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Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:22pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:21pm
Story SUSE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:19pm
Story OSS: AI and Machine Learning Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:19pm
Story Ubuntu and Derivatives Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:17pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:16pm
Story Linux Foundation and Linux Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:15pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 12:02pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 12:01pm
Story Ubuntu Derivatives Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 12:00pm

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Amlogic Meson VPU DRM Driver In The Works

    A new DRM driver is being baked for supporting the video processing unit for Amlogic Meson SoCs.

  • Plans Emerge For Releasing Mesa 13.1

    Mesa release manager Emil Velikov has laid out his draft of a release schedule for the next major Mesa release.

    Emil has proposed that Mesa 13.1 be officially released around 3 February, but for that to happen the feature freeze and RC1 would be on 13 January followed by weekly release candidates until declaring it ready. This proposed Mesa 13.1 release schedule was laid out today on Mesa-dev.

  • Multiseat systems and the NVIDIA binary driver

    Ever since our school switched to Fedora on the desktop, I’ve either used the onboard Intel graphics or AMD Radeon cards, since both are supported out of the box in Fedora. With our multiseat systems, we now need three external video cards on top of the onboard graphics on each system, so we’ve bought a large number of Radeon cards over the last few years.

11 wonderful wearable open source projects

Filed under
OSS

LEDs are on everything, and almost everyone you know has at least tried a FitBit or similar device, whereas Google Glass didn't really take off. Despite several years of growth, whether wearable electronics are a fad, or here to keep growing from fun to truly functional is too early to tell. Judge for yourself—read through a few of our favorite wearable projects from 2016. You might even get inspired to start creating.

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Fedora 25 GNOME 3 screenshots

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 25 is the latest edition of the Linux distribution published by the Fedora Project, which is sponsored by Red Hat, Inc. The Fedora Project supports many desktop environments, including Cinnamon, GNOME 3, KDE, LXDE, MATE and Xfce, but the main edition uses the GNOME 3 desktop environment in its default configuration.

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Also: Fedora 25 Cinnamon screenshots

Fedora 25 KDE screenshots

European Parliament: EUR 1.9M for EU-FOSSA follow-up

Filed under
OSS

The European Parliament today approved a EUR 1.9 million budget for the follow-up to the European Commission’s ‘EU Free and Open Source Software Auditing’ project (EU-FOSSA). The next version of the code audit project is to add bug bounties.

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Servers/Networks

Filed under
Server
  • OpenHPC Pedal Put To The Compute Metal

    The ultimate success of any platform depends on the seamless integration of diverse components into a synergistic whole – well, as much as is possible in the real world – while at the same time being flexible enough to allow for components to be swapped out and replaced by others to suit personal preferences.

  • Docker for AWS Public Beta

    Today, we’re announcing that Docker for AWS is graduating to public beta, just in time for AWS re:Invent. Docker for AWS is a great way for ops to setup and maintain secure and scalable Docker deployments on AWS.

  • Amazon Lightsail: The private server killer

    Hosting companies, and their virtualized descendants -- virtual private server companies such as Bluehost, Digital Ocean, and Linode -- provide remote servers for developers, websites, and businesses needing other internet services. They continue to be very popular with small and medium sized businesses (SMBs) that can't afford or don't need a data center or public cloud services.

  • Trouble in paradise: Is the open-source community planning a revolt against Amazon?

    Things just keep looking up for Amazon. Attendance at this year’s AWS re:Invent conference broke the record; enterprise giants like McDonald’s are singing its praises on the keynote stage; and it has announced roughly 1,000 upcoming features and updates. And yet some foresee adversity ahead from both users and ecosystem players.

    Stu Miniman (@stu), co-host of theCUBE*, from the SiliconANGLE Media team, described the conference and Amazon’s announcements as “an embarrassment of riches.” With difficulty, he picked a handful of favorites, among them Greengrass.

    “Greengrass is how Amazon is taking their server-less architecture, really Lambda, and they’re taking it beyond the cloud,” he said. He explained that this technology has huge promise for IoT, which still struggles with the physics of moving data around. “They talked about the ‘snowball edge,’ which is going to allow me to have kind of compute and storage down at that edge,” he stated.

Comma.ai: Car AI Liberated

Filed under
OSS

Comcast Becomes the First Cable Company to Join ONOS & CORD

Development News (SourceForge and Perl)

Filed under
Development
  • Introducing HTTPS for Project Websites
  • Securing SourceForge With HTTPS

    SourceForge has added a feature that gives project websites the opportunity to opt-in to using SSL HTTPS encryption. Project admins can find this option in the Admin page under “HTTPS.”

