Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft

How I Switched from Windows 10 to Linux Mint?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

This article explains the reasons and process to switch from Windows 10 to the latest Linux Mint version, which is Linux Mint 20 Ulyana.

I was using Microsoft Windows for almost 10 years. As of January 2020, Microsoft has terminated the support for windows. I had the option to use windows 7 by paying for Windows 7 Extended Security Updates or upgrade to Windows 10 for free. But I was not interested to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10. Now, I have decided to move to the Linux based operating systems rather than Microsoft Windows.
The first question that arose in my mind is which Linux Distro will fulfill my needs in terms of professional and personal use. Some of the Linux distros are fine for professional use, but not meant for personal use like Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Therefore, I was keen on finding the best distro that can be used for professional, as well as personal use, and great community support.

Community support is an important aspect to consider when you are selecting any distro. The reason is that if you face any problem while installing any software applications or doing some configuration, then you can post your problem on the community website, and anyone can give the solution.

Read more

Microsoft Teams, Office 365 and OneDrive suffer outage – UK users unable to work from home

Filed under
Microsoft

Office 365 services such as Microsoft Teams, OneDrive and SharePoint have all reportedly been hit with issues today.

Independent outage monitor Down Detector has recorded a spike in Office 365, Microsoft Teams, OneDrive and SharePoint down reports.

The heaviest hit services are Microsoft Teams and SharePoint, which so far have registered hundreds of down reports.

Out of those affected, some 70 percent of Microsoft Teams users said they were experiencing server connection problems.

Read more

Microsoft Failures and the GitHub Trap

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Kills Another Microsoft Product, Profits From Mass Incarceration Instead

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft will shut down Minecraft Earth in June

    At its core, Minecraft Earth was a game based upon exploration and discovery. During the early days of lockdown, my kids and I would wander around the neighborhood, looking for animals, ores, and dungeons to explore. But Microsoft said that the “current global situation” prevented the free movement and collaborative play that allowed Minecraft Earth to survive.

    As a result, Minecraft Earth will be turned off in June. “On June 30, we will discontinue all content and service support for the game,” Microsoft said in a blog post. “This means that we will stop all development, and after that date, you will be unable to download or play Minecraft Earth anymore. On July 1, we will delete any Minecraft Earth player data unrelated to Character Creator and Minecoin entitlements.”

  • What went wrong with software for prisons

    Microsoft and its partner Tribridge, a tech company that specialises in business applications and cloud solutions, Microsoft built the IDOC a searchable web-based solution called Offender 360 to centralise databases in the cloud and upgrade its prison management capabilities.

    Then-Governor Patrick Quinn said at the time, Microsoft’s “cutting-edge technology will give Illinois one of the most advanced criminal justice information systems in the country.”

    [...]

    For Microsoft, this was years in the making. In a 2016 blog post, “Digital Technology and the Prison of the Future”, Microsoft envisioned prisons monitored with CCTV, drones and IoT devices, including “finger, face, and eye recognition to identify inmates” as well as RFID tagging and tracking bands.

Microsoft Spin and Blame-Passing After Major Breach

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft says [crackers] viewed source code as part of SolarWinds attack

    Microsoft made the announcement as part of its investigation into findings last week, first reported by The Washington Post, that Russian [attackers] responsible for one of the biggest cyber incidents in U.S. history had compromised Microsoft cloud customers as part of the attack on IT company SolarWinds.

  • Microsoft Says Suspected Russian [Atackers] Viewed Source Code

    Microsoft had previously said it, too, had received a malicious update of software from information technology provider SolarWinds Corp. that was used to breach government agencies and companies around the world. The details of the campaign are still largely unknown, including how many organizations were victimized and what was taken by the [crackers]. Bloomberg News reported in December that investigators have determined at least 200 organizations were attacked as part of the campaign.

