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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Vega 10, Kaasimir, Xwayland GSoC 2017 Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:12pm
Story Kernel: NOVA, Genpool Subsystem, Automotive Grade Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:10pm
Story Software: GnuCash, Minuet, Citrix, and YouTube Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:08pm
Story Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:06pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:05pm
Story Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:04pm
Story Ubuntu: Themes and Icons, MAAS, Podcast and More Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:02pm
Story Debian: DebConf17, DebCamp and More Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 4:00pm
Story KDE: KStars, KWin, Go support in KDevelop, Qt News, Plasma Mobile, Shelf and More Akademy Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 3:59pm
Story GNOME/GTK: GUADEC, COSCUP, Themes and WebKitGTK+ Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2017 - 3:57pm

Graphics: Vega 10, Kaasimir, Xwayland GSoC 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vega 10 Huge Page Support, Lower CS Overhead For AMDGPU In Linux 4.14

    With this weekend marking the ending of David Airlie accepting new feature material for DRM-Next to in turn land in the Linux 4.14 cycle in a few weeks, there's a rush by Direct Rendering Manager driver maintainers to submit the last of their new feature work of changes they want in this next kernel release.

  • [Video] [ReactOS] Introducing Kaasimir - GPU Testing Made Simple

    It makes use of QEMU, PCI-Express Passthrough, and eRIC Express KVM-over-IP cards to provide ReactOS VMs with real GPUs attached. Testing a GPU driver in ReactOS is now as easy as testing ReactOS in a VM.

  • End in Sight

    The last week of GSoC 2017 is about to begin. My project is in a pretty good state I would say: I have created a big solution for the Xwayland Present support, which is integrated firmly and not just attached to the main code path like an afterthought. But there are still some issues to sort out. Especially the correct cleanup of objects is difficult. That’s only a problem with sub-surfaces though. So, if I’m not able to solve these issues in the next few days I’ll just allow full window flips. This would still include all full screen windows and for example also the Steam client as it’s directly rendering its full windows without usage of the compositor.

Kernel: NOVA, Genpool Subsystem, Automotive Grade Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • [Older] The NOVA filesystem [Ed: used to be behind paywall]

    Nonvolatile memory offers the promise of fast, byte-addressable storage that persists over power cycles. Taking advantage of that promise requires the imposition of some sort of directory structure so that the persistent data can be found. There are a few approaches to the implementation of such structures, but the usual answer is to employ a filesystem, since managing access to persistent data is what filesystems were created to do. But traditional filesystems are not a perfect match to nonvolatile memory, so there is a natural interest in new filesystems that were designed for this media from the beginning. The recently posted NOVA filesystem is a new entry in this race.

    The filesystems that are currently in use were designed with a specific set of assumptions in mind. Storage is slow, so it is worth expending a considerable amount of CPU power and memory to minimize accesses to the underlying device. Rotational storage imposes a huge performance penalty on non-sequential operations, so there is great value in laying out data consecutively. Sector I/O is atomic; either an entire sector will be written, or it will be unchanged. All of these assumptions (and more) are wired deeply into most filesystems, but they are all incorrect for nonvolatile memory devices. As a result, while filesystems like XFS or ext4 can be sped up considerably on such devices, the chances are good that a filesystem designed from the beginning with nonvolatile memory in mind will perform better and be more resistant to data corruption.

    NOVA is intended to be such a filesystem. It is not just unsuited for regular block devices, it cannot use them at all, since it does not use the kernel's block layer. Instead, it works directly with storage mapped into the kernel's address space. A filesystem implementation gives up a lot if it avoids the block layer: request coalescing, queue management, prioritization of requests, and more. On the other hand, it saves the overhead imposed by the block layer and, when it comes to nonvolatile memory performance, cutting down on CPU overhead is a key part of performing well.

  • [Older] The kernel's genpool subsystem

    The kernel is a huge program; among other things, that means that many problems encountered by a kernel developer have already been solved somewhere else in the tree. But those solutions are not always well known or documented. Recently, a seasoned developer confessed to having never encountered the "genpool" memory allocator. This little subsystem does not appear in the kernel documentation, and is likely to be unknown to others as well. In the interest of fixing both of those problems, here is an overview of genpool (or "genalloc") and what it does.

