Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 25 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Raspberry Pi analog input board has weather station option

Filed under
Linux

RasPi.TV has Kickstartered a $12 “RasPiO Analog Zero” Raspberry Pi add-on board the size of an Raspberry Pi Zero. It offers eight 10-bit analog inputs.

The RasPiO Analog Zero has surpassed its Kickstarter goals, and is available through May 31 starting at 8 Pounds ($12). Designed for reading up to eight analog sensors simultaneously on a Raspberry Pi, the add-on board is matched to the size of the 65 x 30mm Raspberry Pi Zero. However, it plugs into any Pi with a 40-pin expansion connector, and can work with older 26-pin Pi models with the help of an adapter.

Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 Development Continues, Now with UEFI Support for 64-bit Platforms

Filed under
Development
BSD

Today, May 25, 2016, GhostBSD maintainer Eric Turgeon announced the general availability of the second Alpha release of the upcoming GhostBSD 10.3 operating system.

Read more

Samsung still undecided on their Android Wear future

Filed under
Android

Yesterday the Internet lit up like a Christmas tree with the news that Samsung was no longer going to use Android Wear for any of its Smartwatches, but it seems that might not be quite the case. The report from Fast Company cited some Samsung executives confirming that Samsung was not looking into developing any further Android Wear products. Now, In a statement provided to the Engadget website Samsung states: “We disagree with Fast Company’s interpretation. Samsung has not made any announcement concerning Android Wear and we have not changed our commitment to any of our platforms.”

Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile.

However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep.

Read more

Whatever Happened To Ubuntu Light?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Amidst the onslaught of Intel-based netbooks in the late 2000s was a custom instant-on OS from Canonical. Ubuntu Light was to be a proverbial glint of free software at the end of a tunnel crowded by clones.

It was a way for OEMs to add extra value to their Windows devices and differentiate themselves from competitors.

It was a way for users to dip their toes into Ubuntu rather than drown at the deep end.

And yet…you are probably having a hard time recalling it.

Read more

7 Essential Skill-Building Courses for the Open Source Jobs Market

Filed under
OSS

Dice and The Linux Foundation recently released an updated Open Source Jobs Report that examines trends in open source recruiting and job seeking. The report clearly shows that open source professionals are in demand and that those with open source experience have a strong advantage when seeking jobs in the tech industry. Additionally, 87 percent of hiring managers say it’s hard to find open source talent.

Read more

Everything you need to know about Linux Commands

Filed under
Linux

It won't be long after starting to use Linux that you ask a question and the answer begins with, "Open a terminal and..." At this point, you may be thrown into an alien environment with typed Linux commands instead of cheery-looking icons. But the terminal is not alien, it's just different.

You are used to a GUI now, but you had to learn that, and the same applies to the command line. This raises an obvious question: "I already know how to use a windowed desktop, why must I learn something different?"

Read more

Red Hat: The Answer is always the same: Layers of Security

Filed under
Red Hat

There is a common misperception that now that containers support seccomp we no longer need SELinux to help protect our systems. WRONG. The big weakness in containers is the container possesses the ability to interact with the host kernel and the host file systems. Securing the container processes is all about shrinking the attack surface on the host OS and more specifically on the host kernel.

Read more

Google to bring official Android support to the Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

The Raspberry Pi 3 is not hurting for operating system choices. The tiny ARM computer is supported by several Linux distributions and even has a version of Windows 10 IoT core available. Now, it looks like the Pi is about to get official support for one of the most popular operating systems out there: Android. In Google's Android Open Source Project (AOSP) repository, a new device tree recently popped up for the Raspberry Pi 3.

Raspberry Pis, if you're not aware, are cheap, credit card-sized, single board ARM computers with a focus on education and open source software. Hardware hackers and DIYers love the Pi due to its open nature, small size, and plethora of ports and software.

