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Sunday, 07 Mar 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Waffle 1.7.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Hi all,

I'd like to announce waffle 1.7.0 as available for download immediately.

Notable changes since 1.6.0:
 - wayland: Support for the xdg-shell protocol.
 - surfaceless: Implement window resize
 - GLX/WGL: Behave correctly in the presence of ARB_create_context
 - tests: Rework and extend test suite
 - cmake: Bump requirement to 2.8.12
 - man: Spelling and associated fixes.
 - GBM: Pass valid arguments to gbm_surface_create_with_modifiers
 - apple: Build fixes

https://mesa.pages.freedesktop.org/waffle/files/release/waffle-1.7.0/waffle-1.7.0.tar.xz
https://mesa.pages.freedesktop.org/waffle/files/release/waffle-1.7.0/waffle-1.7.0.tar.xz.asc
https://mesa.pages.freedesktop.org/waffle/files/release/waffle-1.7.0/waffle-1.7.0.sha256sums
https://mesa.pages.freedesktop.org/waffle/files/release/waffle-1.7.0/waffle-1.7.0.sha256sums.asc

Read more

Also: Waffle 1.7 Released For Runtime OpenGL / Windowing System Selection

ZeMarmot Is Working On Searchable Layer Groups, Stored Layer Selection And Other Cool Features For GIMP

Filed under
Software

ZeMarmot is a 2D animation film project that uses free software to create animated films and other artwork made free available under the Art Libre and Creative Commons licenses. It is easy to see what software you are using daily is missing. Jehan from ZeMarmot has written code for several cool new features that make his GIMP experience better.

ZeMarmot is an animated 2D movie made freely available under the Creative Commons by-SA/Art Libre licenses. They use free software to create their movie.

Jehan, a ZeMarmot member from France, has also been a major GIMP contributor since 2012. He is working on some interesting new features for the GNU Image Manipulation Program such as searchable layer groups, pattern-matching selection and stored layer selection.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Install FFmpeg on Manjaro 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install FFmpeg on Manjaro 20. For those of you who didn’t know, FFmpeg is open-source software (also a command-line tool) for transcoding multimedia files. It contains a set of shared audio and video libraries such as libavcodec, libavformat, and libavutil. With FFmpeg, you can convert between various video and audio formats, set sample rates, capture streaming audio or video, and resize videos.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of FFmpeg on a Manjaro 20 (Nibia).

  • CPU Isolation – Nohz_full – by SUSE Labs (part 3)

    The “nohz_full=” kernel boot parameter is the current main interface to configure full dynticks along with CPU Isolation.

  • Linux pee Command – Tee Standard Input Into Pipes

    The Linux pee command will split your output into two streams… Yes, pun intended. It is another incredibly useful tool provided by the moreutils package. Although the name and description may give you a chuckle, this is a serious utility. Let’s take a look at the pee command and it’s basic usage.

  • How to Create Disk Partitions with Parted Command in Linux

    Managing storage devices is one of the essential skills that any Linux user or systems administrator worth his salt needs to have. There are numerous ways of creating disk partitions in Linux, both graphical and on the command-line. In this guide, we feature an opensource tool known as parted. Parted is a collaborative effort of two developers – Andrew Clausen and Lennert Buytenhek.

    We are going to take you through the parted command along with how to create disk partitions.

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, and SMLR

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Review: Artix Linux in 2021

Filed under
Reviews

Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring alternative init software options, including OpenRC, runit, and s6. The distribution is available in many editions, including Base, Cinnamon, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, KDE Plasma and Xfce. With all of the desktop options, combined with the available init choices, there are 21 editions, not including community spins from which to choose. All editions appear to be built for 64-bit (x86_64) machines. Picking randomly, I selected Artix's Plasma edition featuring the runit init software. The download for this edition is is 1.3GB. Browsing the other editions it looks like most flavours are about 1.1GB to 1.3GB in size, though the minimal Base edition is a compact 618MB.

The project's live media boots to the KDE Plasma desktop. On the desktop we find multiple documentation and README icons. There is also an icon for launching the system installer. The default layout places a panel at bottom of the screen where we can find the application menu and system tray. The default wallpaper is a soft blue while the theme for windows and menus is dark with high contrast fonts.

[...]