    There are a number of memory-allocation subsystems in the kernel, each aimed at a specific need. Sometimes, however, a kernel developer needs to implement a new allocator for a specific range of special-purpose memory; often that memory is located on a device somewhere. The author of the driver for that device can certainly write a little allocator to get the job done, but that is the way to fill the kernel with dozens of poorly tested allocators. Back in 2005, Jes Sorensen lifted one of those allocators from the sym53c8xx_2 driver and posted it as a generic module for the creation of ad hoc memory allocators. This code was merged for the 2.6.13 release; it has been modified considerably since then.

  • Advancing Connected-Car Technology Through Linux

    Automotive Grade Linux—which just launched its UCB 4.0 platform—and GENIVI take somewhat different paths to accelerate the development and adoption of an open software stack for IVI systems.

Software: GnuCash, Minuet, Citrix, and YouTube

Filed under
Software
  • Escape from QuickBooks (with data in hand)

    When a small business contemplates getting away from a proprietary accounting tool like QuickBooks in favor of free software like GnuCash, the first order of business is usually finding a way to liberate that business's accounting data for input into a new system. Strangely enough, Intuit, the creator of QuickBooks, never quite got around to making that easy to do. But it turns out that, with a bit of effort, this move can be made. Getting there involves wandering through an undocumented wilderness; this article is at attempt to make things easier for the next people to come along.

  • Minuet – a guitar adventure

    As you remember from my last post, minuet currently supports multiple plugins to display its exercises. To change from one plugin to another, all you have to do is to press on the desired instrument name: for now, only “Guitar” and “Piano” are available.

  • Available Now: Linux VDA 7.15 LTSR!

    Originally, XenApp and XenDesktop releases occurred around once a year, similar to the Academy Awards, and contained significant updates. Many large enterprise customers needed to assess which version would be ideal to standardize their main production environment on for the coming years, unlike other customers seeking the latest features and capabilities who felt that the releases were not soon enough or feature requirements had changed over time.

  • [Video] YouTube screws us again and Linux is screwing itself.

    Google is up to their old tricks again.They have figured how to ripoff their content providers with a new ad algorithm. Meanwhile, Linux podcasting is a clown show and I'm sick of dealing with it.

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?

    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation.

    I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?

    [...]

    What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months.

    But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture.

    And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.

  • Fedora Design Interns 2017

    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.

  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

Filed under
Security
  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device

     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]

     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]

     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem

     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it

    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday.

    The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.

  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security

    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device.

    The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.

Ubuntu: Themes and Icons, MAAS, Podcast and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Some interesting Ubuntu themes and icons

    Well, I guess there isn't much to say. If you like the stock looks, ignore this article. If you find the defaults not colorful or fun enough, or you just plain like tweaking, then you might want to consider some of the stuff I've outlined here. My taste is subjective, of course, but then, I aim for simple, clean designs and pleasing art work.

    Overall, you have a plenty of good options here. More icons than themes. Vimix or Arc seem like neat choices for the latter, and among the sea of icons, Moka, Numix and Uniform seem to do a great job. And of course, Macbuntu. I wish there were more monochrome or accented icons, but that's something I still haven't found. Anyhow, I hope you like this silly little piece. If you have suggestions, please send them, just remember my aesthetics criteria - simplicity of installation, clean lines, no gradients, no bugs. That would be all for today, fellas.

  • 7 of the Best Icon Themes for Ubuntu

    On a hunt to find the best icon themes for Ubuntu? Well, you’ve come to the right post place!

    In this post we will show you some of the best icon themes for Ubuntu, ranging from modern, flat icon sets, to a circular icon pack carrying a colourful twist.

    Oh, and as this article is constantly updated you don’t need to fret about any of the links or information being out of date. Feel free to bookmark this list for future reference, or share it on social media.

  • MAAS Development Summary – August 18th, 2017
  • S10E24 – Fierce Hurried Start
  • conjure-up dev summary: aws native integration, vsphere <3, and ADDONS

Debian: DebConf17, DebCamp and More

Filed under
Debian

KDE: KStars, KWin, Go support in KDevelop, Qt News, Plasma Mobile, Shelf and More Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • KStars 2.8.1 "Hipster" Release is out!

