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Sunday, 25 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Microsoft Breaches and Their Impact

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Essential Applications for GNU/Linux Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

So, you’ve made the switch from Windows or MacOSX to GNU/Linux, congratulations!

There is a good chance that you’ve also installed a distribution like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, or perhaps Manjaro; and so you have a wide range of software already installed. However, There are a number of applications that don’t always ship by default, that I feel every user should have or at least be aware of, and some that people have by default but have not ventured to use; so I thought a list of essential applications was in order!

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • EV3DEV Lego Linux Updated

    The ev3dev Linux distribution got an update this month. The distribution targets the Lego EV3 which is a CPU Lego provides to drive their Mindstorm robots. The new release includes the most recent kernel and updates from Debian 8.8. It also contains tools needed for some Wi-Fi dongles and other updates.

  • Purism Librem 13 / 15 Laptops Hit GA Status

    Purism has announced their privacy-minded Coreboot-friendly Librem laptops have reached a general availability state.

    Purism will now be holding an inventory of their Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops for quicker shipping rather than everything being made-to-order.

    While this means users will no longer need to wait "months" when ordering a Librem 13/15 laptop, it still doesn't sound like it will be a very quick turnaround time. Their press release announcing the GA state says, "will now arrive in user’s hands a few weeks after purchase."

  • Linux is Running on Almost All of the Top 500 Supercomputers

    Linux is still running on more than 99% of the top 500 fastest supercomputers in the world. Same as last year, 498 out of top 500 supercomputers run Linux while remaining 2 run Unix.

  • Alioth moving toward pagure

    Since 2003, the Debian project has been running a server called Alioth to host source code version control systems. The server will hit the end of life of the Debian LTS release (Wheezy) next year; that deadline raised some questions regarding the plans for the server over the coming years. Naturally, that led to a discussion regarding possible replacements.

    In response, the current Alioth maintainer, Alexander Wirt, announced a sprint to migrate to pagure, a free-software "Git-centered forge" written in Python for the Fedora project, which LWN covered last year. Alioth currently runs FusionForge, previously known as GForge, which is the free-software fork of the SourceForge code base when that service closed its source in 2001. Alioth hosts source code repositories, mainly Git and Subversion (SVN) and, like other "forge" sites, also offers forums, issue trackers, and mailing list services. While other alternatives are still being evaluated, a consensus has emerged on a migration plan from FusionForage to a more modern and minimal platform based on pagure.

  • elementary + GitHub

    We’re excited to finally say that elementary has completed our move and now lives on GitHub! We’ve migrated over 70 repositories from Launchpad and bzr. So what does that really mean?

  • Ultimate Edition 5.4

    For those who like a visually enhanced form of Linux then Ultimate Edition 5.4 is for you. The graphics are extremely nice compared to other versions of Linux I have seen.

    With animated cursors and having a desktop called ‘Budgie’ the Operating System (OS) is visually pleasing.

  • Google Summer of Code day 16
  • Google Summer of Code day 17
  • Running virt-controller locally
  • How to install and use Monit on Ubuntu/Debian Linux server as process supervision tool
  • AMDGPU VRAM Improvements Could Help DiRT Rally, Dying Light

    A patch series posted on Friday could help games suffering from visible video memory pressure when using the AMDGPU DRM driver.

    Independent developer John Brooks has posted a set of nine patches for improving the driver's performance when limited CPU-visible video memory is under pressure.

  • Understanding Xwayland - Part 1 of 2

    In this week’s article for my ongoing Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project I planned on writing about the basic idea behind the project, but I reconsidered and decided to first give an overview on how Xwayland functions on a high-level and in the next week take a look at its inner workings in detail. The reason for that is, that there is not much Xwayland documentation available right now. So these two articles are meant to fill this void in order to give interested beginners a helping hand. And in two weeks I’ll catch up on explaining the project’s idea.

    [...]

    In the second part next week we’ll have a close look at the Xwayland code to see how Xwayland fills its role as an Xserver in regards to its X based clients and at the same time acts as a Wayland client when facing the Wayland compositor.

Flirting With Red Hat and Fedora Games Spin 25

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Q&A: Flying the open source flag

    Red Hat’s vice-president and general manager for the ASEAN region, Damien Wong, sheds light on the company’s strategy for tackling a market that is not used to paying for software

  • Coming off a strong quarter, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst talks public clouds and containers

    Coming off a quarterly earnings report that shattered expectations, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst believes his company is as well-positioned to capitalize on the shift to cloud computing as it ever has been.

