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GNU

GNU Taler news: RFC 8905 - "The 'payto' URI Scheme for Payments" published

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GNU

We are happy to announce the publication of RFC 8905 by the IETF.

RFC 8905 defines the 'payto' Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme for designating targets for payments. A unified URI scheme for all payment target types allows applications to offer user interactions with URIs that represent payment targets, simplifying the introduction of new payment systems and applications.

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Distro Flashback: What happened to Cub Linux?

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GNU
Linux

The operating system wasn’t always known as Cub Linux. In actuality, when it first got announced back in 2014, Chromixium OS was what it was called. After a year of its announcement, its first stable version hit the open-source world as a 32-bit live ISO.

With that being said, this release didn’t go as smoothly as planned. There were several bugs reported by its users, which included slow menu generation and screen tearing. On the bright side, the developers soon got to solving these issues and released a service pack in addition to various updates. However, what really took Chromixium OS to the next level was the release of its 64-bit version in November 2015.

All of this development hit a roadblock when the owner of Chromium and Chrome OS, Google, sent a request to the operating system’s developers to give up the name ‘Chromixium’ and other related social media presences websites. However, that couldn’t stop the head of this project, RichJack, as they soon addressed this issue and renamed their OS as Cub Linux. These events took place in late 2015 and ended on a positive note, but the project didn’t know what was approaching its way in 2016.

When 2016 was nearing its end, Cub Linux users started noticing one big thing: the official website had been missing. This turned out to indicate the demise of a project that could have done wonders in the future. Even though their GitHub page is open to this very day, the development had stopped, and there was no point in keeping up with Cub Linux anymore. According to a developer, this project’s sudden end could be attributed to “private life restrictions,” which is as vague as a statement could get.

With that being said, as far as the future of Cub Linux is concerned, many other developers got interested in this project and wanted to pick it up. Accordingly, the Feren OS developer announced in 2017 that he would give Cub Linux a major overhaul and “bring back Cub” with the name of Phoenix Linux. This might seem like good news to some, but honestly, the future of Phoenix Linux doesn’t seem too bright since the project hasn’t received another update since March 2018. If we’re really hopeful, we’ll get something as soon as 2021, but waiting any longer wouldn’t make much sense.

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Kodachi 7.4 The Secure OS

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GNU
Linux
Security

Linux Kodachi operating system is based on Xubuntu 18.04.5 it will provide you with a secure, anti-forensic, and anonymous operating system considering all features that a person who is concerned about privacy would need to have in order to be secure.

Kodachi is very easy to use all you have to do is boot it up on your PC via USB drive then you should have a fully running operating system with established VPN connection + Connection established + service running. No setup or knowledge is required from your side its all been automated for you. The entire OS is functional from your temporary memory RAM so once you shut it down no trace is left behind all your activities are wiped out.

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GDB 10.1 released

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Development
GNU

            GDB 10.1 released!

Release 10.1 of GDB, the GNU Debugger, is now available.  GDB is
a source-level debugger for Ada, C, C++, Fortran, Go, Rust, and many
other languages.  GDB can target (i.e., debug programs running on)
more than a dozen different processor architectures, and GDB itself
can run on most popular GNU/Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows variants.
GDB is free (libre) software.

You can download GDB from the GNU FTP server in the directory:

        ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gdb

The vital stats:

  Size   md5sum                            Name
  21MiB  1822a7dd45e7813f4408407eec1a6af1  gdb-10.1.tar.xz
  39MiB  67b01c95c88ab8e05a08680904bd6c92  gdb-10.1.tar.gz

There is a web page for GDB at:

        http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/

That page includes information about GDB mailing lists (an announcement
mailing list, developers discussion lists, etc.), details on how to
access GDB's source repository, locations for development snapshots,
preformatted documentation, and links to related information around
the net.  We will put errata notes and host-specific tips for this release
on-line as any problems come up.  All mailing lists archives are also
browsable via the web.

GDB 10.1 includes the following changes and enhancements:

* Support for debugging new targets:

  - BPF  (bpf-unknown-none)

* GDBserver support for the following targets:

  - ARC GNU/Linux
  - RISC-V GNU/Linux

* Multi-target debugging support (experimental)

* Support for debuginfod, an HTTP server for distributing ELF/DWARF
  debugging information as well as source code.

* Support for debugging a 32-bit Windows program using a 64-bit Windows GDB.

