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Tuesday, 13 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kernel: Linux System Wrapper Library, Microsoft Mice, and EXOFS Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 10:27pm
Story today's howtos and CLI examples Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 10:23pm
Story OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where? Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 10:08pm
Story Linux Journal Reviews the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Laptop, Red Hat Wants to Hear About Desktop/Laptop Setups Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 9:45pm
Story Unix, Linux, and IncludeOS Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 9:42pm
Story Debian in Events: Reproducible Builds and X2Go Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 9:02pm
Story Fedora and NeuroFedora Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2018 - 9:00pm
Story Sony Needs Free Software Roy Schestowitz 4 12/11/2018 - 8:53pm
Story Latest Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 1 12/11/2018 - 8:50pm
Story Samsung announce Linux on DeX with Ubuntu: for developers on the move Roy Schestowitz 10 12/11/2018 - 8:48pm

Servers: Red Hat and Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Cloudy weather ahead for IBM and Red Hat?

    The world is buzzing about the software industry’s largest acquisition ever. This “game changing” IBM acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion eclipses Microsoft’s $26.2 billion of LinkedIn, which set the previous record. And it’s the third largest tech acquisition in history behind Dell buying EMC for $64 billion in 2015 and Avago’s buyout of Broadcom for $37 billion the same year.

    Wall Street certainly gets nervous when it sees these lofty price tags. IBM’s stock was down 4.2 percent following the announcement, and there are probably more concerns over a broader IBM selloff around how much IBM is paying for Red Hat.

    This sets the stage for massive expectations on IBM to leverage this asset as a critical turning point in its history. Given that IBM’s Watson AI poster child has failed to create sustainable growth, could this be their best opportunity to right the ship once and for all? Or is this mega merger a complicated clash of cultures and products that will make it hard to realize the full potential?

  • A Slow Motion Strategic Train Wreck With The Color Blue

    IBM's high premium price for the Red Hat buyout places its stamp of approval on Linux cloud services while cheapening its own brand value.

  • Road to ansible-bender 0.2.0

    I’m pleased to announce that ansible-bender is now available in version 0.2.0.

    I would like to share a story with you how I used ansible-bender to release the 0.2.0 version.

  • VMware Buys Kubernetes-based Heptio to Boost Its Multi-Cloud Strategy

Arduino Gets a Command Line Interface

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

When using an Arduino, at least once you’ve made it past blinking LEDs, you might start making use of the serial connection to send and receive information from the microcontroller. Communicating with the board while it’s interacting with its environment is a crucial way to get information in real-time. Usually, that’s as far as it goes, but [Pieter] wanted to take it a step farther than that with his command line interpreter (CLI) for the Arduino.

The CLI allows the user to run Unix-like commands directly on the Arduino. This means control of GPIO and the rest of the features of the microcontroller via command line. The CLI communicates between the microcontroller and the ANSI/VT100 terminal emulator of your choosing on your computer, enabling a wealth of new methods of interacting with an Arduino.

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The "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Paging Linux Users: What Made You Give Up on Windows? [Ed: Microsoft propagandist Bogdan Popa keeps spreading the "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie. That doesn't mean anything good. "Enemies closer" and all...]
  • Microsoft Acquires Obsidian & inXile Entertainment [Ed: The game studios always shut down after Microsoft buys them]

    As what could spell bad news for seeing native Linux game ports of future Pillars and Wasteland titles, among others, Microsoft announced they are acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment.

    Microsoft is acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment as part of their effort to deliver "a steady stream of new, exclusive games to our fans." That exclusive reference doesn't bode well if you were fans of inXile or Obsidian games on Linux.

  • Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment have officially joined Microsoft

    Some rather interesting news here, both Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment (source) have now officially joined Microsoft.

    Together, they've made some pretty interesting Linux games such as Pillars of Eternity, Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire, Tyranny, Wasteland 2, Torment: Tides of Numenera, The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep and more to come.

    [...]

    As long as both studios retain a certain amount of freedom, I think we should be okay for future titles. Microsoft loves Linux after all…right? [sarcasm]

    I have to be honest, I'm a little in shock myself at this news.

Programming: py3status, Debian LTS Work, RcppArmadillo and Programmers

Filed under
Development
  • py3status v3.14

    I’m happy to announce this release as it contains some very interesting developments in the project.

  • Holger Levsen: 20181110-lts-201810

    Today while writing this I also noticed that https://lists.debian.org/debian-lts-announce/2018/10/threads.html currently misses DLAs 1532 until DLA 1541, which I have just reported to the #debian-lists IRC channel and as #913426. Update: as that bug was closed quickly, I guess instead we need to focus on #859123 and #859122, so that DLAs are accessable to everyone in future.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.200.4.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release, now at 0.9.200.4.0, based on the new Armadillo release 9.200.4 from earlier this week, is now on CRAN, and should get to Debian very soon.

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 532 (or 31 more since just the last release!) other packages on CRAN.

