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Linux

Kernel: Systemd, Linux 5.3 Improvements

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Linux
  • Systemd Introduces A New & Practical Service For Dealing With PStore

    Adding to the list of new features for systemd 243 is another last-minute addition to this growing init system... Systemd picked up a new service and while some may view it as bloat, should be quite practical at least for those encountering kernel crashes from time to time.

    Linux for several years now has offered a Pstore file-system that maps to persistent storage for recording kernel panics/errors and other debug logs that can be retained when a kernel crashes or system reboot happens and other behavior where normally all information is lost.

  • The Arm SoC/Platform Changes Finally Sent In For Linux 5.3: Jetson Nano, New SoCs

    The Arm SoC/platform changes arrived a bit late to the Linux 5.3 merge window ending this weekend. The Arm SoC/platform changes were only sent in on Friday night but include Librem 5 Developer Kit support in terms of the DeviceTree bits as well as improving the NVIDIA Jetson Nano support and various other SoC/platform additions.

  • NFS Changes On Linux 5.3 Will Allow Clients To Use New "nconnect" Mount Option

    Sent out on Thursday were the NFS client updates for the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window. This time around are a few interesting changes.

    A new mount option for NFS setups on Linux 5.3+ is the "nconnect=X" mount option where X specifies the number of TCP connections to the server to use. This multiple TCP connection handling to the server is done seamlessly and the queue length is used to balance load across the connections.

Orange Pi and Raspberry Pi 4

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Orange Pi Zero-LTS Allwinner H2+ SBC Gets More Efficient and Cooler

    Orange Pi Zero is a cool little Arm Linux board based on Allwinner H2+ processor for headless applications requiring WiFi and/or Ethernet that was first.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Specs, Release Date, Price and More

    The Raspberry Pi 4 began rolling out across the globe last month, giving cause for celebration to innumerable tinkerers and techies who like to experiment with the most robust piece of computing tech you can find for under $60.

    To get you up to speed on the Raspberry Pi 4 and everything you need to know about it – specs, price, new hardware ports, you-name-it – we’ve gathered all the info you need to know right here.

Cross Architecture Linux Containers

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GNU
Linux
Debian

With more ARM based devices in the market, and with them getting more powerful every day, it is more common to see more of ARM images for your favorite Linux distribution. Of them, Debian has become the default choice for individuals and companies to base their work on. It must have to do with Debian’s long history of trying to support many more architectures than the rest of the distributions. Debian also tends to have a much wider user/developer mindshare even though it does not have a direct backing from any of the big Linux distribution companies.

Some of my work involves doing packaging and integration work which reflects on all architectures and image types; ARM included. So having the respective environment readily available is really important to get work done quicker.

I still recollect back in 2004, when I was much newer to Linux Enterprise while working at a big Computer Hardware Company, I had heard about the Itanium 64 architecture. Back then, trying out anything other than x86 would mean you need access to physical hardware. Or be a DD and have shell access the Debian Machines.
With Linux Virtualization, a lot seems to have improved over time.

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Hardware With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Foundation ? where do thou go? ? Stay out of the Desktop and you shalt be paid
  • Acer Chromebook R 11 C738T
  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K02US
  • Acer Chromebook 14
  • HP Chromebook 11 G5 - X9U02UT
  • Acer Chromebook Spin 15
  • HP Chromebook x2
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C213SA
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus - XE513C24-K01US
  • Samsung Chromebook Pro - XE510C25-K01US
  • ASUS Chromebit CS10
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DSM4T
  • Lenovo Chromebook S330 - 81JW0001US
  • Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

    As it relates to memory technologies, the future looks very promising and very exciting. Will the SSD completely replace the traditional spinning HDD? I doubt it. Look at tape technology. It's still around and continues to find a place in the archival storage space. The HDD most likely will have a similar fate. Although until then, the HDD will continue to compete with the SSD in both price and capacity.

  • Jonathan McDowell: Upgrading my home server

    At the end of last year I decided it was time to upgrade my home server. I built it back in 2013 as an all-in-one device to be my only always-on machine, with some attempt towards low power consumption. It was starting to creak a bit - the motherboard is limited to 16G RAM and the i3-3220T is somewhat ancient (though has served me well). So it was time to think about something more up to date. Additionally since then my needs have changed; my internet connection is VDSL2 (BT Fibre-to-the-Cabinet) so I have an BT HomeHub 5 running OpenWRT to drive that and provide core routing/firewalling. My wifi is provided by a pair of UniFi APs at opposite ends of the house. I also decided I could use something low power to run Kodi and access my ripped DVD collection, rather than having the main machine in the living room. That meant what I wanted was much closer to just a standard server rather than having any special needs.

