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Monday, 25 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Intel Chips and Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 9:58am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 8:23am
Story Packet radio lives on through open source software Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 8:11am
Story Linux 4.14-rc2 Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 8:08am
Story Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 8:04am
Story Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 8:00am
Story BackSlash Linux Olaf Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 7:51am
Story BSD: Testing OpenSSH 7.6, 23 Years of FreeDOS Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 7:03am
Story Various Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 12:49am
Story Subgraph OS Alpha and NuTyX 9.1 Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2017 - 12:48am

New Intel Chips and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Intel Announces Early 8th Gen Core Processors, Coffee Lake

    Intel has rushed up the announcement of their 8th Gen Intel Core desktop processors following a recent leak. We can now confirm that these new Intel CPUs are en route to retailers, they have already arrived for testing, and will be benchmarked under Linux on Phoronix once that secondary embargo expires.

  • Intel Core i9 7980XE Linux Benchmarks: 18 Core / 36 Threads For $1999 USD

    Besides the embargo expiring this morning on the Intel Core i9 7960X, the Core i9 7980XE Extreme Edition processor is also now fair game. Here is our look at the Linux performance for this 18 core / 36 thread processor within a single 165 Watt package.

  • Intel Core i9 7960X Linux Benchmarks

    While Intel previously announced the expanded Intel Core X-Series line-up including the Core i9 7960X and Core i9 7980XE processors, only today is the performance embargo expiring as these CPUs begin to ship to further battle AMD's Ryzen Threadripper line-up. Here is today's launch-day Linux benchmarks of the Core i9 7960X.

Packet radio lives on through open source software

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Packet radio is an amateur radio technology from the early 1980s that sends data between computers. Linux has natively supported the packet radio protocol, more formally known as AX.25, since 1993. Despite its age, amateur radio operators continue to use and develop packet radio today. A Linux packet station can be used for mail, chat, and TCP/IP. It also has some unique capabilities, such as tracking the positions of nearby stations or sending short messages via the International Space Station (ISS).

Read more

Linux 4.14-rc2

Filed under
Linux

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in
all the normal places.

This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week,
and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with
the last few ones showing up Sunday morning).

Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the
weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part
of last week diving instead.

Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security
subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got
rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that
security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

Filed under
Linux

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out.

In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.”

Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you.

Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

Filed under
Reviews

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability.

Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs.

Read more

BSD: Testing OpenSSH 7.6, 23 Years of FreeDOS

Filed under
BSD
  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.6

    OpenSSH 7.6p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing
    on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • 23 Years of FreeDOS

    This eBook contains the voices of many of the users who contributed their stories, as well as the history of FreeDOS. Many individuals have helped make FreeDOS what it is, but this eBook represents only a few of them. I hope you enjoy this collection of 23 years of everything FreeDOS!

Various Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc
  • XFree KWin: Ridding KDE's Wayland Compositor Of X11 Dependencies

    Martin Flöser (nee Gräßlin) has announced the "XFree KWin" project. This isn't to be confused with XFree86 but rather is about ridding KWin optionally of X11/X.Org dependencies.

  • Bad News for Users of TopIcons Plus

    The development of the popular TopIcons Plus GNOME extension has been put on pause.

    Offering a convenient way to access indicator applets and system tray icons from the GNOME top bar, the extension has proven popular with GNOME Shell users, especially as GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray entirely.

  • Fix the “This version of Skype is not supported” Error on Ubuntu
  • Will Blockchain Race to the Front of the Disruption Line in IoT?

    The group, founded in 2015, is the fastest-growing project in the history of the Linux Foundation according to Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf.  This project has reached out to various industries in addition to IoT, industries which also are adopting IoT including healthcare.

  • The State Of Intel's GPU Virtualization Pass-Through On Linux

    Wrapping up our XDC2017 coverage for this annual X.Org developer event that took place this past week in Mountain View, Zhenyu Wang of Intel presented on their ongoing work for mediated GPU virtualization pass-through support on Linux, Intel GVT.