  • SolarWinds [Crackers] Accessed Microsoft Source Code, Microsoft Says

    Source code, the underlying set of instructions that run a piece of software or operating system, is typically among a technology company's most closely guarded secrets, and Microsoft has historically been particularly careful about protecting it.

    It is not clear how much or what parts of Microsoft's source code repositories the [attackers] were able to access, but the disclosure suggests that the [attackers] who used software company SolarWinds as a springboard to break into sensitive U.S. government networks also had an interest in discovering the inner workings of Microsoft products as well.

  • SolarWinds [attackers] accessed Microsoft source code, the company says

    It is not clear how much or what parts of Microsoft's source code repositories the [crackers] were able to access, but the disclosure suggests that the [attackers] who used software company SolarWinds as a springboard to break into sensitive U.S. government networks also had an interest in discovering the inner workings of Microsoft products as well.

  • SolarWinds [crackers] accessed Microsoft source code, the company says

    Three people briefed on the matter said Microsoft had known for days that the source code had been accessed. A Microsoft spokesman said security employees had been working “around the clock” and that “when there is actionable information to share, they have published and shared it.”

Joey Hess: Withdrawing github-backup

Filed under
Development
Microsoft

If the farce of youtube-dl being removed from github, thus losing access to all its issues and pull requests, taught us anything, it's that having that happen does not make many people reconsider their dependence on github.

[...]

That seems like something it might be worth building some software to manage. But it's also just another case of Github's mass bending reality around it; the average Github user doesn't care about this and still gets archived; the average self-hosting git user may care about this slightly more, but most won't get archived, even if that software did get built.

Read more

Proprietary Software Failures and Security Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Microsoft rushes out fix for critical Windows 10 bug

    A new critical bug appears to have emerged in Windows 10, which is crashing some computers when they run the chkdsk command.

    It appears that this bug is affecting Windows 10 running the latest update (December 2020), which was released by Microsoft to fix numerous problems. Instead, as Windows Latest reports, some users have found that when they run the Check Disk tool (also known as chkdsk), their PCs crash, and the dreaded Blue Screen of Death appears.

  • Microsoft Azure breach left thousands of customer records exposed

    Thanks to questionable security practises by an app developer, more than half a million sensitive documents of its customers were exposed on the Internet. The documents were housed in an unprotected Microsoft Azure blob storage and could be viewed by anyone with the direct address of the files, without any kind of authentication.

    Azure Blob storage is a feature of Microsoft Azure that allows users to store large amounts of unstructured data on Microsoft's data storage platform.

    The unsecured blob was managed by Surrey-based app developer Probase and according to The Register, it contained 587,000 files, ranging from backed-up emails to letters, spreadsheets, screenshots, and more.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel and thunderbird), Debian (openjdk-8 and webkit2gtk), Fedora (gdm, mingw-openjpeg2, and openjpeg2), Mageia (compat-openssl10, golang-googlecode-net, mbedtls, openssl, and virtualbox), openSUSE (ovmf and xen), Red Hat (kernel, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb:10.3, postgresql:10, and postgresql:9.6), and SUSE (ardana-cassandra, ardana-mq, ardana-osconfig, ardana-tempest, crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, influxdb, openstack-cinder, openstack-heat, openstack-heat-gbp, openstack-heat-templates, openstack-horizon-plugin-gbp-ui, openstack-ironic-python-agent, openstack-manila, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-gbp, openstack-neutron-vpnaas, openstack-nova, python-Jinja2, python-pysaml2, python-pytest, python-urllib3, release-notes-suse-openstack-cloud, spark, ceph, crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, influxdb, openstack-heat-templates, openstack-nova, python-Jinja2, firefox, java-1_7_0-ibm, java-1_7_1-ibm, PackageKit, and thunderbird).

  • But, what about root passwords?

    If you’ve walked long enough into your enterprise identity management journey you might reach this question: How will root passwords be managed? Having centralized user and group IDs, your access policies—Host Based Access Control (HBAC) and Role Based Access Control (RBAC)—in Red Hat Identity Management (IdM) or any similar solution might still leave root passwords unmanaged.

