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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Graphics: Mesa 17.2.6 RC, AMDGPU, and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.6 release candidate
  • Mesa 17.2.6 RC Arrives With 50+ Fixes

    While Mesa 17.3 is imminent and should be released as stable within the next few days, Mesa 17.2.6 is being prepped for release as the current point release.

  • 43 More AMDGPU DC Patches Hit The Streets

    While the massive AMDGPU DC infrastructure has been merged for Linux 4.15, the flow of improvements to this display code continues and it looks like the next few kernel cycles at least could be quite busy on the AMD front.

  • A Prototype Of The Vulkan Portability Initiative: Low-Level 3D To Vulkan / D3D12 / Metal

    A Mozilla engineer has put out a prototype library in working on the Vulkan Portability Initiative for allowing low-level 3D graphics support that's backed by Vulkan / Direct3D 12 / Metal.

    With Apple sticking to their own Metal graphics API and Direct3D 12 still being the dominant graphics API on Windows 10, The Khronos Group has been working towards better 3D portability for where Vulkan may not be directly supported by the OS/drivers or otherwise available. They've been working to target a subset of the Vulkan API that can be efficiently mapped to these other native graphics APIs and to have the libraries and tooling for better compatibility and code re-use of these different graphics APIs.

Kernel: Linux 4.15, TLDR, and Linus Torvalds' Latest Rant

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.15 Adds AMD Raven Ridge Audio ID

    Not only is AMD Stoney Ridge audio (finally) being supported by the Linux 4.15 kernel, but it also looks like Raven Ridge audio should now be working too.

  • Linux 4.14.2 Fixes The BCache Corruption Bug

    Normally I don't bother mentioning new Linux kernel point releases on Phoronix unless there are some significant changes, as is the case today with Linux 4.14.2.

  • TLDR is what Linux man pages always should have been

    If you get stuck using a Linux tool, the first port of call shouldn’t be to Stack Overflow, but rather its “man pages.” Man — which is short for manual — retrieves documentation for a given program. Unfortunately, this can often be dense, hard to understand, and lacking in practical examples to help you solve your problem.

    TLDR is another way of looking at documentation. Rather than being a comprehensive guide to a given tool, it instead focuses on offering practical example-driven instructions of how something works.

  • Linux creator Linus Torvalds: This is what drives me nuts about IT security

    Developers are often accused of not thinking about security, but Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds has had enough of security people who don't think about developers and end-users.

    After blasting some kernel developers last week for killing processes in the name of hardening the kernel, Torvalds has offered a more measured explanation for his frustration with security myopia.

    While he agrees that having multiple layers of security in the kernel is a good idea, certain ways of implementing it are not, in particular if it annoys users and developers by killing processes that break users' machines and wreck core kernel code. Because ultimately, if there are no users, there's not much point in having a supremely secure kernel, Torvalds contends.

Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu.

Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others.

Read more

Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

Filed under
Development
  • An introduction to the Django ORM

    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.

  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.

Microsoft Bullying and Monkey Business in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Photon Could Be Your New Favorite Container OS

Filed under
OS

Containers are all the rage, and with good reason. As discussed previously, containers allow you to quickly and easily deploy new services and applications onto your network, without requiring too much in the way of added system resources. Containers are more cost-effective than using dedicated hardware or virtual machines, and they’re easier to update and reuse.

Best of all, containers love Linux (and vice versa). Without much trouble or time, you can get a Linux server up and running with Docker and deploying containers. But, which Linux distribution is best suited for the deployment of your containers? There are a lot of options. You could go with a standard Ubuntu Server platform (which makes installing Docker and deploying containers incredibly easy), or you could opt for a lighter weight distribution — one geared specifically for the purpose of deploying containers.

Read more

Dell offers new Ubuntu certified range of workstations

Filed under
Ubuntu

Dell has launched a range of workstations offering the Linux-based Ubuntu operating system out of the box.

There are five new computers in the Precision series, and they come with Canonical certification meaning users don't have to worry about incompatibility issues.

The Precision 5720, sports a 27-inch screen and comes with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS support. Along with an AMD Radeon Pro WX graphics card, you can choose between Intel Xeon, 6th Generation and 7th Core processors.

Read more

Also: Not to worry, Dell will bring Ubuntu to the early 2018 Intel 8th gen. XPS 13 'developers edition'

Dell shuns Windows 10 with launch of five Linux-powered PCs

KDevelop 5.2.1 released

Filed under
KDE

Just a few days after the release of KDevelop 5.2.0, we today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.1. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.0.