  • Just a techie? – Techies, Devs, Boffins and Geeks

    What’s the solution? We could start by giving up on the dream of developers all being equal in ability, who can then be traded as commodities. Developers have different strengths - some are fantastic systems thinkers, some are drawn towards architecture, and others possess a laser focus on delivery. Some are better at communicating, whilst some just want to think deeply about the problem and to ponder every edge case.

    If developers are recognised as individuals and emboldened with trust and freedom, then they will play to their strengths to give an overall multiplying effect. We can embrace individualism rather than chasing it away, by celebrating and raising up the role of the software developer.

    I want my boffins and techies to be seen as surgeons. They know what they’re doing and you’re in safe hands. We’ve got junior doctors in there also to learn, but the junior doesn’t become the senior overnight. When we’ve got top surgeons the results will speak for themselves, and the good news is that the top surgeons aren’t required in such large quantities. This can make everyone happy.

Stable kernels 4.18.18, 4.14.80, 4.9.136, 4.4.163 and 3.18.125

Filed under
Linux

Snapdragon 2100 dev kit arrives as Fossil debuts smartwatch for new Snapdragon 3100

Filed under
Android

Intrinsyc has launched an Android-based Open-Q 2500 SOM module and development kit for smartwatches based on the Snapdragon 2500. Meanwhile, Fossil unveiled the first watch to run Wear OS on the next-gen Snapdragon 3100.

Intrinsyc has followed up on last year’s smartwatch oriented Open‐Q 2100 SOM, featuring Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Wear 2100 SoC, with a new Open-Q 2500 SOM and Open-Q 624A Development Kit for this year’s kids-watch focused Snapdragon Wear 2500 (SDW2500). You can ore-order an early adopter version of the $795 kit due in mid-November. Meanwhile, Qualcomm has already moved on to a new Snapdragon Wear 3100, which powers a new Fossil Sport Smartwatch running Wear OS (see farther below).

Read more

FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 4 Released, Allows NVIDIA Driver To Work With 64-bit Linux Emulation

Filed under
BSD

One change catching our attention are to FreeBSD's linux/linux64 kernel modules for its Linux compatibility code. With changes that had been sought since early 2016, the FreeBSD NVIDIA proprietary driver should now play nicely with the linux64 module. This is necessary for FreeBSD 64-bit CUDA support with NVIDIA's driver. Previously the FreeBSD CUDA support played nicely with 32-bit, but that was dropped in CUDA 9.0. This should help too for other 64-bit Linux emulation code for working with NVIDIA's binary graphics driver.

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A Journey on Budgie Desktop #1: Top Panel

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I decided to make a series of review about Budgie Desktop, the original GUI from Solus OS, now featured on Ubuntu Budgie. Thanks to Ikey Doherty the father of both Budgie and Solus, we can enjoy such free desktop environment that is innovative and customizable. This first part article covers in brief the top panel, the adaptive-transparent one, and introducing its menu and tray, how they look with and without customization. Enjoy!

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Google May Bring GPU Acceleration Support For Linux Apps on Chromebooks In Early 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

First off, let’s put this one down as a bit of conjecture and a strong dose of logic. Google hasn’t officially announced a firm release date for GPU Acceleration for Linux apps on Chromebooks just yet, but we know they are already working on it.

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Ghostery - The eye of the tracker is upon you

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Here's a mind-blowing but obvious realization: the Internet is one giant shopping litmus test lab, with billions of voluntary participants helping big corporations fine-tune their products and marketing strategies. This is done without the use of elaborate, interruptive questionnaires. All it takes is some Javascript running behind every visible Web page, and Bob's your uncle.

The most pervasive form of marketing is, you guessed right, online ads. Shown to you in all sorts of shapes and colors, they not only peddle wondrous solutions, they also directly and indirectly measure (i.e. track) the human response to the shown content, and this wealth of statistical data is used to make future products and future ads work even better for the selling party. On its own, this might not be bad, except people are greedy. What might have been just innocent marketing has become one giant data harvesting industry, going way beyond simple browsing habits. If you are not so keen on participating mind and soul, you are probably using an ad blocker tool of some sort. We talked about Noscript, we talked about UMatrix, we talked about Adblock Plus. Today, we will talk about Ghostery.

[...]

Ghostery is an interesting tool, with a pleasant interface, flexible and granular control of tracking elements, some odd quirks, and a questionable opt-in feature. It is indeed as I expected, a bridge between a plug-n-play ad blocker and a fully featured Javascript manager like Noscript. The good thing is, it works well in unison with either one of these, so you can mix. Shake 'n' bake. For example, intimidated by Noscript or UMatrix? You can use Adblock Plus plus [sic] Ghostery. The former for ads, the latter for extra trackers, no crippling of Javascript functionality. And then, the tool can block ads on its own, too.

I believe Ghostery works best in the complementary mode. It is also best suited for less skilled users who seek more control than just ad blocking, and the cross-platform availability sure makes it appealing. The one thing that remains outstanding is the use of the opt-in policy. Not sure how that fits into the larger scheme of things. That said, I believe it's worth testing and exploring. So far, I'm pleased with its mode of work, and the results from my escapade are promising. Now whether one should really care about these trackers and all that, well that's a separate story. Or as they say, all your ad are belong to us.

