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Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116

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Linux

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X: Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

Recently there have been several Linux distribution benchmark comparisons on Phoronix to test the latest Linux OS releases, including several comparing to the current Microsoft Windows 10 performance. Those recent tests have all be done with various Intel CPUs, but for those curious about the AMD Windows vs. Linux performance, here are some fresh benchmarks as we approach the end of July.

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Linux 4.18 RC6 is Out

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Linux
  • Linux 4.18-rc6

    So this was the week when the other shoe dropped ... The reason the
    two previous rc releases were so nice and small was that David hadn't
    sent me much networking fixes, and they came in this week.

    That said, it's not really a huge rc this week either, so it's all
    good. But the networking pull this week does mean that almost exactly
    half of the diff is core networking, network drivers, or networking
    documentation updates.

    The rest is other drivers (mostly gpu, but also scsi, nvma, pci,
    pinctrl..), some arch updates (arc, x86, nds32, powerpc), and "misc"
    (tooling, header files, some vm and fs noise).

    The small but nasty VM bug we had earlier did indeed get fixed last
    rc, but there was some 32-bit fallout from the fix, so rc5 still had
    issues. But I'm hopeful that rc6 _really_ fixed all the cases.

    Shortlog appended for people who want to just get an overview of the details,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.18-rc6 Kernel Released With Many Networking Fixes, Other Regressions Resolved

    The sixth weekly test release of the Linux 4.18 kernel is now available for evaluation.

    Linux 4.18-rc6 is prior than the two previous weekly release candidates since those versions hadn't incorporated any big batch of networking fixes, which hit this week. So about half of the changes are networking changes in Linux 4.18-rc6 while the other half is a mix of driver and architecture updates along with other noise.

Neptune 5.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce version 5.4 of Neptune .

This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates.

In this update we introduce a new look and feel package called Neptune Dark. This comes together with an modified icon theme optimized for dark themes called Faenza Dark. We improved hardware support further by providing Linux Kernel 4.16.16 with improved drivers and bugfixes.

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How to install Linux on your PC

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GNU
Linux

If you are building a new system or upgrading an existing PC, installing Linux as the OS may not be the first option you considered.

Linux is the underlying structure used to power operating system distributions which are similar to the software most users are familiar with – Windows.

It is open source and prevalent in a number of software distributions, from smart IoT platforms and Android smartphones to server operating systems.

Installing a Linux distribution instead of Microsoft Windows on a new or existing machine can be great for reducing overhead and saving costs.

While certain video games and applications may not run correctly on Linux desktop distributions, most common tasks can be conducted with the same level of convenience as “standard operating” systems.

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Jonathan Dieter: Small file performance on distributed filesystems - Round 2

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Last year, I ran some benchmarks on the GlusterFS, CephFS and LizardFS distributed filesystems, with some interesting results. I had a request to redo the test after a LizardFS RC was released with a FUSE3 client, since it is supposed to give better small file performance.

I did have a request last time to include RozoFS, but, after a brief glance at the documentation, it looks like it requires a minimum of four servers, and I only had three available. I also looked at OrangeFS (originally PVFS2), but it doesn’t seem to provide replication, and, in preliminary testing, it was over ten times slower than the alternatives. NFS was tested and its results are included as a baseline.

I once again used compilebench, which was designed to emulate real-life disk usage by creating a kernel tree, reading all the files in the tree, simulating a compile of the tree, running make clean, and finally deleting the tree.

The test was much the same as last time, but with one important difference. Last time, the clients were running on the same machines that were running the servers. LizardFS benefited hugely from this as it has a “prefer local chunkserver” feature that will skip the network completely if there’s a copy on the local server. This time around, the clients were run on completely separate machines from the servers, which removed that advantage for LizardFS, but which I believe is a better reflection on how distributed filesystems are generally used.

I would like to quickly note that there was very little speed difference between LizardFS’s FUSE2 and FUSE3 clients. The numbers included are from the FUSE3 client, but they only differed by a few percentage points from the FUSE2 client.

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Linux Foundation, AGL and Linux Security

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Linux
  • Deutsche Telekom joins Linux Foundation as platinum member

    Deutsche Telekom has joined The Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) as a Platinum member. Telekom will support LFN’s efforts to accelerate the development and adoption of open-source networking technologies and contribute to new network technologies enabling 5G services, said LFN. LFN said its projects now enable nearly 70 percent of all global mobile subscribers with the addition of Deutsche Telekom, and the company’s membership in LFN will drive the LFN initiative into new regions and promote the adoption of open standards and source.

  • Deutsche Telekom Goes Platinum at Linux Foundation

    Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) continues its membership growth with the addition of its newest Platinum member, Deutsche Telekom, one of the world’s leading integrated telecommunications companies. Deutsche Telekom joins LFN to support its efforts in accelerating the development and adoption of open source networking technologies. With the addition of Deutsche Telekom, LFN projects now enable nearly seventy percent of all global mobile subscribers.

    With its collaboration and extensive global footprint, Deutsche Telekom will help accelerate LFN globally, contributing to emerging network technologies critical to enabling 5G services. LFN supports the momentum of open source networking, integrating governance of participating projects in order to enhance operational excellence, simplify member engagement, and increase collaboration. Deutsche Telekom is also an active participant in the ONAP project and plans to contribute to the next platform release, Casablanca.

  • Automotive open source virtualization: Bringing open source virtualization in AGL

    The AGL Software Defined Car Architecture white paper defines how the AGL target platform for software defined vehicles can be implemented by using virtualization techniques, presented in the document along with their automotive benefits, challenges, use cases and requirements.

    From the beginning, this work objective was to provide an architecture for a virtualization platform that can be used, extended or customized by Tier-1 or OEM companies to reduce time to market.

  • Meltdown Protection For x86 32-bit Aligned For The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Those still relying upon x86 32-bit Linux kernels for aging hardware and continuing to update to the latest software will find mitigation for the Meltdown CPU vulnerability with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle. You'll find this mitigation but at the cost of performance.

    While x86_64 Linux was mitigated back in January for Meltdown, it's taken a while for x86 32-bit support for KPTI, Kernel Page Table Isolation. This is basically applying the same page table isolation approach seen on Linux x86_64 and ARM to now the 32-bit x86 kernel code. Obviously it hasn't been a priority with many Linux distributions not even bothering with i686 install images in recent years.

A Forbes Writer Spent 2 Weeks Using Ubuntu, This is What He Thought…

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A classic love story — one Hollywood has yet to adapt in to major motion picture/musical starring Robert Downey Jr (I swear he’s in everything).

The latest case in point? That comes courtesy of online magazine Forbes.com and its tech contributor Jason Evangelho.

Jason shares his experience of using Ubuntu for a solid fortnight on a swanky Dell XPS 13 laptop. He says he was spurred into “ditching” Windows by yet another ill-timed and infuriating wait while the OS opted to install updates.

“After two decades of relying on Windows I finally decided it was time for the nuclear option,” he writes.

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How Linux Makes Your Life Easier

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GNU
Linux

There is a popular myth that Linux is complicated and hard to use by a non-techie. While there are distros and advanced Linux functionality that do require tech skills, this doesn’t mean Linux is hard to use. On the contrary, there are lots of things in the philosophy and functionality of Linux that make a user’s life easier.

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32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

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Linux

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing

Review: Peppermint OS 9

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either. Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed. Read more

A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons. GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines. The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop. Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design. With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better. Read more

Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116