You can find the updated Windows 32- and 64 bit installers, the Linux AppImage, as well as the source code archives on our download page.

Read more

Rugged, octa-core hacker board has 2GB RAM

Filed under
Android
Debian

FriendlyElec’s $75 “NanoPC-T3 Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on an octa-core -A53 Samsung SoC, and features 2GB DDR3, 16GB eMMC, and -40 to 80℃ support.

FriendlyElec announced the original NanoPC-T3 SBC in April 2016, back when the company still called itself FriendlyARM. The community backed board, which was a processor and RAM upgrade to the NanoPC-T2, has now been further enhanced with a new NanoPC-T3 Plus model.

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Security: Firefox "Breach Alerts", Uber Crack, and Intel Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Firefox “Breach Alerts” Will Warn If You Visit A ‘Hacked’ Website

    One more thing is coming to add to the capabilities of the recently released Firefox 57 aka Firefox Quantum.

    Mozilla is working on a new feature for Firefox, dubbed Breach Alerts, which will warn users when they visit a website, whether it was hacked in the past or not.

  • GCHQ: change your passwords now even if Uber says it contained the breach

    Uber claims to have paid $100,000 to secure 57 million accounts exposed in a breach last year, but the UK's spy agency, GCHQ, suggests consumers don't place too much faith in Uber’s claim.

    The GCHQ's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) on Thursday published guidance for Uber users, reminding those affected by the firm’s just revealed 2016 breach they should take precautionary action even if their personal details may not have been compromised.

    The agency warned that Uber drivers and riders should “immediately change passwords” that were used for Uber.

  • Drive-By Phishing Scams Race Toward Uber Users

    Indeed, hardly any time elapsed after Uber came clean Tuesday about the year-old breach it had concealed before crack teams of social engineers unleashed appropriately themed phishing messages designed to bamboozle the masses (see Fast and Furious Data Breach Scandal Overtakes Uber).

  • EU authorities consider creating data breach justice league to tackle uber hack

    Multiple investigations prompted by Uber's admission that it concealed a hack could join together for one big mega-probe into the incident.

    An EU working group which has responsibility for data protection will decide next week whether to co-ordinate different investigations taking place in the UK, Italy, Austria, Poland and the Netherlands.

  • Intel Didn't Heed Security Experts Warnings About ME [Ed: Intel refused to speak about back doors until it became too mainstream a topic, then pretended it's a "bug"]

    For nearly eight years, the chip maker has been turning a deaf ear on security warnings about the wisdom of Intel Management Engine.

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Filed under
Software

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series.

VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]

    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.

  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]

    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn

    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.

  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122

    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.

  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?

    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

Filed under
BSD
  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released

    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released

    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements.

    Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management.

    Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.

Security: Uber Sued, Intel ‘Damage Control’, ZDNet FUD, and XFRM Privilege Escalation

Filed under
Security
  • Uber hit with 2 lawsuits over gigantic 2016 data breach

    In the 48 hours since the explosive revelations that Uber sustained a massive data breach in 2016, two separate proposed class-action lawsuits have been filed in different federal courts across California.

    The cases allege substantial negligence on Uber’s part: plaintiffs say the company failed to keep safe the data of the affected 50 million customers and 7 million drivers. Uber reportedly paid $100,000 to delete the stolen data and keep news of the breach quiet.

    On Tuesday, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi wrote: “None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it.”

  • Intel Releases Linux-Compatible Tool For Confirming ME Vulnerabilities [Ed: ‘Damage control’ strategy is to make it look like just a bug.]

    While Intel ME security issues have been talked about for months, confirming fears that have been present about it for years, this week Intel published the SA-00086 security advisory following their own internal review of ME/TXE/SPS components. The impact is someone could crash or cause instability issues, load and execute arbitrary code outside the visibility of the user and operating system, and other possible issues.

  • Open source's big weak spot? Flawed libraries lurking in key apps [Ed: Linux basher Liam Tung entertains FUD firm Snyk and Microsoft because it suits the employer's agenda]
  • SSD Advisory – Linux Kernel XFRM Privilege Escalation
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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

  • An introduction to the Django ORM
    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.
  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.

Microsoft Bullying and Monkey Business in Munich

Games Leftovers

Android Leftovers