web-browser, Opera 41 is now available as the latest stable release and seems primarily focused on performance improvements.

  • Faster and better browsing – Welcome Opera 41

    We all know the feeling. You want to check out your favorite website, but when you open your laptop or turn on your computer, you realize the browser is closed. You click on the browser icon and then have to wait while the browser opens all your previously opened sites…

    We have a solution for you that makes your browsing faster: Opera 41 includes a new, smarter startup sequence that cuts away almost all the wait time, no matter how many tabs you open on startup.

Security News

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  • Tuesday's security updates
  • We Got Phished

    She logged into her account but couldn’t find the document and, with other more urgent emails to deal with, she quickly moved on and put this brief event out of mind.

    This staff member will henceforth be known as PZ, or “patient zero.”

    The login page wasn’t really a login page. It was a decoy webpage, designed to look legitimate in order to trick unsuspecting recipients into typing in their private login credentials. Having fallen for the ruse, PZ had effectively handed over her email username and password to an unknown party outside the Exploratorium.

    This type of attack is known as “phishing.” Much like putting a lure into a lake and waiting to see what bites, a phishing attack puts out phony prompts, such as a fake login page, hoping that unwitting recipients can be manipulated into giving up personal information.

  • DDoS attacks against Dyn the work of 'script kiddies'

    Last week's distributed denial of service attack in the US against domain name services provider Dynamic Network Services are more likely to have been the work of "script kiddies", and not state actors.

    Security researchers at threat intelligence firm Flashpoint dismissed reports that linked the attack to WikiLeaks, the Russian government or the New World Hackers group.

    Instead, Flashpoint said, it was "moderately confident" that the Hackforums community was behind the attack which led to well-known sites like Twitter, Spotify, Netflix and Paypal being inaccessible on 21 October (US time).

  • How one rent-a-botnet army of cameras, DVRs caused Internet chaos

    Welcome to the Internet of Evil Things. The attack that disrupted much of the Internet on October 21 is still being teased apart by investigators, but evidence thus far points to multiple "botnets" of Internet-connected gadgets being responsible for blocking access to the Domain Name Service (DNS) infrastructure at DNS provider Dyn. Most of these botnets—coordinated armies of compromised devices that sent malicious network traffic to their targets—were controlled by Mirai, a self-spreading malware for Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

    in a blog post on the attack, Dyn reported "tens of millions" of devices were involved in the attack

    But other systems not matching the signature of Mirai were also involved in the coordinated attack on Dyn. "We believe that there might be one or more additional botnets involved in these attacks," Dale Drew, CSO of Level 3 Communications, told Ars. "This could mean that they are 'renting' several different botnets to launch an attack against a specific victim, in which multiple other sites have been impacted."

    The motive may have been blackmail, since the attacker sought a payout by Dyn to stop. But Drew warned that the huge disruption caused by the attack "could result in large copycat attacks, and [a] higher [number of] victim payouts [so] as to not be impacted in the same way. It could also be a signal that the bad guy is using multiple botnets in order to better avoid detection since they are not orchestrating the attack from a single botnet source."

  • ARM builds up security in the tiniest Internet of Things chips

    IoT is making devices smaller, smarter, and – we hope – safer. It’s not easy to make all those things happen at once, but chips that can help are starting to emerge.

    On Tuesday at ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, ARM will introduce processors that are just a fraction of a millimeter across and incorporate the company’s TrustZone technology. TrustZone is hardware-based security built into SoC (system on chip) processors to establish a root of trust.

    It’s designed to prevent devices from being hacked and taken over by intruders, a danger that’s been in the news since the discovery of the Mirai botnet, which recently took over thousands of IP cameras to mount denial-of-service attacks.

  • Antique Kernel Flaw Opens Door to New Dirty Cow Exploit

Red Hat Open Tech to Run UKCloud’s Enterprise Platform; Radhesh Balakrishnan Comments

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Red Hat

Red Hat and public cloud provider UKCloud have forged a partnership to develop an infrastructure-as-a-service cloud platform for the U.K. government’s work to deliver digital services to the public.

UKCloud has standardized on Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Red Hat Ceph Storage to handle citizen web applications and government systems in behalf of public sector organizations across industries such as healthcare, defense and police and justice, Red Hat said Monday.

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Clonezilla Live 2.4.9-17 Disk Cloning Live CD Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.7.8

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On October 25, 2016, Clonezilla Live developer Steven Shiau proudly announced the release of Clonezilla Live 2.4.9-17, a new stable version of the popular, open-source disk imaging and cloning live system.

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darktable 2.0.7 Open-Source Image Editor Supports New Canon EOS 80D RAW Formats

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The powerful, open-source, and cross-platform darktable RAW image editor has just been updated today, October 25, 2016, to version 2.0.7, a major release that adds numerous new features and improvements.

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A History Of Everyday Linux User's 350 Blog Posts

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This article is something of a landmark as it is the 350th post on Everyday Linux User.

