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LOCKDOWN Aiming To Be In Linux 5.2 For Tightening Up Hardware/Kernel Access

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

Google developer Matthew Garrett recently took over work on the long-standing "LOCKDOWN" kernel patches with a goal of preventing the running kernel image from being modified and strengthen the boundary between UID 0 and the kernel. These patches, which have been around for years and shipped by some Linux distributions, didn't make it into the recent Linux 5.1 merge window but now a pull request has been issued in trying to ship it with Linux 5.2.

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World’s first Zynq UltraScale+ based SMARC module runs Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

MSC’s rugged “MSC SM2S-ZUSP” SMARC module features a Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC with 4x Cortex-A53, 2x Cortex-R5, GPU, and FPGA plus up to 8GB DDR4 and 64GB eMMC and optional WiFi/BT and carrier.

MSC Technologies — a brand of Avnet Integrated Solutions — has launched the world’s first SMARC 2.0 form-factor module with Xilinx’s Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. The 82 x 50mm SMARC “Short” style MSC SM2S-ZUSP joins other Zynq UltraScale+ based modules such as iWave’s iW-RainboW-G30M, Enclustra‘s Mars XU3 and Mercury+ XU1, Trenz’s TE0808 UltraSOM+, and Iveia’s Atlas-II-Z8 and Atlas-III-Z8 COMs. SBCs include Avnet’s 96Boards compatible Ultra96.

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Puppy Linux 8.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Puppy Linux is one of the tiniest Linux distros. It loads into RAM and runs from it making it faster than most Linux distributions. Puppy Linux 8.0 "Bionicpup" came out yesterday with a couple of new features and latest software.
As the codename 'Bionicpup" suggests, this release is based on Ubuntu 18.04.

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Meanwhile in Sparky Linux (lightweight):

  • Sway

    There is a new, small desktop available for Sparkers: Sway

    [...]

    If you don’t want to install gdm3 (and gnome-shell), you can use other display managers, such as LightDM, SDDM, etc., but they can run Sway in Xorg session with Xwayland (xwayland package has to be installed).

The 6 Best Linux Bandwidth Monitoring Tools in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Knowledge is power! Consequently, knowing what the bandwidth utilization of the network you manage will give you power by allowing you to be proactive and by ensuring that network congestion is avoided as much as possible. To accomplish that, what you need are bandwidth monitoring tools. And since Linux is a popular platform with many network administrators, let’s have a look at some of the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools available. Considering that most of them are free and open source, they will allow you to start monitoring bandwidth at no other cost than the time you’ll spend installing and configuring them. As you’ll soon find out, many of these tools are as good as some of the best Windows tools.

We’ll begin our exploration by having an overview of bandwidth monitoring. We’ll explain what it is and, more importantly, how it works. This will lead us to discuss the Simple Network Management Protocol, the basis of most monitoring tools. Then, we’ll briefly discuss Linux in general and also what it means to use it as a platform for monitoring tools. Once we’re all on the same page, we’ll be ready for the core of our subject, the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools.

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NuTyX 11 available with cards 2.4.96

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I'm very please to announce the new NuTyX 11 release.

The NuTyX 11 is a complete recompilation of all the available binaries on NuTyX.

Since everything has been recompiled, most of the packages have been update as well.

The base of NuTyX comes with the new kernel LTS 4.19.28 and the very new kernel 5.0.3.

The toolchain is completely rebuild around glibc 2.29, gcc 8.3.0 and binutils 2.32.

The graphical server is now in xorg-server 1.20.4, the mesa lib in 18.3.4, gtk3 3.24.3, qt 5.12.1.

The python 3.7.2 and 2.7.16 are updated as well

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Also new: Feren OS 19.03 Run Through

Linux Foundation and Servers Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • How Open Source Is Accelerating NFV Transformation

    Red Hat is noted for making open source a culture and business model, not just a way of developing software, and its message of open source as the path to innovation resonates on many levels.