    Red Hat is in a very interesting place in 2017, with one foot in two different eras of enterprise computing but thriving in that position instead of feeling trapped. It still makes most of its money selling Red Hat Enterprise Linux to companies running their own data centers, but it has become the de facto leader of the OpenStack cloud computing project and has interesting DevOps products in Ansible (IT automation) and OpenShift (container management).

    On Tuesday, the company reported a 19 percent increase in both revenue and net income to $677 million and $73 million, respectively, during its first fiscal quarter of the year. Financial analysts, who peppered Whitehurst with more than their usual share of “Great quarter!” asides during a conference call, were expecting revenue of $648 million according to Marketwatch. The company also raised revenue guidance for its full fiscal year.

  • Fedora Games Spin 25

    Fedora Games Spin can be downloaded from https://labs.fedoraproject.org/games/download/index.html. Here, you can choose from the 32- or 64-bit version of the OS. Download the version you need and save it to your hard disk.

Software: Calibre, juju, Wine, Castle Game Engine, Budgie and Latte Dock

Filed under
Software
  • Calibre 3.1 Open-Source Ebook Manager Released with Support for RAR 5.0 Archives

    Last week's major Calibre 3.0 update made a lot of noise among the ebook community with its new support for reading books in-browser on your phone or tablet, and now developer Kovid Goyal announces the first point release to the series.

    Calibre 3.1 is out, and among the new features is ships with, we can mention support for reading RAR and CBR files compressed using the latest RAR 5.0 archiving format, a new option in the Tag browser to control the spacing between items, and new buttons to the Edit metadata dialog to easily set and clear the "Yes/No" columns.

  • conjure-up dev summary for week 25

    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.

  • Wine 2.11 Adds OpenGL Support in the Android Driver, Adobe Premiere Improvements
  • Castle Game Engine 6.2 release

    We’re proud to announce the release of Castle Game Engine 6.2!

  • Budgie Desktop User? Here’s 5 Applets You Should Be Using

    Are you a Budgie desktop user wanting to add a bit more functionality to your nimble, lightweight desktop? Well you can, by adding Budgie applets.

    Budgie applets are like little souped-up mini-apps that live in your panel. They provide additional features and functionality in an accessible and semi-uniform manner.

    You likely already have a small set of icons and applets nestled in the far reaches of your Budgie panel right now, such as the simple clock applet, Wi-Fi signal status, and volume control.

  • Latte Dock Is Working On Wayland Support, New Features

    Latte Dock, the desktop dock based on KDE's Plasma Framework and Qt, is preparing for their next release at the end of August.

    Latte Dock 0.7 is expected to be the next major release of this dock and it's slated for availability by the end of August.

  • Latte Dock accepts donations, what is coming...

    to cheer you up a bit for the upcoming 0.7 version which is scheduled for the end of August or maybe earlier Wink based on the effort...

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • [Older] Andy Rubin says Essential’s Ambient OS will be open source, just like Android

    Playground CEO Andy Rubin, whose new company Essential unveiled a new premium Android smartphone and Amazon Echo competitor today, says his company’s Ambient OS smart home platform will be open source. That means that Rubin, who rose to fame in the tech industry for co-founding Android, essentially wants to apply the same open-source philosophy that made Android the most dominant mobile operating system to the smart home.

  • [Older] How to Build Open Source Communities

    Seeing programming as a social activity changes how we build communities around programming. We should focus on building a community, and not on building a codebase, argued Ash Furrow at Craft. He suggested using a code of conduct, moving long or heated discussions into a Skype call or Google Hangout, avoiding fixing easy issues yourself, and distributing power and responsibilities.

  • [Older] R3’s open-source distributed ledger platform ‘Corda’ goes into public beta

    R3, the financial innovation company that runs blockchain consortium, announced that it’s open-source, financial-grade, distributed ledger platform ‘Corda’ has entered into first public beta.

    The release of the public beta represents a step forward in the path of Corda, towards API stabilization for production applications. The announcement was first made by Richard Gendal Brown, Chief Technology Officer of R3, last week.

  • As Blockchain Advances, Developers Look To Open Source As A Solution

    As the digitization of financial transactions becomes ever more mainstream, with Bitcoin’s core technology blockchain leading the way, the rapid adaptation raises security concerns at the same time its enhanced efficiency is being exploited. A recent Greenwich Associates survey highlights the conundrum but also points to solutions.

