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LinuxSecurity.com Advisories

Syndicate content LinuxSecurity - Security Advisories
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news.
Updated: 2 hours 11 min ago

openSUSE: 2019:2317-1: moderate: GraphicsMagick

5 hours 56 min ago
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

openSUSE: 2019:2319-1: important: libopenmpt

5 hours 57 min ago
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

openSUSE: 2019:2318-1: moderate: epiphany

5 hours 58 min ago
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

RedHat: RHSA-2019-3089:01 Important: kernel-rt security and bug fix update

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 03:58:17 AM
An update for kernel-rt is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability

Debian: DSA-4544-1: unbound security update

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 01:29:57 AM
X41 D-Sec discovered that unbound, a validating, recursive, and caching DNS resolver, did not correctly process some NOTIFY queries. This could lead to remote denial-of-service by application crash.

Fedora 29: runc FEDORA-2019-3fc86a518b

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:13:39 PM
Resolves: #1757214, #1757290 - CVE-2019-16884 ---- add patch for cgroupsv2

Fedora 30: sudo FEDORA-2019-9cb221f2be

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 06:41:03 PM
* Rebase to 1.8.28 * Fixed CVE-2019-14287

Fedora 30: runc FEDORA-2019-96946c39dd

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 06:40:41 PM
Resolves: #1757214, #1757290 - CVE-2019-16884 ---- add patch for cgroupsv2

Fedora 30: opendmarc FEDORA-2019-24b3f84f6e

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 06:40:19 PM
This update provides the final 1.3.2 release (previously the package was 1.3.2 beta). It also includes the previously-omitted database schema directory (resolving [#1415753](https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1415753)) and rddmarc tools, and backports proposed fixes for a [crasher bug](https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1673293) and [security issue

SUSE: 2019:2673-1 important: libpcap

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 05:13:48 PM
An update that fixes two vulnerabilities is now available.

Debian: DSA-4509-3: apache2 security update

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 05:12:52 PM
It was reported that the apache2 update released as DSA 4509-1 incorrectly fixed CVE-2019-10092. Updated apache2 packages are now available to correct this issue. For reference, the relevant part of the original advisory text follows.

SUSE: 2019:2674-1 important: tcpdump

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 05:12:46 PM
An update that fixes 28 vulnerabilities is now available.

Ubuntu 4156-1: SDL vulnerabilities

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 02:30:23 PM
Several security issues were fixed in SDL.

SUSE: 2019:2667-1 important: sudo

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 02:22:31 PM
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

SUSE: 2019:2668-1 important: sudo

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 02:21:07 PM
An update that solves one vulnerability and has three fixes is now available.

SUSE: 2019:2669-1 important: libpcap

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 02:14:40 PM
An update that fixes two vulnerabilities is now available.

SUSE: 2019:2666-1 important: sudo

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 02:13:46 PM
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

RedHat: RHSA-2019-3055:01 Important: kernel security and bug fix update

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 01:50:38 PM
An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability

RedHat: RHSA-2019-3067:01 Important: jss security update

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 01:50:20 PM
An update for jss is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability

RedHat: RHSA-2019-3076:01 Important: kpatch-patch security update

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 01:50:10 PM
An update for kpatch-patch is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability

More in Tux Machines

Google: Replacing Google Chrome, AMP and Titan Security Keys

  • The top 5 alternatives to Google Chrome

    Google Chrome is the most popular web browser on the market. It provides a user-friendly, easy-to-use interface, with a simple appearance featuring a combined address and search bar with a small space for extensions. Chrome also offers excellent interconnectivity on different devices and easy syncing that means that once a user installs the browser on different devices, all their settings, bookmarks and search history come along with it. Virtually all a user does on Google chrome is backed up to Google Cloud. Chrome also offers easy connectivity to other Google products, such as Docs, Drive, and YouTube via an “Apps” menu on the bookmarks bar, located just below the address/search bar. Google Translate, one of the best translation applications currently available on the internet, is also included.

  • Google unplugs AMP, hooks it into OpenJS Foundation after critics turn up the volume [Ed: Microsoft Tim on Google passing a bunch of EEE to a foundation headed by a Microsoft ‘mole’, 'open'JS ]

    AMP – which originally stood for Accelerated Mobile Pages though not any more – was launched in 2015, ostensibly to speed up page loading on smartphones. The technology includes AMP HTML, which is a set of performance-optimized web components, and the AMP Cache, which serves validated AMP pages. Most AMP pages are served by Google’s AMP Cache.

  • Google USB-C Titan Security Keys Begin Shipping Tomorrow

    Google announced their new USB-C Titan Security Key will begin shipping tomorrow for offering two-factor authentication support with not only Android devices but all the major operating systems as well. The USB-C Titan Security Key is being manufactured by well known 2FA key provider Yubico. This new security key is using the same chip and firmware currently used by Google's existing USB-A/NFC and Bluetooth/NFC/USB Titan Security Key models.

Manjaro | Review from an openSUSE User

There are many flavors of Linux, we call them distributions but in a way, I think “flavor” is a good word for it as some some are a sweet and delightful experience while with others a lingering, foul taste remains. Manjaro has not left a foul taste in any way. In full disclosure, I am not a fan of Arch based Linux distributions. I appreciate the idea of this one-step-removed Gentoo and for those that really like to get into the nitty-gritty bits Arch is good for that. My problem with Arch is the lack of quality assurance. The official repository on Arch Wiki describes the process of how core packages need to be signed off by developers before they are allowed to move from staging into the official repositories. With the rate at which packages come in, it is almost an impossibility that through manual testing software will continue to work well with other software as some dependencies may change. Admittedly, I don’t use it daily, outside of VMs for testing nor do I have a lot of software installed so this is not going to be a problem I am likely to experience. Manjaro, from my less than professional opinion, is a slightly slower rolling Arch that seems to do more testing and the process, from what I understand, is similar. Developers have to approve the packages before they are moved into the official repositories. I also understand that there isn’t any automated QA to perform any testing so this is all reliant on user or community testing, which, seemingly, Manjaro is doing a good job of it. My dance with Manjaro is as part of a BigDaddyLinuxLive Community challenge, to give it a fair shake and share your experience. This is my review of Manjaro with the Plasma Desktop. Bottom Line Up Front, this is quite possibly the safest and most stable route if you like the Arch model. In the time I ran it, I didn’t have any issues with it. The default Plasma Desktop is quite nice, and the default themes are also top notch. The graphical package manager works fantastically well and you do have Snap support right out of the gate. It’s truly a great experience. Was it good enough to push me from my precious openSUSE? No, but it has made for a contender and something about which to think. Read more

Android Leftovers

Open source interior design with Sweet Home 3D

Historically, I practiced the little-known fourth principle: don't have furniture. However, since I became a remote worker, I've found that a home office needs conveniences like a desk and a chair, a bookshelf for reference books and tech manuals, and so on. Therefore, I have been formulating a plan to populate my living and working space with actual furniture, made of actual wood rather than milk crates (or glue and sawdust, for that matter), with an emphasis on plan. The last thing I want is to bring home a great find from a garage sale to discover that it doesn't fit through the door or that it's oversized compared to another item of furniture. Read more