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Updated: 1 hour 8 min ago

Setting up Continuous Integration With GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube

1 hour 21 min ago
This tutorial is about continuous integration between GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube. At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to view the quality reports of GitLab repository codes at SonarQube by using Jenkins as a Continuous Integrator and sonar-scanner as code analyzer.

Security: Updates, “US Huawei Blackballing Efforts” and Microsoft’s Back Doors Keep Crackers Busy

1 hour 30 min ago
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • US Huawei Blackballing Efforts Stall Due To Lack Of 'Actual Facts'

    During the Trump era, the US government has dramatically ramped up claims that Chinese hardware vendor Huawei is a nefarious spy for the Chinese government, blackballing it from the U.S. telecom market. From pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies, this effort hasn't been subtle.

    While Huawei should never be confused with a saint (what telecom company would be?) there's several problems with the effort. The biggest being that despite a decade of hand-wringing and one eighteen month investigation by the US government, there's still no public evidence Huawei uses its network gear to spy on Americans. That's not sitting well with countries we've asked to join along in the fun.

  • Sorry, Linux. We know you want to be popular, but cyber-crooks are all about Microsoft for now

    Eight out of the ten most exploited vulnerabilities tracked by threat intelligence biz Recorded Future in 2018 targeted Microsoft products – though number two on its list was, surprise surprise, a Flash flaw.

    The most exploited vuln in the firm's hall of shame was a remote code execution flaw in Windows' VBScript engine that could pwn users who opened a booby-trapped web page with Internet Explorer.

    "Exploit kits associated with this vulnerability were noted to spread the malware Trickbot through phishing attacks," said Recorded Future in a report published today.

    The Flash vuln was none other than one exploited by North Korean state-backed hackers – first detected by South Korea's CERT, which discovered a flood of booby-trapped MS Office documents, web pages, spam messages and more.

read more

Graphics and Games: NVIDIA, Orbital/Vulkan, Cataclysm and System Shock 3

1 hour 46 min ago
  • NVIDIA Shows Off Quake II Path-Traced Using Vulkan RTX/Ray-Tracing

    ne of the demos NVIDIA is showing off this week at their GPU Technology Conference is Quake II being path-traced using a Vulkan port of the game and adapted to handle VK_NV_ray_tracing functionality paired with the latest GeForce RTX GPUs.

    Q2VKPT is a path-traced version of Quake II started by a former NVIDIA intern and is rendered using Vulkan and does support Linux.

  • Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4's AMD GPU Using Vulkan

    Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V.

    Orbital leverages QEMU and other open-source components. At this stage it's not running any PS4 games but is able to boot into safe mode on PS4 5.xx kernels.

  • Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead, a free and open source turn-based survival game had a huge update

    It occurred to me today, that no one here at GOL seems to have ever written about the free and open source turn-based survival game Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead.

    Okay, so what is it? A classic roguelike with a survival theme, set in a post-apocalyptic procedurally generated world.

  • System Shock 3 may see Linux support, OtherSide still working on Underworld Ascendant for Linux

    OtherSide Entertainment have teased out a new short video of System Shock 3 and it may see Linux support.

    Not to be confused with the crowdfunded System Shock reboot that Nightdive Studios are currently working on. System Shock 3 is being made with some of the original team behind the first two games as well like Warren Spector, so it should remain faithful to the series while being a rather nice upgrade in visuals.

read more

How to Monitor Network Traffic using nethogs

1 hour 51 min ago
nethogs is a networking monitoring tool for Linux. Just like top or htop, nethogs can monitor network traffic in real time. nethogs can monitor any specific network interface or all the networking interfaces on your computer. nethogs shows bandwidth usage per process on your computer in real time. In this article, I am going to show you how to install and use nethogs to monitor network traffic on Linux.

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

1 hour 55 min ago
  • Linux 5.0.3

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel.

    All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

read more

Stable kernel updates

2 hours 4 min ago
Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107, and 4.9.164 have been released with the usual set of important fixes. This is the last 4.20.y kernel and users should upgrade to 5.0.y at this time.

Security updates for Tuesday

2 hours 18 min ago
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel), Debian (libjpeg-turbo, liblivemedia, neutron, and otrs2), Fedora (SDL), Gentoo (ntp), openSUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk), Red Hat (cloud-init), Slackware (libssh2), SUSE (libssh2_org, nodejs10, and nodejs8), and Ubuntu (tiff).

