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Thursday, 30 Jul 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Student researchers collaborate virtually with help of open-source software

Filed under
OSS

A typical summer research program—the institute's Nanobio Research Experience for Undergraduates, for example—brings students together to one host university, where they work in different laboratories on various projects. In the new pilot training program on Computational Biomolecular, students use an open-source software called Rosetta to work together on problems in computational biology and are mentored by faculty who are part of a global collaborative team known as the Rossetta Commons. The software gives users the ability to analyze massive amounts of data to predict the structure of real and imagined proteins, enzymes, and other molecular structures.

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Open Source Is Going Even More Open—Because It Has To

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OSS

Open source foundations are nothing new. Linux Foundation has been around since 2007, and other major projects like the Eclipse code editing tool and the Apache web server have been governed this way for even longer. Many of the most important open source projects in recent years, such as the Hadoop big data crunching platform and the database system Cassandra, are managed by the Apache Foundation. But it’s unusual to see so many new foundations created so quickly.

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Apache HTTP Server Vulnerabilities Fixes in Ubuntu OSes

Filed under
Server
Security
Ubuntu

Details about a couple of Apache HTTP Server vulnerabilities that have been found and fixed in Ubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS have now been published by Canonical in a security notification.

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Nvidia 352.30 Stable Driver for Linux Has Lots of Fixes and GeForce 910M Support

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Linux

Nvidia has released a new Linux driver in the stable branch and has fixed a few outstanding issues. The company also provides support for the latest GeForce 910M chipset.

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Amazon's MySQL database challenger Aurora exits preview

Filed under
Server
OSS

Following three years of development and nine months of testing, Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Tuesday announced that its Aurora database engine is now generally available to customers.

AWS first debuted Aurora during its re:Invent conference in November 2014, positioning the database as a lower cost, higher performance alternative to the widely used open source MySQL database and other similar commercial offerings.

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Fedora 23 will feature a Cinnamon Spin

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Red Hat

The Cinnamon desktop is the only popular desktop environment that Fedora does not have a Spin for.

But that should change, unless something really bad happens, starting from Fedora 23, which is scheduled for release later this October.

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Entroware Now Sells the Ubuntu-Powered Proteus with a New Card

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Ubuntu

Proteus is a powerful laptop from Entroware that ships only with Ubuntu and Ubuntu MATE. Its makers have just announced that they are now equipping the Proteus model with a video card at no extra cost for new users.

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Vector Light Linux 7.1 Is Based on Slackware and IceWM

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Slack

Vector Light Linux, a distribution based on Slackware that uses the IceWM window manager by default, has been released and is now available for download.

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New FCC Rules May Prevent Installing OpenWRT on WiFi Routers

Filed under
Linux
Legal

Many cheap WiFi routers are sold with the vendor firmware, but the most popular ones likely also support OpenWRT, which some users may prefer as it is much more customizable. However, this may soon become more difficult according to a talk at the upcoming “Wireless Battle of the Mesh” which will take place on August 3-8 in Maribor, Slovenia.

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DHI Group plans to sell off Slashdot and Sourceforge

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OSS

More recently, SourceForge has been accused of a whole lot of bad behavior with injecting malware into some of the open source projects it hosts. Although SourceForge representatives explained that they only intended to modify "abandoned" projects and publicly denied any wrongdoing, it was difficult to square that statement with its apparent tampering with the download packages of well-known and clearly-not-abandoned projects like image editor GIMP and network scanning tool nmap.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Technology Week looks at potential of open-source tech

    Experts from industry and academia gathered in Cambridge at the weekend to discuss just that as part of the city's first Open Technology Week.

    Open technology refers to items for which the source code or designs are available free of charge for users to use and modify.

  • Intel to shift Hillsboro engineers to Texas for open source project

    Intel Corp. engineers from Portland will play a role in the development in a new tech development center that's opening in San Antonio.

    As the San Antonio Business Journal reports, Intel announced a significant investment with Rackspace in a new OpenStack Innovation Center that will be based at Rackspace's headquarters in San Antonio.

  • 10 tips for better documentation

    Last July, after a full week at OKFestival, I managed to find enough energy to attend the Write the Docs EU Berlin Unconference. I only managed to attend one day of the event, but it was worth it because Paul Adams, a free software advocate and Director of Engineering at KDAB, led a discussion in which we came up with rules for helping documentation teams be more productive:

  • This is why your open source project is failing

    At OSCON this year, Red Hat's Tom Callaway gave a talk entitled "This is Why You Fail: The Avoidable Mistakes Open Source Projects STILL Make." In 2009, Callaway was starting to work on the Chromium project—and to say it wasn't a pleasant experience was the biggest understatement Callaway made in his talk.

  • NPR releases open source social media tools for newsrooms

    The helpful folks at NPR have released a collection of fully customisable, open source tools to help journalists create visually engaging images for social media.

    The tools – called Quotable, Factlist and Waterbug – were announced last night by Brian Boyer, editor of the NPR visuals team, as an easy way "for you to create those fashionable social graphics for your news organisation".

  • Growing pains: Open source ubiquity raises ownership, governance issues

    Overlapping scope and membership can confuse users, Miniman warns. Unlike the rules produced by standards committees, foundations don’t guarantee interoperability between implementations. IT organizations need to develop an understanding of how open communities operate, how different licensing models work and how they can become actively involved in shaping open source software.

pfSense 2.2.4 BSD Firewall Fixes Multiple Stored XSS Vulnerabilities in the WebGUI

Filed under
Security
BSD

Electric Sheep Fencing LLC., through Chris Buechler, has announced the immediate availability for download of the fourth maintenance release of the pfSense 2.2 FreeBSD-based firewall software.