* Support for building GDB with GNU Guile 3.0 and 2.2 (in addition to 2.0)

* Improved performance during startup through the use of threading
  during symbol table loading (an optional feature in GDB 9, now
  enabled by default in GDB 10).

* Various enhancements to the Python and Guile APIs

* Various TUI Mode fixes and enhancements.

* Other miscellaneous enhancements:

  - Detection when attaching to a process of a mismatch between
    this process and the executable previously loaded into GDB.

  - Support for default arguments for "alias" commands.

* GDBserver support for the following host triplets has been removed:

    i[34567]86-*-lynxos*
    powerpc-*-lynxos*
    i[34567]86-*-nto*
    bfin-*-*linux*
    crisv32-*-linux*
    cris-*-linux*
    m32r*-*-linux*
    tilegx-*-linux*
    arm*-*-mingw32ce*
    i[34567]86-*-mingw32ce*

For a complete list and more details on each item, please see the gdb/NEWS
file, available at:
https://sourceware.org/git/gitweb.cgi?p=binutils-gdb.git;...

-- 
Joel Brobecker

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Audiocasts/Shows: Noodlings, Python Bytes, Going Linux, Linux in the Ham Shack and Hackaday

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Noodlings | Inspiration Is Around You – CubicleNate's Techpad

    This is the 21st hot-pocket-sized podcast that won’t scorch roof of your mouth.

    I have a small collection of vintage or near vintage gaming consoles. I lean mostly in the Nintendo party as I think they have a great grasp on what is fun. I don’t always agree with many of their business practices but the entertainment they have provided is multi-generationally successful. In order to lower the wasted time of hooking these systems up to enjoy and better organize their presentation, I built a Gaming Rack that was inspired by watching a YouTube channel called Retro Recipes. Seeing how nicely laid out and easily enjoyed they were set up, I made the decision that I must adapt this idea to my little world.

  • Episode #204 Take the PSF survey and Will & Carlton drop by - [Python Bytes Podcast]

    Python Bytes podcast delivers headlines directly to your earbuds.

  • Going Linux #398

    In our second of two parts on editing and managing photos on Linux we describe a few additional applications for you to try. We share what they do but the trying is up to you! We also reveal what we are doing for our 400th episode.

  • LHS Episode #374: The Weekender LVIV | Linux in the Ham Shack

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Hackaday Podcast 090: DIY Linux SBC, HDMI CEC, Fake Bluepills, And SCARA Arms | Hackaday

    Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys chat about our favourite hacks from the past week. We start off with a bit of news of the Bennu asteroid and the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module. We drive ourselves crazy trying to understand how bobbin holders on sewing machines work, all while drooling over the mechanical brilliance of a bobbin-winding build. SCARA is the belt and pulley champion of robot arms and this week’s example cleverly uses redundant bearings for better precision. And we wrap up the show looking in on longform articles about the peppering of microcontrollers found on the Bluepill and wondering what breakthroughs are left to be found for internal combustion.

Software: ncmpcpp, GNU Make and gedit

Filed under
GNU
Software

  • Ncmpcpp: The Best MPD Client With The Worst Name - YouTube

    I picked a good place to start with MPD client, I think it's fair to say that ncmpcpp might be one of the best mpd clients that exist, I'll be trying out other but I don't know how anything will top this one.

  • Things I do: Proposal to add build graph output to GNU Make

    In 2015 I worked as a consultant at a large company in Lund. My position was with the build team and one of our responsibilities was managing and maintaining the build system for their Android based phones.

    The problem I was tasked with solving was the fact that running 'make' for a product after a successful build resulted in a lot of stuff being rebuilt unnecessarily.

    A stock Android build tree behaved nicely: a second run of 'make' only produced a line about everything being up-to-date. But the company products were taking a good 15 minutes for a rebuild even if nothing had been changed.

    The Android build system works by including all recipes to be built (programs / libraries / etc) using the GNU Make include directive, so that you end up with one giant Makefile that holds all rules for building the platform. Possibly to avoid the problems laid out in the paper Recursive make considered harmful.

  • Sébastien Wilmet: gedit crowdfunding

    The gedit text editor has a long history of development, it has been created in 1998 at the beginnings of GNOME. So it is one of the oldest GNOME application still alive and usually installed by default with Linux distributions that provide GNOME as their desktop environment.

