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GNU/Linux Monthly Screenshots


July 2017 Setup


June 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


March-April 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


February 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


January - February 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot

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Susan has gathered far more diverse screenshots over the years, as shown below.


2011-2013 Linux Screenshots
2010 Linux Screenshots
2009 Linux Screenshots
2008 Gentoo Screenshots
2007 Gentoo Screenshots
2006 Gentoo Screenshots
2005 Gentoo Screenshots
2004 Gentoo Screenshots



Blast from the Past!


More in Tux Machines

Aaeon launches M.2 and mini-PCIe based AI accelerators using low-power Kneron NPU

Aaeon’s M.2 and mini-PCIe “AI Edge Computing Modules” are based on Kneron’s energy-efficient, dual Cortex-M4-enabled KL520 AI SoC, which offers 0.3 TOP NPU performance on only half a Watt. Aaeon took an early interest in edge AI acceleration with Arm-based Nvidia Jetson TX2 based computers such as the Boxer-8170AI. More recently, it has been delivering M.2 and mini-PCIe form-factor AI Core accessories for its Boxer computers and UP boards equipped with Intel Movidius Myriad 2 and Myriad X Vision Processing Units (VPUs). Now, it has added another approach to AI acceleration by launching a line of M.2 and mini-PCIe AI acceleration cards built around Kneron’s new KL520 AI SoC. Read more

Purism Partners with Halo Privacy to Bring Extra Security to Its Linux Devices

Purism is already known for providing top notch security and privacy for its Linux laptops and phones, but with the new partnership with Halo Privacy, the company wants to bring strong cryptography and custom managed attribution techniques to secure communications from direct attacks. These new, unique security stack provided by Halo Privacy works together with Purism's state-of-the-art security implementations for its Linux devices, including the Librem Key USB security token with tamper detection and PureBoot secure UEFI replacement, to cryptographically guarantee signing of the lowest level of firmware and user's privacy. Read more

Android Leftovers

Red Hat: Puff Pieces, OpenStack, OpenShift, CodeReady and More

  • Red Hat and SAS: Enabling enterprise intelligence across the hybrid cloud

    Every day 2.5 quintillion bytes of big data is created - this data comes from externally sourced websites, blog posts, tweets, sensors of various types and public data initiatives such as the human genome project as well as audio and video recordings from smart devices/apps and the Internet of Things (IoT). Many businesses are learning how to look beyond just data volume (storage requirements), velocity (port bandwidth) and variety (voice, video and data) of this data; they are learning how to use the data to make intelligent business decisions. Today, every organization, across geographies and industries can innovate digitally, creating more customer value and differentiation while helping to level the competitive playing field. The ability to capture and analyze big data and apply context-based visibility and control into actionable information is what creates an intelligent enterprise. It entails using data to get real-time insights across the lines of business which can then drive improved operations, innovation, new areas of growth and deliver enhanced customer and end user experiences

  • Working together to raise mental health awareness: How Red Hat observed World Mental Health Day

    Cultivating a diverse and inclusive workspace is an important part of Red Hat’s open culture. That’s why we work to create an environment where associates feel comfortable bringing their whole selves to work every single day. One way we achieve this mission is by making sure that Red Hatters who wish to share their mental health experiences, are met with compassion and understanding, but most importantly, without stigma. It is estimated that one in four adults suffers from mental illness every year.

  • Introducing Red Hat OpenShift 4.2: Developers get an expanded and improved toolbox

    Today Red Hat announces Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extending its commitment to simplifying and automating the cloud and empowering developers to innovate. Red Hat OpenShift 4, introduced in May, is the next generation of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform, reengineered to address the complexity of managing container-based applications in production systems. It is designed as a self-managing platform with automatic software updates and lifecycle management across hybrid cloud environments, built on the trusted foundation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS. The Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release focuses on tooling that is designed to deliver a developer-centric user experience. It also helps cluster administrators by easing the management of the platform and applications, with the availability of OpenShift migration tooling from 3.x to 4.x, as well as newly supported disconnected installs.

  • A look at the most exciting features in OpenStack Train

    With all eyes turning towards Shanghai, we’re getting ready for the next Open Infrastructure Summit in November with great excitement. But before we hit the road, I wanted to draw attention to the latest OpenStack upstream release. The Train release continues to showcase the community’s drive toward offering innovations in OpenStack. Red Hat has been part of developing more than 50 new features spanning Nova, Ironic, Cinder, TripleO and many more projects. But given all the technology goodies (you can see the release highlights here) that the Train release has to offer, you may be curious about the features that we at Red Hat believe are among the top capabilities that will benefit our telecommunications and enterprise customers and their uses cases. Here's an overview of the features we are most excited about this release.

  • New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

    Today’s announcement of Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 represents a major release for developers working with OpenShift and Kubernetes. There is a new application development-focused user interface, new tools, and plugins for container builds, CI/CD pipelines, and serverless architecture.

  • Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

    Red Hat CodeReady Containers 1.0 is now available with support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.2. CodeReady Containers is “OpenShift on your laptop,” the easiest way to get a local OpenShift environment running on your machine. You can get an overview of CodeReady Containers in the tech preview launch post. You can download CodeReady Containers from the product page.

  • Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

    Of all of the new features of the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release, what I’ve been looking forward to the most are the developer-focused updates to the web console. If you’ve used OpenShift 4.1, then you’re probably already familiar with the updated Administrator Perspective, which is where you can manage workloads, storage, networking, cluster settings, and more. The addition of the new Developer Perspective aims to give developers an optimized experience with the features and workflows they’re most likely to need to be productive. Developers can focus on higher level abstractions like their application and components, and then drill down deeper to get to the OpenShift and Kubernetes resources that make up their application. Let’s take a tour of the Developer Perspective and explore some of the key features.