    In anticipation of the upcoming Open Networking Summit, we talked with Thomas Nadeau, Technical Director NFV at Red Hat, who gave a keynote address at last year’s event, to hear his thoughts regarding the role of open source in innovation for telecommunications service providers.

    One reason for open source’s broad acceptance in this industry, he said, was that some very successful projects have grown too large for any one company to manage, or single-handedly push their boundaries toward additional innovative breakthroughs.

  • Why The CDF Launch From Linux Foundation Is Important For The DevOps And Cloud Native Ecosystem

    Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) has become an essential building block of modern application lifecycle management. This technique allows business to increase the velocity of delivering software to users. Through CI/CD, what was once confined to large, web-scale companies became available to early-stage startups and enterprises.

  • Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift

    Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed to deliver a superior user experience. In-memory Data Grid has a variety of use cases in today’s environment, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies, among many others. With containers getting more attention, the need to have Data Grid running on a container platform like OpenShift is clear, and we are seeing more and more customers aligning their architecture with a datastore running natively on a container platform.

    In this article, I will talk about multiple layers of security available while deploying Data Grid on OpenShift. The layers of security offer a combination of security measures provided by Data Grid as well as by OpenShift/Kubernetes.

  • Rebooting UUCP to redecentralize the net

    UUCP (Unix-to-Unix Copy Protocol) is a venerable, non-hierarchical networking protocol that was used as transport for early email and Usenet message boards; its intrinsic decentralization and its cooperative nature (UUCP hosts store and forward messages for one another) make it a kind of symbol of the early, decentralized robustness that characterized the early net and inspired so much optimism about a fundamentally distributed arrangement of peers rising up to replace the top-down phone companies and other centralized systems.

    As part of the decentralized web movement, UUCP has been rebooted by Dataforge, a Fort Worth, Texas-based "hybrid shell provider/tilde server" whose proprietor Wesley "praetor" Banderia uses his decades of Unix systems administration to keep the system running on a cluster of lovingly maintained vintage SGI machines with a Google Cloud VPS for backup.

Octavo Systems Shows Off With Deadbug Linux Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Once upon a time, small Linux-capable single board computers were novelties, but not anymore. Today we have a wide selection of them, many built around modules we could buy for our own projects. Some of the chipset suppliers behind these boards compete on cost, others find a niche to differentiate their product. Octavo Systems is one of the latter offering system-in-package (SiP) modules that are specifically designed for easy integration. They described how simple it would be to build a minimal computer using their SC335x C-SiP, and to drive the point home they brought a deadbug implementation to Embedded World 2019. [Short video after the break.]

Most of us encounter Octavo modules as the heart of a BeagleBoard. Their increasing integration made tiny wonders like PocketBeagle possible. But bringing out all those pins for use still required a four-layer circuit board. Octavo’s pitch for hardware professionals center around how easy integration saves time for faster time to market, and fortunately for us easy integration also translates to a more accessible device for our projects. It’s one thing to publish a document describing a hypothetical single-layer PCB for an Octavo module, it’s quite something else to show that concept in action with no PCB at all.

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Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

Filed under
OS
Linux

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park.
Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks.

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7 Great XFCE Themes for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Gnome might be the de-facto default desktop for many Linux distributions, but that doesn’t mean it’s everyone’s favorite. For many Linux users that distinction goes to XFCE. While it’s not as lightweight as it used to be, XFCE remains a favorite among users who want their desktop environment to stay out of their way.

Just because you want a relatively minimal desktop doesn’t mean you want it to be ugly. Looking to spice up the look of your XFCE installation? You have plenty of options.

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Linux 5.1-rc2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1-rc2

    Well, we're a week away from the merge window close, and here's rc2.
    Things look fairly normal, but honestly, rc2 is usually too early to
    tell. People haven't necessarily had time to notice problems yet.
    Which is just another way of saying "please test harder".

    Nothing particularly stands out. Yes, we had some fixes for the new
    io_ring code for issues that were discussed when merging it. Other
    than that, worth noting is that the bulk of the patches are for
    tooling, not the core kernel. In fact, about two thirds of the patch
    is just for the tools/ subdirectory, most of it due to some late perf
    tool updates. The people involved promise they're done.