    It is this – the fact that many Linux users know and have gedit installed – that motivates me to improve it, to make it a top notch core application. It is not an easy undertaking though, the codebase is old and large, and there are several underlying software components (libraries) that are critical for the main functioning of gedit.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, ZaReason Review and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Ubuntu Podcast S13E31 – Cheers with water

    This week we’ve been upgrading computers and Ebaying stuff. We discuss the Windows Calculator coming to Linux, Microsoft Edge browser coming to Linux, Ubuntu Community Council elections and LibreOffice office getting Yaru icons. We also round up our picks from the general tech news.

  • Review - The Verix 9100 Linux Laptop from ZaReason

    Time for another laptop review! This time I have the Verix 9100 in the studio sent over from ZaReason, an awesome local Linux laptop vendor that has some great hardware available.

  • BSD Now #373: Kyle Evans Interview

    We have an interview with Kyle Evans for you this week. We talk about his grep project, lua and flua in base, as well as bectl, being on the core team and a whole lot of other stuff.

GNU RCS 5.10.0 available

Filed under
Development
GNU

release notes:

  A spate of bugfixes, new support for nanosecond mtime, etc.

README excerpt:

  GNU RCS (Revision Control System) manages multiple revisions of files.
  RCS can store, retrieve, log, identify, and merge revisions.
  It is useful for files that are revised frequently, e.g.,
  programs, documentation, graphics, and papers.

NEWS for 5.10.0 (2020-10-20):

  - bug fixes

    - RCS file search skipped RCS/FILENAME by default

      The default set of candidate filenames for the RCS file is:

       RCS/FILENAME,v
       RCS/FILENAME
       FILENAME,v

      RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30) introduced a bug which caused the
      default RCS file search to skip RCS/FILENAME.  Regression fixed.

    - ‘rlog -w’ behaved like ‘rlog’ (sans ‘-w’)

      RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30) introduced a bug which caused
      ‘rlog -w’ (without any logins specified) to fail to default to
      the user login.  Instead it behaved as if option ‘-w’ were
      omitted entirely.

      The cases where logins are specified (e.g., ‘rlog -wjrhacker’)
      were not affected.

    - missing string in comma-v detected, diagnosed

      Previously, if foo,v contained fragment:

       1.1
       log
       text
       @@

      i.e., there was no string value following the ‘log’ keyword,
      then rlog (et al) would interpret that as an "empty log message"
      instead of as a violation of the RCS file format grammar, which
      stipulates that a string value must follow the keywords ‘desc’,
      ‘log’ and ‘text’ -- (info "(rcs) comma-v grammar").

      Now, such a situation causes rlog (et al) to abort w/ message
      "missing string after KEYWORD" (KEYWORD ∈ {desc, log, text}).

    - subsecond resolution maintained for ‘-d’, ‘-T’

      An RCS ‘delta’ includes a ‘date’ component w/ second (whole
      number) resolution.  Previously, on filesystems that support
      subsecond (fractional) resolution for the file modification time
      (aka "mtime"), RCS commands given the ‘-d’ and/or ‘-T’ options
      would disregard, on read, and specify 0 (zero), on write, the
      fractional mtime.

      Now, RCS preserves subsecond mtime in those cases.  More details
      in new manual section -- (info "(rcs) Stamp resolution").

  - portability fixes

    - now buildable under ‘gcc -std=c11’ (default for GCC 5)

      RCS previously failed to build under ‘-std=c11’, which happens
      to be the default mode of GCC 5.  In particular, ‘-std=c11’ is
      more strict about function attributes syntax than ‘-std=c99’.

      Now, the offending code has been rectified.  (Specifically,
      attribute ‘_Noreturn’ now is at the start of a func decl.)

    - threads support

      RCS itself is clueless about threads, but it uses gnulib, which
      may or may not require threads support.  This manifests as the
      configure script options ‘--enable-threads=MODEL’ as well as
      ‘--disable-threads’.

      Previously, "make" would ignore MODEL (even implicitly), acting
      as if ‘--disable-threads’ were specified.  Now, it takes into
      account MODEL by propagating makefile var ‘LIBTHREAD’.