    The highlight for this release is experimental support for HiPS: Hierarchical Progressive Surveys. HiPS provides multi-resolution progressive surveys to be overlayed directly in client applications, such as KStars. It provides an immersive experience as you can explore the night sky dynamically.

    With over 200+ surveys across the whole electromagnetic spectrum from radio, infrared, visual, to even gamma rays, the user can pan and zoom progressively deeper into the data visually.

  • Distribution management – how Upstream ensures Downstream keeps the Quality

    I read Emmanuele Bassi’s very interesting blog post about software distribution this week and thought a lot about it. Emmanuele kind of answers to a presentation by Richard Brown (from OpenSUSE fame). While I haven’t seen that presentation, I saw a similar one last year at the openSUSE conference and also talked with Richard about the topic. So I dare to think that I understand Richard’s arguments and even agree with most of them.

    Nevertheless I want to share some of my thoughts on the topic from the perspective of KWin maintainership. KWin is more part of the OS stack, so distributing through means like Flatpack are not a valid option IMHO. As KWin is close to the OS, we have a very well integration with distributions. Plasma (which KWin is part of) has dedicated packager groups in most distributions, we have a direct communication channel to the distros, we know our packagers in large parts in person, etc. etc. So from the open source distribution model we are in the best category. We are better positioned than let’s say a new game which needs to be distributed.

  • Go support in KDevelop. GSoC week 11. Code completion and bug fixing.
  • Introducing QtMqtt
  • 2017 for Qt Contributors

    This is a good year to be a Qt contributor.

    There was Qt Day Italy in June. From what I hear, the event was a success. The talks were great and everything worked. This was the sixth Qt Day Italy, so there is tradition behind this event!

    Even though it is not a Qt event, KDE Akademy is worth mentioning. Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community. This year Akademy was in Almeria Spain, in late July, 22nd to 27th. KDE has over the years brought many excellent developers to Qt, and they are definitely the biggest open source project using Qt.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Officially Out, More Apps Were Ported to KDE Frameworks 5

    The KDE Project is pleased to announce the release and general availability of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite primarily designed for KDE Plasma 5 desktop environments, but also compatible with other desktops and window managers.

    KDE Applications 17.08 has been in development since mid-July 2017, and it received both a Beta and an RC build that users could test on their GNU/Linux distros if they had access to these pre-release packages. But the final release is now officially out and it's coming soon to the repos of your favorite operating system.

    "We have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier. Enjoy your new apps," reads the release announcement.

  • Modest Wallpaper Tweaks
  • Sixth Blog Gsoc 2017

    Hi, this post is general information about telemetry in Krita. I want to clarify some points.

    Soon we will launch a preliminary testing of my branch. In case of successful testing, it will go into one of the closest releases of Krita (not 3.2). Krita must follow the policy of the KDE on information gathering. What information do we want to collect?

  • Plasma Mobile - Journey Towards Open Mobile Platform (slides from Akademy 2017)
  • Documents Shelf [KAMD, KAStats]

    Once upon a time, for those who remember the old days of Plasma and Lancelot, there was an experimental applet called Shelf.

    The idea behind the Shelf was that sometimes it is useful to have a small applet that just shows your recent files, favourite applications, devices, which you can place on your panel or desktop for quick access.

    Now, this post is not about a revival of Lancelot and Shelf (sadly), but it is closely related to them.

    Namely, I always disliked the “recent documents” section that is available in almost all launchers in Plasma. The reason is that only one in ten of those documents has a chance to ever be opened again.

  • Running applications and unittests without "make install"

    In our Akademy presentation, Kévin and I showed the importance for a better developer story to be able to work on a KDE module without having to install it. Running unittests and running applications without installing the module at all is possible, it turns out, it just needs a bit of effort to set things up correctly.

GNOME/GTK: GUADEC, COSCUP, Themes and WebKitGTK+

Filed under
GNOME
  • [Video] GUADEC 2017 - Richard Brown - Resurrecting dinosaurs, what could possibly go wrong

    GUADEC is GNOME's annual user and developer European conference. This year GUADEC took place in the city of Manchester, UK with 45 talks and more than 200 attendees. Thanks this year's GUADEC sponsors for making the conference happen. For more information see: http://2017.guadec.org

  • Post-GUADEC distractions

    We finally picked it up this year. I produced a better cairo patch, which we reviewed, fixed and merged during the unconference days at GUADEC. Behdad also wrote and merged the necessary changes for fontconfig, so we can have an “emoji” font family, and made pango automatically choose that font when it finds Emoji.

