Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

…and today is Software Freedom Day!

Filed under
GNU
OSS

For its fourteenth edition the Digital Freedom Foundation is happy to celebrate Software Freedom Day! At the time of this writting we have 112 teams listed on the wiki and about 80+ events registered. Over the year we’ve notice that this “double registration process” (creating a wiki page and then filling the registration form) is a bit difficult for some of our participants and we wish to change that. In the plan for the coming months we plan to have a single registration process which will in turn generate a wiki page. We also want to display the event date as some of us cannot celebrate exactly on this international day due to local celebrations or other reasons.

Read more

Ubuntu-enabled open source SDR board shrinks in size and price

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

Lime Microsystems launched the $139 “LimeSDR Mini,” a size- and cost-reduced sibling of its Ubuntu Core-enabled LimeSDR board, at CrowdSupply.

Lime Microsystems, a developer of field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has gone to CrowdSupply again, to fund a size- and cost-reduced variant of the LimeSDR board that it launched there last year. Like its larger sibling, the LimeSDR Mini is a “free and open source project” that supports the company’s “entirely open-source” LimeSuite host-side software that supports a range of SDRs.

Read more

​Check Point's bogus Windows Subsystem for Linux attack

Filed under
Security

Security companies, desperate for attention and headlines, love to come up with flashy, dangerous-sounding security hole names. The latest is Check Point's Bashware. This one, Check Point claims, can render 400 million Windows 10 PCs open to malware using Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) to launch Windows malware from a WSL Linux instance, thus bypassing most Windows security products in the process.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IBM Linux-only mainframe delivers breakthrough security
  • Kubernetes Meets HPC

    Anyone who has worked with Docker can appreciate the enormous gains in efficiency achievable with containers. While Kubernetes excels at orchestrating containers, high-performance computing applications can be tricky to deploy on Kubernetes.

    In this post, I discuss some of the challenges of running HPC workloads with Kubernetes, explain how organizations approach these challenges today, and suggest an approach for supporting mixed workloads on a shared Kubernetes cluster. We will also provide information and links to a case study on a customer, IHME, showing how Kubernetes is extended to service their HPC workloads seamlessly while retaining scalability and interfaces familiar to HPC users.

  • The latest Windows Server beta has a surprising feature: Support for Linux containers
  • VMware wants the support of open-source developers
  • Public Money? Public Code!

    31 organisations ask to improve public procurement of software

    Today, on 13 September 2017, 31 organisations are publishing an open letter. The letter calls for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software that has been developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software licence.

  • WordPress to ditch React library over Facebook patent clause risk

    Automattic, the company behind the popular open source web publishing software WordPress, has said it will be pulling away from using Facebook’s React JavaScript library over concerns about a patent clause in Facebook’s open source license.

    In a blog post explaining the decision yesterday, WordPress’ Matt Mullenweg said Automattic had hoped to officially adopt React for WordPress — noting it has already used it for the Calypso ground-up rewrite of WordPress.com a few years ago, and had started using it for its major Gutenberg core project.

    But he reveals it’s changed its mind after seeing Facebook dig in behind the patent clause — which was recently added to the Apache Software Foundation’s (ASF) list of disallowed licenses.

  • Havenlabs' Open Source 3D Printed Utility Band Offers Simple Functionality for Amputees
  • Bluetooth problem could let hackers take control of Apple, Samsung and Google devices

    Millions of mobile phones, laptops and smart home devices could be at risk of hacking after researchers discovered a way to take over devices using the Bluetooth connection.

Linux Hardware: Asustor, Advantech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Latest in Linux 4.14 and Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • FBDEV Is Still Seeing Improvements With Linux 4.14

    It has been five years since a call was made to deprecate Linux FBDEV back during LPC 2012. Five years later while there are now more DRM and V4L2 drivers, FBDEV is still alive and kicking within the mainline later.

  • CNCF Adds Oracle, Onboards the Envoy and Jaeger Projects

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation continues to gain momentum, signing on as a sponsor one of the most venerable enterprise software companies, Oracle, and adding two more cloud-native projects to its portfolio, the Envoy service mesh and the Jaeger microservice debugging software.

    The CNCF announced the new inclusions at the Open Source Summit North America, being held this week in Los Angeles.

Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Test Drive and a Digital Signage Solution

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Test Drive

    ​It has been a while since Canonical has launched Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds but most users don't want to switch to the latest builds as they are still in daily build period. Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds were quite unstable and many things were broken and as the first beta has released on Aug 31, I got my hands on it and tried it. Using it since then many things have been fixed. So in this article, I'm going to share my experience with Ubuntu 17.10 beta.

  • Canonical and NEC Work on Digital Signage Solution Based on Ubuntu, Raspberry Pi

    Canonical announced that it partnered with NEC Display Solutions Europe to collaborate on a new digital signage platform powered by the Ubuntu Core operating system for embedded and IoT devices.

    NEC is a Japanese multinational manufacturer of display solutions and technology services aimed at mass audiences and professional environments. Today's partnership with Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system and Screenly, the leading digital signage software solution that leverages the Raspberry Pi single-board computer aims to facilitate the development of an upcoming, innovative digital signage solution.

    "Digital signage platforms are now an increasing must-have feature for businesses all around the world. By partnering with the brightest minds in the industry, we can continue to develop enterprise and embedded IoT uses for Ubuntu Core," said Mike Bell, EVP of IoT and Devices at Canonical. "NEC’s large format displays with their support for Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 running Ubuntu Core, offers a compelling and fully-integrated solution."

Events: Broadband Forum in Helsinki; Samsung Developer Conference 2017

Filed under
OSS

OSS: Tanmay Bakshi, Jono Bacon, Blockchain, Instaclustr, and BlueZ

Filed under
OSS
  • 13-year-old coder works to advance cognitive tech

    Folks say computers are a young person’s game, and one of the best examples is Tanmay Bakshi (pictured), algorithmist and cognitive developer. Thirteen years old, going on 14, he represents the energy and innovation of young coders. Some of the biggest companies in the industry have offered the enthusiastic Bakshi a seat at the table.

    When asked about the coolest thing he’s working on, Bakshi replied: “It would have to be a tie between AskTanmay, DeepSPADE and advancements with the cognitive story.” Bakshi is an Honorary Cloud Advisor with IBM Corp.

  • Developers must simplify, standardize tech to expand reach, says analyst

    It’s good for a company to have the technology it needs, however, putting that tech to use is another matter. Few companies are staffed with enough tech wizards, and for technology to expand into the mainstream, developers must make it easy for non-tech businesses to integrate new innovations in open source software, according to Jono Bacon (pictured), founder of Jono Bacon Consulting.

  • GMO Blockchain Open Source Software project enters fourth phase

    This time, GMO Internet has teamed up with GMO-Z.com RUNSYSTEM JSC to demonstrate the security applications of blockchain technologies. As many of you are aware, the enhanced security is one of the main advantages of this type of technologies.

  • Open Source as a Service platform launches

    Instaclustr has announced the launch of its Open Source-as-a-Service platform. This comprehensive platform offers customers across industries - and from startups to the enterprise - fully hosted and securely managed Apache Cassandra, Apache Spark, Elasticsearch, Kibana, Lucene, and Zeppelin. Each is delivered to customers in its 100% open source form, with no vendor or technical lock-in. The platform arrives as the company continues to deliver top-line growth in excess of 100% YoY, and has reached milestones of 10 million node hours and 1 petabyte of data under management.

    In an industry where, all too often, providers will deliver open source solutions repackaged into proprietary versions that promote vendor lock-in, Instaclustr is ensuring that every solution it provides will always consist of fully portable open source code.

  • BlueZ 5.47 Released, Working On Bluetooth 5.0 Support & More

    BlueZ 5.47 has been released as the latest user-space components to the Linux Bluetooth stack.

    BlueZ 5.47 is a bit more exciting on the feature front than some of the past releases. BlueZ 5.47 includes support for decoding Bluetooth 5.0 commands and events, Bluetooth Mesh advertising bearer decoding, support for Bluetooth Mesh control applications, the ability to retrieve supported discovery filters, and support for appearance and local name advertising data.

Red Hat News Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME and KDE: Librem 5, KDE Accessibility, and GNOME 3.26 Release Video

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Encrypted, Open Source Phone That Won’t Track Users Launches Crowdfunding Campaign

    Here’s the weird thing about ears: you can’t shut them. You can shut your eyes, but you can’t shut your ears.