    - consult ‘USER’ first if ‘LOGNAME’ read-only

      To determine the user (login) name in the absence of a specific
      command-line option, RCS normally checks first the env var
      ‘LOGNAME’ and second, ‘USER’.  Alas, this is unworkable under
      AIX, where ‘LOGNAME’ is read-only.  So now, if the configure
      script finds ‘LOGNAME’ to be read-only, it arranges to build RCS
      to check ‘USER’ first and then ‘LOGNAME’.  See README.

    - configure script avoids ‘date -r’

      Unfortunately ‘date -r’ is not POSIX.  This made AIX unhappy.

    - other AIX accomodation

      The AIX compiler complains about the implicit casting that
      occurs when returning a pointer from a function whose return
      type is ‘bool’.  So, we are now explicit.

  - documentation improvements

    - docfix: add "Log message option" to Detailed Node Listing

      Probably Emacs by now has some automagic way to sync the
      ‘@detailmenu’ section w/ the text body... hmmm.

    - style change due to ‘-zZONE’ option

      Specifying option ‘-zZONE’ to ‘rcs log’ changes the date output
      style to use hyphens (ISO) instead of slashes (YYYY/MM/DD).

    - rlog, use with CVS

      Since RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30), there have been sporadic
      reports of rlog (aka "rcs log") failing with CVS files.  The
      manual now addresses this -- (info "(rcs) comma-v particulars").

    - delim-separated list

      GNU RCS has always supported comma to separate items in a list
      (e.g., ‘rcs frob -o1.1,2.2’ to remove (or "outdate") revisions
      1.1 and 2.2).  But did you know that most places a comma is
      welcome and you can use other delimiter characters as well?
      Read all about it -- (info "(rcs) Delim-separated list").

    - (style) pargraphs no longer indented

      This looks nicer (IMHO) for Info and Text output formats.

  - testing improvements

    Many new tests and test cases for existing tests were added, to
    catch regressions and exercise infrequent code paths.  For "make
    check" (locally), function coverage is 97.3% (considered "high")
    and line coverage is 84.9% (considered "medium"), per lcov.

  - bootstrap/maintenance tools

    upgraded:

     GNU gnulib 2020-10-19 23:37:09
     GNU texinfo 6.7
     GNU Automake 1.16.2
     GNU Autoconf 2.69c

    as before:

     (none)

tarballs and detached signatures:

  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.lz
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.lz.sig
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.xz
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.xz.sig

source code:

  https://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/rcs.git/?h=p

homepage:

  https://www.gnu.org/software/rcs/

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Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, The Linux Link Tech Show, Talk Python and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Leaping Lizard People | Coder Radio 384

    It's confession hour on the podcast, and your hosts surprise each other with several twists and turns.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 876

    repairing 3ds, power issues, ubuntu 20.10, games

  • Episode #287 Testing without dependencies, mocking in Python - [Talk Python To Me Podcast]

    We know our unit tests should be relatively independent from other parts of the system. For example, running a test shouldn't generally call a credit card possessing API and talk to a database when your goal is just to test the argument validation.

    And yet, your method does all three of those and more. What do you do? Some languages use elaborate dependency passing frameworks that go under the banner of inversion of control (IoC) and dependency injections (DI). In Python, the most common fix is to temporarily redefine what those two functions do using patching and mocking.

    On this episode, we welcome back Anna-Lena Pokes to talk us through the whole spectrum of test doubles, dummies, mocks, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 601: Open Source Creative - Blender, Gimp, Audacity

    Looking at open source software from a creative lens and discussing the importance and ease of using open-source software to make art, graphics, video, and more. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Jason van Gumster a creator, engineer, and host of the podcast, Open Source Creative. They talk about the positive side of customizing your workplace with open source software such as Blender, Gimp, Hydrogen, and Audacity. They also discuss the simplicity of open source creative software support and the great community surrounding open source creative software.

Septor 2020.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2)
System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020
Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1
Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2
Update Tor to 0.4.4.5
Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20