  • Red Hat announces that Ansible Project 2.4 now generally available

    Red Hat announced this week general availability of Ansible Project 2.4, its simple and agentless open source IT automation framework. The upstream Ansible project is one of the world’s most popular open source IT automation technologies, with nearly 3,000 unique contributors, more than 32,000 commits to the upstream Ansible open source project, and a user base that spans industries and the globe.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is Under Analysts Radar
  • Best Self-Hosted CRM Apps

    Customer relationship management or simply CRM is a term or specifically an approach to managing and analyzing the interaction of your current customers and leads. The CRM software allows you to manage the customer data, customer interaction, automate sales, manage client contacts and employees, customer support etc. In this article we will cover some of the best self-hosted CRM applications which you can install on a CRM Linux VPS and use for managing your company.

  • Electric Cars, Open Source Summit, and Linux Server Innovation [Ed: "This article was sponsored and written by IBM." Linux Foundation writes what Big Bully IBM tells it to write.]
  • Intel IX4 Networking Performance On DragonFly Gets Boosted By Direct Input Support

    DragonFlyBSD today picked up direct input support within the kernel's polling code. This can boost the networking performance though for now is just supported by the IX4 driver, what is used as the Intel 10Gb Ethernet driv

  • Chicago School Official: US IT Jobs Offshored Because 'We Weren't Making Our Own' Coders

    In the video, the Director of Computer Science and IT Education for the nation's third largest school district offers a take on why U.S. IT jobs were offshored that jibes nicely with the city's new computer science high school graduation requirement. From the transcript: "People still talk about it's all offshored, it's all in India and you know, there are some things that are there but they don't even realize some of the reasons that they went there in the first place is because we weren't making our own."

  • After the breach, Equifax now faces the lawsuits

    Since it announced a massive data breach earlier this month, Equifax has been hit with dozens of lawsuits from shareholders, consumers and now one filed by a small Wisconsin credit union that represents what could be the first by a financial institution attempting to preemptively recoup losses caused by alleged fraud the hack could cause.

    Equifax has said its breach exposed sensitive information about 143 million consumers, including Social Security and driver's license numbers. This kind of data could be used for identity theft and to create fake accounts, cybersecurity experts have said.

Subgraph OS Alpha and NuTyX 9.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
  • A new Subgraph OS Alpha ISO is available for download.

    This is a release mainly targeting some bugs that were present in the last available ISO.

    We are working on some major new features that aren't done yet or aren't yet robust enough to be included in a release to users. Some of those new features are described below.

    We really should have released an ISO sooner than this as there were some annoying bugs that got in the way of new users trying Subgraph OS for the first time. We've setup a new, more aggressive release schedule and should be making non-release ISO builds available as we produce them monthly.

  • NuTyX 9.1 available with cards 2.3.3.0

    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.1 release of NuTyX.

    NuTyX 9.0 comes with kernel lts 4.9.23, glibc 2.25, gcc 6.3.0, binutils 2.28, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.2, qt 5.8.0, plasma 5.9.4, kf5 5.31.0, gnome 3.22.2, mate 1.18.0, xfce4 4.12.3, firefox 54.0.1, etc....

    New Isos are available in 32 bits and 64 bits. sizes are respectively 246 MB and 247 MB on http://downloads.nutyx.org

    This is a maintenance release of the 9.0 branche of NuTyX. It is possible to make an upgrade of your system without problems. It's no need to reinstall your NuTyX. If the automatic upgrade process is activate, it will be done at next shutdown.

    Available graphical interfaces are: kde5, gnome, mate, xfce4, lxde, flwm, jwm, ratpoison, blackbox, fluxbox, openbox, bspwm, icewm, twm, etc.