    After guadec, I worked on the input side in GTK+. As a first result, it is now possible to use Control-Shift-e to select Emoji by name or code.

  • My first (and definitely not the last) GUADEC!

    I recently attended GNOME Users and Developers European Conference (GUADEC) 2017 held in Manchester, UK. It was my first time in the UK and my first time at a conference and needless to say, I had a wonderful time.

    [...]

    Lots of social events and fun activities were organised. The GNOME 20th Anniversary party was one of the best parties I’ve been to yet.

  • Report for COSCUP 2017

    As a GNOME Foundation member, together with Bin Li, we have a task to promote GNOME and collaborate with Local Free Desktop community in this COSCUP.

  • Shipping PKCS7 signed metadata and firmware
  • Plano Another Flat Theme For Gnome And Xfce Desktop

    There are many flat themes available for Linux desktops, you may have favorite one also. Plano another flat theme specially designed for Gnome and Xfce desktops. It is compatible with Gtk 3.24/3.22/3.20 versions, if you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download zip file directly from theme page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". There is also theme for Gnome Shell which can go along with its Gtk version. If you find any kind of bug or issue within this theme then report it to creator and hopefully he will fix it soon.

  • Vimix Gtk Themes Available in Dark and Light Variants for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    There isn't much theme development going on for latest Ubuntu release since it requires theme creator to build their theme from scratch for new GTK versions, it seems development almost went away but there are still people who are giving their free time just to make your desktop elegant, make sure to support them as well. Vimix GTK themes available in dark and light version and for GTK 3.20/3.22 there are more variants which means you get more themes on latest 16.10 desktop. It is a flat Material Design theme designed for GTK 3, GTK 2 and Gnome Shell based on Flat-Plat theme, and these themes are compatible with most of the desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Mate, Cinnamon, Xfce, Budgie and so on. If you find any kind of bug or issue within this theme then report it to creator via linked page. Shadow and Papirus icons used in the following screenshots. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool.

  • The coming WebKitGTK+ 2.4 apocalypse

    It is well understood that old and unmaintained software tends to be a breeding ground for security problems. These problems are never welcome, but they are particularly worrying when the software in question is a net-facing tool like a web browser. Standalone browsers are (hopefully) reasonably well maintained, but those are not the only web browsers out there; they can also be embedded into applications. The effort to do away with one unmaintained embedded browser is finally approaching its conclusion, but the change appears to have caught some projects unaware.

    In early 2016, Michael Catanzaro sounded the alarm about security issues with the widely used WebKitGTK+ browser engine. At the time, security issues were turning up in WebKitGTK+ with great regularity, but nobody was calling them out as such; as a result, they were not getting CVE numbers and distributors were not bothering to ship updates. That created a situation where Linux desktop systems were routinely running software that was known to have security issues that, in many cases, could be exploited via a hostile web page or HTML email attachment.

Docker Pivots to Proprietary

Filed under
Server

Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W: Linux computing in an even smaller package

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

When the original Raspberry Pi (Rpi) became available in 2012, it was amazing that a Linux computer could fit in the palm of your hand for the low, low price of $35. On the other hand, if you’re a student without a real job, for which these boards were in part intended, $35 can still be a lot of money. To bring this cost down even further, the RPi team announced the RPi Zero in late 2015, which is available for $5, and even came as a “gift” on the cover of that December’s MagPi magazine.

Read more

Canonical Unveils the Ubuntu Dock, Here's What It Looks Like on Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu contributor and Open Source developer Didier Roche had the pleasure of revealing today the Ubuntu Dock, Canonical's modification of the Dash to Dock extension for the GNOME desktop environment of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 operating system.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Dock Now Present By Default In Ubuntu 17.10's GNOME Session

Ubuntu MATE Devs Need Your Help to Fix a Critical Bug in Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Martin Wimpress and the devs behind Ubuntu MATE, an official flavor of the widely-used Ubuntu operating system, have discovered a critical bug in the GVFS (GNOME Virtual File System) component and they need your help before they can fix it.