I took last week off to celebrate. Well actually I went away with the family down to England for a few days and didn't take a computer with me. I did take in Alnwick Castle however which is the location for Hogwarts from the Harry Potter films.

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Kodi 17 "Krypton" Beta 4 Released with ARMv8A 64-bit Builds for Android, Fixes

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Today, October 25, 2016, Martijn Kaijser had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability of the fourth, and probably the last Beta milestone of the upcoming Kodi 17 open-source and cross-platform media center software.

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GNOME's Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser to Use Firefox Sync Service, HTTPS Everywhere

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The GNOME developers are preparing to release the first development version of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, versioned 3.23.1, and we can't help but notice that some of the core apps were updated recently.

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Suse: Question. What do you call second-place in ARM enterprise server linux? Answer: Red Hat

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Red Hat

ARM TechCon Suse is claiming victory over Red Hat by announcing – and these caveats are all crucial – "the first commercial enterprise Linux distribution optimized for ARM AArch64 architecture servers."

In plainer English, Suse has developed an enterprise-grade Linux distribution that runs on 64-bit ARM servers (should you happen to ever find one). Suse claims this software is a world first because it is a finished commercial product, thus beating Red Hat to the punch: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM is still only available as a beta-like development preview.

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"softWaves" will be the default theme for Debian 9

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After the Debian Desktop Team made the call for proposing themes, a total of twelve choices have been submitted, and any Debian contributor has received the opportunity to vote on them in a survey. We received 3,479 responses ranking the different choices, and softWaves has been the winner among them.

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Introducing DNS66, a host blocker for Android

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I’m proud (yes, really) to announce DNS66, my host/ad blocker for Android 5.0 and newer. It’s been around since last Thursday on F-Droid, but it never really got a formal announcement.

DNS66 creates a local VPN service on your Android device, and diverts all DNS traffic to it, possibly adding new DNS servers you can configure in its UI. It can use hosts files for blocking whole sets of hosts or you can just give it a domain name to block (or multiple hosts files/hosts). You can also whitelist individual hosts or entire files by adding them to the end of the list. When a host name is looked up, the query goes to the VPN which looks at the packet and responds with NXDOMAIN (non-existing domain) for hosts that are blocked.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Zorin OS 12 Beta - Flat white, no sugar

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I did not do any other testing, no extensive tweaking, no customization. I felt no need or desire to do so. Now, do remember Zorin OS 12 is still in beta, so we can excuse some of the problems we see here. But others are purely Ubuntu, and have been ported over from the parent distro without any discrimination or any improvements and fixes introduced in the last six months. The big offenders include: multimedia and smartphone support, poor software management, and then the somewhat heavy utilization and slow performance.

Zorin is quite pretty but weary on the eyes, it tries perhaps too hard to be more than it is, and overall, the value it brings is negatively offset by the myriad papercuts of its design and the implementation of its unique style, plus the failings of the Ubuntu family. It's an okay choice, if you will, but there's nothing too special about it anymore. It's not as fun as it used to be. Gone is the character, gone is the glamor. This aligns well with the overall despair in the Linux desktop world. Maybe the official release will be better, but I doubt it. Why would suddenly one distro excel where 50 others of the same crop had failed with the exact same problems? Final grade, 5/10. Test if you like the looks, other than that, there's no incentive in really using Zorin. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

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Fedora News

  • The Bugs So Far Potentially Blocking The Fedora 25 Release
    Adam Williamson of the Fedora QA team has sent out a list of the bugs currently outstanding that could block the Fedora 25 release from happening on its current schedule should they not be fixed in time.
  • Updated Fedora 24 ISO Respins Now Available with Dirty COW-Patched Linux Kernel
    It looks like a new set of updated Live ISO images for the Fedora 24 GNU/Linux operating system were published by Ben Williams, founder of the Fedora Unity Project and a Fedora Ambassador. Dubbed F24-20161023, the updated Live ISOs a few days ago and include up-to-date components from the official Fedora 24 Linux software repositories, with which was fully syncronized as of October 23, 2016. Of course, this means that they also include the latest Linux kernel update fully patched against the "Dirty COW" bug.
  • PHP version 5.6.28RC1 and 7.0.13RC1
  • Flock Stories 2016, Episode 1: Redon Skikuli
    Flock Stories by Chris WardIf you were wondering where Flock 2018 might be, today’s guest Redon Skikuli might just have your answer! Redon is not just a Fedora community contributor, he’s a Fedora community creator. I ask Redon what he’s up to these days and why he thinks we should also consider joining future Flocks.

New KNOPPIX Release, LibreOffice 5.1.6, Rosa Down

In Linux news today KNOPPIX 7.7.1 was released to the public based on Debian with GNOME 3.22, KDE 5.7.2, and "Everything 3D." The Rosa project is experiencing network issues and folks may experience problems trying to connect to their services the next few days. LibreOffice 5.1.6 was announced today by The Document Foundation, the sixth update to the Still branch for stable users, and a new vulnerability was disclosed in GNU Tar. Read more