Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Collabora

Syndicate content
Your one-stop shop for all the latest from Collabora
Updated: 1 hour 50 min ago

Google Summer of Code 2019

1 hour 50 min ago
A few days ago, coding began for this year's Google Summer of Code (GSoC) projects. Along with four GStreamer and Wayland related projects, this year's edition also includes two Debian projects for which Collaborans will be mentors.

Adding stateless support to vicodec

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 11:03:00 AM
Prior to joining Collabora, I took part in Round 17 of the Outreachy internships, to work on the virtual drivers in the media subsystem of the Linux kernel, or more specifically, on the vicodec driver.

Why HDCP support in Weston is a good thing

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 04:22:00 PM
What HDCP is, and why supporting HDCP in Weston is justified in both an economical and technical context.

Open graphics in Montreal

Monday 30th of September 2019 12:49:00 PM
Collabora is proud to be hosting in Montreal the 2019 edition of the X.Org Developer's Conference (XDC), the leading event for developers working on all things Open graphics, including the Linux kernel, Mesa, DRM, Wayland and X11.

All the right ingredients in Paris

Friday 20th of September 2019 06:35:00 AM
Next week, Collaborans including Julian Bouzas and Enric Balletbò i Serra will be in Paris to participate in the 3rd edition of Embedded Recipes and 8th edition of Kernel Recipes

Linux Kernel 5.3

Thursday 19th of September 2019 12:42:00 PM
Linux 5.3 was released over the weekend, which means it's time for our usual "where does Collabora stand in this picture?" tour. As has been the case for several years now, Collabora continues being an active contributor to the Linux kernel.

Open Source at IBC 2019

Thursday 12th of September 2019 06:22:00 PM
Showcasing two brand new Open Source software demonstrations featuring the Xilinx high-performance Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC, and the Magic Leap One augmented reality headset.

Bringing the FOSS XR community together

Friday 6th of September 2019 11:28:00 AM
With the recent release of the OpenXR 1.0 specification, the presence of numerous Open Source platforms for Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality, and a growing community of developers, the need for a collaborative Open Source XR Conference became clear.

Virglrenderer and the state of virtualized virtual worlds

Wednesday 28th of August 2019 12:33:00 PM
With the release of virglrenderer 0.8.0, getting accelerated OpenGL within a virtual machine (VM) made a big leap forward. Since virglrenderer-0.7.0, the code base has seen ~600 commits, and Collabora provided more than 80% of these contributions.

Embedded in San Diego

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 01:41:00 PM
Starting tomorrow, Collabora will be exhibiting & speaking at Embedded Linux Conference North America (ELCNA), the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using embedded Linux.

ROCK Pi and an easy place: Panfrost & Wayland on a Rockchip board

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 01:25:00 PM
Ongoing work on the reverse-engineered Panfrost OpenGL ES driver for Arm Mali GPUs has turned the RK3399 SoC into a very attractive platform to try out Wayland on ARM devices.

What's new in OpenXR 1.0 & Monado?

Friday 2nd of August 2019 10:06:00 AM
As part of its unwavering commitment to open source and open standards, Collabora is proud to be part of bringing the recently-released OpenXR 1.0 to life, and to be pioneering the Monado open source runtime for OpenXR.

Linux Developer Conference Brazil 2019

Friday 2nd of August 2019 08:34:00 AM
This weekend, Collaborans are in São Paulo, Brazil, to take part in the third edition of Linux Developer Conference Brazil, a conference which aims to take the Brazilian Linux development community to the international level.

Moving the Linux desktop to another reality

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 10:16:00 AM
Today, we are very excited to announce xrdesktop, a new open source project sponsored by Valve, enabling interaction with traditional Linux desktop environments, such as GNOME and KDE, in VR.

Zink: Summer Update & SIGGRAPH 2019

Thursday 25th of July 2019 02:39:00 PM
There's been quite a few updates to Zink, an OpenGL implementation on top of Vulkan, since I last wrote about it. Here's an overview of the recent changes, as well as an exciting announcement!

Collabora & Debian 10 (Buster)

Thursday 25th of July 2019 10:28:00 AM
With DebConf19, the annual conference for Debian contributors and users, in full swing this week in Curitiba, Brazil, what better time to look at the contributions made by Collaborans to the latest Debian release!

GStreamer in Oslo

Thursday 18th of July 2019 03:01:00 PM
A little over a month and a half ago, Collaborans including Aaron Boxer, George Kiagiadakis, Guillaume Desmottes, Stéphane Cerveau and myself took part in the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Oslo. This year, the hackfest was kindly hosted by Pexip.

Linux Kernel 5.2

Wednesday 17th of July 2019 12:08:00 PM
With 11 engineers authoring, reviewing and testing nearly 170 patches for this latest release, Collabora ranked 8th in the list of most active employers by lines changed, sharing ranks with some of the prominent employers in Linux kernel development.

GNOME meets Panfrost

Wednesday 26th of June 2019 12:58:00 PM
In my last Panfrost blog post, I announced my internship goal: improve Panfrost to run GNOME3. GNOME is a popular Linux desktop making heavy use of OpenGL; to use GNOME with only free and open source software on a machine with Mali graphics, Panfrost is necessary.