  • The perils of live demonstrations

    Yesterday, I was giving a talk at the The South SF Bay Haskell User Group about how implementing lock-step simulation is trivial in Haskell and how Chris Smith and me are using this to make CodeWorld even more attractive to students. I gave the talk before, at Compose::Conference in New York City earlier this year, so I felt well prepared. On the flight to the West Coast I slightly extended the slides, and as I was too cheap to buy in-flight WiFi, I tested them only locally.

  • Announcing automatically updating Linux LibreOffice builds

    I’m finally ready to announce LibreOffice daily builds for Linux that integrate our new automatic updater. The work on the automatic updater has been going on for nearly a year now and is finally in a shape that we produce builds on TDF hardware that will automatically update using delta updates.

    The current builds are 64-bit Linux builds created on SLES 12.2 and should run on most Linux distros. These builds are .tar.gz based archives that you can extract and just run. Note that we can’t update builds that are placed into locations that are not writeable by the current user (and due to missing support for signing executables and libraries on Linux there are no plans to change that).

  • A beta for PostgreSQL 10

    PostgreSQL version 10 had its first beta release on May 18, just in time for the annual PGCon developer conference. The latest annual release comes with a host of major features, including new versions of replication and partitioning, and enhanced parallel query. Version 10 includes 451 commits, nearly half a million lines of code and documentation, and over 150 new or changed features since version 9.6. The PostgreSQL community will find a lot to get excited about in this release, as the project has delivered a long list of enhancements to existing functionality. There's also a few features aimed at fulfilling new use cases, particularly in the "big data" industry sector.

  • Firefox Focus for Android, Torvalds reflects on Linux, and more news
  • University of Missouri launches systemwide initiative to adopt affordable and open educational resources

    On Wednesday, University of Missouri System President Mun Choi and Chancellors Leo Morton, Tom George, Garnett Stokes and Christopher Maples announced a plan that will save students significant amounts of money on textbooks and other course materials. This effort is designed to reduce the cost of attendance and enhance learning for students. The plan takes advantage of Open Educational Resources, or class materials that are free for students, and AutoAccess, which is a program that makes textbooks and class materials available online at a lower cost than traditional learning resources.

  • Textbook Costs to Drop Under University of Missouri Plan

    University system President Mun Choi wants to use more open-source learning material written by experts, vetted by their peers and posted for free downloading. Choi spoke about the effort Wednesday at an event with members of the Board of Curators, administrators, lawmakers, faculty from all four campuses and student representatives, the Columbia Daily Tribune (http://bit.ly/2t2L4HQ ) reported.

  • Sudo or Sudo Not, There Is No (4th) Try

    If you've been using Linux for any length of time, at some point in some tutorial or troubleshooting guide you've more than likely encountered Linux's magic word: "sudo". A casual observer probably can tell you that it's used to access restricted functions on your computer, but there is much more to it than that.

Freedom vs Free vs Open

Filed under
OSS
  • Making money with foss

    Because we are interested in making money, this post will took us all over the place. On the one hand we have the greedy businesses, and on the other side the diligent developer. Licenses were never discussed in hbo or university, which is interesting because these are the methods corporations use to make money. I think having discussed the overview and shown some concrete examples was a good exercise. I was not aware at all for example of the AGPLv3 practices which are interesting (without passing moral judgment). My blog seems to be really focused on money, but this is a reflection of what I'm worried about these days, having almost graduated.

  • Open-source software may save money, but what about monetization?

    While the open-source delivery model has emerged as a highly popular success, the problem remains that free downloadable software does not usually lead to revenue. But a growing number of cloud network entrepreneurs are becoming convinced that focusing their efforts on providing specific services for the enterprise computing marketplace is their path to the promised land.

  • Finnish firm offers €30,000 prize to kick start open-source wood design

    Finnish materials firm Metsä Wood has launched the Open Source Wood initiative to encourage architects and engineers to make more use of the material. The idea is to make the company’s own intellectual property freely available to designers, and as an additional incentive, to offer a €30,000 prize for “exceptional designs” that are undertaken as part of the initiative and use one of its product lines.