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Microsoft and Apple Against Repairs

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft
Mac

GNOME: Purism Fractal Sponsorship and Developer Center Initiative

Filed under
GNOME
  • Purism Fractal sponsorship

    I’m happy to announce that Purism agreed to sponsor my work on Fractal for the next couple of weeks. I will polish the room history and drastically improve the UX/UI around scrolling, loading messages etc. which will make Fractal feel much nicer. As part of this I will also clean up and refactor the current code. On my agenda is the following:

  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 10th November 2018

    Thibault currently holds a branch for gnome-devel-docs. The branch contains the old GNOME Developer docs ported to markdown. To ensure that no duplicate work happens between gnome-devel-docs master and the branch, the next step is to announce to relevant mailing lists that further contribution to the developer docs should happen in the gnome-devel-docs branch. Even more ideal would be to have the branch pushed to master. The markdown port is not synchronized in any way with the mallard docs in master, so any changes to the mallard docs would require re-synchronization and that’s why currently editing ported markdown docs in the branch currently is a no-go for now.

    Pushing the branch does imply that we initially loose translations though and most changes made to gnome-devel-docs seem to be translations these days with a few exceptions (mostly grammar corrections). Thibault and Mathieu expressed interest in supporting translated docs in the future, but it is a substantial amount of work and low on the todo list.

    We agreed that I should try to get in touch by e-mail to the relevant mailing lists (including translations) and to individuals who contributed to gnome-devel-docs recently to hear their opinion before we proceed.

NVIDIA Open-Sources New I2C USB Type-C Turing GPU Driver In Linux 4.20

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS

The Linux 4.20 kernel has just received a new post-merge-window new driver: i2c-nvidia-gpu that is being contributed by the NVIDIA crew for their newest Turing graphics cards.

While it's great seeing NVIDIA contribute code for their latest generation graphics hardware to the mainline Linux kernel, i2c-nvidia-gpu comes down to just being a bus driver for the USB Type-C controller that is accessible over I2C. These newest NVIDIA graphics cards have a USB Type-C port for next-gen VR headsets using the VirtualLink standard. VirtualLink allows for four HBR3 DP lanes, USB 3.1 data, and up to 27 Watts of power over this slim cable -- much better than the mess of cables currently needed for VR headsets.

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POWER On-Chip Controller Driver Coming For Linux 4.21

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The IBM POWER On-Chip Controller (OCC) driver is queued for inclusion in the next version of the Linux kernel. This on-chip controller driver collects sensor data from the system and processor, including temperature and power metrics, and exposes that to the user as well as handling thermal/power management tasks.

The on-chip controller is embedded into POWER processors with P8/P9 processors. The newly-queued OCC driver exposes via sysfs temperatures, frequencies, power usage, power capacity/minimum/maximums, and other sensor data. The OCC driver documentation covers the information in more detail.

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Ubuntu Core and Kura: A framework for IoT gateways

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The Linux distribution model, whilst established and well understood for computing, has some limitations when it comes to IoT edge gateway devices. Due to often being located in remote or hard to access areas, there is a greater demand for a system that offers both high levels of robustness and security.

With the IoT gateway market growing at a fast pace in recent years and continuing to grow even more rapidly – mostly due to increasing demand for big data collection and analytics, there is greater importance being placed upon finding solutions that are capable of offering this.
Having a standard Linux distribution as the base is often not the optimal choice due to these systems often lacking a clear update story, creating security risks caused by an unmaintained system. Updates are often deferred because they are identified as risky operations, without a good recovery path. This makes such systems an unsuitable fit for unattended devices.

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GCC 9 Lands Initial Support For The OpenRISC Architecture

Filed under
Development
GNU
Hardware

It's been a long journey for the OpenRISC CPU instruction set architecture not to be confused with RISC-V, but with the GCC 9.1 compiler release due out in early 2019 will finally be initial mainline support for this ISA.

There had been GCC OpenRISC patches for a while, but the original developers were not okay with assigning their copyrights to the Free Software Foundation as is required to contribute to the GCC project (and most other FSF projects for that matter). Since earlier this year a clean-room rewrite of the GCC OpenRISC port has been taking place and the GCC steering committee approved of this CPU architecture seeing a port in GCC.

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Updated Debian 9: 9.6 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the sixth update of its stable distribution Debian 9 (codename stretch). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old stretch media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won't have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release.

New installation images will be available soon at the regular locations.

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More in Tux Machines

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler. Read more

This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a “C-SKY Linux Development Board” for $5.60 and up, featuring a RISC-V derived, 574MHz C-SKY GX6605S CK610M SoC, 64MB DDR2, an HDMI port, and 2x USB 2.0 ports. Last month, Hangzhou C-SKY Microsystems Co. announced Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel support for its new RISC-V based C-SKY CK810 SoC design. Now, Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a development board that runs Linux on a similar CK610M SoC. The C-SKY Linux Development Board sells for 39-40 Yuan ($5.60 to $7.05) on Taobao and $19.50 to $21.50 on AliExpress. Read more