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GNU

Building A Custom Linux Single Board Computer Just To Play Spotify

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Housed inside a tidy little wooden enclosure of his own creation, the Spotify Box can turn any amplifier into a remote-controlled Spotify player via Spotify Connect. Pick the songs on your smartphone, and they?ll play from the Spotify Box as simple as that.

The project is based on the Allwinner V3S, a system-on-chip with a 1.2GHz ARM-Cortex-A7 core, 64MB of DDR2 RAM, and an Ethernet transceiver for good measure. There?s also a high-quality audio codec built in, making it perfect for this application. It?s thrown onto a four-layer PCB of [Evan?s] own design, and paired with a Wi-Fi and BlueTooth transceiver, RJ-45 and RCA jacks, a push-button and some LEDs. There?s also an SD card for storage.

With a custom Linux install brewed up using Buildroot, [Evan] was able to get a barebones system running Spotifyd while communicating with the network. With that done, it was as simple as hooking up the Spotify Box to an amp and grooving out to some tunes.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Manjaro 21.1.3 GNOME Edition, mintCast, LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Better Support & Performance For OpenACC Kernels Is Coming To GCC

Filed under
Development
GNU

While the GNU Compiler Collection has supported OpenACC for a few years now as this parallel programming standard popular with GPUs/accelerators, the current implementation has been found to be inadequate for many real-world HPC workloads leveraging OpenACC. Fortunately, Siemens has been working to improve GCC's OpenACC kernels support.

GCC's existing OpenACC kernels construct has been found to be "unable to cope with many language constructs found in real HPC codes which generally leads to very bad performance." Fortunately, improvements are on the way and could potentially be mainlined in time for next year's GCC 12 stable release.

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Bash Programming

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Bash While And Until Loop Explained With Examples - OSTechNix

    This is a continuation article in bash loop wherein the previous article we have explained about for loop. In this article, we will take a look at two more bash loops namely, while and until loop.

    The while loop is mostly used when you have to read the contents of the file and further process it. Reading and writing to a file are common operations when you write bash scripts. We will see how to read files using a while loop.

  • Bash Scripting - For Loop Explained With Examples - OSTechNix

    In Bash shell scripting, Loops are useful for automating repetitive tasks. When you have to repeat a task N number of times in your script, loops should be used. There are three types of loops supported in bash.

  • 2 Bash commands to change strings in multiple files at once | Enable Sysadmin

    Think about some situations when you need to change strings in text files in your Linux hosts.

    Depending on the case, you will simply change the file directly in your favorite text editor.

Retro TV Shows off Family Memories with Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Fascinated by the look and feel of vintage electronics, [Democracity] decided to turn an old Sony Micro TV into a digital picture frame that would cycle through old family photos in style. You?d think the modern IPS widescreen display would stick out like a sore thumb, but thanks to the clever application of a 1/16? black acrylic bezel and the original glass still installed in the front panel, the new hardware blends in exceptionally well.

Driving the new display is a Raspberry Pi 4, which might sound overkill, but considering the front-end is being provided by DAKboard through Chromium, we can understand the desire for some extra horsepower and RAM. If it were us we?d probably have gone with a less powerful board and a few Python scripts, and of course there are a few turn-key open source solutions out there, though we?ll admit that this is probably faster and easier to setup.

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Oracle's Next-Generation GNU Profiler "gprofng" Is Looking Great For Developers

Filed under
GNU

Oracle engineers have been working on "gprofng" as a next-generation GNU Profiler that can analyze production binaries. Oracle talked up Gprofng today during the GNU Tools Track as part of Linux Plumbers Conference 2021.

Gprofng stems from Oracle Developer Studio's Performance Analyzer and this new tool currently supports profiling C, C++, Java, and Scala code. Unlike the original gprof, gprofng is able to profile production binaries that do not need to be built with any special options or still have the source code available. Unmodified executable can be easily analyzed and a wealth of information provided.

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Videos/Shows: Gardiner Bryant, GhostBSD 21.09.06, and "Why Universal Linux Apps are GREAT!"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Announcing a New Video Series: Video Editing with Linux

    When we were designing the Librem 14, we wanted it to be our dream laptop in all possible respects. This meant squeezing the most resources we could fit in there that could run coreboot and PureBoot. We settled on a tenth generation Intel i7 10710U CPU with 6 cores and 12 threads and combined with up to 64GB RAM and fast NVMe storage, we feel this is a great laptop for resource-intensive tasks like video editing.

    Instead of just telling you about it, we thought it would be useful to show you. While we could just do a high-level marketing video that demonstrated a bit of video editing on the Librem 14, we thought it would be better (and more aligned with our Social Purpose) to invest in a complete tutorial series that would teach people how to edit videos on a Librem 14 running PureOS.

    We thought who better to teach you how to edit videos in Linux than someone who does it professionally, so we partnered with Gardiner Bryant to produce a complete series. This series will cover all the major aspects of video editing from selecting video editing software through to each step in the process.

  • GhostBSD 21.09.06 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious
  • Why Universal Linux Apps are GREAT! - Invidious

    Universal Linux Apps/Packages (Flatpaks, Snaps, AppImages) seem to get a lot of hate in the Linux community, but why?! In this video, I talk about why this type of technology is not only necessary, but a good thing.

Top 10 unique Linux distros designed especially for a small niche of users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When most people hear about Linux distributions they most likely think of alternative operating systems to Windows or macOS , to distros like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, perhaps Arch or Fedora.

Complete systems to use on a day-to-day basis, edit documents, browse the web, consume multimedia content, etc. However, in the world of Linux what is left over are niches, and for almost any niche you can imagine there is a special distribution . These are just some of them.

It is important to clarify that all these systems are designed with one or more quite specific and determined purposes, and are far from being an alternative for those who are simply looking for a distro to use as their main system to do “normal” things.

These distros have their uses, and it ‘s nice to know of their existence in case we need something like that one day . But to replace personal use operating systems that serve for most regular operations, they do not go.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Bad Documentation, Linux in the Ham Shack, and Late Night Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Bad Documentation Doesn't Make Software Advanced! - Invidious

    Documentation is incredibly important but somehow we've got to a point where some people think that having good documentation is a bad thing or that it somehow makes the software for advanced users, I completely disagree and think if it's for advanced users the documentation is even more important.

  • LHS Episode #430: Bag of Hammers

    Welcome to the 430th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this action-packed episode, the hosts discuss topics including the JARL Hamfest, AMSAT events going virtual, JOTA and JOTI, vulnerabilities in OpenSSL, updates to the Linux kernel, Pat, Winlink, HAMRS and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 143

    What we’d do if we were in charge of the Linux desktop, first impressions of an unusual but frustrating distro, and your feedback about Mastodon and Bodhi Linux.

If you don’t want to upgrade to Windows 11, here are some Best Linux distros to adapt

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you don’t want to upgrade to Windows 11, here are some Best Linux distros to choose, after end support of most popular Windows 7, and although there are some extraordinary measures you can take to continue using the system that give you a minimum of security, it is not recommended at all. Keep in mind that it is still possible to upgrade to Windows 10 or Windows 11 for free, but if you refuse, you also have the option of trying your luck with Linux.

Distributions abound and although the experience will never be the same as Windows 7 or Windows 10, neither better nor worse but different, and you will have to go through an adaptation process, there are some Linux distros that make this process a little easier than others.

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i.MX8M Nano based mini-PC features Wirepas mesh networking

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Windowsfx is the Linux distribution Windows users have been looking for

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The 3 Best Alternatives to Mandriva Linux

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