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Stable Kernels: 5.14.8, 5.10.69, 5.4.149, 4.19.208, 4.14.248, 4.9.284, and 4.4.285

Filed under
Linux

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.8 kernel.

    All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

    thanks,

    greg k-h

Read more

Also: Linux 5.10.69

Linux 5.4.149

Linux 4.19.208

Linux 4.14.248

Linux 4.9.284

Linux 4.4.285

Can You Run Linux Without a Desktop Environment?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

While modern Linux systems have attractive desktop interfaces, you may be wondering whether you can use Linux without them. The straightforward answer is "yes."

What Is a Desktop Environment?

While the desktop environments on Windows and macOS are tightly integrated and built into the system, on Linux, desktop environments like GNOME, KDE, and Xfce are just collections of programs that you can install in addition to the base operating system.

Read more

Linux 5.15-rc3

Filed under
Linux

So after a somewhat rocky merge window and second rc, things are now
actually looking pretty normal for rc3. Knock wood.

There are fixes all over, and the statistics look fairly regular, with
drivers dominating as they should (since they are most of the tree).
And outside of drivers, we have a fairly usual mix of changes -
architecture fixes, networking, filesystems, and tooling (the latter
being mostly kvm selftests).

Shortlog appended, it's not too long and easy to scan through to get a
flavor for the details if you happen to care.

Please do give it a whirl,

             Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.15-rc3 Released - Looking "Pretty Normal" Plus Performance Fix - Phoronix

Librem 14 Is the Most Secure Laptop You Can Buy, but It Comes at a High Price

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

If you're looking for a Linux laptop with a focus on privacy and security, you could roll your own. Several GNU/Linux operating systems are available that are more angled towards privacy and keeping you secure online, rather than general computing. One example is PureOS, the operating system from Purism that you will find pre-installed on the Librem 14.

A top-end ultraportable notebook with specs comparable with a MacBook Pro, the Librem 14 is arguably the most security and privacy-conscious laptop around.

But Purism's laptop costs a pretty penny – is it worth the price?

Read more

Kernel: Linux IO_uring and "amd-pstate"

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux IO_uring Can Now Achieve Up To ~3.8M IOPS Per-Core - Phoronix

    It was just last month when ~3.5M IOPS per-core was impressive with the code for Linux 5.15 to further push Linux's I/O limits. Now for code likely to be included in Linux 5.16 it's currently at 3.8M IOPS with a single tread.

    With this patch series reworking and further optimizing the submission and completion paths, the I/O throughput is upped even more. With block maintainer and IO_uring lead developer Jens Axboe's Intel Optane based rig, he is enjoying around a 3% throughput improvement.

  • Updated AMD P-State Driver Published For Linux - Phoronix

    Earlier this month AMD published their "amd-pstate" Linux driver that leverages ACPI CPPC data to make more informed CPU frequency scaling decisions with an aim to boost the performance-per-Watt for Zen 3 (and eventually Zen 2) processors on Linux. The second spin of that "amd-pstate" Linux kernel driver is now available for testing.

8 Reasons Why You Should Use Linux for Programming

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

Linux is a platform with a good market reputation. Programmers prefer to use it for multiple reasons. It is easier to set up and run over any system. Moreover, its interface comes up with continuous improvements that make it desirable even for programming assignment help .

[....]

No doubt system maintenance is an important thing that requires consideration while setting up and operating the operating system. Linux is simple in maintenance due to its easy to understand interface. The operating system and other software are easier to update. Further, it is a protective system from malware and viruses that helps to arrange data accurately or safely.

The feature of getting all updates on a regular basis helps a lot in making the system quick over actions. As compared to Linux system maintenance on any other setup is not that easy. Further, it requires third party assistance to update the system and much more. But in the case of Linux it is quick and smart in updating or maintenance without the requirement of any third party system.

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Pinebook Pro Review: A FOSS Laptop That Doesn't Suck

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

Pinebook's Linux-only approach to hardware development makes an attractive proposition for those wanting the all-FOSS experience. But how does its Pinebook Pro laptop stack up against more established opposition, such as the much-loved Chromebook?

