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GNU

Flatpak 0.8.1 Lets Users Update Apps by Installing Newer Bundles, Fixes Bugs

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OS
GNU
Linux

It's been a month since Flatpak 0.8 major release hit the streets for GNU/Linux distribution that want to offer their users fast and easy access to various third-party apps that aren't available in the official repositories of the respective OS.

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Robolinux 8.7.1 Linux OS Is Out and It's Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Robolinux GNU/Linux distribution have announced today, January 18, 2017, the release and immediate availability of a new stable update based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series.

Still offering a free installer, the Robolinux 8.7.1 "Raptor" edition is now available for download with the usual Cinnamon, MATE 3D, Xfce 3D, and LXDE flavors. It's based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.7.1 "Jessie" operating system, which means that it ships with its newest Linux 3.16 kernel and over 170 bug fixes and security patches. The GRUB bootloader and login screens have been refreshed too.

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The Best Linux Distros to Watch Out for in 2017

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GNU
Linux

In 2016 Linux made modest gains in the desktop market. There is a lot of speculation out there from many people as to why Linux had a good year. Some of this is attributed to the lukewarm reception of the new Macbook Pro and the overall decline in usage of Mac OS. Others say it’s the natural evolution of Linux and that the operating system is bound to see gains eventually.

Regardless of the reason, because Linux saw a tiny uptick in users in 2016, many new and lesser-known Linux distributions gained a lot more attention. In 2017 we expect these same Linux distributions to make even more gains in popularity.

Below are the distros Linux fans should keep an eye on in 2017.

1. Solus

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Also: Adopting Flatpak To Reassemble Third Party Applications

GNU/Linux and Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server

GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
  • Are You Ready For Linux?

    Linux on the Desktop is well past the stage of being a plaything for computer hobbyists but it still isn’t at the stage where it could be considered completely mainstream. There’s still some way to go but Linux is fast gaining ground at an accelerating pace and lots of folks are looking at it as a serious alternative to Windows and Mac. People tend to bring some misconceptions about hardware and software to the table when they seek advice and support as they contemplate making the switch. In this article, I will address a few of the most common complaints I get from folks who come to me for help getting started with Linux. I try to be up-front and honest about what Linux can and can’t do for them but I also am quick to point out that the surest way to have a bad experience with Linux is to approach it too quickly.

  • Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

    Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started.

    But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000.

    [...]

    In this article, we discussed the feasibility of creating an entry level home recording studio for under $1,000. In the next article of this series, we will start to look at the software needed to turn our collection of hardware into a fully operational recording studio. We will install Ubuntu Studio, a Linux-based operating system that is made for audio recording, and extend its functionality with the software repositories from KXstudio. Looking forward to seeing you.

  • Lunduke Hour: Jan-17-2017, Dell Linux Hardware w/Barton George

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

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GNU
Linux

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George.

What did he learn?

Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu.

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Linux on Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • IBM i Open Source Business Architect Lays Out A Plan

    Enterprise level application development is no place for open source languages. Can you believe it? That was once the widely accepted truth. Jiminy Crickets! Things have changed. The number of the stable open source distributions available with comprehensive support and maintenance goes well beyond common knowledge. Industry giants, successful SMB players, and mom and pop businesses are finding good reasons to use open source. Even IBM uses open source for internal business reasons.

    There are reasons for you to do the same.

  • Lightning Talk - Realizing the Multi-Cloud Promise of Kubernetes by Blake White, The Walt Disney Co.
  • How Disney Is Realizing the Multi-Cloud Promise of Kubernetes

    The Walt Disney Company is famous for “making magic happen,” and their cross-cloud, enterprise level Kubernetes implementation is no different. In a brief but information-packed lightning talk at CloudNativeCon in Seattle in November, Disney senior cloud engineer Blake White laid out a few of the struggles and solutions in making Kubernetes work across clouds.

  • Puppet Launches its Latest State of DevOps Survey

    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet is still making news, creating jobs and more.

Solus to Move to GNOME 3.22 Stack Soon, Adopt Linux 4.9 and Bulletproof Updates

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GNU
Linux

It's been a little over two weeks since the Solus Project launched the first ISO snapshot of their Linux-based operating system, Solus 2017.01.01.0, but its development team has been engaged in various duties since then.

We've already told you about their plans to concentrate on delivering the Linux Driver Management tool that lets users more easily choose and install the perfect drivers for their hardware, as well as the long-anticipated Budgie 11 desktop environment for Q1 2017.

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antiX 16.1 Linux OS Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," without Systemd

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OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

More than six months after its official release, the antiX 16 "Berta Cáceres" GNU/Linux distribution sees its first point release, based on the recently unveiled Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie" operating system.

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Distributions and Kernels

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GNU
Linux
  • What is your favorite Linux distribution?

    Of all the many questions you might ask an open source enthusiast, none may evoke quite the passionate response as asking which distribution they prefer.

    People choose a distribution for many reasons, from look and feel to stability, from speed to how it runs on older machines, from the pace of updates to simply which offers the packages they need. Whatever the reason, with so many distributions available, asking which one you use can be seen as a proxy for asking how you choose to interact with your computer.

  • The joy of Just Works
  • Amdocs, Linux Foundation to accelerate service provider, developer adoption of open source ECOMP

    Amdocs and the Linux Foundation have struck up a partnership in an effort to accelerate adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform developed by AT&T.

  • The Age of the Unikernel: 10 Projects to Know

    When it comes to operating systems, container technologies, and unikernels, the trend toward tiny continues. What is a unikernel? It is essentially a pared-down operating system (the unikernel) that can pair with an application into a unikernel application, typically running within a virtual machine. They are sometimes called library operating systems because they include libraries that enable applications to use hardware and network protocols in combination with a set of policies for access control and isolation of the network layer.