    The first thing to consider was a case. My ADSL terminates in what I call the “comms room” - it has the electricity meter / distribution board and gas boiler, as well as being where one of the UniFi’s lives and where the downstairs ethernet terminates. In short it’s the right room for a server to live in. I don’t want a full rack, however, and ideally wanted something that could sit alongside the meter cabinet without protruding from the wall any further. A tower case would have worked, but only if turned sideways, which would have made it a bit awkward to access. I tried in vain to find a wall mount case with side access that was shallow enough, but failed. However in the process I discovered a 4U vertical wall mount. This was about the same depth as the meter cabinet, so an ideal choice. I paired it with a basic 2U case from X-Case, giving me a couple of spare U should I decide I want another rack-mount machine or two.

New Releases of GNU/Linux: Clonezilla, EasyOS and ARCOLINUX

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GNU
Linux

Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Alpha Arrives, But Only for the GPD MicroPC

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Did you know that Ubuntu MATE is besties with the GPD Pocket & Pocket 2?

Well it is; the pair of pocket-sized PCs, which were made possible through various crowdfunding efforts, got their own, customised, and 100% official Ubuntu MATE 18.10 install image last year, and a follow-up with the 19.04 release this year.

I guess making a custom-spun ISO is the distro equivalent of weaving a friendship bracelet!

Accordingly, it’s no major surprise to learn Ubuntu MATE 19.10 will also come tailored for use on China-based GPD’s latest mini-marvel, the GPD MicroPC.

Interestingly, the device is sold with Ubuntu MATE 18.10 pre-loaded.

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Librem One Design Principles: Services You Can Trust

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GNU
Linux

Our hardware and software puts users back in control of computing–but, you may be wondering, can we do the same with our services? With Librem One, the answer is yes. We have big, no, huge dreams about what we can achieve with your support and the wealth of free software that already exists. But we need to keep our feet firmly on the ground.

In this post we will outline the touchstones we have used to do just that–engineer trustworthy services that everyone can use–with a design process called user-centered software engineering. We hope it will facilitate communication with friends and colleagues as we hack towards a common goal… and also show all non-technical readers that human beings are at the center of our bits and bytes. So, how did we do it?

Read more

Also: joining social media at DebConf19

Graphics: Nouveau, Wayland's Weston and Libinput

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Driver Gets A Batch Of Fixes For Linux 5.3

    Originally on Thursday was finally the Nouveau-next 5.3 pull request that offered improvements to the display color management, fixes to Secure Boot on newer hardware, and Turing TU116 mode-setting support. But that was rejected by the DRM maintainers for being way too late as usually the cut-off for new feature material is when hitting RC6 on the previous cycle, just not days before the end of the current merge window. Not that those changes were all too exciting or notable, but this pushes back the color management and other work to Linux 5.4.

    Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat as a result today sent in Nouveau-fixes 5.3. This pull request has support still for the TU116 GPU since that shouldn't regress any existing support as well as having fixes around KMS, a memory leak, and a few other basic fixes.

  • Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

    Wayland's Weston compositor for the past year has provided a remoting plug-in for virtual output streaming that was built atop RTP/GStreamer. Now though a new plug-in has landed in the Weston code-base making use of Red Hat's promising PipeWire project.

    The PipeWire plug-in was merged into Weston today and is similar to the GStreamer-powered remoting plug-in but instead leverages PipeWire. The compositor's frames are exported to PipeWire and the same virtual output API is shared between these plug-ins. The virtual outputs can be configured using the weston.ini configuration file. Any PipeWire client in turn can read these frames.

  • Libinput 1.14 RC Arrives With Better Thumb Detection & Dell Canvas Totem Support

    Linux input expert Peter Hutterer of Red Hat shipped the much anticipated release candidate today for libinput 1.14, the open-source input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland systems.

  • libinput 1.13.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.14 is now available.
    
    We have new and improved thumb detection for touchpads, thanks to Matt
    Mayfield. On Clickpad devices this should make interactions where a thumb is
    resting on the touchpad or dropped during an interaction more reliable. A
    summary of the changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/07/libinputs-new-thumb-detection-code.html
    
    The Dell Canvas Totem is now supported by libinput. It is exposed as a new
    tool type through the tablet interface along with two new axes. Note that
    this is only low-level support, the actual integration of the totem needs
    Wayland protocol changes and significant changes in all applications that
    want to make use of it. A summary of the changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-dell-canvas-totem.html
    
    Touch-capable tablets now tie both devices together for rotation. If you set
    the tablet to left-handed, the touchpad will be rotated along with the
    tablet. Note that this does not affect the left-handed-ness of the touchpad,
    merely the rotation. 
    