Read more

The Speed of Time

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

How long does it take to read the time? How would you time time? These strange questions came to the fore back in 2014 when Netflix was switching services from CentOS Linux to Ubuntu, and I helped debug several weird performance issues including one I'll describe here. While you're unlikely to run into this specific issue anymore, what is interesting is this type of issue and the simple method of debugging it: a pragmatic mix of observability and experimentation tools. I've shared many posts about superpower observability tools, but often humble hacking is just as effective.

A Cassandra database cluster had switched to Ubuntu and noticed write latency increased by over 30%. A quick check of basic performance statistics showed over 30% higher CPU consumption. What on Earth is Ubuntu doing that results in 30% higher CPU time!?

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Making Linux Offline Voice Recognition Easier

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For just about any task you care to name, a Linux-based desktop computer can get the job done using applications that rival or exceed those found on other platforms. However, that doesn’t mean it’s always easy to get it working, and speech recognition is just one of those difficult setups.

A project called Voice2JSON is trying to simplify the use of voice workflows. While it doesn’t provide the actual voice recognition, it does make it easier to get things going and then use speech in a natural way.

The software can integrate with several backends to do offline speech recognition including CMU’s pocketsphinx, Dan Povey’s Kaldi, Mozilla’s DeepSpeech 0.9, and Kyoto University’s Julius. However, the code is more than just a thin wrapper around these tools. The fast training process produces both a speech recognizer and an intent recognizer. So not only do you know there is a garage door, but you gain an understanding of the opening and closing of the garage door.

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If you install Windows 11 on an unsupported PC, you will not get updates

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

You can always install Ubuntu or Linux Mint

Being a Linux evangelist it would be very remiss of me not to at least mention it is an option that you have. Linux Distros like Ubuntu and Linux Mint are quite user friendly and easy to set up. It’s a lot easier to install Ubuntu on your laptop or PC than it is to install Windows. You can even install Ubuntu or Linux Mint alongside Windows and choose which OS you want to boot into during startup.

I am always telling people that these days it doesn’t really matter which OS you are using as long as you can install Google Chrome. Most of the stuff we do and need is in the cloud. If you are an accountant for example you can use Sage or QuickBooks in the cloud so there is no need for Windows support. You can use Office 365 or Google Workspace and so much more.

Your OS just sits behind the scenes unobtrusively facilitating your desires. There was a time when desktop apps ruled the roost and this was a big reason for you not to install Linux but those days are long gone. Ubuntu 20.04 will be supported for the next 10 years so, 2030 inenge ichipo!

Ubuntu will also run much faster than Windows 11 will ever will on your old Hardware. You can do that or just keep Windows 10 which Microsoft has said they will keep supporting and updating.

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Security and DRM Leftovers

Linux 5.15-rc3

So after a somewhat rocky merge window and second rc, things are now
actually looking pretty normal for rc3. Knock wood.

There are fixes all over, and the statistics look fairly regular, with
drivers dominating as they should (since they are most of the tree).
And outside of drivers, we have a fairly usual mix of changes -
architecture fixes, networking, filesystems, and tooling (the latter
being mostly kvm selftests).

Shortlog appended, it's not too long and easy to scan through to get a
flavor for the details if you happen to care.

Please do give it a whirl,

             Linus

Read more Also: Linux 5.15-rc3 Released - Looking "Pretty Normal" Plus Performance Fix - Phoronix

Huawei launches OS openEuler, aims to construct 'ecological base of national digital infrastructure'

Chinese tech giant Huawei launched openEuler operating system (OS) on Saturday, another self-developed OS after the HarmonyOS, as it tries to "solve the domestic stranglehold problem of lacking its homegrown OS in basic technology," and build a full-scenario covered ecosystem to prepare for more US bans. The openEuler OS can be widely deployed in various forms of equipment such as servers, cloud computing and edge computing. Its application scenarios cover Information Technology, Communication Technology and Operational Technology to achieve unifying an operating system with multi-device support, according to the company's introduction. In the ICT field, Huawei provides products and solutions such as servers, storage, cloud services, edge computing, base stations, routers, industrial control among others, all of which need to be equipped with an OS. Huawei has therefore been building capabilities to achieve a unified OS architecture, and meet the demands of different application scenarios, the firm said on Saturday. The openEuler program was initially announced back in 2019 as an open source operating system. Today's launch is an updated one. Read more