Artix Linux is one of those distributions I really enjoy using and yet struggle to review in a meaningful way because it doesn't really go out of its way to introduce new or exciting features and everything works smoothly. The distribution is wonderfully easy to install, offers top-notch performance, and is unusually light on resources. Artix is somewhat minimal, but still ships enough software to be immediately useful right out of the gate. We can browse the web, install packages, view files, and play videos. Meanwhile the application menu isn't cluttered with a lot of extras. The developers clearly expect us to install the functionality we need, while doing a really good job of providing enough for the desktop environment to feel base-line useful right from the start.

Artix does a nice job of balancing performance and functionality while also juggling ease of use against not getting in the way. There is a little documentation, but no initial welcome screen or configuration wizards that might distract the user.

The one piece I felt was missing was a graphical package manager which would have made it easier to build the extra functionality I wanted on top of the base distribution. However, that one piece aside, I felt as though Artix was really well designed and put together, at lease for someone like me. It's not a distribution geared toward beginners, it's not a "first distro". It is a bit minimal and requires command line knowledge. However, for someone with a little experience with Linux, for someone who doesn't mind the occasional trip to the command line or installing new applications as needed, then Artix provides an excellent experience. It's fast, light, looks (in my opinion) great with the default theme, and elegantly walks the line between minimalism and having enough applications ready to go out of the box to be immediately useful. I'm unusually impressed with how smooth and trouble-free my experience was with this distribution and the fact it offers such a range of desktop and init diversity is all the more appealing.

Read more

Alpine Linux Review: Ultimate Distro for Power Users

Filed under
Reviews

Alpine Linux is gathering a lot of attention because of its super-small size and focus on security. However, Alpine is different from some of the other lightweight distros we covered on FOSSLinux. It isn’t your typical desktop distribution as it is terminal-based like Arch and is marketed as a “general purpose distro.”

It is currently widely adopted as a Docker container thanks to its ultra-small footprint. However, it can be used for all sorts of Linux deployments that benefit from small, resource-efficient Linux distros.

Now, that statement might feel too generic. But don’t worry, as we have put together an in-depth and comprehensive review of Alpine Linux, giving you a detailed look at what it has under the hood and how to use it. As such, by the end, you should have a clear understanding of whether you should consider Alpine Linux as your next Linux distro.

So without further ado, let’s dive in.

Read more

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • How to manipulate strings in bash

    Without explicit support for variable types, all bash variables are by default treated as character strings. Therefore more often than not, you need to manipulate string variables in various fashions while working on your bash script. Unless you are well-versed in this department, you may end up constantly coming back to Google and searching for tips and examples to handle your specific use case.

    In the spirit of saving your time and thus boosting your productivity in shell scripting, I compile in this tutorial a comprehensive list of useful string manipulation tips for bash scripting. Where possible I will try to use bash's built-in mechanisms (e.g., parameter expansion) to manipulate strings instead of invoking external tools such as awk, sed or grep.

    If you find any missing tips, feel free to suggest it in the comment. I will be happy to incorporate it in the article.

  • Python Generators

    Python generators are very powerful for handling operations which require large amount of memory.

  • We got lucky

    If you’re having enough production incidents to be able to evaluate your preparation, you’re probably either unlucky or unprepared Wink

    If you have infrequent incidents you may be well prepared but it’s hard to tell. Chaos engineering experiments are a great way to test your preparation, and practice incident response in a less stressful context. It may seem like a huge leap from your current level of preparation to running automated chaos monkeys in production, but you don’t need to go straight there.

    Why not start with practice drills? You could have a game host who comes up with a failure scenario. You can work up to chaos in production.

  • React Testing Library – Tutorial with JavaScript Code Examples

    This post will help you to learn what React Testing Library is, and how you can use it to test your React application.

    This tutorial will assume you already know some basic JavaScript and understand the basics of how React works.

    React Testing Library is a testing utility tool that's built to test the actual DOM tree rendered by React on the browser. The goal of the library is to help you write tests that resembles how a user would use your application, so that you'll have more confidence that your application work as intended when a real user do use it.

  • Why I Moved From Ops to DevOps (and why you might want to)

Linux 5.11.4, 5.10.21, 5.4.103, 4.19.179, 4.14.224, 4.9.260, and 4.4.260

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.11.4
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.11.4 kernel.
    
    All users of the 5.11 kernel series must upgrade.
    