    Opting-in will also trigger a domain name change, from http://name.sourceforge.net to https://name.sourceforge.io. Visitors using the old domain will automatically redirect to the new domain.

  • Fedora 25 Easy Enough, SourceForge Goes HTTPS
  • CPAN Testers RULE!

    Late last evening I sent a development version of a Perl module to PAUSE. This module had had a bunch of work on it since the last release, including a change in the way timegm() and timelocal() were called.

    The CPAN testers worked on it overnight, and this morning I had a brand-new shiny RT ticket in my inbox. Slaven Rezic (to give credit where it is due) had noticed and correctly diagnosed the problem. I fixed it, and tonight the CPAN testers are chewing on a new and hopefully better test release.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

3 open source password managers

Filed under
OSS

Keep your data and accounts safe by using a secure open source password manager to store unique, complex passwords.

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Is Open Source Good for Business?

Filed under
OSS

Open source software firms have made a push for the business world for quite some time now. The idea of running a business on software whose source code is readily available for anyone to tinker with gained considerable validity when IBM announced its full on support for Linux on its hardware, including z Series mainframes, in 1999.

The potency and capability of open source software is not in doubt. Open source software powers much of the Internet: Linux, the Apache Web server, sendmail, and OpenSSL are just a few important Internet technologies that are open source, among many.

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Make Q4OS Look Like Windows With XPQ4

Filed under
OS

Many Linux distributions over the years have tried to look like Windows including Lindows, to a certain extent Linux Mint and of course Zorin OS.

Q4OS with the XPQ4 theme is definitely the one that has achieved the best results.

Zorin OS looks to be moving in a slightly different direction now and I have just installed version 12 as a dual boot to Q4OS so a review will be coming shortly.

I could have made my experience with XPQ4 better by installing the ttf-mscorefonts-installer package from Synaptic.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Q4OS - Part 2

Filed under
OS
Reviews

So now I have all the software I need installed, all hardware setup and running and I am using Q4OS on a daily basis.

As an operating system I am finding the performance is extremely good and everything is extremely stable.

Check out this guide which shows how to make Q4OS look like Windows XP, 2000, 7, 8 and 10.

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Mozilla Patches SVG Animation Remote Code Execution in Firefox and Thunderbird

Filed under
Moz/FF

If you've been reading the news lately, you might have stumbled upon an article that talked about a 0-day vulnerability in the Mozilla Firefox web browser, which could be used to attack Tor users running Tor Browser on Windows systems.

Read more

Raspberry Pi Foundation Disables SSH in Raspbian PIXEL's Latest Security Update

Filed under
Linux

Raspberry Pi Foundation, through Simon Long, announces that a security update is now available for the PIXEL desktop environment of the company's Debian-based Raspbian operating system for Raspberry Pi single-board computers.

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Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • What Malware Is on Your Router?

    Mirai is exposing a serious security issue with the Internet of Things that absolutely must be quickly handled.

    Until a few days ago, I had been seriously considering replacing the 1999 model Apple Airport wireless router I’ve been using since it was gifted to me in 2007. It still works fine, but I have a philosophy that any hardware that’s more than old enough to drive probably needs replacing. I’ve been planning on taking the 35 mile drive to the nearest Best Buy outlet on Saturday to see what I could get that’s within my price range.

    After the news of this week, that trip is now on hold. For the time being I’ve decided to wait until I can be reasonably sure that any router I purchase won’t be hanging out a red light to attract the IoT exploit-of-the-week.

    It’s not just routers. I’m also seriously considering installing the low-tech sliding door devices that were handed out as swag at this year’s All Things Open to block the all-seeing-eye of the web cams on my laptops. And I’m becoming worried about the $10 Vonage VoIP modem that keeps my office phone up and running. Thank goodness I don’t have a need for a baby monitor and I don’t own a digital camera, other than what’s on my burner phone.

  • National Lottery 'hack' is the poster-girl of consumer security fails

    IN THE NEW age of hacking, you don't even need to be a hacker. National Lottery management company Camelot has confirmed that up to 26,500 online accounts for their systems may have been compromised in an attempted hack, that required no hacking.

    It appears the players affected have been targetted from hacks to other sites, and the resulting availability of their credentials on the dark web. With so many people using the same password across multiple sites, it takes very little brute force to attack another site, which is what appears to have happened here.