  • Free vs Open

    Here’s why. Corporations are not people, and so can’t “behave ethically” — doing so requires consciousness as a minimum. The people they employ can be expected to behave ethically, but a corporation will follow its programming to optimise the objectives stated in its bylaws. The people tending the machine can steer it towards different ways of achieving those objectives and can express their ethical selves through their choices, but they are not free to justify preferences purely on the basis of ethics. As a consequence, most advocacy of Open Source has focussed on helping those corporate employees demonstrate the value arising from it rather than the values motivating the people involved with it.

Microsoft Openwashing and Spin

Filed under
Microsoft

FreeBSD 11.1 BETA3

Filed under
BSD

GNOME Improvements, Performance Improvements Included

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 Improves Control Center's Network, Online Accounts & Printers Panels

    Development of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment continues as planned, and, as we reported earlier this week, the third milestone (GNOME 3.25.3) has been released with various updates and bug fixes across multiple components and apps.

    GNOME Control Center is an essential part of the GNOME desktop, and the GNOME 3.25.3 development release adds quite a bunch of improvements enhancing the Network, Online Accounts, Printers, and Region & Language panels. While many of these improvements are mostly related to the look and feel, there's also some new functionality implemented.

  • GNOME Music Should No Longer Be So Sluggish

    Georges Stavracas' latest work on GNOME is making the GNOME Music player less slow.

  • Even faster GNOME Music

    This afternoon, I felt an urge to hear some classical music. Perhaps because I’m overworking a lot these days, I wanted to grab a good hot tea, and listen to relaxing music, and rest for a few minutes.

    My player of choice is GNOME Music.

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.32 to Support ROS Lunar in the Catkin Plugin

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Kyle Fazzari released today a new maintenance update of the Snapcraft tool that lets application developers package their apps as Snaps for distribution across multiple Linux-based operating systems that support the Snappy technologies.

Read more

Linux 4.11.7

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.11.7 kernel.

All users of the 4.11 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.11.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.11.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.34

[PATCH 4.4 00/30] 4.4.74-stable review

[PATCH 3.18 00/32] 3.18.58-stable review

Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspbian OS to Soon Be Rebased on Debian 9 "Stretch"

Filed under
Hardware
Debian

Raspberry Pi Foundation UX engineer Simon Long is reporting on the availability of a new stable update to the project's Debian-based Raspbian operating system for Raspberry Pi and x86 computers.

The Raspbian 2017-06-21 images are now available for download, and besides being synced with the upstream Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" repositories to include all the latest security and software updates, they add a couple of big new changes, such as the inclusion of an offline version of Scratch 2.0 and Thonny Python IDE.

Read more

Fedora: Design Team, QtWebKit Security, Badges, and Multimedia

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Building Design Team Approved Presentations

    Throughout the last month I’ve been working on creating an updated presentation template for the Fedora community to use. With Flock coming up quickly, there’s no better time to give these new templates a shot as a vehicle to present your talks!

  • Improving QtWebKit security for Fedora

    The Qt port of the WebKit engine was unmaintained for years, until Konstantin Tokarev (also known as annulen) decided to pick it up about ten months ago. Within the last months he did an impressive job on getting QtWebKit up to date again, some days ago he released the second alpha of QtWebKit 5.212.0. As the current state of QtWebkit is really bad in Fedora, we always shipped the latest one from Qt upstream, but they did not do any backports of security fixes from upstream WebKit anymore, the KDE SIG now decided to move to the new community QtWebKit. Qt itself only supports the QtWebEngine based on Chromium, which itself has some issues (hard to maintain as we have to remove codec stuff, always some Chromium releases behind) , but more important: Many applications have not been ported and still use QtWebKit. With Konstantins work on QtWebKit it is possible to use them without all these unfixed security issues again. There are also some reasons to use QtWebKit instead of QtWebEngine, checkout the QtWebKit Wiki.

  • Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

    Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges).

  • Plex Media Player and MPV with CUDA

    The Plex Media Player is now part of the multimedia repository for Fedora 25+. I works as a standalone player and also as the main interface for an HTPC setup, where the “TV interface” starts as the main thing when you power up your system.

    Plex Media Player uses MPV in the background, so any compilation option that was added to MPV, is now also part of Plex Media Player by using the same libraries that were already available in the multimedia repository.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Server, Desktop and Icons/Themes

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 23 Jun 2017
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Video Acceleration Progress, New Unity-Session Package

    We recently reported on Ubuntu planning to finally ship video acceleration by default, at least for Intel hardware, and they have made progress in this area.