    The updated 5.11.y git tree can be found at:
    	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.11.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
    
    thanks,
    
    greg k-h
    
  • Linux 5.10.21
  • Linux 5.4.103
  • Linux 4.19.179
  • Linux 4.14.224
  • Linux 4.9.260
  • Linux 4.4.260

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

  • OPNsense set up and configure DNS Over TLS (DoT)

    OPNsense is an open-source, FreeBSD-based firewall and routing security software. It also acts as a DNS resolver for all of your desktops and mobile devices. Let us see how to configure the OPNsense DNS resolver to encrypt all DNS queries to protect from eavesdropping to increase our privacy and security.

    All DNS queries routed using plaintext. We either use UDP and TCP protocol 53 in plaintext, and your ISP or an attacker/hacker can monitor transmissions even if you use HTTPS, the DNS queries and answers of the site leaked. Hence we need to encrypt our DNS queries to protect ourselves. DNS over TLS (DoT) is nothing but a security protocol for encrypting DNS traffic using the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. The main objective is to increase your security and privacy.

  • Install Drupal in Raspberry PI - peppe8o

    Drupal is, before all, a Content Management System (CMS). Between their users you can find, for example, City of London web page, New York web page, Tesla and many others.

    Drupal focuses to make working well these features that everyone refers as standard, like easy content authoring, reliable performance, and excellent security. It also aims to get macimum felxibility with modular core, enabling website owners to extend functionalities by installing add-ons.

    Like quite all CMSs, you can customize your website appearence by selecting your favourite theme.

  • How to install V.S. Whitty Full Week on a Chromebook - Friday Night Funkin Mod

    Today we are looking at how to install the V.S. Whitty, Friday Night Funkin, mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

Top 25 icon themes for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

An icon is a graphical representation of something. It can be termed as being a symbolic thing or noted figure. An icon theme is, therefore, a combination of icons that share the same feel and look. Thus, when a user selects a specific icon theme, all the apps will look and feel as specified by the icon theme used.

In this article, we shall concentrate our findings on the top 25 icon themes for Ubuntu. If you are bored by the old Ubuntu look, then this is the right article for you.

Icon themes are the easiest way to change the look and feel of your Ubuntu desktop. Your Ubuntu desktop is transformed to your desired theme. If you are stuck and wish to give your Ubuntu a new feel, try out the tricks highlighted in this article.

Read more

Also: Finding Ubuntu Crash Reports

Videos: Smenu, Linux Experiment, and David Revoy With Krita

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A Look at the Newly-Released Pardus 19.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Pardus 19.5

    Today we are looking at Pardus 19.5, the XFCE edition. It comes with Linux Kernel 4.19, XFCE 4.12, based on Debian 10, and uses about 1GB to 1.5GB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Pardus 19.5 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Pardus 19.5.

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: March 7th, 2021

Filed under
News

This week has been really interesting as we saw the release of Manjaro ARM’s first update in 2021, Arch Linux’s first ISO release powered by Linux kernel 5.11, which finally and completely fixes the touchpad on my Lenovo IdeaPad Gaming 3 laptop, KDE’s Plasma Mobile sees its first major update in 2021, and Lenovo brings another ThinkPad laptop to Linux.

On top of that, Linus Torvalds kicked off the development cycle of the upcoming Linux 5.12 kernel, Star Labs finally adds Coreboot open-source firmware to its Linux laptops, Valve’s Steam Link finally gets ported to Linux as a Flatpak and Snap, and Canonical chooses to use Google’s Flutter to build future Ubuntu apps.

Read more

Mesa 21.1 Addresses Issue Of Gallium Nine Often Hitting Memory Issues With 32-bit Games

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those using Gallium3D Nine as a Direct3D 9 state tracker when running Windows games on Linux rather than the likes of DXVK for going through Vulkan, next quarter's Mesa 21.1 will better handle 32-bit games with the Nine state tracker.

As written about a few days ago, Gallium Nine has been seeing a fresh round of improvements for this D3D9 state tracker that has long been part of Gallium3D. Gallium Nine is still used particularly by those with older hardware lacking Vulkan support where DXVK is then unsupported. Gallium Nine also generally performs better than using Wine's Direct3D 9 to OpenGL code path albeit making use of "Nine" requires a patched version of Wine.