  • Mozilla and Tor release urgent update for Firefox 0-day under active attack

    "The security flaw responsible for this urgent release is already actively exploited on Windows systems," a Tor official wrote in an advisory published Wednesday afternoon. "Even though there is currently, to the best of our knowledge, no similar exploit for OS X or Linux users available, the underlying bug affects those platforms as well. Thus we strongly recommend that all users apply the update to their Tor Browser immediately."

    The Tor browser is based on the open-source Firefox browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation. Shortly after this post went live, Mozilla security official Daniel Veditz published a blog post that said the vulnerability has also been fixed in a just-released version of Firefox for mainstream users. On early Wednesday, Veditz said, his team received a copy of the attack code that exploited a previously unknown vulnerability in Firefox.

  • Tor Browser 6.0.7 is released

    Tor Browser 6.0.7 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page and also from our distribution directory.

    This release features an important security update to Firefox and contains, in addition to that, an update to NoScript (2.9.5.2).

    The security flaw responsible for this urgent release is already actively exploited on Windows systems. Even though there is currently, to the best of our knowledge, no similar exploit for OS X or Linux users available the underlying bug affects those platforms as well. Thus we strongly recommend that all users apply the update to their Tor Browser immediately. A restart is required for it to take effect.

    Tor Browser users who had set their security slider to "High" are believed to have been safe from this vulnerability.

  • Firefox 0-day in the wild is being used to attack Tor users

    Firefox developer Mozilla and Tor have patched the underlying vulnerability, which is found not only in the Windows version of the browser, but also the versions of Mac OS X and Linux.

    There's a zero-day exploit in the wild that's being used to execute malicious code on the computers of people using Tor and possibly other users of the Firefox browser, officials of the anonymity service confirmed Tuesday.

    Word of the previously unknown Firefox vulnerability first surfaced in this post on the official Tor website. It included several hundred lines of JavaScript and an introduction that warned: "This is an [sic] JavaScript exploit actively used against TorBrowser NOW." Tor cofounder Roger Dingledine quickly confirmed the previously unknown vulnerability and said engineers from Mozilla were in the process of developing a patch.

  • Mozilla Patches SVG Animation Remote Code Execution in Firefox and Thunderbird

    If you've been reading the news lately, you might have stumbled upon an article that talked about a 0-day vulnerability in the Mozilla Firefox web browser, which could be used to attack Tor users running Tor Browser on Windows systems.

City of Munich now uses Kolab open source groupware

Filed under
OSS

In August this year, the city of Munich completed its two-year switch to Kolab, an open source based suite of groupware and collaboration tools such as email and calendaring. Across the city’s 50 departmentsb there are now some 60,000 Kolab mail boxes, said Kolab CEO George Greve at a conference for the IT departments of the European Commission and European Parliament, in Brussels on Tuesday.

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 2
    After a long, but exciting first day, we even managed to get some sleep before we started again and discussed the whole morning about our policies and other stuff that is now updated in the openSUSE wiki. After that, we went out for a nice lunch…
  • Installing Tumbleweed, November 2016
    The Tumbleweed system that I already have installed had desktops KDE, Gnome, XFCE and LXDE. But for recent intstalls (as with Leap 42.2), I have been going with KDE, Gnome, XFCE, LXQt, FVWM and MATE. So it seemed reasonable for the new Tumbleweed install to follow the same path. I also added Enlightenment for experimenting.

Android Leftovers

Linux Graphics

  • LibRetro's Vulkan PlayStation PSX Renderer Released
    A few days back I wrote about a Vulkan renderer for a PlayStation emulator being worked on and now the code to that Vulkan renderer is publicly available. For those wanting to relive some PlayStation One games this week or just looking for a new test case for Vulkan drivers, the Vulkan renderer for the LibRetro Beetle/Mednafen PSX emulator is now available, months after the LibRetro folks made a Vulkan renderer for the Nintendo 64 emulator.
  • Etnaviv DRM Updates Submitted For Linux 4.10
    The Etnaviv DRM-Next pull request is not nearly as exciting as MSM getting Adreno 500 series support, a lot of Intel changes, or the numerous AMDGPU changes, but it's not bad either for a community-driven, reverse-engineered DRM driver for the Vivante graphics cores.
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Being Prepped For Ubuntu 16.10/16.04
    Ubuntu is preparing Mesa 12.0.4 for Ubuntu Xenial and Yakkety users. It's not as great as Mesa 13, but at least there are some important fixes back-ported. Mesa 12.0.4 is exciting for dozens of bug fixes, including the work to offer better RadeonSI performance. But with Mesa 12.0.4 you don't have the RADV Vulkan driver, OpenGL 4.5, or the other exciting Mesa 13 work.

Games for GNU/Linux