    Canonical's Will Cooke reported in the latest Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update that they have a proof-of-concept working with Intel VA-API by making use of the Intel QuickSyncVideo support paired with GStreamer. They are able to enjoy H.264 4K video playback with around 3% CPU usage on Haswell as well as playable 4K H.264/HEVC too, for Skylake and newer.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: June 23, 2017

    We’ve migrated ubuntu-session to a new unity-session package. This means that the default session is GNOME Shell and people can install Unity 7 and it’s related packages via unity-session. The migration is working well so far, but we still have some more work to do in order to make sure everything “just works”.

  • Papirus Icons Updated With Newly Designed Icons, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Papirus suite is specifically designed for KDE desktop but now the icon theme is available for other desktops as well which includes: Unity, Gnome, Mate, Cinnamon and others. Previously we had a ported version of Papirus KDE icons in the PPA but now it is directly supported and maintained by creator. There are two variants in this icon pack with light and dark panel icons, it has more than 1000 icons for different applications and still counting, if you find any missing icon then directly report it creator via Github page. There was an official PPA but discontinued back in November 2016 and now these icons can be installed via wget method. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • MacBuntu Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack took a little bit while to get ready for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty but finally it's ready for your desktop. In this pack we are offering many GTK themes targeting multiple desktops specifically Unity and Gnome but others are also supported like Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce. First of all we would like to thank Jared for helping us with this pack, our main themes Macbuntu which is for Gnome and other desktops, Macbuntu-Unity is for Unity desktop. We also included dark theme version for those who like to use Mac dark version, also featuring great themes Gnome-OSX and Gnome-OSX-T for Gnome desktop. Now we are providing two cursors themes one is featured from here, and some plank themes are from KenHarkey and erikdubois. Additionally there are two themes for Gnome Shell, two for Cinnamon, and two icon packs.

Advocacy of Desktop GNU/Linux and Introduction to Libreboot T400

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Seven Great Ways To Talk About Linux

    I asked Twitter how they talk about Linux to the uninitiated. Here are their responses!

  • Advantages Of Using Linux Over Windows

    Odds are you may have noticed that the open source nature of Linux is behind many of its advantages, and that is something that Windows simply can’t match. Make no mistake Windows does have several areas where it is stronger than Linux as well, but in some cases Linux is definitely the far superior option. At very least you should now be aware of the reasons why you may want to experiment with Linux or even use it as your primary operating system.

  • Libreboot T400: A GNU+Linux laptop that respects your freedom

    The Libreboot T400 is certified by the Free Software Foundation, under their Respects Your Freedom hardware certification program. It is now available at a reduced price without any binary blobs or backdoors in BIOS. The Libreboot T400 comes without the Intel Management Engine.

Cross-compilation, D Language in GCC, and Complexity

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Free and ready-to-use cross-compilation toolchains

    For all embedded Linux developers, cross-compilation toolchains are part of the basic tool set, as they allow to build code for a specific CPU architecture and debug it. Until a few years ago, CodeSourcery was providing a lot of high quality pre-compiled toolchains for a wide range of architectures, but has progressively stopped doing so. Linaro provides some freely available toolchains, but only targetting ARM and AArch64. kernel.org has a set of pre-built toolchains for a wider range of architectures, but they are bare metal toolchains (cannot build Linux userspace programs) and updated infrequently.

  • D Language accepted for inclusion in GCC

    I am pleased to announce that the GCC Steering Committee has accepted the D Language front-end and runtime for inclusion in GCC and appointed Iain Buclaw as maintainer.

  • Is Complexity Bad?

    You can essentially think of complexity as a distinction between two different types. Accidental and necessary complexity. Necessary complexity is okay, but accidental complexity will absolutely ruin your day as a programmer.

PyCharm IDE and LWN Coverage From the 2017 Python Language Summit

Filed under
Development

KDE/Qt: Krita, GCompris, Compiler Explorer and Qt

Filed under
Development
KDE
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More in Tux Machines