    The same is true for our devices. While no one builds devices with built in covers for cameras, it’s easy to add one. Microphones are trickier. In fact, there’s a persistent conspiracy theory that Facebook constantly listens for buzzwords to trigger ads through the microphones on people’s phones.

  • ​KDE Partners With Purism To Create The “First Truly Free” Linux Smartphone

    Just last month, we told you about a new crowdfunding project launched by privacy-focused hardware maker Purism. The device was named Librem 5 and it was expected to ship with PureOS, an open source Debian GNU/Linux derivative.

  • Testing Applications for Color Blindness

    At the Randa Meeting 2017 Volker and I decided to write a little KWin plugin. Activating this plugin you can simulate various types of color vision deficiencies, either on individual windows or full-screen. The plugin works by running a fragment shader on the respective window/screen.

  • The Official GNOME 3.26 Release Video Has Arrived

    The GNOME 3.26 release arrived earlier this week, and now an official release video has popped out to help promote it.

    The 1 minute 51 second clip zips through all of the pertinent new details, including support for color emoji, many of the core app updates, and (of course) the spiffy new search layout and streamlined Settings app.

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.1 RC, X11 Turns 30, Radeon and Vulkan Updates

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.1 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 17.2.1 is now available.

  • Mesa 17.2.1 Being Prepped For Release Next Week

    For those that have been waiting for the first point release of Mesa 17.2 before upgrading, the release candidate is out while the official build is slated for next week.

    Emil Velikov just announced the Mesa 17.2.1 Release Candidate with 53 new patches since the 17.2.0 release earlier this month.

  • Today Marks 30 Years Since The Release Of X11

    The X11 window system turns 30 years old today! X11 which still lives on through today via the X.Org Server on Linux, BSD, Solaris, and other operating systems is now three decades old.

    It was on this day in 1987 that Ralph Swick of MIT announced the X Window System Version 11 Release 1. As explained in the announcement compared to earlier versions of X, X11 offered "This release represents a major redesign and enhancement of X and signals it's graduation from the research community into the product engineering and development community. The X Window System version 11 is intended to be able to support virtually all known instances of raster display hardware and reasonable future hardware, including hardware supporting deep frame buffers, multiple colormaps and various levels of hardware graphics assist."

  • Radeon RX Vega OpenGL Linux Performance For September 2017

    It's been a couple weeks since running any Mesa Git benchmarks to show the latest state of the open-source Radeon Linux graphics stack, so here are some fresh numbers with the RX Vega 56 and RX Vega 64 along with other Radeon GPUs compared to the NVIDIA Linux performance.

  • R600 Gallium3D To End Code Sharing With RadeonSI Driver

    While the R600g and RadeonSI drivers are two distinct Gallium3D drivers for R600 (HD 2000) through Northern Islands (HD 6000) and GCN and newer, respectively, they have up until now shared some code via gallium/radeon. But that will now be ending.

    Marek Olšák is ending the code sharing between R600 and RadeonSI with the R600g driver now importing its own current state of the previously-shared Radeon Gallium code. This is common code pertaining to Gallium3D pipe setup, video decoding, command submission, and other items that could be shared between R600g and RadeonSI.

  • Vulkan 1.0.61 Introduces Four New Extensions
  • There Are Now 1,400 Vulkan Projects On GitHub

    The milestone was breached today of having 1,400 projects on GitHub referencing the Vulkan graphics API.

    It was just this April when there were 1,000 Vulkan projects on GitHub, in July when reaching 1,200 projects, and now on 15 September is crossing the 1,400th project.

Programming: Machine Learning, Women in Tech, Sublime Text 3.0, GitHub, Oracle Java and Compilers

Filed under
Development
  • Machine Learning Lends a Hand for Automated Software Testing

    Automated testing is increasingly important in development, especially for finding security issues, but fuzz testing requires a high level of expertise — and the sheer volume of code developers are working with, from third-party components to open source frameworks and projects, makes it hard to test every line of code. Now, a set of artificial intelligence-powered options like Microsoft’s Security Risk Detection service and Diffblue’s security scanner and test generation tools aim to make these techniques easier, faster and accessible to more developers.

