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Monday, 22 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The skinny on thin Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Much commotion has surrounded this column in the past few weeks. Not even counting the systemd discussion, my call for a server-only Linux distribution that does not support any desktop applications or frameworks caused a tizzy, mostly from folks who couldn't quite grasp that I wasn't only talking about not selecting desktop packages during installation.

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CipherShed: A replacement for TrueCrypt

Filed under
OSS
Security

While the Open Crypt Audit Project, headed by cryptographer Matthew Green and Kenneth White, Principal Scientist at Social & Scientific Systems, has been considering whether to take over the development of TrueCrypt and is working on the second phase of the audit process (a thorough analysis of the code responsable for the actual encryption process), one of TrueCrypt's developers has expressed his disapproval of a project that would fork the software.

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Red Hat CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Red Hat is in the midst of changing its image from a top Linux company to the future king of cloud computing. CEO Jim Whitehurst told me in 2011 that the Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud would be Red Hat's future. Today in a blog posting, Whitehurst underlined this shift from Linux to OpenStack.

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PyPy 2.4 - Snow White

Filed under
Development

PyPy is a very compliant Python interpreter, almost a drop-in replacement for CPython 2.7. It’s fast (pypy 2.4 and cpython 2.7.x performance comparison) due to its integrated tracing JIT compiler.

This release supports x86 machines on most common operating systems (Linux 32/64, Mac OS X 64, Windows, and OpenBSD), as well as newer ARM hardware (ARMv6 or ARMv7, with VFPv3) running Linux.

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Brocade Unveils Vyatta SDN Controller

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The new controller, which will launch in November, is based on the upcoming "Helium" release from OpenDaylight.

Brocade in November will launch a software-defined networking controller based on the OpenDaylight Foundation's upcoming "Helium" release and which will represent the vendor's latest move to grow its Vyatta platform.

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Six Clicks: Androids Apps on Chromebooks

Filed under
Android
Google

Recently Google started making it possible to run Android apps on Chromebooks. For now, there are only four applications, but developers looking into the code have already found that porting their applications to Android on Chrome will require almost no effort.

With over a million Android apps waiting in the wings, Chromebooks are about to become even more of a true rival to Windows PCs.

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Mentor Embedded Linux ready to roll on AMD SoCs

Filed under
Linux

Mentor Graphics has begun shipping Mentor Embedded Linux for AMD’s new Steppe Eagle, Crowned Eagle, and Bald Eagle G-Series and R-Series SoCs.

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Open source is not dead

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS
Security

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source.

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10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Filed under
OSS

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure.

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Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written.

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From next release onwards, Debian is tied to systemd

Filed under
Debian

Anyone who installs Jessie from scratch will find that they are not offered no choice in the matter. This means that only the technically well-equipped will be able to make a switch in the event that systemd does not work as promised. Existing users of the testing stream will find, on checking, that their systems have been migrated over to systemd. Systems running the stable version of Debian have not been migrated across yet.

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Ubuntu to Get Native HTML5 Streaming Through Google Chrome Soon

Filed under
Ubuntu

Netflix is looking to expand its business, and one of the ways to do that is to look at what other platforms it can support. Ubuntu is the most used Linux distribution, so it stands to reason that they might be interested to have their service working on it.

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

Filed under
BSD

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features.

Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types.

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Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

Filed under
Android

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable.

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Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa.

The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful.

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Small Console Menu Utilities

Filed under
Linux
OSS

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications.

The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects.

Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own.

This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill.

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Samsung ship SM-Z130H budget Tizen Smartphones to India for R&D Purposes

Filed under
Linux

According to a Zauba International shipping manifest, Samsung have shipped 150 of these units from South Korea to India for R&D and Evaluation purposes, which is a fair amount for an R&D unit to continue its work with. We have been tracking two budget Tizen based Smartphones lately, the SM-Z130H & SM-Z130E, with various parts being shipped to India every couple of months or so, but this is one of the largest shipments that we have seen so far.

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Fresh software from the 3.14 menu

Filed under
GNOME

If all goes according to plan, I'll be able to merge the aforementioned automatic rotation support into systemd/udev. The kernel API is pretty bad, which makes the user-space code look bad...

The first parts of ebooks support in gnome-documents have already been written, scheduled for 3.16

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Florida is back on the Map for Linux and Open Source conventions with FOSSETCON 2

Filed under
Linux
OSS

In summary the event was a good investment in time and booth expenses spent. We were able to distribute and promote Fedora in a very positive manner. More importantly getting more information on the various spins offered on our website pointed out to many individuals that there are more available on the Fedora Project website.. As the event ended on the 13th, I had had a conversation with the event coordinator with the plus side and the down side of what was going on.

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