Games: SteamWorld Dig 2, Coma: Recut, Rusted Warfare, Rise to Ruins

Filed under
Gaming
  • Digging for riches and falling onto spikes in SteamWorld Dig 2, now available for Linux

    It hooked me in way more than I though it would, I could hardly stop myself playing. Image & Form have created such a fantastic world to explore that's rammed full of imagination and personality throughout. A solid Linux release and a pleasantly surprising game.

  • Linux version of 'The Coma: Recut' removed at release after taking pre-orders

    Sadly it seems the Linux version of The Coma: Recut [Official Site] vanished at release, even after taking pre-orders.

    We all know all too well that pre-orders have inherent risks attached to them. This is especially true when it comes to Linux releases. Steam is full of cases of developers pulling out Linux support right on release without any prior indication.

  • Rusted Warfare, the sweet 2D RTS has a new major release with tons of goodies

    Do you love RTS games? Rusted Warfare [Steam] is one you seriously need to look at. This sweet 2D RTS works great on Linux and just had a huge update.

    The first major new feature is a replay system. You can now re-watch previous online games, but the icing in the cake is that you can jump in at any point and take over the game. I'm hoping they roll that out to offline battles too, as it sounds great.

  • Rise to Ruins updated with an overhauled combat system along with bows and arrows

    The village building god game Rise to Ruins [Official Site] has expanded once again. This latest development release 'InDev 28 Unstable 3' overhauls the combat system. Ranged attacks are now possible!

    For those unfamiliar with the title, it mixes up a few genres to create a pretty unique game. It has elements of a god sim, a city builder and tower defence and it's really quite fun. It has multiple game modes to choose from, with the ability to customize things to your liking.

XFree KWin, Plasma, KDE, and Qt/GTK

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Announcing the XFree KWin project

    Over the last weeks I concentrated my work on KWin on what I call the XFree KWin project. The idea is to be able to start KWin/Wayland without XWayland support. While most of the changes required for it are already in Plasma 5.11, not everything got ready in time, but now everything is under review on phabricator, so it’s a good point in time to talk about this project.

  • Adapta Theme is Now Available for the #KDE Plasma Desktop

    A new port brings the Adapta GTK theme to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop for the first time, news that will please fans of its famous flat stylings.

  • A New Project To Let You Run Qt Apps With GTK+ Windowing System Integration

    A Norwegian developer has developed a new Qt platform abstraction plug-in to let Qt applications make use of GTK+ for windowing system integration. The Qt apps rely upon GTK+ as a host toolkit to provide GTK menus, GTK for input, and other integration bits.

  • Ant is a Flat GTK Theme with a Bloody Bite

    Between Arc, Adapta and Numix it kind of feels like Linux has the whole flat GTK theme thing covered.

    But proving their’s always room for one more is Ant.

Development: Blockchain for Good Hackathon, ASUS Tinker Board, React License, JavaScript, Pascal, Python

Filed under
Development
  • Blockchain for Good Hackathon, Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October

    The Blockchain for Good Hackathon takes place Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October. Full agenda can be found here.

  • ASUS Tinker Board Is An Interesting ARM SBC For About $60 USD

    Earlier this year ASUS announced the Tinker Board as their first step into the ARM single board computer world. Earlier this month I finally received a Tinker Board for testing and it has been quite interesting to say the least. The Tinker Board with its Rockchip SoC has been among the most competitive ARM SBCs we have tested to date in its price range and the form factor is compatible with the Raspberry Pi.

  • Configure Thunderbird to send patch friendly
  • Facebook to Relicense React Under MIT [Ed: as we hoped [1, 2]]

    Facebook has decided to change the React license from BSD+Patents to MIT to make it possible for companies to include React in Apache projects, and to avoid uncertain relationship with the open source community.

    Adam Wolff, an Engineering Director at Facebook, has announced that a number of projects - React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js – will soon start using the more standard MIT License instead of BSD+Patents. The reason provided is "because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons." While aware that the React’s BSD+Patents license has created "uncertainty" among users of the library, prompting some to select an alternative solution, Facebook does not "expect to win these teams back" but they still hope some will reconsider the issue. The change in license will become effective when React 16 will be released next week.

