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Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

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GNU
Linux

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week.

Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm.

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6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

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GNU
Linux
  • 6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

    I’ve been a long-time GNOME user, but for the past few months, I was in a loving relationship with Elementary OS. I found much to love in the minimalist Linux-based operating system, and I encouraged readers to give it a try.

    But that has changed. The number of bugs I encountered grew over time, and I’ve recently had enough. As a freelance writer, the only thing I need is a working laptop. If that’s not reliable, then I’m wasting time trying to fix the one tool my job requires.

  • Why do Linux distributions have software bugs?

    Linux is one of the best operating systems around, but no OS is perfect. All operating systems end up having bugs of one kind or another, including your favorite Linux distributions.

    A writer at MakeUseOf has listed six reasons why Linux distributions often have their share of bugs.

Lakka 2.0 RC4 is out

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GNU
Linux

Lakka 2.0 RC4 is available for testers. This is certainly the last Release Candidate before the stable release.

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Lightroom and Darktable: the verdict two years after switching

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GNU
Linux
Software

In summer 2015, I posted a detailed account of my tentative switch from Windows7 and Lightroom to Linux and Darktable. This was sparked by sudden crashes that were afflicting my system, but in a deeper sense grew from frustration with Windows and, to a lesser degree, with Lightroom.

Once I headed for Linux, I decided to plunge in fully and commit to using Ubuntu and free, open-source photo software for several months – at least until the end of that year. That would give me a chance to see whether I could actually run my photography business on the new system.

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7 Linux Mainstream Distros Alternatives

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GNU
Linux

Linux Mainstream Distros are quite popular as they have a large number of developers working on them as well as a large number of users using them. In addition, these distros also have strong support system.

People often search alternatives for Linux Mainstream Distros but often get confused about which is the best one for them. So listed below are 7 best Linux mainstream distros alternative choices for you.

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Minimal Linux Live

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GNU
Linux

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system.

Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything.

I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process.

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Desktop GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
  • [Video] Litebook Alpha Review! | Unboxing, Apps, and Gaming!
  • Beginners Guide To Linux

    Curious about getting into Raspberry Pi or just Linux in general but you're not sure where to start? This post is for you. It's not intended to be a comprehensive guide, rather a gentle intro into the Linux world. I'm not a Linux expert, but I know from experience that it can be an intimidating platform to get started in. I want this post to show you what you need to know to get started with Linux.

  • [Video] 5 Reasons To Switch To Linux
  • System76 Provides Wireless Fixes for Ubiquity

    We are proud to have contributed to Ubiquity in such a way that we feel improves all users’ lives when using Ubuntu. We will continue improving the platform and hope that our users will see value in what we do.

  • GNOME 3.24 Released, See What`s New

    After being in development for six months, GNOME 3.24 was released today, bringing improvements such as Night Light, weather information in the date / time indicator, along with updates to its applications, and more.

Distributions News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Proxmox VE 5.0 beta1 released!

    We are proud to announce the release of the first beta of our Proxmox VE 5.x family - based on the great Debian Stretch.

    With the first beta we invite you to test your hardware and your upgrade path. The underlying Debian Stretch is already in a good shape and the 4.10 kernel performs outstandingly well. The 4.10 kernel for example allows running a Windows 2016 Hyper-V as a guest OS (nested virtualization).

  • NuTyX 9.0-RC1 available with cards 2.2

    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the first release candidate of the almost stable (RC1) NuTyX 9.0.

  • This Week In Solus - Install #42

    Welcome to the 42nd installation of This Week in Solus.

  • Flatpak vs Snap - Which format is "Better"?

    Explore differences between Flatpaks and Snaps and decide for yourself which format is better!

  • A distro-agnostic AUR: would it be useful?

    Also, when I use KDE Neon or other distros I miss AUR a lot: on it you can find everything and install it quickly, you can find also Git versions of apps that are in the official repos in their stable release. So I thought: since now there are distro-agnostic packages, like Flatpak, Snap and AppImage, why not create the “distro-agnostic AUR”? It would work exactly like AUR but at the end of installation process it doesn’t create an Arch package but a Flatpak/Snap/AppImage one.

A Short MATE Desktop 1.18 Review in March 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

MATE 1.18 has been released at 13 March 2017. The source code are available on their public file server and the runnable version has been available on Ubuntu MATE 17.04 "Zesty Zapus". This short review covers some new things for end-users: better playback notifications, "safely remove disk" notification, touchpad/mouse control improvements (libinput), MATE Calc returns, and some more. It's RAM usage on Zesty at idle is ~700MB. This is a continuation from our previous MATE 1.17 review. I hope this review will be helpful for you all. Enjoy!

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Microsoft v GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Illinois residents sue Microsoft over forced Windows 10 upgrades

    The lawyers who have acted on behalf of the trio are looking to have the case expanded to a class action covering every person who has been affected by a forced upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. They allege that there are thousands of such cases.

    The trio claim that Microsoft uses various tactics to get users to upgrade and does not give them a chance to refuse.

  • New Windows 10 courts govt deals

    The system was developed by its joint venture with China Electronics Technology Group Corp, a State-owned company. Equipped with tailor-made security {sic} features, it is expected to allow the US tech giant to regain access to China's lucrative government software procurement market.

  • Microsoft One Drive Bug In Chrome OS And Linux Fixed
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More in Tux Machines

Mesa and Intel Graphics

RadeonSI OpenGL vs. RADV Vulkan Performance For Mad Max

Feral Interactive today released their first Linux ported game into public beta that features a Vulkan renderer. Mad Max on Linux now supports Vulkan and OpenGL, making for some fun driver/GPU benchmarking. Up first are some Radeon RX 480 and R9 Fury Vulkan vs. OpenGL benchmarks for Mad Max when using Mesa 17.1-dev Git. Read more

Ubuntu 17.04: A mouse-sized step forward

It's almost the fourth month of the year. You know what that means. A new Ubuntu release is upon us. This time around, the release number is 17.04 and the name is Zesty Zapus. For those that don't know, a zapus is a genus of North American jumping mice and the only extant mammal with a total of 18 teeth. Which means the zapus is quite unique. Does that translate over to the upcoming release of one of the most popular Linux distributions on the planet (currently listed as fourth on Distrowatch)? Let's find out. Read more

Quad-core Atom thin client offers hardened ThinLinux

Dell revealed a tiny “Wyse 3040” thin client that runs ThinOS or a hardened new ThinLinux on a quad-core Intel SoC, and supports Citrix, MS, and VMware. Dell has launched its “lightest, smallest and most power-efficient thin client” yet, with a 101.6 x 101.6 x 27.9mm Wyse 3040 system that weighs 0.24kg and runs on under 5 Watts. The device is powered by a quad-core, 1.44GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8350 “Cherry Trail” SoC, giving it 30 percent better performance than “previous generations,” says Dell, presumably referring to the single-core Wyse 3010 and the dual-core 3020 and 3030. The power-efficient (2W SDP) SoC also runs on the UP board and UP Core SBCs. Read more