  • Linux 5.1-rc2 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has announced the second weekly release candidate for Linux 5.1.

    Linux 5.1-rc2 is looking "fairly normal" but then again with being the trailing week after a busy merge window, it's difficult to tell how the rest of the cycle will pan out.

    Linus noted in the 5.1-rc2 announcement that nothing particular stands out but there are fixes to the io_uring code and other improvements merged over the past week.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora and Red Hat: SuperIO, Microsoft Mono, Fedora Modularity, NeuroFedora, OpenShift and 'Data Economy' (Spying)

  • Even more fun with SuperIO
    There were a few slight hickups, in that when you read the data back from the device just one byte is predictably wrong, but nothing that can’t be worked around in software. Working around the wrong byte means we can verify the attestation checksum correctly. Now, don’t try flashing your EC with random binaries. The binaries look unsigned, don’t appear to have any kind of checksum, and flashing the wrong binary to the wrong hardware has the failure mode of “no I/O devices appear at boot” so unless you have a hardware programmer handy it’s probably best to wait for an update from your OEM.
  • Mono 5 Might Come For Fedora 30 While Other Fedora 31 Features Discussed
    Earlier this month was the feature proposal for Fedora 31 to finally upgrade to Mono 5, which has been out for nearly two years for this open-source .NET environment. This feature request has been approved for Fedora 31 while it's also been decided to allow it into Fedora 30 if it can land within the next week. The transition from Mono 4 to Mono 5 was blocked due to the build process depending upon some binary references that complicated the process for distributions like Fedora and Debian. But they've now overcome those challenges and are ready to introduce Mono 5 to Fedora users.
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Day for Fedora Modularity
    Modularity lets you keep the right version of an application, language runtime, or other software on your Fedora system even as the operating system is updated. You can read more about Modularity in general on the Fedora documentation site. The Modularity folks have been working on Modules for everyone. As a result, the Fedora Modularity and QA teams have organized a test day for Tuesday, March 26, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read on for more information on the test day.
  • NeuroFedora update: 2019 week 13
  • OpenShift Commons AIOps SIG Kick off Meeting Recap (Video & Slides included)
    OpenShift Commons hosted the first AIOps SIG meeting today with guest speakers from Red Hat, Siscale and Prophetstor. This AIOps SIG group will be meeting on the last Monday of each month. Please join the AIOps google group to receive notices of upcoming meetings and events.
  • Data explosion, or data implosion?
    Data. It’s here. It’s everywhere. It is, as I’ve said before, the dawn of the Data Economy. With data permeating our lives—and business—it makes sense to say that data, and the ability to use it wisely for insights, is important to many organizations’ success. In this post, I’ll examine some of the barriers organizations face in the Data Economy and how they’re overcoming them.

LOCKDOWN Aiming To Be In Linux 5.2 For Tightening Up Hardware/Kernel Access

Google developer Matthew Garrett recently took over work on the long-standing "LOCKDOWN" kernel patches with a goal of preventing the running kernel image from being modified and strengthen the boundary between UID 0 and the kernel. These patches, which have been around for years and shipped by some Linux distributions, didn't make it into the recent Linux 5.1 merge window but now a pull request has been issued in trying to ship it with Linux 5.2. Read more

openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life. We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community. Read more Obituary: Peter T. Linnell

Top 15 Econometric Software and Statistical Software for Linux

Today’s article is specifically designed for those who work or studies in the statistics field. This field is quite tough and in order to preserve the data and calculation, some software may come to great help to you. To ease your burden and to take care of all your information, Linux has come up with some prodigious software which will work as your helping hand and will lead you to the right track. As you know that econometric software and statistical software almost belong to the same category, that is why in this article, you will find an amalgamation and combination of this two Linux software. By doing this, it will also be easier for you to search the software easily. Read more Also: PlantUML for text based UML diagram modelling - nice free software