Flirting With Red Hat and Fedora Games Spin 25

  • Q&A: Flying the open source flag
    Red Hat’s vice-president and general manager for the ASEAN region, Damien Wong, sheds light on the company’s strategy for tackling a market that is not used to paying for software
  • Coming off a strong quarter, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst talks public clouds and containers
    Coming off a quarterly earnings report that shattered expectations, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst believes his company is as well-positioned to capitalize on the shift to cloud computing as it ever has been. Red Hat is in a very interesting place in 2017, with one foot in two different eras of enterprise computing but thriving in that position instead of feeling trapped. It still makes most of its money selling Red Hat Enterprise Linux to companies running their own data centers, but it has become the de facto leader of the OpenStack cloud computing project and has interesting DevOps products in Ansible (IT automation) and OpenShift (container management). On Tuesday, the company reported a 19 percent increase in both revenue and net income to $677 million and $73 million, respectively, during its first fiscal quarter of the year. Financial analysts, who peppered Whitehurst with more than their usual share of “Great quarter!” asides during a conference call, were expecting revenue of $648 million according to Marketwatch. The company also raised revenue guidance for its full fiscal year.
  • Fedora Games Spin 25
    Fedora Games Spin can be downloaded from https://labs.fedoraproject.org/games/download/index.html. Here, you can choose from the 32- or 64-bit version of the OS. Download the version you need and save it to your hard disk.

Software: Calibre, juju, Wine, Castle Game Engine, Budgie and Latte Dock

  • Calibre 3.1 Open-Source Ebook Manager Released with Support for RAR 5.0 Archives
    Last week's major Calibre 3.0 update made a lot of noise among the ebook community with its new support for reading books in-browser on your phone or tablet, and now developer Kovid Goyal announces the first point release to the series. Calibre 3.1 is out, and among the new features is ships with, we can mention support for reading RAR and CBR files compressed using the latest RAR 5.0 archiving format, a new option in the Tag browser to control the spacing between items, and new buttons to the Edit metadata dialog to easily set and clear the "Yes/No" columns.
  • conjure-up dev summary for week 25
    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.
  • Wine 2.11 Adds OpenGL Support in the Android Driver, Adobe Premiere Improvements
  • Castle Game Engine 6.2 release
    We’re proud to announce the release of Castle Game Engine 6.2!
  • Budgie Desktop User? Here’s 5 Applets You Should Be Using
    Are you a Budgie desktop user wanting to add a bit more functionality to your nimble, lightweight desktop? Well you can, by adding Budgie applets. Budgie applets are like little souped-up mini-apps that live in your panel. They provide additional features and functionality in an accessible and semi-uniform manner. You likely already have a small set of icons and applets nestled in the far reaches of your Budgie panel right now, such as the simple clock applet, Wi-Fi signal status, and volume control.
  • Latte Dock Is Working On Wayland Support, New Features
    Latte Dock, the desktop dock based on KDE's Plasma Framework and Qt, is preparing for their next release at the end of August. Latte Dock 0.7 is expected to be the next major release of this dock and it's slated for availability by the end of August.
  • Latte Dock accepts donations, what is coming...
    to cheer you up a bit for the upcoming 0.7 version which is scheduled for the end of August or maybe earlier ;) based on the effort...