How usable is desktop Linux on ARM?

2 hours 21 min ago
A discussion of Linux on ARM.

8 out of 10 top vulnerabilities target Microsoft products

2 hours 23 min ago
Prioritizing vulnerabilities can be difficult if you don't know which ones are being actively exploited. The latest annual research from Recorded Future looks at the top vulnerabilities and which products they are targeting. In 2018, the company observed more exploits targeting Microsoft products compared to Adobe ones. Eight out of 10 vulnerabilities exploited via phishing attacks, exploit kits, or RATs were targeting Microsoft products. While Adobe has been a popular target in the past, only one Adobe Flash vulnerability made the top 10. This is likely due to a combination of better patching and Flash Player's impending demise in 2020.… [Continue Reading]

Corporations, not consumers, drive demand for HP’s new VR headset

2 hours 41 min ago

Enlarge (credit: HP)

HP was one of the many companies that built a VR headset for the Windows Mixed Reality platform which launched back in 2017. Microsoft provided a SteamVR-compatible software platform, controller design, and inside-out, six-axis, positional-tracking technology; hardware companies like HP provided the rest, greatly reducing the price of PC-attached virtual reality.

Today, HP is launching the Reverb Virtual Reality Headset Professional Edition. As the name might imply, the audience for this isn't the consumer space; it's the commercial space. The headset will have a near-identical consumer version, but HP's focus is very much on the pro unit, because that's where the company has seen the most solid uptake of VR tech. The big VR win isn't gaming or any other consumer applications: it's visualization, for fields such as engineering, architecture, and education, and entertainment, combining VR headsets with motion-actuated seating to build virtual rides. The company has also found that novelty items such as its VR backpack have also found a role in the corporate space, with companies using them to allow free movement around virtual worlds and objects.

Accordingly, HP's second-gen headset is built for these enterprise customers in mind. Their demands were pretty uniform, and in many ways consistent with consumer demands too, with the big ones being more resolution and more comfort. To that end, it now has a resolution of 2160×2160 per eye, using an LCD with a 90Hz refresh rate. The optics have also been improved through the use of aspherical lenses, for a 114-degree (diagonal) field of view. AMOLED screens are common in this space, but HP said that it preferred LCD because LCD panels use full red, green, and blue subpixels, rather than the pentile arrangement that remains common for AMOLED.

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Firefox Quantum 66 blocks audio autoplay, improves scrolling behavior and adds option to search all tabs

2 hours 50 min ago
Mozilla has rolled out Firefox 66.0 for Windows, macOS and Linux, along with Firefox for Android 66.0. The new release is light on new features, but heavy on delivering significant improvements across the browser. The big new addition is that websites will now automatically be blocked from playing sound -- however, the customizable feature won’t be immediately available to all users The sound-blocking feature is planned for a gradual rollout, so many users may not see it for a while yet. For those who do, look out for a new icon appearing in the increasingly cluttered Site Information section of… [Continue Reading]

Mid-sized businesses lead the way in workplace technology

2 hours 59 min ago
Medium-sized businesses now account for over 60 percent of US jobs, and are investing fast in technology, but they must ensure they have the skills and management in place to avoid falling behind. A new study from Aruba looks at how mid-sized businesses around the world are currently adopting workplace technology, Among key findings are that almost two-thirds (63 percent) of medium-sized business employees rate the choice of technology, applications and IT support at their company as either good or very good. That compares to 53 percent of those also surveyed from the largest companies. Medium-sized businesses are also ahead… [Continue Reading]

Firefox 66 Released

3 hours 13 min ago

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off.

Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

read more

Mozilla/Firefox: Reducing Your Online Annoyances, This Week in Servo Development and Vista 10 Integration

3 hours 16 min ago
  • Today’s Firefox Aims to Reduce Your Online Annoyances

    Almost a hundred years ago, John Maynard Keyes suggested that the industrial revolution would effectively end work for humans within a couple of generations, and our biggest challenge would be figuring what to do with that time. That definitely hasn’t happened, and we always seem to have lots to do, much of it online. When you’re on the web, you’re trying to get stuff done, and therefore online annoyances are just annoyances. Whether it’s autoplaying videos, page jumps or finding a topic within all your multiple tabs, Firefox can help. Today’s Firefox release minimizes those online inconveniences, and puts you back in control.