    “If you ask developers what the most hated aspect of their job is, it’s testing and debugging,” Diffblue CEO and University of Oxford Professor of Computer Science Daniel Kroening told the New Stack.

  • Are Women in Tech Facing Extinction?

    We hear a lot about how few women work in tech. The numbers range from 3 percent in open source to 25 percent industry-wide. But frankly, those aren’t the numbers that scare me most. The numbers that scare the hell out me are the ones that underscore how many women are choosing to leave tech.

    The latest NCWIT data shows that women leave tech at twice the rate of men, and that number has been increasing since 1991. A Harvard Business Review study found that as many as 50 percent of women working in science, engineering and technology will, over time, leave because of hostile work environments.

  • Sublime Text 3.0 is released for download on MacOS, Windows and Linux
  • Open Source Atom Code Editor Gets IDE Features

    GitHub is morphing its open source code editor, Atom, into more of a full-fledged IDE with a new project appropriately called Atom-IDE.

    Just announced this week, Atom-IDE integrates programming language support in order to offer IDE-like features.

  • Migrating GitHub's Web and API to Kubernetes Running on Bare Metal

    Over the last year GitHub has evolved their internal infrastructure that runs the Ruby on Rails application responsible for github.com and api.github.com to run on Kubernetes. The migration began with web and API applications running on Unicorn processes that were deployed onto Puppet-managed bare metal ("metal cloud") servers, and ended with all web and API requests being served by containers running in Kubernetes clusters deployed onto the metal cloud.

    According to the GitHub engineering blog, the basic approach to deploying and running GitHub did not significantly change over the initial eight years of operation. However, GitHub itself changed dramatically, with new features, larger software communities, more GitHubbers on staff, and many more requests per second. As the organisation grew, the existing operational approach began to exhibit new problems: many teams wanted to extract the functionality into smaller services that could run and be deployed independently; and as the number of services increased, the SRE team found they were increasingly performing maintenance, which meant there was little time for enhancing the underlying platform. GitHub engineers needed a self-service platform they could use to experiment, deploy, and scale new services.

  • Oracle turns Java EE over to an open source foundation
  • The Basics of Going Serverless with Node.js

    Linda Nichols, of Cloudreach, will discuss the basics of serverless and why it works so well with Node.js at Node.js Interactive, Oct. 4-6, 2017 in Vancouver, BC Canada.
    The Linux Foundation

    Developers are continuing to look for more efficient and effective ways to build out applications, and one of the new approaches to this involves serverless applications, which are the future of lightweight, scalable, and performant applications development.

    The space of “serverless” is still fairly new and many developers and companies are wanting to go “serverless,” but don’t know how to orchestrate decisions like how to choose the right cloud provider, how to avoid vendor lock in. And, if you do change your mind about the cloud platform, does that mean you have to rewrite your application code?

  • Clear Linux & Their Love For FMV + dl_platform/dl_hwcap In The Name Of Performance

    For those mesmerized by the numbers whenever posting a cross-distribution comparison like the recent Core i9 7900X vs. Threadripper 1950X On Ubuntu 17.10, Antergos, Clear Linux with showing Intel's performance optimizations done on Clear Linux, Intel engineer Victor Rodriguez presented this week at the 2017 Open-Source Summit North America about some of their Linux performance boosting work.

    While Clear Linux ships with aggressive compiler flags and other optimizations, contrary to the belief of some, their distribution does work on Intel hardware going back to ~2011 and just not the most recent generations of CPUs. But for remaining optimized for both new and old hardware, they do utilize Function Multi-Versioning (FMV) as offered by GCC. They also rely upon optimized binaries for particular hardware platforms via GLIBC with the dl_platform/dl_hwcap features for shipping optimized libraries that are then selected at run-time based on the CPU. This is one of the approaches to how Clear Linux is already shipping with AVX-512 optimized libraries.

  •  

  • GCC Finishing Up C++17 Adjustments, Preparing For C++2A

    While C++17 was just formally approved days ago and is now waiting for ISO publication, GCC (and Clang) developers have largely finished up their C++17 (formerly known as "C++1z") support for some time. There are just a few lingering patches for GCC and already are beginning to lay the ground work for C++2a.