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Standardisation process should be open, study shows

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OSS

Organisations setting ICT standards should be open, as this improves their standards and contributes to their implementation in software, concludes a group of Swedish researchers. “Standards get better with contributions coming from individuals and organisations,” says Jonas Gamalielsson, lead author of a paper published in June.

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Open source runs Croatia’s geospatial services platforms

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OSS

Croatia’s Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection has become one of the country’s major users of open source solutions. The software is making possible two geospatial service platforms on biodiversity and environmental protection, unveiled in May.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Three months with a Chromebook computer

    Chromebooks have become incredibly popular among some users, as you can see from Amazon's list of bestselling Chromebooks. One user decided to use a Chromebook as his primary computing device for three months, and found that it worked extremely well for him.

    [...]

    Debian Linux is known as a distribution that supports lots of different hardware, but now the Debian developers have announced the removal of support for the SPARC hardware architecture.

  • New Target for Mobile App Devs: Plasma Mobile on Linux
  • New Plasma Mobile, New Security Issues

    Jonathan Riddell said the hacking was frustrating at first, but Martin Gräßlin was able to get the system going with Wayland and KWin. Gräßlin said Plasma Mobile is the first product to use Wayland by default and the only reason Wayland is mature enough to be included as a technical preview in upcoming Plasma 5.4. They're confident Android apps will run on it at some point as well.

  • KDE Creates Plasma Mobile, A KDE Based Operating System For Mobile Phones

    As you may know, the KDE developers have created Plasma Phone UI, a Linux based operating based on Ubuntu Touch and Kubuntu Linux.

    The OS is open-source, has an user-friendly interface and provides a customizable platform for mobile devices. For now, KDE’s mobile OS is just a prototype and can be tested on the LG Nexus 5.

  • GSoC ’15 Post #5: Port Complete – Time for the Real Deal

    With loads of help from people on #kde-devel, we finally managed to complete the KDE Network Filesharing port to KF5. Wasn’t easy, given that this was my first time porting frameworks, but it was real fun. Apart from apol’s blogpost shared in my last post, here’s another post that was immensely helpful to me while porting: Porting a KControl Module to KF5.

  • Gnome Pie 0.6.3 (Circular Application Launcher) Brings New Features And Bug-Fixes

    As you may know, Gnome Pie is a circular application launcher, enabling the users to easily access their favorite apps, which they have added to the pie. For usage information, see this link.

  • Gnome 3.18 Will Include A News Reader App
  • ExLight Distro Brings Enlightenment 0.19.7 and Linux Kernel 4.0 to Ubuntu 15.04

    On July 26, Arne Exton, the creator of numerous distributions of GNU/Linux as well as various Android-x86 Live DVDs, was more than proud to announce the immediate availability for download of a new build for his ExLight Linux distribution.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42 Will Be An OpenSUSE Flavor For The Users That Need A Stable System
  • Very slow ssh logins on Fedora 22

    I’ve recently set up a Fedora 22 firewall/router at home (more on that later) and I noticed that remote ssh logins were extremely slow. In addition, sudo commands seemed to stall out for the same amount of time (about 25-30 seconds).

  • Debian Dropping SPARC Support

    While Debian supports many CPU architectures, it's working to remove support for the Sun/Oracle SPARC architecture. As of this weekend, Debian has dropped SPARC from their unstable, experimental, and jessie-updates archives.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Update Brings Double Battery Life On Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition
  • Ubuntu Phone Gets Blasted In Reviews This Week
  • 3.5-inch SBC runs Yocto on Braswell and 6 Watts

    Aaeon’s Yocto Linux ready, 3.5-inch “GENE-BSW5″ SBC offers Intel Braswell CPUs, dual GbE ports, six serial ports, and mini-PCIe, SATA, and mSATA expansion.

  • Not Learning Unix is a Mistake

    It has occurred to me that not learning Unix is a grave mistake. My relatively early exposure to Unix was important. I may not have appreciated Linux as much or even at all if I hadn't had that ability to experiment at home with Xenix. Learning about Unix develops new mental muscles like playing a musical instrument or learning a new language. But learning these new processes becomes more difficult with age. To me the exact technical details are less important. It does not really matter if you are a Linux user or if you use one of the BSDs or even something more exotic like Plan 9. The important thing is you can learn new concepts from what I will broadly refer to as the Unix/Internet Community.

  • Mmm, what's that smell, Google+? Yes it's death: Google unhooks 'social network' from YouTube

    Google is no longer forcing Google+ on the world: people will be able to log into YouTube, and other Googley services, without having to create mandatory Google+ profiles.

    From now on, only those who deliberately sign up for Google+ will create profiles on the ghost town of a social network. Previously, Google harassed users of YouTube, Gmail and so on, to convert their accounts into Google+ accounts, a move obviously designed to boost G+'s sad numbers. It didn't go down very well at all – a lot of folks hated it.

  • Google to block access to unofficial autocomplete API

    Google has decided the autocomplete API it informally offers will no longer be available for “unauthorised” users as of August 10th.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • See How Your Linux System Stacks Up To 15 GPUs For 1080p Gaming

    This week I posted the results of a 15-way graphics card comparison on Ubuntu Linux with AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards while running the very latest proprietary drivers. Those tests were focused on 4K resolution testing in order to stress the latest-generation AMD/NVIDIA GPUs. However, if you want to see 1080p numbers, here are some benchmark-friendly results.

  • Victor Vran Action RPG Is Now Available on Steam for Linux

    Victor Vran, an isometric action RPG developed by Haemimont Games and published by EuroVideo Medien on Steam, has been released on Linux as well.

    The genre of isometric action RPGs is a very well defined one and it incorporates titles like Diablo. Victor Vran has been very well received by the community and the Linux platform has been supported right from the start.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
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