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Routers and Linux

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Linux
Web

Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

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OS
GNU
Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false.

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Also: Anti-Systemd People

Linux Freedom vs. Convenience

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Linux

One of my favorite websites that illustrate this point is WhyLinuxIsBetter.net. As the page loads, you're immediately presented with clear, easy to understand reasons why Linux is better than proprietary operating systems. Now granted, the website is a bit dated. But the overall message is timeless and positive. What this site does well is show its readers exactly why Linux on the desktop is awesome. From its features to its built-in safety, everything is clearly illustrated and easy to understand.

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A MAN WITH HIS FINGERS IN MILLIONS OF PIES

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Linux
Interviews

Over 5 million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching and transformative legacy, helping the next generation of games designer and computer scientists find their feet. There are countless numbers of people who have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software, albeit now with a little more help than when the foundation started. We met with Eben a couple of weeks before the launch of the monumental model 2 where he generously answered our questions despite a terrible cold.

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Imagination to release open MIPS design to academia

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Linux

Imagination is releasing a free version of its Linux-ready MIPS MicroAptiv CPU to universities called “MIPSfpga,” which will offer fully transparent RTL.

Imagination Technologies has developed a Linux-ready academic version of its 32-bit MIPS architecture MicroAptiv processor design, and is giving it away free to universities for use in computer research and education. As the MIPSfpga name suggests, the production-quality RTL (register transfer level) design abstraction is intended to run on industry standard FPGAs.

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It Doesn't Look Like KDBUS Will Make It For Linux 4.1

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Linux

While Linux 4.1 is bringing many new features and improvements, there's one addition that's noticeably absent.

To frequent Phoronix readers, the missing feature is, of course, KDBUS. KDBUS developers had been planning to land it in 2014 but that didn't pan out and now most likely they're looking at a H2'2015 arrival for this feature.

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Also: The Many Features Of The Linux 4.1 Kernel

With Linux 4.1 You Can Play With The Chrome OS Lightbar

Dell Keyboard Backlight Support In Linux 4.1

Intel Bay Trail & Cherry Trail CPUs To Run Faster With Linux 4.1

CHROMIXIUM 1.0 – FINAL STABLE VERSION IS OUT NOW!

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GNU
Linux

Chromixium combines the elegant simplicity of the Chromebook with the flexibility and stability of Ubuntu’s Long Term Support release. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux.

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Fedora-Based Qubes OS 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Linux Distro Now Available for Testing

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Linux
Red Hat

Joanna Rutkowska announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate version of the forthcoming Qubes OS 3.0 computer operating system based on the Fedora Linux distribution.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 Will Be Named Stretch

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GNU
Linux
Debian

On April 26, the Debian Release Team, through Niels Thykier, announced that the next major release of the acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux computer operating system will be named Stretch.

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Linux 4.1-rc1

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Linux

It's been a normal merge window, and I'm releasing according to the
normal schedule. The few days of travel didn't seem to matter, as I
had internet access at all times.

The merge window is pretty normal in terms of what got merged too.
Just eyeballing the size, it looks like this is going to fit right in
- while 4.0 was a bit smaller than usual, 4.1 seems to be smack dab in
the middle of the normal range for the last couple of years. And all
the patch statistics look normal as well: the bulk of the changes are
to drivers (just under 60% of the patch), with arch updates being
about 20% of it all, and the rest is spread all over.

No earth-shattering new features come to mind, even if initial support
for ACPI on arm64 looks funny. Depending on what you care about, your
notion of "big new feature" may differ from mine, of course. There's a
lot of work all over, and some of it might just make a big difference
to your use cases.

So go out and test. Even -rc1, as raw as it may sometimes be, has
tended to be pretty good. It's not that scary. Promise.

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Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People