  • This Week In Servo 127

    In the past week, we merged 50 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

  • Passwordless Web Authentication Support via Windows Hello

    Firefox 66, being released this week, supports using the Windows Hello feature for Web Authentication on Windows 10, enabling a passwordless experience on the web that is hassle-free and more secure. Firefox has supported Web Authentication for all desktop platforms since version 60, but Windows 10 marks our first platform to support the new FIDO2 “passwordless” capabilities for Web Authentication.

read more

Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: 3D Printers

3 hours 20 min ago

One interesting thing about the hobbyist 3D printing market is that it was founded on free software and open hardware ideals starting with the RepRap project. The idea behind that project was to design a 3D printer from off-the-shelf parts that could print as many of its own parts as possible (especially more complex, custom parts like gears). Because of this, the first generation of 3D printers were all homemade using Arduinos, stepper motors, 3D-printed gears and hardware you could find in the local hardware store.

As the movement grew, a few individuals started small businesses selling 3D printer kits that collected all the hardware plus the 3D printed parts and electronics for you to assemble at home. Later, these kits turned into fully assembled and supported printers, and after the successful Printrbot kickstarter campaign, the race was on to create cheaper and more user-friendly printers with each iteration. Sites like Thingiverse and YouMagine allowed people to create and share their designs, so even if you didn't have any design skills yourself, you could download and print everyone else's. These sites even provided the hardware diagrams for some of the more popular 3D printers. The Free Software ethos was everywhere you looked.

read more

3 Ways To Check Whether A Port Is Open On The Remote Linux System?

3 hours 21 min ago
2DayGeek: These commands allow you to check whether the given port is open or not in the remote Linux system.

Introducing flat-manager

3 hours 26 min ago

A long time ago I wrote a blog post about how to maintain a Flatpak repository.

It is still a nice, mostly up to date, description of how Flatpak repositories work. However, it doesn’t really have a great answer to the issue called syncing updates in the post. In other words, it really is more about how to maintain a repository on one machine.

In practice, at least on a larger scale (like e.g. Flathub) you don’t want to do all the work on a single machine like this. Instead you have an entire build-system where the repository is the last piece.

read more

Servers: VMware, US Department of Energy, Red Hat/Fedora and SUSE/SAP

3 hours 28 min ago
  • VMware demos hypervisor running on a network card

    VMware has demonstrated Linux running on a network card.

    Speaking at the VMware user group convention in Sydney today, Chris Wolf, chief technology officer, global field and industry demonstrated a VMware’s ESXi hypervisor and a Ubuntu guest VM running on a Mellanox SmartNIC.

  • Aurora Will Be The First Exascale Supercomputer Of America

    The exascale supercomputer has the ability to make use of high-performance computing (HPC) and artificial intelligence (AI) in various areas such as cancer research, climate modeling, and veterans’ health treatments, and more. Aurora will be specially designed to analyze the large amount of data generated by DOE-owned equipment like particle accelerators, telescopes, and other detectors.

  • Intel Xe Graphics Being Part Of The First US Exascale Supercomputer Is Great For Linux

    Announced on Monday was that the US Department of Energy in cooperation with Argonne National Laboratory will see the "Aurora" supercomputer as the first US Exascale SC coming online in 2021 and featuring Intel's highly anticipated Xe Graphics.

    The Intel Xe Graphics are expected to put Aurora over the edge in being the first exascale super computer at least within the United States. Aurora will also feature Optane persistent DIMMs and next-generation Xeon processors. Intel is partnered with Cray on this design for the half a billion USD super computer.

  • Career advice for engineers: Step away from the keyboard

    Over the course of my career, I've had two to three major mindset shifts in how I approach my work. At first, I just focused on engineering—trying to know the most about whatever language or libraries I was using, being very "trivia" focused, and ultimately ignoring the concerns of others in an effort to just write good code. This wasn't to say I didn't try to get along with my coworkers or help them out, but my efforts to improve were all about me; after all, the team and the company do better as I become better. And to be fair, this approach isn't totally unfounded in its merits. As engineers, we must constantly evolve, learn more, and improve because the industry is getting harder with bigger problems that need more technical solutions every day. This approach worked well enough for me for the first half of my career, where I was junior enough to have such selfish (albeit well-meaning) motivations.