    [...]

    While there is a resemblance in some of these examples and the public cloud’s approach in having no root password set, and shifting the privileged access to users other than root, there is one big difference. Many physical and virtual provisioning workflows for on-prem will include setting up a default root password for a variety of reasons, but those reasons are beyond the scope of this blog post.

  • Kali Linux: The Last 12 Months (2019/2020) & Looking forwards (2021)

    As the end of the year is coming up (some may say not quickly enough), we want to take a few minutes and recap on our roadmap 2019/2020 post.

    At a higher level, the last 12 months of Kali Linux (outside of the normal release items – e.g. packages updates), Kali has had various refreshes, switches and additional new features added.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 248 – Door 23: How to report 1000 security flaws

    Josh and Kurt talk about how to file 1000 security flaws. One is easy, scale is hard.

  • The State of Safety Certification of Platforms

    A lot has been written about safety “certification” of platforms. As the number of applications involving human safety increases in markets such as avionics, automotive, industrial, etc., the importance of the functional safety certification of software that controls key functions has never been greater. There are several standards that govern the safety certification of software like DO-178, SEAL, ISO26262, and IEC61508. It is the best known and perhaps the most rigorous is the DO-178 standard that is governed by the FAA for commercial avionics software. A look “under-the-hood” into the process of safety certification reveals many interesting facts.

    As the leader of an engineering team that is working on certifying code for deployment on big programs like the Joint Strike Fighter, I thought it would be interesting to share the next level of what is involved. Let me start with a datapoint. The average time to get a single line of source certified to DO-178 DAL A Standard (used for the most critical system functions in aircraft and helicopters) may take 2-3 hours. So, that means that every 2,000 lines of code takes one year to certify. How many applications these days have as little as 2,000 lines of code?

Proprietary Software and Security Problems

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Proprietary Software and Security Issues

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Security
  • Google Blames Gmail, YouTube Outage on Error in User ID System

    Google diagnosed a widespread outage that knocked out major services earlier this week, such as Gmail and YouTube, as a mistake with its system for identifying people online.

    Alphabet Inc.’s Google has several tools that enable it to verify and track logged-in users. In October, the company began moving those tools to a new file storage system, and in the process misreported portions of the data, according to a Friday post. That caused several of its services to go down for 47 minutes Monday morning, a rare technical misstep.

  • Windows 10 updates cause CorsairVBusDriver BSOD crash loop
  • Microsoft has delivered a partial fix for this nagging Windows 10 bug

    Microsoft has released a partial fix for a known issue affecting Windows 10 devices with certain audio drivers for Conexant and Synaptics devices. The issue has been under investigation since May this year.

  • Attackers in compromised US system at least since mid-2019: report

    Malicious attackers, who were exposed as having hit a number of government and private sector entities through software made by Texas firm SolarWinds, appear to have gained access to that firm's network as early as mid-2019, Yahoo! News claims.

  • Suspected Russian [attack]: Was it an epic cyber attack or spy operation?

    But for many current and former American officials, that’s not the right way to look at it. By [cracking] into dozens of corporations and government agencies, they say, the [crackers] have pulled off a stunning and distressing feat of espionage. But they note that it’s just the sort of cyber spying that the American National Security Agency attempts on a regular basis against Russia, China and any number of foreign adversaries.

    It might constitute an attack if the intruders destroyed data, for example, or used their access to do damage in the physical world, say, by shutting down power grids. But breaking into unclassified government and corporate networks? Reading other people’s emails? That’s spying.

  • Exploiting a stack-based buffer overflow in practice

    In my previous post, I detailed a fun method of obtaining root access on the Zyxel VMG8825-T50 router, which required physical access to the device and authenticated access to the web interface.