    Regarding other projects, Wolff said that "many of our popular projects will keep the BSD + Patents license for now", while they are "evaluating those projects' licenses too, but each project is different and alternative licensing options will depend on a variety of factors." It seems from this clause that Facebook plans to get rid of the BSD+Patents license entirely, but they need to figure out the best option for each project.

    [...]

    Facebook’s plan to switch to a standard license MIT, supported by Apache, completely solves this problem with React and several other projects. It remains to see what happens with the license of other Facebook projects, and how much this license issue has affected how React is perceived by the community.

  • To type or not to type: quantifying detectable bugs in JavaScript
  • Plug For PASCAL
  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition

New Manjaro Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

What a week we had. With this update we have removed most of our EOL tagged kernels. Please adopt to newer series of each, when still be used. PulseAudio and Gstreamer got renewed. Also most of our kernels got newer point-releases. Series v4.12 is now marked as EOL.

Guillaume worked on Pamac to solve reported issues within our v6 series. The user experience should be much better now. Latest NetworkManager, Python and Haskell updates complete this update-pack.

Please report back and give us feedback for given changes made to our repositories.

Read more

Linux 4.14 Is Up To Around 23.2 Million Lines Of Code

Filed under
Linux

While I usually look at the Linux kernel code size following each merge window, I am a few days late this time around due to busy Xeon/EPYC benchmarking and XDC2017. Anyhow, Linux 4.14 is showing some weight gains but nothing too bad.

Linux 4.14 has been another busy cycle with a lot of happenings from finally seeing Heterogeneous Memory Management merged to a lot of other new core functionality plus the always fun and exciting changes and new support happening in driver space. See our Linux 4.14 feature overview for a rundown on the new functionality.

Read more

10 Best Free Photo Editors For Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux has come a long way in terms of the applications that are available for the platform. Whatever your specific needs are, you can be sure that there are at least a few applications available for you to use. Today, we'll look at 10 free photo editors for Linux, and I must say, there are a lot of image editing tools available. This post selects just 10 of these awesome tools and talks about them briefly looking at what makes them stand out. In no particular order, let's get started.

Read<br />
more

Security: Adobe and Apple Fail/Fare Badly

Filed under
Security
  • In spectacular fail, Adobe security team posts private PGP key on blog

    Having some transparency about security problems with software is great, but Adobe's Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) took that transparency a little too far today when a member of the team posted the PGP keys for PSIRT's e-mail account—both the public and the private keys. The keys have since been taken down, and a new public key has been posted in its stead.

  • Hackers Using iCloud's Find My iPhone Feature to Remotely Lock Macs and Demand Ransom Payments

    Over the last day or two, several Mac users appear to have been locked out of their machines after hackers signed into their iCloud accounts and initiated a remote lock using Find My iPhone. 

    With access to an iCloud user's username and password, Find My iPhone on iCloud.com can be used to "lock" a Mac with a passcode even with two-factor authentication turned on, and that's what's going on here.

Games: Open Source Puzzle Games and SDL 2.0.6 Release

Filed under
Gaming
  • Improve Your Mental Mettle with These Open Source Puzzle Games

    The puzzle genre often tests problem-solving skills enhancing both analytical and critical thinking skills. Word completion, pattern recognition, logical reasoning, persistence, and sequence solving are some of the skills often required to prosper here. Some games offer unlimited time or attempts to solve a puzzle, others present time-limited exercises which increase the difficulty of the puzzle. Most puzzle games are basic in graphics but are very addictive.

  • SDL 2.0.6 Released With Vulkan Helpers, DRM/KMS Driver

    SDL 2.0.6 was released on Friday as the latest feature update for this widely-used library that allows for more cross-platform portability of applications and games centered around input, audio, and video helpers.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more