Read more

CentOS Linux 6.8 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8

Filed under
OS
Linux

CentOS developer and maintainer Johnny Hughes today, May 25, 2016, had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the CentOS Linux 6.8 operating system.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Switches to GTK3, Adopts Snap Packages for the MATE Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Softpedia was informed a few moments ago by Martin Wimpress about the development plan for the next major release of the Ubuntu MATE computer operating system.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Moving To GTK3

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu specs and features

    Canonical's Meizu line of smartphones may not mean a lot to UK readers, but the Pro 5 should help to raise its profile.

    Unlike its competitors the Meizu Pro 5 runs the Ubuntu operating system. This approach means it relies less on apps and more on an integrated experience.

    It's just as powerful as the Samsung Galaxy S6, but does that mean it's worth your cash?

  • What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

  • Coming soon! First ever certification for open hardware

    At the Summit, OSHWA will launch the first ever (version 1) of the open source hardware certification, administered by OSHWA. This certification is designed to benefit at least two parts of the open source hardware community.

    First, it benefits purchasers of open source hardware by making it easy to identify truly open source hardware in the marketplace. Projects and products obtaining certification and displaying the certification logo clearly communicate a commonly agreed upon definition of openness with customers and users. While certification is not a condition for openness, obtaining certification is a way to make it clear to others that a given project is open source hardware.

  • 3 alternatives to resumes for hiring talent

    By 2020, there will be 1.4 million new computer science jobs but only 400,000 computer science students. The number of computer science jobs is growing twice as fast as the national average for job growth. Hiring is not a filtering problem anymore, it's a sourcing problem. We need to "sell" our companies and hire the most qualified people before our competitors do.

  • Open-source blueprint Pepperoni released for mobile development

    Named Pepperoni, the development team behind this open-source project has been working for more than 10 months trying to build apps and learning the best ways to do it using React Native. The company powering Pepperoni is Futurice, a software consulting company that creates digital services for its customers. Futurice is also behind the open-source social impact Spice Program, where it serves as advocate of open-source projects.

  • Install GrandCMS on an Ubuntu VPS
  • Install GLPI (IT and asset Managemet Software) on Ubuntu 16.04 Server

Leftovers: Software (Nginx, GitLab, Gammu)

Filed under
Software
  • Nginx 1.11 Web Server Released

    Version 1.11 of the open-source, high-performance Nginx web-server is now available.

    Nginx 1.11 presents a new transparent parameter for several options, support for loading multiple certificates of different types, various other security-related changes, a $proxy_protocol_port variable, some HTTP/2 changes, and more.

  • GitLab 8.8 released with Pipelines and .gitignore templates

    Fresh off our third GitLab Summit, this time in Austin, Texas, we are releasing our 54th consecutive release on the 22nd of the month. Sunday or not, we are not slowing our release schedule and are excited to show you what we're launching today. GitLab 8.8 is ready to go with GitLab CI improvements, performance enhancements, convenient templates, and more!

  • Gammu release day

    There has been some silence on the Gammu release front and it's time to change that. Today all Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu have been released. As you might guess all are bugfix releases.

OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha

Filed under
SUSE

Android/Chromebook

Filed under
Android
Google
  • No more Android Wear watches says Samsung, Tizen all the way !

    Samsung has been getting pretty serious about its Smartwatches and has certainly excelled with its latest creation, the Tizen based Gear S2. The company has had a little dabble with Android wear in the past, with the Galaxy Gear Live, and since has been focusing on Tizen. According to a report from Fast Company stating that “no more Samsung Android Wear devices are in development or being planned.” This is according to a Samsung executive. The report goes further to say that Samsung executives are going with Tizen because it’s “far more battery-efficient than Android Wear” and “the standard OS on other Samsung products from TVs to refrigerators.”

  • Are games too easy to pirate on Android?

    It's long been known that game developers make much more money on iOS than they do on Google's Android platform. The most recent example of this is Monument Valley. The developers of the game posted an article on Medium with infographics that show that 73% of their revenue comes from iOS, while only 17% comes from Android.

  • Google Trust API Will Replace Your Passwords With A ‘Trust Score’

    In the wake of increasing security threats and password leaks, Google is working on Project Abacus that will introduce Trust API in Android devices. This API will calculate your Trust Score and use them to give you access to various services. This score will be calculated by using a variety of user patterns.