Read more

Rocket League Still Thriving on Steam While Delisted

Filed under
Gaming

As you can see from the above chart, the Rocket League community on Steam has never been as active as now, even though the game is officially delisted. The game is alive and well and continues to be receive frequent updates on Steam – and the increase of the player base through EGS has potentially made the game more enticing than ever to play online, regardless of the platform.

Wile you cannot purchase Rocket League directly on Steam anymore, it can still be obtained through third party resellers. Such third party key are selling at crazy prices, sometimes above 100 USD.

[...]

Also, this is a reminder that Rocket League still works fine on Linux even after the termination of the native port and the big Epic client update in September 2020…

Read more

Small Image Tools that Pack a Real Punch

Filed under
Software

The spotlight usually focuses on the heavyweight Linux graphics tools such as GIMP, Shotwell, digiKam, Inkscape, and Krita. However, there are many other open source graphics tools that merit attention.

Linux offers a vast collection of open source small utilities that perform functions ranging from the obvious to the bizarre. It is the quality and selection of these tools that help Linux stand out as a productive environment. A good utility cooperates with other applications, integrating seamlessly.

Although command-line tools are very useful for updating, configuring, and repairing a system, their benefits are not only confined to system administration. The majority of the applications featured in this article are command-line tools. They are very light on system resources, fast and efficient, don’t rely on a windowing system, and are great for integrating with other applications and scripting.

The term lightweight is a label attached to computer software which is relatively simpler or faster than its counterparts. Feature bloat is endemic in software especially commercial software. Often, the easiest way to persuade users to upgrade to the latest version is to add new spangly features. This happens with open source software (to a lesser degree), and open source graphics software is not immune to feature bloat. Well, there is no feature bloat here!

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of small image tools that are incredibly useful.

Read more

Debian: Rejections, LTS Work, and Bugfixes

Filed under
Debian

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in February 2021

    FTP master

    This month I accepted 162 and rejected 28 packages, which is again a small increase compared to last month. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 291.

    Debian LTS

    This was my eightieth month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

  • RCBW 21.9 – jwiltshire.org.uk

    A recent upload of electrum suffers from the serious bug #981374. On the face of it this is just a missing package dependency: can you help with testing and preparing an updated package to fix this? You don’t need to be a Debian Developer to get stuck into this one!

Videos and Shows: KDE Community Edition PinePhone and This Week in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • KDE Community Edition PinePhone Unboxing and First Try! - YouTube

    In this video I'm "unboxing" (or, rather, showing the box and its contents) of the pinephone, and trying it for my first time!

  • This Week in Linux 141: GRUB 2 Security Flaw, Linux Mint to Force Updates?, Valve’s Steam Link

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’re going to try something different with the show. Let me know what you think of the changes. This episode is completely stacked with exciting news, we’ve got a ton of Distro News from Ubuntu, openSUSE, Linux Mint, SystemRescue, IPFire, and even Linux From Scratch. A vulnerability was found in GRUB 2 that lets someone bypass Secure Boot so we’ll talk about that and just how bad is it? The EU announced some great news related to Right to Repair. Valve has announced that Steam Link is now available on Linux and it’s a real game changer. We’ve also got some media production news to check out this week from Blender, Ardour and a new synthesizer called Vital. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Hands-On with Raspup on Raspberry Pi 4: Puppy Linux for Tinkerers

Filed under
Reviews

If you never heard of Raspup before, let me tell you that it’s a Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution built from the Woof-CE build system that was originally developed by Barry Kauler, the creator of Puppy Linux, and binary compatible with Raspbian (the official Raspberry Pi OS).

As such, Raspup is a Puppy Linux port for Raspberry Pi. Raspup was created by Michael Amadio and it’s designed to run on ARMv7l hardware, specifically on the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 1, Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi 3+, and Raspberry Pi 4 single-board computers (SBCs).

