Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Alpine 3.10.2 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.10.2 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

Read more

Video and Audio: Neptune OS 6.0, Test and Code, GNU World Order, Coder Radio and This Week in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Neptune OS 6.0 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Neptune OS 6.0. Enjoy!

  • Test and Code: 84: CircuitPython - Scott Shawcroft

    The combination of Python's ease of use and Adafruit's super cool hardware and a focus on a successful beginner experience makes learning to write code that controls hardware super fun.

    In this episode, Scott Shawcroft, the project lead, talks about the past, present, and future of CircuitPython, and discusses the focus on the beginner.

    We also discuss contributing to the project, testing CircuitPython, and many of the cool projects and hardware boards that can use CircuitPython, and Blinka, a library to allow you to use "CircuitPython APIs for non-CircuitPython versions of Python such as CPython on Linux and MicroPython," including Raspberry Pi.

  • GNU World Order 13x34
  • Absurd Abstractions | Coder Radio 371

    It’s a Coder Radio special all about abstraction. What it is, why we need it, and what to do when it leaks.

    Plus your feedback, Mike’s next language challenge, and a functional ruby pick.

  • KDE Apps 19.08, KNOPPIX, System76, Slackware, Huawei, EndeavourOS, Dreamcast | This Week in Linux 79

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, KDE announced their latest big release of their Application Suite with dozens of new app updates. We got some Distro news to talk about with KNOPPIX, Slackware, EndeavourOS and Neptune Linux. System76 announced some really cool news with their new Graphical Firmware Manager tool.

Screenshots/Screencasts: 10 GNU/Linux Distros (Screenshots) and New Screencast/Video of Endeavour OS 2019.08.17

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 10 Linux distros: From different to dangerous

    One of the great benefits of Linux is the ability to roll your own. Throughout the years, individuals, organizations, and even nation states have done just that. In this gallery, we're going to showcase some of those distros. Be careful, though. You may not want to load these, or if you do, put them in isolated VMs. We're not kidding when we say they could be dangerous.

  • Endeavour OS 2019.08.17 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Endeavour OS 2019.08.17.

Linux Candy: WallGen – image generator tool

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!!

Linux Candy is a new series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We’re only going to feature open-source software in this series.

I’m not going to harp on about the tired proverb “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. But there’s a certain element of truth here. If you spend all day coding neural networks, mastering a new programming language, sit in meetings feeling bored witless, you’ll need some relief at the end of the day. And what better way by making your desktop environment a bit more memorable.

Let’s start our candy adventure with WallGen. It’s a small command-line utility that generates HQ poly wallpapers with only a few text arguments for inputs. Depending on these arguments, you can create shape-based patterns, randomly filled surfaces, and even image-based patterns.

Read more

Review: AcademiX GNU/Linux 2.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

What sets AcademiX apart from other distributions is the EDU software manager. This package manager provides curated lists of educational software, which are grouped by subject and by age range. This package manager makes finding educational software really easy. There is software for astronomy, biology, geography, foreign languages, and many other subjects. While there are gaps in the availability of applications covering various subjects, that is a gap in the broader open source application ecosystem, not something specific to AcademiX. While some of the rough edges I noted with the installation process and the desktop customization make me a hesitant to recommend AcademiX to new Linux users, Educational Technology professionals should perhaps try out AcademiX just to use the EDU package manager to explore various open source applications.

While installing and updating software was easy and basically the same experience as any other modern, Debian-based distribution, the fact that some of the packages come from servers in Romania means that some package downloads can be much slower than downloading from the world-wide network of Debian mirrors. For individual packages and small collections of packages this is not too noticeable, but it is still an issue. The frustrating part is the fact that the speeds are not consistent. Sometimes I was downloading at only 40kbps, but other times it was much faster. I experienced the same issue when trying to download the ISO. One download took about 20 minutes for the 1.7GB image but some other attempts took 4 hours.

Final thoughts

AcademiX GNU/Linux is an interesting distribution, but it has some rough edges that need to be cleaned up. Honestly, I really, really wanted to like this distribution (good distributions aimed at the educational market are always needed), but found it to be merely okay. AcademiX has a lot of potential, but it is just not there yet. DebianEdu/Skolelinux is far more polished while serving almost the exact same niche. However, if the AcademiX team cleans up some of the issues I noted above, especially the installer issues, I think future versions of AcademiX might turn out to be worthwhile. The EDU software installer is well organized and aids in discovering educational software, so that is one solid advantage AcademiX offers, but overall the distribution needs more work and polish before I could move it from "this distribution is okay" to "you should give this distribution a try".