    Tablet proximity out handling for tablets that are unreliably sending
    proximity out events is now always timeout-based. It is no longer necessary
    to add per-device quirks to enable this feature and it is completely
    transparent on devices that work correctly anyway. A summar of the
    changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-tablet-proximity-handling.html
    
    Tablets that send duplicate tools (BTN_TOOL_PEN and BTN_TOOL_ERASER) now
    ignore the latter. This is an intermediate fix only but at least makes those
    tablets more usable than they are now. Issue #259 is the tracker for this
    particular behaviour if you are affected by it.
    
    The handling of kernel fuzz has been slightly improved. Where our udev rule
    fails to reset the fuzz on the kernel device, we disable the hysteresis and
    rely on the kernel now to handle it. Previously our hysteresis would take
    effect on top of the kernel's, causing nonresponsive behaviour.
    
    Note to distribitors: the python-evdev dependency has been dropped, the
    tools that used it are now using python-libevdev instead.
    
    And of course a random assortment of fixes, improvements, etc. Many thanks
    to all contributors and testers.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    

Kernel: F2FS, AMDGPU/AMDKFD, RISC-V

Filed under
Linux
  • F2FS Is The Latest Linux File-System With Patches For Case-Insensitive Support

    Following EXT4 getting initial (and opt-in) support for case-insensitive directories/files, the Flash-Friendly File-System has a set of patches pending that extend the case-folding support to this F2FS file-system that is becoming increasingly used by Android smartphones and other devices.

    Sent out today were a revised set of two patches and just 300+ lines of code that implement case-folding support inside the F2FS file-system. This case-folding support for case-insensitive file-name look-ups is based upon the support found within EXT4 on the latest kernels.

  • AMDGPU/AMDKFD Queue Up Early Linux 5.3 Fixes For Navi & More

    While the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window isn't even over until this weekend when it will kick off with 5.3-rc1 and headlining new features like Radeon RX 5700 series support, AMD has already sent in a batch of AMDGPU/AMDKFD fixes. Making these fixes notable are some early fixes around the new open-source Radeon RX "Navi" support.

  • RISC-V's Kernel Support Continues Maturing With Linux 5.3

    With the RISC-V support in Linux 5.3 there is now support for huge-pages, image header support (based on the ARM64 kernel image header), initial page table setup is split into two stages, CONFIG_SOC support has been started with initially catering to the SiFive SoCs, high resolution timers and dynamic ticks have now made it into the default RISC-V 64-bit default configuration, and other low-level work.

deepin 15.11 - Better Never Stops

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GNU
Linux
Debian

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users.
deepin is an open source GNU/Linux operating system, based on Linux kernel and mainly on desktop applications, supporting laptops, desktops, and all-in-ones. It preinstalls Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) and nearly 30 deepin native applications, as well as several applications from the open source community to meet users' daily learning and work needs. In addition, about a thousand applications are offered in Deepin Store to meet users' various requirements.
Welcome to deepin 15.11 release. Compared with deepin 15.10, deepin 15.11 comes with new features - Cloud Sync in Control Center and disc burning function in Deepin File Manager. Besides, kwin window manager was fixed and optimized for better stability and compatibility, and a number of bugs were fixed. In deepin 15.11, you will enjoy smooth and better user experiences!

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Researchers Build App That Kills To Highlight Insulin Pump Exploit

    By now the half-baked security in most internet of things (IOT) devices has become a bit of a running joke, leading to amusing Twitter accounts like Internet of Shit that highlight the sordid depth of this particular apathy rabbit hole. And while refrigerators leaking your gmail credentials and tea kettles that expose your home networks are entertaining in their own way, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that the same half-assed security in the IOT space also exists on most home routers, your car, your pacemaker, and countless other essential devices and services your life may depend on. Case in point: just about two years ago, security researchers discovered some major vulnerabilities Medtronic's popular MiniMed and MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps. At a talk last year, they highlighted how a hacker could trigger the pumps to either withhold insulin doses, or deliver a lethal dose of insulin remotely. But while Medtronic and the FDA warned customers about the vulnerability and issued a recall over time, security researchers Billy Rios and Jonathan Butts found that initially, nobody was doing much to actually fix or replace the existing devices. [...] And of course that's not just a problem in the medical sector, but most internet-connected tech sectors. As security researcher Bruce Schneier often points out, it's part of a cycle of dysfunction where the consumer and the manufacturer of a flawed product have already moved on to the next big purchase, often leaving compromised products, and users, in a lurch. And more often than not, when researchers are forced to get creative to highlight the importance of a particular flaw, the companies in question enjoy shooting the messenger.