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, and SMLR

Review: Artix Linux in 2021

Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring alternative init software options, including OpenRC, runit, and s6. The distribution is available in many editions, including Base, Cinnamon, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, KDE Plasma and Xfce. With all of the desktop options, combined with the available init choices, there are 21 editions, not including community spins from which to choose. All editions appear to be built for 64-bit (x86_64) machines. Picking randomly, I selected Artix's Plasma edition featuring the runit init software. The download for this edition is is 1.3GB. Browsing the other editions it looks like most flavours are about 1.1GB to 1.3GB in size, though the minimal Base edition is a compact 618MB. The project's live media boots to the KDE Plasma desktop. On the desktop we find multiple documentation and README icons. There is also an icon for launching the system installer. The default layout places a panel at bottom of the screen where we can find the application menu and system tray. The default wallpaper is a soft blue while the theme for windows and menus is dark with high contrast fonts. [...] Artix Linux is one of those distributions I really enjoy using and yet struggle to review in a meaningful way because it doesn't really go out of its way to introduce new or exciting features and everything works smoothly. The distribution is wonderfully easy to install, offers top-notch performance, and is unusually light on resources. Artix is somewhat minimal, but still ships enough software to be immediately useful right out of the gate. We can browse the web, install packages, view files, and play videos. Meanwhile the application menu isn't cluttered with a lot of extras. The developers clearly expect us to install the functionality we need, while doing a really good job of providing enough for the desktop environment to feel base-line useful right from the start. Artix does a nice job of balancing performance and functionality while also juggling ease of use against not getting in the way. There is a little documentation, but no initial welcome screen or configuration wizards that might distract the user. The one piece I felt was missing was a graphical package manager which would have made it easier to build the extra functionality I wanted on top of the base distribution. However, that one piece aside, I felt as though Artix was really well designed and put together, at lease for someone like me. It's not a distribution geared toward beginners, it's not a "first distro". It is a bit minimal and requires command line knowledge. However, for someone with a little experience with Linux, for someone who doesn't mind the occasional trip to the command line or installing new applications as needed, then Artix provides an excellent experience. It's fast, light, looks (in my opinion) great with the default theme, and elegantly walks the line between minimalism and having enough applications ready to go out of the box to be immediately useful. I'm unusually impressed with how smooth and trouble-free my experience was with this distribution and the fact it offers such a range of desktop and init diversity is all the more appealing. Read more

Alpine Linux Review: Ultimate Distro for Power Users

Alpine Linux is gathering a lot of attention because of its super-small size and focus on security. However, Alpine is different from some of the other lightweight distros we covered on FOSSLinux. It isn’t your typical desktop distribution as it is terminal-based like Arch and is marketed as a “general purpose distro.” It is currently widely adopted as a Docker container thanks to its ultra-small footprint. However, it can be used for all sorts of Linux deployments that benefit from small, resource-efficient Linux distros. Now, that statement might feel too generic. But don’t worry, as we have put together an in-depth and comprehensive review of Alpine Linux, giving you a detailed look at what it has under the hood and how to use it. As such, by the end, you should have a clear understanding of whether you should consider Alpine Linux as your next Linux distro. So without further ado, let’s dive in. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • How to manipulate strings in bash

    Without explicit support for variable types, all bash variables are by default treated as character strings. Therefore more often than not, you need to manipulate string variables in various fashions while working on your bash script. Unless you are well-versed in this department, you may end up constantly coming back to Google and searching for tips and examples to handle your specific use case. In the spirit of saving your time and thus boosting your productivity in shell scripting, I compile in this tutorial a comprehensive list of useful string manipulation tips for bash scripting. Where possible I will try to use bash's built-in mechanisms (e.g., parameter expansion) to manipulate strings instead of invoking external tools such as awk, sed or grep. If you find any missing tips, feel free to suggest it in the comment. I will be happy to incorporate it in the article.

  • Python Generators

    Python generators are very powerful for handling operations which require large amount of memory.

  • We got lucky

    If you’re having enough production incidents to be able to evaluate your preparation, you’re probably either unlucky or unprepared ;) If you have infrequent incidents you may be well prepared but it’s hard to tell. Chaos engineering experiments are a great way to test your preparation, and practice incident response in a less stressful context. It may seem like a huge leap from your current level of preparation to running automated chaos monkeys in production, but you don’t need to go straight there. Why not start with practice drills? You could have a game host who comes up with a failure scenario. You can work up to chaos in production.

  • React Testing Library – Tutorial with JavaScript Code Examples

    This post will help you to learn what React Testing Library is, and how you can use it to test your React application. This tutorial will assume you already know some basic JavaScript and understand the basics of how React works. React Testing Library is a testing utility tool that's built to test the actual DOM tree rendered by React on the browser. The goal of the library is to help you write tests that resembles how a user would use your application, so that you'll have more confidence that your application work as intended when a real user do use it.

  • Why I Moved From Ops to DevOps (and why you might want to)