Read more

Linux Mint-Based feren OS Gets Upgraded to Linux Mint 18.2, USB Boot Improved

Filed under
Linux

The developers of the feren OS GNU/Linux distribution based on the popular Linux Mint operating system announced the release of August 2017's snapshot ISO with many enhancements and updated components.

Read more

SBC expands on 2GHz Rockchip RK3399 with eye-popping feature list

Filed under
Android
Linux

Videostrong’s new SBC runs Android 7.1 or Ubuntu on the RK3399 with 2GB RAM plus GbE, WiFi, BT, HDMI 2.0, DP 1.2, MIPI-CSI, USB 3.0, and mini-PCIe.

Shenzhen-based Android set-top box maker Videostrong has released a “VS-RD-RK3399” development kit built around the Rockchip RK3399. The OEM focused single-board computer sells for $250 individually, but can be had for $149 in 1,000+ OEM volumes. The kit is available in otherwise identical Android 7.1 and Ubuntu with Linux 4.4.55 SKUs, with the latter drawing on Rockchip’s increasingly capable Linux support.

Read more

Tor “can’t build free and open source tools” and stop racists from using them

Filed under
OSS
Security

The Tor Project has reiterated its absolutist commitment to free speech, saying that even though Daily Stormer recently moved to a Tor onion service, the organization won’t do anything to stop the "hate-spewing website."

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Stealth Warship Runs On Linux and Doesn't Need Humans to Defend Itself

    In the ongoing fight between Macs and PCs, it's hard to deny that Linux has the biggest actual firepower. Case in point: the USS Zumwalt, the most advanced surface ship in existence, which weighs in at over 10,000 tons and features 80 missile silos (its Tomahawk missiles can cover a distance of 1,550 miles), as well as a main gun that fires rocket-assisted, GPS-guided rounds (which can hit within 30 inches of a target roughly 72 miles away). What's really interesting, though, is its ability to detect, analyze, and respond to potential threats, all without the need for human intervention at all. This is where Linux comes in.

  • The Default Wallpaper of Plasma 5.11

    Meet the new KDE Plasma default wallpaper set to ship in the the next major stable release, Plasma 5.11, later this year.

  • Krita 3.2.0 Supports Smart Patching Elements in Paintings and 7 New Brushes Presets

    Krita Team has announced a new release Krita 3.2.0 It brought many new substantial features will enhance creating a high-quality painting. Many bugs have been fixed since the earlier stable release Krita 3.1.4 released 3 months ago. Let’s take a quick look at what’s new in Krita 3.2.0.

  • Bodhi 2.10.0 released
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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?
    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation. I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks? [...] What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months. But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture. And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.
  • Fedora Design Interns 2017
    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.
  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

today's howtos

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device
     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]
     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]
     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem
     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it
    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday. The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.
  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security
    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.

Ubuntu: Themes and Icons, MAAS, Podcast and More

  • Some interesting Ubuntu themes and icons
    Well, I guess there isn't much to say. If you like the stock looks, ignore this article. If you find the defaults not colorful or fun enough, or you just plain like tweaking, then you might want to consider some of the stuff I've outlined here. My taste is subjective, of course, but then, I aim for simple, clean designs and pleasing art work. Overall, you have a plenty of good options here. More icons than themes. Vimix or Arc seem like neat choices for the latter, and among the sea of icons, Moka, Numix and Uniform seem to do a great job. And of course, Macbuntu. I wish there were more monochrome or accented icons, but that's something I still haven't found. Anyhow, I hope you like this silly little piece. If you have suggestions, please send them, just remember my aesthetics criteria - simplicity of installation, clean lines, no gradients, no bugs. That would be all for today, fellas.
  • 7 of the Best Icon Themes for Ubuntu
    On a hunt to find the best icon themes for Ubuntu? Well, you’ve come to the right post place! In this post we will show you some of the best icon themes for Ubuntu, ranging from modern, flat icon sets, to a circular icon pack carrying a colourful twist. Oh, and as this article is constantly updated you don’t need to fret about any of the links or information being out of date. Feel free to bookmark this list for future reference, or share it on social media.
  • MAAS Development Summary – August 18th, 2017
  • S10E24 – Fierce Hurried Start
  • conjure-up dev summary: aws native integration, vsphere <3, and ADDONS