  • Desktop Operating Systems: Which is the safest? [Ed: This shallow article does not discuss NSA back doors and blames on "Linux" devices with open ports and laughable passwords -- based on narrative often pushed by corporate media to give illusion of parity. Also pushes the lie of Linux having minuscule usage.]
  • How Open Source Data Can Protect Consumer Credit Card Information
  • Open Source Hacking Tool Grows Up

    An open source white-hat hacking tool that nation-state hacking teams out of China, Iran, and Russia have at times employed to avoid detection....

Games: Dota Underlords and Stadia

  • Dota Underlords has another update out, this one changes the game quite a lot

    Valve continue to tweak Dota Underlords in the hopes of keeping players happy, this mid-Season gameplay update flips quite a few things on their head. I like their sense of humour, with a note about them removing "code that caused crashes and kept code that doesn't cause crashes". There's a few smaller changes like the addition of Loot Round tips to the Season Info tab, the ability to change equipped items from the Battle Pass and some buffs to the amount XP awarded for your placement in matches and for doing the quests. Meaning you will level up the Battle Pass faster.

  • Interested in Google's Stadia game streaming service? We have a few more details now

    With Google's game streaming service Stadia inching closer, we have some more information to share about it. Part of this, is thanks to a recent AMA (Ask Me Anything) they did on Reddit. I've gone over what questions they answered, to give you a little overview. Firstly, a few points about the Stadia Pro subscription: The Pro subscription is not meant to be like a "Netflix for Games", something people seem to think Stadia will end up as. Google said to think of it more like Xbox Live Gold or Playstation Plus. They're aiming to give Pro subscribers one free game a month "give or take". If you cancel Stadia Pro, you will lose access to free games claimed. However, you will get the previously claimed games back when you re-subscribe but not any you missed while not subscribed. As for Stadia Base, as expected there will be no free games included. As already confirmed, both will let you buy games as normal.

LabPlot has got some beautifying and lots of datasets

Hello everyone! The second part of this year's GSoC is almost over, so I was due to let you know the progress made in the last 3 weeks. I can assure you we haven't lazed since then. I think I managed to make quite good progress, so everything is going as planned, or I could say that even better. If you haven't read about this year's project or you just want to go through what has already been accomplished you can check out my previous post. So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots. The first step was to improve the welcome screen and make it easily usable, dynamic, clean and intuitive for users. This step was very important since the welcome screen is what the users will first get in contact with when they start using LabPlot. Read more

Graphics: Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha and RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

  • weston 6.0.91
    This is the alpha release for weston 7.0.  A lot of new features and
    fixes are shipped in this release, including:
    
    - New internal debug scopes and logging framework
    - Improved documentation
    - HDCP support
    - A new PipeWire plugin
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    We've moved to Meson as our only build system, autotools support has
    been removed.  Package maintainers: please report any issues you have
    with Meson before the stable release.
    
    Full commit history below.
    
  • Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha With PipeWire, HDCP, EGL Partial Updates & Mores

    Wayland release manager Simon Ser announced the alpha release of the Weston 7.0 reference compositor on Friday that also marks the feature freeze for this Wayland compositor update. Some of the major changes to Weston 7.0 include HDCP content protection support, better documentation, new debugging and logging framework support, and the just-added PipeWire plug-in for remote streaming. There are also less prominent additions like EGL partial update support, various DRM compositor back-end restructuring, build system updates, and a variety of libweston updates.

  • RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

    One of the new features to the RDNA architecture with Navi is support for single cycle issue Wave32 execution on SIMD32. Up to now the RadeonSI code was using just Wave64 but now there is support in this AMD open-source Linux OpenGL driver for Wave32. Well known AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák landed this Wave32 support on Friday for the RadeonSI driver. The Wave32 support landed over several commits to Mesa 19.2-devel and is enabled for vertex, geometry, and tessellation shaders. Wave32 isn't enabled for pixel shaders but rather Wave64. Additionally, Wave32 isn't yet enabled for compute shaders due to Piglit OpenGL test case failures.