  • Monument Valley in Numbers: Year 2
  • And the winners of the Google Play Awards are…
  • Why are Chromebooks outselling Macs?
  • Fancy ChromiumOS, Ubuntu, And Android TV All-In-One System

    If you are looking for a mini PC that is capable of running ChromiumOS, Ubuntu LTS, and Android TV operating systems, you may be interested in a new mini desktop computer system that has been created by Dylan Callahan.

    The Fancy mini PC is a “handcrafted personal computer” that is now available to purchase price to $225 plus shipping and is powered by a Quad Core x86 2.0 Ghz processor supported by 4K AMD Radeon graphics that is supported by 4GB of DDR3 RAM.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Linksys Sees Value Open Source Market for WRT Wireless Routers

    The wireless router world remains safe for open source -- at least for users of certain Linksys Wi-Fi devices, which will still allow the installation of open source firmware like DD-WRT after new FCC rules take effect next week.

    Here's the back story: Last fall, the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) introduced new regulations that required device manufacturers to ensure "that third parties are not able to reprogram the device to operate outside the parameters for which the device was certified." Those rules go into effect June 2.

  • Keynote: How Enterprises are Leveraging Open Source Analytics Platforms

    In this Keynote, Luciano Resende, Architect, Spark Technology Center at IBM, will showcase Open source Analytic platforms. Luciano will also discuss how they are being leveraged by different organizations to upend their competition, as well as enable new use cases.

  • Verizon’s Open Source Network Points Way For Enterprises
  • An open source toolbox for pure mathematics

    The field of pure mathematics has always depended on computers to make tables, prove theorems and explore new theories. Today, computer aided experiments and the use of databases relying on computer calculations are part of the pure mathematician's standard toolbox. In fact, these tools have become so important that some areas of mathematics are now completely dependent on them.

  • Asa Dotzler: My New Role @ Mozilla

    After a couple of years working on Mozilla’s mobile operating system project, I’m coming back to Firefox!

    I’ll be doing some familiar things and some new things. My official title is Product Manager, Firefox Roadmap and Community. What that means, first and foremost, is that I’ll be returning as our storyteller, making sure that we’re communicating regularly about where Firefox is heading, and that we’re fully engaged with Firefox users, fans, and contributors.

Big Data and Databases

Filed under
Server
OSS

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Server

There is a lot of interesting buzz around specialized container hosts, rump kernels, and unikernels because they hold the potential to revolutionize certain workloads (embedded, cloud, etc.). Keep your eye on this exciting, fast moving space, but cautiously.

Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

Here's to an exciting future of containers, rump kernels, and unikernels!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile. However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep. Read more

Whatever Happened To Ubuntu Light?

Amidst the onslaught of Intel-based netbooks in the late 2000s was a custom instant-on OS from Canonical. Ubuntu Light was to be a proverbial glint of free software at the end of a tunnel crowded by clones. It was a way for OEMs to add extra value to their Windows devices and differentiate themselves from competitors. It was a way for users to dip their toes into Ubuntu rather than drown at the deep end. And yet…you are probably having a hard time recalling it. Read more

7 Essential Skill-Building Courses for the Open Source Jobs Market

Dice and The Linux Foundation recently released an updated Open Source Jobs Report that examines trends in open source recruiting and job seeking. The report clearly shows that open source professionals are in demand and that those with open source experience have a strong advantage when seeking jobs in the tech industry. Additionally, 87 percent of hiring managers say it’s hard to find open source talent. Read more

Everything you need to know about Linux Commands

It won't be long after starting to use Linux that you ask a question and the answer begins with, "Open a terminal and..." At this point, you may be thrown into an alien environment with typed Linux commands instead of cheery-looking icons. But the terminal is not alien, it's just different. You are used to a GUI now, but you had to learn that, and the same applies to the command line. This raises an obvious question: "I already know how to use a windowed desktop, why must I learn something different?" Read more