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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu! Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 3:22am
Story A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 3:12am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 3:11am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 2:19am
Story R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 2:17am
Story Lakka 2.0 stable release! Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:57am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:55am
Story SparkyLinux Now Powered by Linux 4.10.13, Budgie Desktop Removed from Repos Roy Schestowitz 30/04/2017 - 1:49am
Story Raspbian PIXEL Fork Lets You Install and Run the Operating System on a PC or Mac Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2017 - 5:27pm
Story Ubuntu 17.10 Won't Ship with Upstart and CGManager as Unity 8 Is Being Dropped Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2017 - 5:24pm

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today.

And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking?

Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

Filed under
Android
  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated

    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both.

    After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets.

    I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.

  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Anonymous Open Source Projects

    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this.

    I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets.

    Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces.

    Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements.

    Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.

  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead

    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing.

    Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left.

    Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.

  • This Week In Creative Commons History

    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.

  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards

    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution

    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users.

    The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.

  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell

    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0!

This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated!

We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult.

Read more

Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

SparkyLinux Now Powered by Linux 4.10.13, Budgie Desktop Removed from Repos

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Polish developers of the Debian-based SparkyLinux operating system are ending the month of April by informing the community about everything good or bad that happened to their open-source project during the last few weeks.

First thing first, the distribution is now powered by the latest stable kernel, Linux 4.10.13, so you are urged to update your SparkyLinux installation as soon as possible, and remember to reboot the machine after installing the new kernel. Enlightenment's EFL libraries were also updated, to version 1.19.0.

Read more

Raspbian PIXEL Fork Lets You Install and Run the Operating System on a PC or Mac

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the availability of new builds of his AndEX Nougat 7.1.1 Android-x86 fork that lets users run Android 7.1.1 on their PCs, now Arne Exton released a custom build of Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspbian PIXEL image.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Won't Ship with Upstart and CGManager as Unity 8 Is Being Dropped

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov informs the Ubuntu Linux and Ubuntu Touch communities that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system will drop support for the Upstart init daemon and CGManager project.

Read more

Benchmarking Various Linux Distributions With Amazon's EC2 Cloud In 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

After carrying out the recent Amazon EC2 Cloud benchmarks vs. Intel/AMD CPUs I also decided to run some Linux distribution tests in the Elastic Compute Cloud with not having done any such comparisons in a long time. So for those wondering how different Linux distributions compare in Amazon's cloud, this article is for you.

Read more

This Custom Android-x86 Build Puts Android 7.1.1 on Your PC, with Linux 4.11 RC7

Filed under
Android
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton was happy to announce the release of a new build of his custom built Android-x86 project that lets uses runs the latest Android mobile operating system on their personal computers.

Read more

Clear Linux Announces Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6 with Docker 17.04.0 Support

Filed under
Linux

Clear Linux's Kent Helm was proud to announce the release and general availability of Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6, a maintenace update that promises to improve compatibility with recent Docker releases, but also adds various bug fixes.

Read more

Nantes Métropole releases open source tool for LibreOffice transition

Filed under
LibO
OSS

The French city of Nantes (Nantes Métropole) has released an open source tool used to schedule its migration to LibreOffice. The shift from commercial software to the free and open source LibreOffice productivity suite started in 2013 and is intended to save the administration EUR 260 000 per year. The transition was finalised in April 2016.

Read more

In-Development Software

Filed under
Development
  • Chromium Now Enables GTK3 For 32-Bit Builds
  • Oracle Outs VirtualBox 5.1.22 and 5.0.40 Maintenance Releases to Fix ALSA Issues

    Oracle released two new maintenance updates of its open-source and cross-platform virtualization software, VirtualBox 5.1.22 and VirtualBox 5.0.40, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows.

    Both VirtualBox 5.1.22 and VirtualBox 5.0.40 are bugfix releases that come about ten days after the launch of the previous updates, in this case VirtualBox 5.1.20 and VirtualBox 5.0.38. They include pretty much the same changes with small exceptions.

  • GNOME 3.25.1 Released

    GNOME 3.25.1 is now available as the first development milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26.

  • ETSI announces the latest release of its Open Source MANO

    The ETSI Open Source MANO group (ETSI OSM) has announced OSM Release TWO. The standards body says this new release of its management and orchestration (MANO) work brings significant improvements in terms of interoperability, performance, stability, security and resources footprint to meet operators’ requirements for trials and upcoming RFx processes.

More Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • HardenedLinux: The way to the Ark

    We’ve been sharing some of our works on security practices ( STIG-4-Debian, Debian GNU/Linux profiles, etc) for servers running in data center. PaX/Grsecurity is the corner stone to most of our solutions. Evidences have revealed that PaX/Grsecurity can defeat multiple public exploits w/o any patch fixes in critical scenarios for a long run. With PaX/Grsecurity, for the 1st time we believe that we can build the defense based on free/libre & open source software/firmware solution to prevent many threats from Ring 3/0/-1/-2/-3. HardenedLinux is going to continue develop solutions of defense based on PaX/Grsecurity. From our point of view, we see no other option. Please remember this date: Apr 26 2017. This is the day we lost our Ark.

  • It's Official: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) Linux OS Reached End of Life

    Canonical, through Adam Conrad, informed us today that the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system is now officially dead, reaching end of life on April 28, 2017.

    If you're still using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on your desktop or server systems, it's time to upgrade to a newer, supported release. You can choose to upgrade to either Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), which will be supported for two more years, until April 2019, or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), supported until April 2021.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unreal Engine 4.16 Enters Public Preview State

    Epic Games on Friday released the first public preview of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.16.

    There are many changes to find with Unreal Engine 4.16 while some of the highlights include volumetric fog support, a new clothing solver, optimized distance field lighting, garbage collection improvements, and more.

  • Unreal Engine 4.16 Preview

    A Preview of the upcoming 4.16 release is available now on the Launcher and Github. We have made this Preview available so that our developer-community can help us catch issues before the final release. As fixes are implemented, we will release updated previews throughout the development cycle. Please be aware that the preview releases are not fully quality tested, that they are still under heavy active development, and that they should be considered as unstable until the final release. Developers should not convert their projects for active development on preview releases. Please test on copies of your project instead.

  • Watch this highlight reel of iAlwaysSin's Alien Isolation livestreams!

    Last Thursday the newest member of the GOL Livestream Team, iAlwaysSin, completed her live playthrough of the extremely scary Alien Isolation. And, to commemorate this achievement (and all the deaths that occurred in the process) I decided to download and edit all the VODs together into a nice highlight reel. With my sarcastic remarks, of course.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming