Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

PineCube camera kit arrives for $30

Filed under
OS
Linux

Pine64’s $30 PineCube camera dev kit runs Linux on an Allwinner S3 and offers a 5MP, OmniVision OV5640 based M12 camera with IR night-vision plus audio I/O, WiFi, 10/100 LAN with PoE, USB, 26-pin GPIO, and optional battery and display.

The open-spec PineCube was first revealed by Pine64 in early 2019 as a device called The CUBE with an 8-megapixel Sony iMX179 CMOS sensor. By early this year, it was recast as the CUBE IP Camera, which was promised for a delayed 2Q release due to issues with the Sony camera implementation. Since then, Pine64 switched to a 5MP OmniVision OV5640 sensor and a new PineCube name. The camera dev kit has now shipped for $30.

Read more

Sailfish OS now lets you share your Mobile Linux device

Filed under
OS
Linux

Use Multi-account sign-on on your Mobile Linux device. Jolla has Introduced this feature as part of its latest Sailfish OS 3.4 Pallas-Yllästunturi release software update.

Having the ability to share a mobile device amongst your family or co-workers can be very useful. This is something that mobile manufacturers such as Motorola have been doing on their smartphones and Samsung on their tablets for a while now. What I mean by sharing is that everyone can have their own Independent accounts set up on the device - once logged in they have access to their OWN emails, social media accounts, pictures, etc. It's THEIR device.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, ZaReason Review and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Ubuntu Podcast S13E31 – Cheers with water

    This week we’ve been upgrading computers and Ebaying stuff. We discuss the Windows Calculator coming to Linux, Microsoft Edge browser coming to Linux, Ubuntu Community Council elections and LibreOffice office getting Yaru icons. We also round up our picks from the general tech news.

  • Review - The Verix 9100 Linux Laptop from ZaReason

    Time for another laptop review! This time I have the Verix 9100 in the studio sent over from ZaReason, an awesome local Linux laptop vendor that has some great hardware available.

  • BSD Now #373: Kyle Evans Interview

    We have an interview with Kyle Evans for you this week. We talk about his grep project, lua and flua in base, as well as bectl, being on the core team and a whole lot of other stuff.

IBM/Red Hat: LinuxONE, OpenShift, Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) and More

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
  • IBM integrates Linux One with R3 Corda Enterprise

    It’s an exciting time for IBM LinuxONE. Over the past several months, we’ve been doubling down on new hardware, Red Hat OpenShift and new Cloud Paks for LinuxONE, and new confidential computing capabilities.

    More than ever, our clients of all sizes looking to win in the era of hybrid cloud are focused on key areas: resiliency, performance demands, security, flexibility and modernization.

    Other areas of growth for LinuxONE are emerging workloads and industries like blockchain and digital asset custody. While the importance of safeguarding business and customer data is well known, the nature of blockchain use cases often include the initiation, transfer and custody of financial assets for your business and your customers—which further increases the importance of building applications with security and privacy first.
    News from R3’s CordaCon

  • Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift's persistent volume framework - Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides a number of different models you can use to deploy an application. OpenShift 4.x uses Operators to deploy Kubernetes-native applications. It also supports Helm and traditional template-based deployments. Whatever deployment method you choose, it will be deployed as a wrapper to one or more existing OpenShift resources. Examples include BuildConfig, DeploymentConfig, and ImageStream.

    In this article, I introduce you to OpenShift’s Kubernetes-based persistent volume framework for persistent cluster storage. You will learn how to use OpenShift’s PersistentVolume (PV) and PersistentVolumeClaim (PVC) objects to provision and request storage resources.

  • How to use the Linux kernel's Integrity Measurement Architecture

    The kernel integrity sub-system can be used to detect if a file has been altered (accidently or maliciously), both remotely and/or locally. It does that by appraising a file's measurement (its hash value) against a "good" value stored previously as an extended attribute (on file systems which support extended attributes like ext3, ext4. etc.). Similar, but complementary, mechanisms are provided by other security technologies like SELinux which depending on policy can attempt to protect file integrity.

    The Linux IMA (Integrity Measurement Architecture) subsystem introduces hooks within the Linux kernel to support creating and collecting hashes of files when opened, before their contents are accessed for read or execute. The IMA measurement subsystem was added in linux-2.6.30 and is supported by Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

    The kernel integrity subsystem consists of two major components. The Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) is responsible for collecting file hashes, placing them in kernel memory (where userland applications cannot access/modify it) and allows local and remote parties to verify the measured values. The Extended Verification Module (EVM) detects offline tampering (this could help mitigate evil-maid attacks) of the security extended attributes.

    IMA maintains a runtime measurement list and, if anchored in a hardware Trusted Platform Module(TPM), an aggregate integrity value over this list. The benefit of anchoring the aggregate integrity value in the TPM is that the measurement list is difficult to compromise by a software attack, without it being detectable. Hence, on a trusted boot system, IMA-measurement can be used to attest to the system's runtime integrity.

  • Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company, and _VOIS Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India. Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance Company, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company Limited and _VOIS were honored at the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

Kernel (Linux): ABI, NFS, NAPI (new API), Stats and Security Hardening

Filed under
Linux

  • The ABI status of filesystem formats [LWN.net]

    One of the key rules of Linux kernel development is that the ABI between the kernel and user space cannot be broken; any change that breaks previously working programs will, outside of exceptional circumstances, be reverted. The rule seems clear, but there are ambiguities when it comes to determining just what constitutes the kernel ABI; tracepoints are a perennial example of this. A recent discussion has brought another one of those ambiguities to light: the on-disk format of Linux filesystems.
    Users reporting kernel regressions will receive a varying amount of sympathy, depending on where the regression is. For normal user-space programs using the system-call API, that sympathy is nearly absolute, and changes that break things will need to be redone. This view of the ABI also extends to the virtual filesystems, such as /proc and sysfs, exported by the kernel. Changes that break things are deemed a little more tolerable when they apply to low-level administrative tools; if there is only one program that is known to use an interface, and that program has been updated, the change may be allowed. On the other hand, nobody will be concerned about changes that break out-of-tree kernel modules; the interface they used is considered to be internal to the kernel and not subject to any stability guarantee.

    But those are not the only places where user space interfaces with the kernel. Consider, for example, this regression report from Josh Triplett. It seems that an ext4 filesystem bug fix merged for 5.9-rc2 breaks the mounting of some ext4 filesystems that he works with.

  • NFS Client With Linux 5.10 Adds "READ_PLUS" For Faster Performance - Phoronix

    The NFS client code with Linux 5.10 has another performance optimization.

    The NFS client code now supports the READ_PLUS operation supported by NFS v4.2 and later. READ_PLUS is a variant of READ that supports efficiently transferring holes. In cases where READ_PLUS is supported by both the NFS client and server, this operation should always be used rather than READ.

  • NAPI polling in kernel threads

    Systems that manage large amounts of network traffic end up dedicating a significant part of their available CPU time to the network stack itself. Much of this work is done in software-interrupt context, which can be problematic in a number of ways. That may be about to change, though, once this patch series posted by Wei Wang is merged into the mainline.
    Once a packet arrives on a network interface, the kernel must usually perform a fair amount of protocol-processing work before the data in that packet can be delivered to the user-space application that is waiting for it. Once upon a time, the network interface would interrupt the CPU when a packet arrived; the kernel would acknowledge the interrupt, then trigger a software interrupt to perform this processing work. The problem with this approach is that, on busy systems, thousands of packets can arrive every second; handling the corresponding thousands of hardware interrupts can run the system into the ground.

    The solution to this problem was merged in 2003 in the form of a mechanism that was called, at the time, "new API" or "NAPI". Drivers that support NAPI can disable the packet-reception interrupt most of the time and rely on the network stack to poll for new packets at a frequent interval. Polling may seem inefficient, but on busy systems there will always be new packets by the time the kernel polls for them; the driver can then process all of the waiting packets at once. In this way, one poll can replace dozens of hardware interrupts.

  • Some 5.9 kernel development statistics [LWN.net]

    The 5.9 kernel was released on October 11, at the end of a ten-week development cycle — the first release to take more than nine weeks since 5.4 at the end of 2019. While this cycle was not as busy as 5.8, which broke some records, it was still one of the busier ones we have seen in some time, featuring 14,858 non-merge changesets contributed by 1,914 developers. Read on for our traditional look at what those developers were up to while creating the 5.9 release.

    Of the 1,914 developers contributing to 5.9, 306 made their first contribution for this release. This is the largest number of new contributors we have seen since 4.12 (which had 334 first-time contributors) was released in 2017 and, indeed, the second-highest number ever seen. All together, the 5.9 contributors added just over 730,000 lines of code and removed nearly 262,000 for a net growth of 468,000 lines of code.

  • Linux 5.10 Hardens Against Possible DMA Attacks By External PCIe Devices - Phoronix

    The PCI changes were submitted on Wednesday for the Linux 5.10 kernel. 

    The PCI subsystem updates for Linux 5.10 aren't too exciting this round but there are a few items worth noting. One change is the enabling of ACS translation blocking for external PCIe devices in protecting against possible DMA attacks. 

    Translation Blocking is enabled for untrusted/external PCIe devices to harden against direct memory access attacks. ACS (Access Control Services) Translation Blocking will block any request with the AT bit set as an effort to protect against improper routing of PCIe packets. 

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, The Linux Link Tech Show, Talk Python and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Leaping Lizard People | Coder Radio 384

    It's confession hour on the podcast, and your hosts surprise each other with several twists and turns.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 876

    repairing 3ds, power issues, ubuntu 20.10, games

  • Episode #287 Testing without dependencies, mocking in Python - [Talk Python To Me Podcast]

    We know our unit tests should be relatively independent from other parts of the system. For example, running a test shouldn't generally call a credit card possessing API and talk to a database when your goal is just to test the argument validation.

    And yet, your method does all three of those and more. What do you do? Some languages use elaborate dependency passing frameworks that go under the banner of inversion of control (IoC) and dependency injections (DI). In Python, the most common fix is to temporarily redefine what those two functions do using patching and mocking.

    On this episode, we welcome back Anna-Lena Pokes to talk us through the whole spectrum of test doubles, dummies, mocks, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 601: Open Source Creative - Blender, Gimp, Audacity

    Looking at open source software from a creative lens and discussing the importance and ease of using open-source software to make art, graphics, video, and more. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Jason van Gumster a creator, engineer, and host of the podcast, Open Source Creative. They talk about the positive side of customizing your workplace with open source software such as Blender, Gimp, Hydrogen, and Audacity. They also discuss the simplicity of open source creative software support and the great community surrounding open source creative software.

Kernel: CPU Undervolting, Nvidia Problems and Embedded Linux Conference Europe

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Developers Discussing Possible Kernel Driver For Intel CPU Undervolting

    While the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) on Windows allows for undervolting laptop processors, currently on Linux there isn't any Intel-endorsed way for undervolting your CPU should you be interested in better thermal/power efficiency and other factors. But a hypothetical Linux kernel driver could be coming for filling such void.

    There does exist the intel-undervolt program that is unofficial and developed by an independent developer for undervolting Intel CPUs from Haswell and newer on Linux. Besides dropping the CPU voltage, it also allows manipulating the throttling power/thermal limits for Intel processors. That intel-undervolt functionality relies on reverse-engineering and discoveries made by the community for the support. That program in turn is touching the CPU MSRs directly for manipulating the behavior.

  • The Closed-Source NVIDIA Linux Driver Is Incompatible With Linux 5.9 And Support Won't Come Until Mid-November

    The latest Nvidia graphics driver for Linux, v455.28, won't work with the latest Linux kernel. This may be due to an intentional change on the Linux kernel side that blocks third party shims from using GPL-only symbols. Regardless of the root cause, anyone using Nvidia on Linux should stick with Linux 5.8 for now. Nvidia has promised that an updated driver compatible with Linux 5.9 will arrive mid-November.

    [...]

    Using the closed-source proprietary software driver from Nvidia used to be a total nightmare on Linux. It would only work with Xorg version X and kernel version Y and if you were screwed if you upgraded either of those. That's been less of a problem in recent years. now we're once again back to Nvidia's driver dictating what kernel versions those who own their hardware can and can't use.

  • Live Embedded Event: a new online conference - Bootlin's blog

    In these times of COVID19, pretty much all of the existing conferences have moved to an online format. For example, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe is going to take place next week, online, and Bootlin will significantly contribute to the event with no less than 7 talks on a wide range of topics.

    But this trend for online conferences has also spurred the creation of new events. And specifically, we’re happy to announce the creation of a new conference oriented towards our favorite topic of embedded systems: Live Embedded Event. It will take place online on December 3 and will have a broader range of topics covered than ELC typically has, as Live Embedded Event is open to non-Linux embedded topics, hardware platform and interfaces discussions, and more.

Septor 2020.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2)
System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020
Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1
Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2
Update Tor to 0.4.4.5
Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20

Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive.

    Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop".

    [...]

    We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

10 Linux Based Mini PCs to Buy in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It won’t be wrong to say that mini PCs have all the potential in the world to take over the computer market shortly. Not only do they save a lot of space on your computer desk but also work in a very power-efficient manner while also causing less noise. Although they could be a tad more expensive than regular desktop PCs, they will actually save you some money in the long run.

With that being said, one thing that should be noted here is that most of these mini PCs are not as powerful as your regular desktop computers when it comes to processing power, memory size, and storage space. Accordingly, users who don’t plan on either gaming or video editing should definitely give these computers a shot.

The 10 Best Linux-based Mini PCs

Mini PCs aren’t anything new since they’ve been in the computer market for quite a while now. However, the number of such computers that have optimal support for Linux distros is still relatively small. So, in this article, we’re going to do all the research for you and provide you with some of the best Linux-based mini PCs out there right now.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

PineCube camera kit arrives for $30

Pine64’s $30 PineCube camera dev kit runs Linux on an Allwinner S3 and offers a 5MP, OmniVision OV5640 based M12 camera with IR night-vision plus audio I/O, WiFi, 10/100 LAN with PoE, USB, 26-pin GPIO, and optional battery and display. The open-spec PineCube was first revealed by Pine64 in early 2019 as a device called The CUBE with an 8-megapixel Sony iMX179 CMOS sensor. By early this year, it was recast as the CUBE IP Camera, which was promised for a delayed 2Q release due to issues with the Sony camera implementation. Since then, Pine64 switched to a 5MP OmniVision OV5640 sensor and a new PineCube name. The camera dev kit has now shipped for $30. Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Official Flavors Released, Here’s What’s New

As part of the today’s Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) release, all the official Ubuntu flavors have been updated and I want you to be the first to read about their new features and improvements. The official flavors released as part of Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) include Kubuntu 20.10, Xubuntu 20.10, Lubuntu 20.10, Ubuntu Studio 20.10, Ubuntu MATE 20.10, Ubuntu Budgie 20.10, and Ubuntu Kylin 20.10. As expected, they come with all the core features of Ubuntu 20.10, as well as… Kubuntu 20.04 LTS ships with the KDE Plasma 5.19.5 desktop environment, KDE Frameworks 5.74 and KDE Applications 20.08 software suites, as well as Qt 5.14.2. Among the included apps, there’s Elisa 20.08.1 as default music player instead of Cantata, LibreOffice 7.0 office suite, Mozilla Firefox 81 web browser, Latte Dock 0.9.10, KDE Connect 20.08.1, Krita 4.3.0, and KDevelop 5.5.2. Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is Now Available for Download, this is What's New

The latest Ubuntu 20.10 code-named "Groovy Gorilla" is available for download after a bit of delay due to last-minute bugs. The final announcement is due shortly today October 22 2020 from Canonical. Check out what's new. Read more