Using dummy-hcd to play with USB gadgets

Monday 24th of June 2019 03:11:00 PM
Dummy_hcd which consists of a software-emulated host controller and a UDC chip. In other words, this means you can play with USB gadgets even if you don't have the appropriate hardware, because your PC can act as both a USB host and a USB device.

More in Tux Machines

4 Free and Open Source Alternatives to Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is a premium image editing and design tool available for Windows and macOS. Undoubtedly, almost everyone knows about it. It’s that popular. Well, you can use Photoshop on Linux using Windows in a virtual machine or by using Wine – but that is not an ideal experience. In general, we don’t have a lot of options available as a replacement for Adobe Photoshop. However, in this article, we shall mention some of the best open-source Photoshop alternatives available for Linux (with cross-platform support as well). Do note that Photoshop is not just a photo editor. It’s used by photographers, digital artists, professional editors for various usage. The alternative software here may not have all the features of Photoshop but you can use them for various task that you do in Photoshop. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Use sshuttle to build a poor man’s VPN

    Nowadays, business networks often use a VPN (virtual private network) for secure communications with workers. However, the protocols used can sometimes make performance slow. If you can reach reach a host on the remote network with SSH, you could set up port forwarding. But this can be painful, especially if you need to work with many hosts on that network. Enter sshuttle — which lets you set up a quick and dirty VPN with just SSH access. Read on for more information on how to use it. The sshuttle application was designed for exactly the kind of scenario described above. The only requirement on the remote side is that the host must have Python available. This is because sshuttle constructs and runs some Python source code to help transmit data. [...] Depending on the capabilities of your system and the remote system, you can use sshuttle for an IPv6 based VPN. You can also set up configuration files and integrate it with your system startup if desired. If you want to read even more about sshuttle and how it works, check out the official documentation.

  • Hardening Firefox against Injection Attacks

    Firefox not only renders web pages on the internet but also ships with a variety of built-in pages, commonly referred to as about:pages. Such about: pages provide an interface to reveal internal state of the browser. Most prominently, about:config, which exposes an API to inspect and update preferences and settings which allows Firefox users to tailor their Firefox instance to their specific needs. Since such about: pages are also implemented using HTML and JavaScript they are subject to the same security model as regular web pages and therefore not immune against code injection attacks. More figuratively, if an attacker manages to inject code into such an about: page, it potentially allows an attacker to execute the injected script code in the security context of the browser itself, hence allowing the attacker to perform arbitrary actions on the behalf of the user. To better protect our users and to add an additional layer of security to Firefox, we rewrote all inline event handlers and moved all inline JavaScript code to packaged files for all 45 about: pages. This allowed us to apply a strong Content Security Policy (CSP) such as ‘default-src chrome:’ which ensures that injected JavaScript code does not execute. Instead JavaScript code only executes when loaded from a packaged resource using the internal chrome: protocol. Not allowing any inline script in any of the about: pages limits the attack surface of arbitrary code execution and hence provides a strong first line of defense against code injection attacks.

  • IPFire on AWS: Update to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136

    Today, we have updated IPFire on AWS to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136 - the latest official release of IPFire. This update includes security fixes for OpenSSL and the Linux kernel, an updated Perl, and of course many other fixes throughout the whole system.

  • Pros and cons of event-driven security

    Great news, everyone! Forrester Research says that 95% of all recorded breaches in 2016 came from only three industries: government, technology, and retail. Everyone else is safe... ish, right? Hold on for a moment. Tech? Retail? What kind of industry diversification is this? We are, after all, living in 2019, where every business is a tech business. And all of us are continuously selling something, whether it’s an innovative product or an amazing service. So what the report should have said is that 95% of all recorded breaches came from attacks on 95% of all businesses both online and offline. And some of the attackers went for the .gov. More on the matter, 43% of attackers target small businesses—and that’s a lot considering that, on average, a hack attempt takes place every 39 seconds. To top things off, the average cost of a data breach in 2020 is expected to exceed $150 million. These stats sound a bit more terrifying out of context, but the threat is still very much real. Ouch.

Programming: Elana Hashman, Red Hat Pushing Microsoft (.NET) and More

  • PyDev of the Week: Elana Hashman

    This week we welcome Elana Hashman (@ehashdn) as our PyDev of the Week! Elana is a director of the Open Source Initiative and a fellow of the Python Software Foundation. She is also the Clojure Packaging Team lead and a Java Packaging Team member. You can see some of her work over on Github. You can also learn more about Elana on her website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

  • Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer

    Eclipse Che 7, an open source in-the-browser development environment, allows you to define custom workspaces for your software development. Think of a workspace as you would think of a development PC: You have an operating system, programming language support, and all the tools necessary to write code. In this article, I’ll introduce the .NET developer to this new world and highlight ways you can use Eclipse Che to your advantage.

  • How to Convert String to Lowercase in Python

    Some times you may require to convert any string to lower case (all letters). This tutorial will help to convert a string (any case) to lower case as showing in the below image.

  • How to fuck up software releases

    I manage releases for a bunch of free & open-source software. Just about every time I ship a release, I find a novel way to fuck it up. Enough of these fuck-ups have accumulated now that I wanted to share some of my mistakes and how I (try to) prevent them from happening twice.

today's howtos