    Then I took a job where I worked with more engineers in one office than I had worked with in my entire career to date. This job nearly broke me. I went from being one of the better people in my role to barely scraping by… for nearly two years. I struggled to succeed, I constantly felt outclassed by the people around me, and many days I couldn't figure out why they even hired me (a feeling, it turns out, that some of my co-workers shared). But there was no big epiphany, no single defining moment that turned it around. Just a series of hard, abject failures from which I had two choices—give up or learn and grow. I did my best to do the latter. As I moved back to a smaller startup, I saw firsthand just how important it is to cement a culture, from the ground up, based around these lessons.

    My final mindset shift happened when I transitioned into management after the startup was acquired by a larger company. I didn't choose to be a manager; management chose me, in that I was offered the position. I was also told that, while everyone really believed in me, the ultimate reason they chose me was that they felt it would be less tumultuous to promote someone from within than hiring someone from outside. We had a very aggressive timeframe after the acquisition, and my new company didn't want to risk things by bringing in an outside leader who didn't have the team's trust. I found that this phase reinforced everything I had learned before about being effective in an engineering role—and turned up the dial on how hard I need to apply these lessons every minute of every day.

  • Why you should take the jobs no one else wants

    So often, we describe open organizations as places overflowing with highly engaged people—places where leaders emerge spontaneously to tackle urgent problems, where people opt-in to challenging initiatives they know they can influence and drive, where teams act with initiative and few top-down mandates.

    And it's all true. I see it regularly at Red Hat.

  • OpenShift 4 ISV Operators

    In Red Hat OpenShift 4, the Operator Hub provides access to community and certified operators that facilitate the deployment and configuration of potentially complex applications. In this video, we take a look at creating and scaling a Couchbase cluster using the operator shipped with OpenShift 4.

  • Contribution opportunity! Quick docs!

    Quick docs are meant to be short articles on the official Fedora documentation site that cover commonly used workflows/tools.

    Unlike wiki pages which are generally unreviewed, information on quick-docs follows the PR (peer-review + pull request) process. So the new information that is added there is more trustworthy and should be too, given that quick docs is listed on the official Fedora documentation website.

  • We did it again – Our HA solution is SAP Certified

    One of the main differences is that the new setup is now also supported for clusters with more than two nodes (n>2). We recommend to use an odd number of nodes to guarantee that always a majority of the cluster could proceed after cluster separations.

read more

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

Mozilla/Firefox: Reducing Your Online Annoyances, This Week in Servo Development and Vista 10 Integration

  • Today’s Firefox Aims to Reduce Your Online Annoyances
    Almost a hundred years ago, John Maynard Keyes suggested that the industrial revolution would effectively end work for humans within a couple of generations, and our biggest challenge would be figuring what to do with that time. That definitely hasn’t happened, and we always seem to have lots to do, much of it online. When you’re on the web, you’re trying to get stuff done, and therefore online annoyances are just annoyances. Whether it’s autoplaying videos, page jumps or finding a topic within all your multiple tabs, Firefox can help. Today’s Firefox release minimizes those online inconveniences, and puts you back in control.
  • This Week In Servo 127
    In the past week, we merged 50 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.
  • Passwordless Web Authentication Support via Windows Hello
    Firefox 66, being released this week, supports using the Windows Hello feature for Web Authentication on Windows 10, enabling a passwordless experience on the web that is hassle-free and more secure. Firefox has supported Web Authentication for all desktop platforms since version 60, but Windows 10 marks our first platform to support the new FIDO2 “passwordless” capabilities for Web Authentication.

Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: 3D Printers

One interesting thing about the hobbyist 3D printing market is that it was founded on free software and open hardware ideals starting with the RepRap project. The idea behind that project was to design a 3D printer from off-the-shelf parts that could print as many of its own parts as possible (especially more complex, custom parts like gears). Because of this, the first generation of 3D printers were all homemade using Arduinos, stepper motors, 3D-printed gears and hardware you could find in the local hardware store. As the movement grew, a few individuals started small businesses selling 3D printer kits that collected all the hardware plus the 3D printed parts and electronics for you to assemble at home. Later, these kits turned into fully assembled and supported printers, and after the successful Printrbot kickstarter campaign, the race was on to create cheaper and more user-friendly printers with each iteration. Sites like Thingiverse and YouMagine allowed people to create and share their designs, so even if you didn't have any design skills yourself, you could download and print everyone else's. These sites even provided the hardware diagrams for some of the more popular 3D printers. The Free Software ethos was everywhere you looked. Read more