Read more

The ClockworkPi GameShell is a super fun DIY spin on portable gaming

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

Portable consoles are hardly new, and thanks to the Switch, they’re basically the most popular gaming devices in the world. But ClockworkPi’s GameShell is something totally unique, and entirely refreshing when it comes to gaming on the go. This clever DIY console kit provides everything you need to assemble your own pocket gaming machine at home, running Linux-based open-source software and using an open-source hardware design that welcomes future customization.

The GameShell is the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, which began shipping to its backers last year and is now available to buy either direct from the company or from Amazon. The $159.99 ( on sale for $139.99 as of this writing) includes everything you need to build the console, like the ClockworkPi quad-core Cortex A7 motherboard with integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 1GB of DDR3 RAM — but it comes unassembled.

Read more

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019.

It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations.

The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support.

Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions.

Read more

7 of the Best Linux Distros for Developers and Programmers

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

One of the reasons Linux is great is because of how flexible it is. For example, it can run on everything from servers to your old laptop to a Raspberry Pi. For this reason, it’s also a fantastic platform for developers.

Whether you’re a seasoned developer or just using Linux to learn to program, you still have to choose a distribution. The reality is that you can pretty much be a developer with most Linux distros, but some have those little conveniences that make them head-and-shoulders above the crowd.

Here are the best Linux distros for developers.

Read more

[EndeavourOS] The August release is available.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This ISO contains:

Calamares 3.2.11 (the latest version of our installer)
Kernel 5.2.8
mesa 19.1.4-1
systemd 242.84-1
xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.16-1
XFCE 4.14
bash-completion
broadcom-wl-dkms
We also took care of some bug fixes:

Autologin is working now (if chosen inside Calamares)
Virtualbox detection is working
Powersaving/screen-locking issues are resolved
Added Leafpad as an option to use the editor as admin (not working with mousepad anymore)
A general cleanup
Removed light-locker (was causing issues)

Read more

Emmabuntus DE2 1.05 Released, Which Reduces ISO Image Size

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Emmabuntus Team is pleased to announce the release of the new Emmabuntüs Debian Edition 2 1.05 (32 and 64 bits) on 02nd Aug, 2019.

It’s based on Debian 9.9 stretch distribution and featuring the XFCE desktop environment.

This is a lightweight distribution, which was designed to run on older computers.

This distribution was originally designed to facilitate the reconditioning of computers donated to humanitarian organizations, starting with the Emmaüs communities.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Dualboot Ubuntu 19.04 and Debian 10 on a 32GB USB Stick

Ubuntu 19.04, or Disco Dingo, and Debian 10, or Buster, are two latest versions in 2019 of two most popular GNU/Linux distros I already wrote about here and here. This tutorial explains dualboot installation procedures in simple way for Ubuntu Disco Dingo and Debian Buster computer operating systems onto a portable USB Flash Drive. There are 2 advantages of this kind of portable dualbooting; first, it's safer for your data in internal HDD and second, you can bring both OSes with you everywhere you go. You will prepare the partitions first, then install Ubuntu, and then install Debian, and finally finish up the GRUB bootloader, and enjoy. Go ahead! Read more

Compute module offers choice of 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake

Aaeon’s “COM-CFHB6” COM Express Basic Type 6 module is available with 8th or 9th Gen H-series Core and Xeon CPUs and offers up to 48GB DDR4 with ECC plus support for 12x USB ports and 24 PCIe 3.0 lanes. Aaeon has announced a COM Express Basic Type 6 module that supports Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake and 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh H-series chips. We’ve seen similar combinations on Congatec’s refreshed Conga-TS370 and Kontron’s similarly updated COMe-bCL6. The new COM-CFHB6 module follows other Aaeon Basic Type 6 entries including its 6th Gen Skylake powered COM-KBHB6. Read more

today's howtos

Alpine 3.10.2 released

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.10.2 of its Alpine Linux operating system. Read more