    Containers often come to mind when discussion turns to cloud computing and Linux, but unikernels are doing transformative things, too. Neither containers nor unikernels are brand new. There were unikernel-like systems in the 1990s such as Exokernel, but today popular unikernels include MirageOS and OSv. Unikernel applications can be used independently and deployed across heterogeneous environments. They can facilitate specialized and isolated services and have become widely used for developing applications within a microservices architecture.

    [...]

    In this series of articles, we are looking at the projects mentioned in the guide, by category, providing extra insights on how the overall category is evolving. Below, you’ll find a list of several important unikernels and the impact that they are having, along with links to their GitHub repositories, all gathered from the Guide to the Open Cloud:

  • Mesa 17.0 Delayed To Allow For Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.0

    Mesa 17.0 (formerly known as Mesa 13.1) was supposed to enter its feature freeze last weekend, but that milestone and branching of the code-base didn't happen due to last minute feature work.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Nvidia Graphics Drivers Vulnerability in All Ubuntu Releases

It's time to update your Ubuntu Linux operating system if you have a Nvidia graphics card running the Nvidia Legacy 340 or 304 binary X.Org drivers provided on the official software repositories. Read more

Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance andd New Device From CompuLab

  • Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance Made Easier
    The good old days when security breaches only happened to Windows folk are fading fast. Malware hackers and denial of service specialists are increasingly targeting out of date embedded Linux devices, and fixing Linux security vulnerabilities was the topic of several presentations at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in October. One of the best attended was “Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years” by Pengutronix kernel hacker Jan Lübbe. After summarizing the growing security threats in embedded Linux, Lübbe laid out a plan to keep long-life devices secure and fully functional. “We need to move to newer, more stable kernels and do continuous maintenance to fix critical vulnerabilities,” said Lübbe. “We need to do the upstreaming and automate processes, and put in place a sustainable workflow. We don’t have any more excuses for leaving systems in the field with outdated software.”
  • CompuLab Has Upgraded Their Small Form Factor "IPC" Line To Kabylake
    HARDWARE -- Our friends and Linux-friendly PC vendor, CompuLab, have announced a new "IPC" line-up of their small form factor computers now with Intel Kabylake processors. In the past on Phoronix we tested CompuLab's Intense-PC (IPC) and then the IPC2 with Haswell processors, among other innovative PCs from CompuLab. Now they are rolling out the IPC3 with Intel's latest Kabylake processors.
  • Fanless mini-PC runs Linux Mint on Kaby Lake
    Compulab launched a rugged “IPC3” mini-PC that runs Linux on dual-core, 7th Gen Core i7/i5 CPUs, and also debuted three GbE-equipped FACE expansion modules. Compulab has opened pre-orders starting at $693 for the first mini-PCs we’ve seen to offer the latest, 14nm-fabricated 7th Generation Intel Core “Kaby Lake” processors. The passively cooled, 190 x 160 x 40mm IPC3 (Intense PC 3), which is available in up to industrial temperature ranges, follows two generations of similarly sized IPC2 mini-PCs. There’s the still available, 4th Gen “Haswell” based IPC2 from 2014 and the apparently discontinued 5th Gen “Broadwell” equipped IPC2 from 2015.
  • Compulab IPC3 is a tiny, fanless PC with Intel Kaby Lake CPU
    Compulab is an Israeli company that makes small, fanless computers for home or commercial use. The company’s latest mini PC aimed at enterprise/industrial usage is called the IPC3, and it has a die-cast aluminum case with built-in heat sinks for passive cooling and measures about 7.4″ x 6.3″ x 1.6″.

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Imperium Galactica II: Alliances released for Linux & SteamOS, seems native too
    Imperium Galactica II: Alliances [GOG, Steam] just released for Linux & SteamOS and it looks like it's a native version. Note: My friends at GOG sent over a copy, so big thanks to them. There's no sign of DOSBox or Wine and I had no idea this game had ever been ported to Linux. Pretty awesome really for a game like this to get a proper Linux build when it gets a new release.
  • Nearly five years after the Kickstarter, Carmageddon still isn’t on Linux despite the stretch goal being reached
    The problem here, for me, is that they later did a revamp of the title called Carmageddon: Max Damage. This was to fix some problems, boost sales again and port it to consoles. Carmageddon: Max Damage also never made it to Linux. Fun fact, they actually released a trailer where they just run over a ton of penguins, make from that what you will: Not saying this was trolling the entire Linux gaming community, but it sure felt like it after their previous trolling attempts directed at our official Twitter account.
  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Client Stable Update with Promised Linux Changes, More
    Today Valve announced the availability of a new stable update of the Steam Client for all supported platforms, including the company's SteamOS operating system for Steam Machines, as well as GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. Bringing all the new features during the Beta stages of development, the new Steam Client update improves the interaction between the Steam runtime and your GNU/Linux distribution's libraries. This is a huge and long-anticipated milestone for the Steam Client, which, unfortunately, did not work out-of-the-box on all Linux-based operating systems.

Robolinux 8.7.1 Linux OS Is Out and It's Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

The developers of the Robolinux GNU/Linux distribution have announced today, January 18, 2017, the release and immediate availability of a new stable update based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series. Still offering a free installer, the Robolinux 8.7.1 "Raptor" edition is now available for download with the usual Cinnamon, MATE 3D, Xfce 3D, and LXDE flavors. It's based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.7.1 "Jessie" operating system, which means that it ships with its newest Linux 3.16 kernel and over 170 bug fixes and security patches. The GRUB bootloader and login screens have been refreshed too. Read more