    In this post, I will detail the exploitation of a vulnerability that could potentially result in unauthenticated RCE as root, given LAN access only. This vulnerability was also found on the VMG8825-T50 router, but it turns out to be present in multiple other Zyxel devices.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.10 LTS Status and More Stables Releases of Linux Announced Today

  • Linux 5.10 LTS Will Only Be Maintained Until EOY 2022 Unless More Companies Step Up

    Announced a few years ago was the notion of "extended" LTS kernel versions whereby the long term support cycle would span six years rather than the usual two years for LTS kernels in providing maintenance and bug/security fixes to the codebase. This means Linux 5.4 LTS is supported until the end of 2025, Linux 4.19 until the end of 2024, and even Linux 4.14 until the start of 2024. But with the recently minted Linux 5.10 LTS at least for now it's only being committed to maintenance until the end of next year. There's been differing remarks/indications for how long the Linux 5.10 long-term support cycle would last with many expecting six years given that's what has been happening on recent LTS kernels -- even the Linux 4.4 kernel is being planned for maintenance until February 2022 and Linux 4.9 until 2023. Linux stable maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has now provided a more transparent answer on the Linux kernel mailing list stemming from the talk over how long Linux 5.10 will be maintained.

  • Three stable kernels

    Stable kernels 5.10.11, 5.4.93, and 4.19.171 have been released. They contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

  • 5.10.11
  • 5.4.93
  • 4.19.171

Security and FUD

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (sudo), CentOS (sudo), Debian (sudo), Fedora (kernel, php-pear, and sudo), Gentoo (cacti, mutt, and sudo), Mageia (sudo), openSUSE (sudo), Oracle (sudo), Red Hat (sudo), Scientific Linux (sudo), Slackware (sudo), SUSE (go1.14, go1.15, nodejs8, and sudo), and Ubuntu (libsndfile and sudo).

  • Mimecast admits certificate compromise tied to SolarWinds supply chain attack

    Email security firm Mimecast has admitted that the compromise of a certificate it had issued for some Microsoft services is connected to the SolarWinds supply chain incident.

  • SolarWinds Cyberattack: Layered OT Security Creates Best Defense

    The recent SolarWinds supply chain cyberattacks serve to underscore an age-old cybersecurity tenant, and the reason we need to continue beating the drum as cybersecurity professionals: Use a layered approach to OT security. This incident highlights a rare, specific use case of a nation state threat actor, an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). In this particular case, layers provided somewhat limited value, but helped keep the less skilled attackers – about 99% of those on the playing field – at bay. Technology boundaries can be used to lessen the impact of (but unfortunately not prevent) nation state APTs. They not only offer additional protection, they may also help expose the presence of APTs in your network. Let’s examine how they would have helped in the case of APTs like the Sunburst malware that infected SolarWinds Orion software and was downloaded by 18,000 organizations.

  • Linux malware uses open-source tool to evade detection [Ed: How pro-Microsoft propaganda sites blame for a tool which comes from Microsoft (GitHub) "Open Source" and "Linux" (though it is the fault of neither). Alternative headline: Microsoft malware is being used to attack machines that run GNU/Linux]

    This tool is known as libprocesshider and is an open-source tool available on Github that can be used to hide any Linux process with the help of the ld preloader.

AMD Schedutil vs. Performance Governor Benchmarks On Linux 5.11 Shows More Upside Potential

With a pending patch, the Linux 5.11 AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 performance is looking very good as far as the out-of-the-box performance is concerned when using Schedutil as is becoming the increasingly default CPU frequency scaling governor on more distributions / default kernels. With the previously noted Linux 5.11 regression addressed from when the AMD CPU frequency invariance support was first introduced, the Schedutil performance from small Ryzen systems up through big EPYC hardware is looking quite good. But how much upside is left in relation to the optimal CPU frequency scaling performance with the "performance" governor? Here is a look at those benchmarks on Ryzen and EPYC for Schedutil vs. Performance on a patched Linux 5.11 kernel. Read more

today's howtos

  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions. Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself. But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast! So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective. I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021. OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction. There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20. Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only). Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos. It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software? Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.