    There's the longstanding GCC C++ status page where it does show all the major features of C++17/C++1z are complete in GCC 7. Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek sent out a patch this week with the final adjustments and now that C++1z is indeed going to be called C++17 officially.

Can Ubuntu Come Back To Top On Distrowatch After GNOME Desktop Environment?

Filed under
Ubuntu

For a very long time, Ubuntu was at the heart of the Linux revolution. The leader, the heart, and soul on the quest for Linux to win the desktop operating systems wars. With the then GNOME and GNOME 2 desktop environments, the task was clear, the job was cut out and then in 2017, it has not happened yet.

Read more

Wine 2.17

Filed under
Software

Kubuntu Zesty & HP Pavilion setup - Very, very sweet

Filed under
Reviews

I only have good things to share here. It wasn't the most trivial of tests: a system that is seven years old, runs a dual-boot setup with tons of old data, lots of hardware that needs tender care. But it was a breeze - literal and figurative, he he. I had the drivers sorted like a charm. The system is reasonably fast and fully usable. All the peripherals properly behave. Fun stuff, extra software, wicked looks.

Now imagine what this distro can do if you give it ultra-modern hardware. That will be the topic of my future laptop purchase. Whenever it happens, whatever Kubuntu version will be the default out there, I shall attempt to twine the two. I am not deluding myself that Linux can replace Windows in every aspect. Far from it. But the combo shall make for a splendid workhorse, and that's what I aiming for. My current tests, and this one in particular, show that Zesty has all the right ingredients to be the perfect match.

Read more

Software Patents Versus Free Software (WordPress, MP3 Playback)

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • On React and WordPress

    Big companies like to bury unpleasant news on Fridays: A few weeks ago, Facebook announced they have decided to dig in on their patent clause addition to the React license, even after Apache had said it’s no longer allowed for Apache.org projects. In their words, removing the patent clause would "increase the amount of time and money we have to spend fighting meritless lawsuits."

    I'm not judging Facebook or saying they're wrong, it's not my place. They have decided it's right for them — it's their work and they can decide to license it however they wish. I appreciate that they've made their intentions going forward clear.

    A few years ago, Automattic used React as the basis for the ground-up rewrite of WordPress.com we called Calypso, I believe it's one of the larger React-based open source projects. As our general counsel wrote, we made the decision that we'd never run into the patent issue. That is still true today as it was then, and overall, we’ve been really happy with React. More recently, the WordPress community started to use React for Gutenberg, the largest core project we've taken on in many years. People's experience with React and the size of the React community — including Calypso — was a factor in trying out React for Gutenberg, and that made React the new de facto standard for WordPress and the tens of thousands of plugins written for WordPress.

    We had a many-thousand word announcement talking about how great React is and how we're officially adopting it for WordPress, and encouraging plugins to do the same. I’ve been sitting on that post, hoping that the patent issue would be resolved in a way we were comfortable passing down to our users.

    That post won't be published, and instead I'm here to say that the Gutenberg team is going to take a step back and rewrite Gutenberg using a different library. It will likely delay Gutenberg at least a few weeks, and may push the release into next year.

  • MP3 Is Dead! Long Live MP3!

    Back in May, there was an unexpected surge in press coverage about the MP3 audio file format. What was most unexpected about it was it all declared that the venerable file format is somehow “dead”. Why did that happen, and what lessons can we learn?

    What had actually happened was the last of the patents on the MP3 file format and encoding process have finally expired. Building on earlier work, it was developed by the Moving Pictures Expert Group (MPEG) built on the doctoral work of an engineer at Fraunhofer Institute in Germany. Many companies held patents on the standard and it was not until April that the last of them expired. There’s no easy way to ascertain whether a patent has expired even after the date one moght expect it, so the wave of news arose from announcements by Fraunhofer Institute.

    Framing this as an “ending” fits the narrative of corporate patent holders well, but does not really reflect the likely consequences. Naturally the patent holding companies would rather everyone “upgrade” to the newer AAC format, which is still encumbered under a mountain of patents necessitating licensing. But for open source software, the end of patent monopilies signals the beginning of new freedoms.

Games: Fugl, Don’t Starve: Hamlet DLC, RUINER, Prime Arena, Tannenberg, Psychonauts, Mesa GL Threading

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.