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More in Tux Machines

9 Best Free and Open Source Linux Archive Managers

A file archiver is computer software which brings together a group of files into a single archive file. An archive file is therefore a collection of files and directories that are stored in one file. There are many advantages of storing multiple files this way. For example, an archive is a great way to store backup data, transfer files to another directory, or to a different computer. Archive files are often compressed to save disk space and reduce transfer times. This type of utility lets users compress, decompress, and archive files and directories. Most archivers also store additional metadata such as user and group permissions, timestamps, and directory structures. Other features often found in archive managers include support for multiple volumes, encryption, Unicode names, password protection, and integration into the shell. The granddaddy of archive managers is the tar utility (together with the ar and cpio tools). Tar was created in the early days of Unix and remains an essential utility for any Linux system. The filename extension .tar is synonymous with file archives. Other types of archive formats include .iso (for optical storage mediums such as CDROM and DVD-ROMs), .shar, .cpio, and .ar. Linux has a good range of open source archive managers, both console based (such as tar) or sporting an attractive graphical user interface and integrating with a desktop environment. Here’s our recommendations. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who wants to backup their data, create new archives, and decompress files downloaded from the internet. Read more

Red Hat's Tom Stellard Now Serving As LLVM Release Manager

After six years serving as the LLVM release manager and taking over the role from LLVM founder Chris Lattner, Google's Hans Wennborg has stepped down from his position and handed it over to Red Hat's Tom Stellard. Wennborg announced this week that after six years and twelve major LLVM releases, he is stepping down as LLVM release manager to devote the time to other activities. Read more Also: IBM Hopes to Double Sales at Red Hat in Next Three Years

Programming: RISC-V Dev Board, JS, Bash and More

  • BL602 IoT SDK and $5 DT-BL10 WiFi & BLE RISC-V development board

    Go to Doiting_BL/docs/html folder and then open index.html in your browser to access the documentation. The SDK works both in Windows and Linux and relies on either Eclipse & OpenOCD or Freedom Studio & OpenOCD. A graphical software called Dev Cube is used for flashing the board. The documentation is made for a specific board Doit.am DT-BL10 development board powered by BL602 WiSoC that sells for $5 plus shipping on Aliexpress or 19.99 RMB on Taobao (about $3). We’re not at ESP8266 board price level ($2+) yet, but still affordable and interesting for evaluation.

  • Javascript Redirect – Linux Hint

    Javascript is a web-oriented programming language. When using the web, you will often need to navigate through pages. When you click on any button, submit a form, or log in to any website, you get redirected to a different new page. Page redirection is an essential part of any website, but it is not only restricted to page navigation on a website. 

  • JavaScript Sleep Function – Linux Hint

    Javascript is the language of freedom yet is a function-oriented language at the same time. Unlike other languages, javascript does not provide a built-in sleep() function. You can either build a custom sleep() function using the built-in setTimeout() function, or the latest ECMAScript promises an async-await function. This article shows you how to stop or pause the execution of the sleep function for a desired amount of time using promises or async-await functions.

  • 3 Hour Bash Tutorial – Linux Hint

    In this article, you will learn from printing a simple “Hello World” to using conditional statements such as if statements, case statements to using loops such as while, for until loops to awk, grep, sed, and debugging bash scripts. We will cover the following topics in this article:

  •  
  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.27: Build fix

    Exactly one week after the previous release 0.6.26 of digest, a minor cleanup release 0.6.27 just arrived on CRAN and will go to Debian shortly. digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at one million monthly downloads, 282 direct reverse dependencies and 8068 indirect reverse dependencies, or just under half of CRAN) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

today's howtos

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  • What To Do After Installing Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla

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  • Install Firefox on Raspberry Pi OS – Linux Hint

    Chromium is the default web browser of Raspberry Pi OS – the official operating system of Raspberry Pi. Chromium is the open-source version of the popular Google Chrome web browser. Chromium performs really well on the Raspberry Pi. But many people like the Firefox web browser. If you’re one of them, you have come to the right place. [...] In this article, I have shown you how to install the Firefox web browser on your Raspberry Pi OS. I have also shown you how to set the Firefox web browser as the default web browser of Raspberry Pi OS.

  • How to use PHP through command-line – Linux Hint

    PHP is mainly used to develop web applications, but it can also be used for other purposes. One of the useful features of PHP is the support of SAPI (Server Application Programming Interface) type named CLI (Command Line Interface). The CLI SAPI is released in PHP 4.2.0 version for the first time. The –enable-cli option is used to enable this feature, and this option is enabled in the new version of PHP by default. Furthermore, the –disable-cli option is used to disable this feature.

  • Install Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.16 in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS / Linux Mint | askmetutorials

    This tutorial shows how you can install Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.16 On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Linux Mint 20. Virtualbox is an Open source application for running operating systems virtually in your base system, with this application, you can create and run multiple Operating systems virtually on your PC.