OSS Leftovers

  • [Older] Andy Rubin says Essential’s Ambient OS will be open source, just like Android
    Playground CEO Andy Rubin, whose new company Essential unveiled a new premium Android smartphone and Amazon Echo competitor today, says his company’s Ambient OS smart home platform will be open source. That means that Rubin, who rose to fame in the tech industry for co-founding Android, essentially wants to apply the same open-source philosophy that made Android the most dominant mobile operating system to the smart home.
  • [Older] How to Build Open Source Communities
    Seeing programming as a social activity changes how we build communities around programming. We should focus on building a community, and not on building a codebase, argued Ash Furrow at Craft. He suggested using a code of conduct, moving long or heated discussions into a Skype call or Google Hangout, avoiding fixing easy issues yourself, and distributing power and responsibilities.
  • [Older] R3’s open-source distributed ledger platform ‘Corda’ goes into public beta
    R3, the financial innovation company that runs blockchain consortium, announced that it’s open-source, financial-grade, distributed ledger platform ‘Corda’ has entered into first public beta. The release of the public beta represents a step forward in the path of Corda, towards API stabilization for production applications. The announcement was first made by Richard Gendal Brown, Chief Technology Officer of R3, last week.
  • As Blockchain Advances, Developers Look To Open Source As A Solution
    As the digitization of financial transactions becomes ever more mainstream, with Bitcoin’s core technology blockchain leading the way, the rapid adaptation raises security concerns at the same time its enhanced efficiency is being exploited. A recent Greenwich Associates survey highlights the conundrum but also points to solutions.
  • The perils of live demonstrations
    Yesterday, I was giving a talk at the The South SF Bay Haskell User Group about how implementing lock-step simulation is trivial in Haskell and how Chris Smith and me are using this to make CodeWorld even more attractive to students. I gave the talk before, at Compose::Conference in New York City earlier this year, so I felt well prepared. On the flight to the West Coast I slightly extended the slides, and as I was too cheap to buy in-flight WiFi, I tested them only locally.
  • Announcing automatically updating Linux LibreOffice builds
    I’m finally ready to announce LibreOffice daily builds for Linux that integrate our new automatic updater. The work on the automatic updater has been going on for nearly a year now and is finally in a shape that we produce builds on TDF hardware that will automatically update using delta updates. The current builds are 64-bit Linux builds created on SLES 12.2 and should run on most Linux distros. These builds are .tar.gz based archives that you can extract and just run. Note that we can’t update builds that are placed into locations that are not writeable by the current user (and due to missing support for signing executables and libraries on Linux there are no plans to change that).
  • A beta for PostgreSQL 10
    PostgreSQL version 10 had its first beta release on May 18, just in time for the annual PGCon developer conference. The latest annual release comes with a host of major features, including new versions of replication and partitioning, and enhanced parallel query. Version 10 includes 451 commits, nearly half a million lines of code and documentation, and over 150 new or changed features since version 9.6. The PostgreSQL community will find a lot to get excited about in this release, as the project has delivered a long list of enhancements to existing functionality. There's also a few features aimed at fulfilling new use cases, particularly in the "big data" industry sector.
  • Firefox Focus for Android, Torvalds reflects on Linux, and more news
  • University of Missouri launches systemwide initiative to adopt affordable and open educational resources
    On Wednesday, University of Missouri System President Mun Choi and Chancellors Leo Morton, Tom George, Garnett Stokes and Christopher Maples announced a plan that will save students significant amounts of money on textbooks and other course materials. This effort is designed to reduce the cost of attendance and enhance learning for students. The plan takes advantage of Open Educational Resources, or class materials that are free for students, and AutoAccess, which is a program that makes textbooks and class materials available online at a lower cost than traditional learning resources.
  • Textbook Costs to Drop Under University of Missouri Plan
    University system President Mun Choi wants to use more open-source learning material written by experts, vetted by their peers and posted for free downloading. Choi spoke about the effort Wednesday at an event with members of the Board of Curators, administrators, lawmakers, faculty from all four campuses and student representatives, the Columbia Daily Tribune (http://bit.ly/2t2L4HQ ) reported.
  • Sudo or Sudo Not, There Is No (4th) Try
    If you've been using Linux for any length of time, at some point in some tutorial or troubleshooting guide you've more than likely encountered Linux's magic word: "sudo". A casual observer probably can tell you that it's used to access restricted functions on your computer, but there is much more to it than that.

Freedom vs Free vs Open

  • Making money with foss
    Because we are interested in making money, this post will took us all over the place. On the one hand we have the greedy businesses, and on the other side the diligent developer. Licenses were never discussed in hbo or university, which is interesting because these are the methods corporations use to make money. I think having discussed the overview and shown some concrete examples was a good exercise. I was not aware at all for example of the AGPLv3 practices which are interesting (without passing moral judgment). My blog seems to be really focused on money, but this is a reflection of what I'm worried about these days, having almost graduated.
  • Open-source software may save money, but what about monetization?
    While the open-source delivery model has emerged as a highly popular success, the problem remains that free downloadable software does not usually lead to revenue. But a growing number of cloud network entrepreneurs are becoming convinced that focusing their efforts on providing specific services for the enterprise computing marketplace is their path to the promised land.
  • Finnish firm offers €30,000 prize to kick start open-source wood design
    Finnish materials firm Metsä Wood has launched the Open Source Wood initiative to encourage architects and engineers to make more use of the material. The idea is to make the company’s own intellectual property freely available to designers, and as an additional incentive, to offer a €30,000 prize for “exceptional designs” that are undertaken as part of the initiative and use one of its product lines.
  • Free vs Open
    Here’s why. Corporations are not people, and so can’t “behave ethically” — doing so requires consciousness as a minimum. The people they employ can be expected to behave ethically, but a corporation will follow its programming to optimise the objectives stated in its bylaws. The people tending the machine can steer it towards different ways of achieving those objectives and can express their ethical selves through their choices, but they are not free to justify preferences purely on the basis of ethics. As a consequence, most advocacy of Open Source has focussed on helping those corporate employees demonstrate the value arising from it rather than the values motivating the people involved with it.