Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Budgie 10.2.8 Desktop Brings New Places Indicator Applet, Countless Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:57pm
Story Ubuntu Turns 12, Happy Birthday! Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:55pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 4:32pm
Story Linux 4.8.3 Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 3:25pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 2:13pm
Story ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 1:12pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:32am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:30am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:27am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 11:27am

Linux Kernel 3.12.65 LTS Released with Updated Wireless Drivers, PowerPC Fixes

Filed under

Today, October 19, 2016, Linux kernel maintainer Jiri Slaby announced the release and immediate availability for download of the sixty-fifth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

Read more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Foundation:Blockchain and ONF/ONOS

Filed under
  • Blockchain technology can help save the lives of millions of refugees by giving them a verified identity

    What if you had no proof of who you are? What would you do when the bank manager asked for ID when you tried to open an account or when the hospital asked for your documentation?

    You wouldn’t be able to function, at least not easily. Billions face this problem internationally, but now blockchain technology is helping those with no paper proof of existence get the same services as those with “official” identification.

  • Open Networking Foundation and ON.Lab Merge

    As Software Defined Networking (SDN) has matured from just being a theoretical concept to a production reality, consolidation is now happening in SDN advocacy efforts as well. Today the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) and ON.Lab announced that they would be merging, bringing the two groups' SDN efforts under one umbrella organization.


    There is also a connection between ONF and the Linux Foundation, with the ONOS and CORD projects led by ON.Lab. Parulkar said that with the ONF merger, the ONOS and CORD boards and governance will continue unchanged and they will continue to be Linux Foundation Collaborative projects.

  • ONF to Merge With On.Lab

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is merging with On.Lab, creating one entity that will curate standards such as OpenFlow while developing software projects such as ONOS and the Central Office Re-Imagined as a Datacenter (CORD).

NethServer 7 RC1 Replaces Snort with Suricata, Adds Deep Packet Inspection

Filed under
Red Hat

The development of the CentOS-based, server-oriented NethServer 7 operating system continues, and today, October 19, 2016, Alessio Fattorini informed Softpedia about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) version.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
  • Linux 4.9 Is Showing Some Performance Improvements On A Core i7 6800K

    Now that Linux 4.9-rc1 is out, it's onward to testing this new Linux kernel on the dozens of test systems at Phoronix. With some early testing on a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box, there are some promising improvements.

  • Linux 4.10 To Expose EFI Framebuffer Configuration

    While Linux 4.9-rc1 was only released this past weekend, the EFI subsystem changes are already being staged for the next kernel cycle.

    One of the EFI changes catching my attention for Linux 4.10 is that the EFI frame-buffer configuration will be exposed. This will allow for localized status strings during firmware updates.

  • Features You Won't Find In The Linux 4.9 Mainline Kernel

    While there are many new features in Linux 4.9, there is some functionality we've been looking forward to that sadly isn't yet in the mainline kernel tree.

RaspEX Project Now Lets You Run Ubuntu 16.10 on Raspberry Pi 3 and 2, with LXDE

Filed under

Today, October 19, 2016, GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informed us about the immediate availability of a new build of his RaspEX project, which brings the latest Ubuntu OS to Raspberry Pi users.

Read more

Nasdaq Selects Drupal 8

Filed under

Dries Buytaert announced today that Nasdaq Corporate Solutions has selected Drupal 8 and will work with Acquia to create its Investor Relations Website Platform. In the words of Angela Byron, a.k.a "Webchick", "This is a big freakin' deal."

Read more

Direct: Nasdaq using Drupal 8 for new Investor Relations websites

Android Leftovers

Filed under

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat brings enterprise mobile apps to its containers platform

    Linux major Red Hat has unveiled its Red Hat Mobile Application Platform, a containerized offering designed to run in any public or private cloud or on-premise infrastructure that supports its Enterprise Linux. When used alongside Red Hat’s existing SaaS (software-as-a-service) mobile app platform, enterprises gain a wider set of deployment options to integrate, manage, and scale their mobile app initiatives to meet their business objectives, said the company.

  • Red Hat flaunts new curriculum offering

    The solution provides higher education institutions with the support to offer exams and courses centred around Red Hat technology.

    “Red Hat Academy goes beyond just implementing the software,” said Mustapha Hill, Channel Ecosystem Leader, MENA, Red Hat. “With this initiative, we actually advise universities on how they can implement software training into their curriculum. We do this because we want graduates to eventually be able to gain employment in the market based on their knowledge of Red Hat technology.

  • Fedora kernel scripting

    When I joined the Fedora kernel team about 1.5 years ago, I was the first brand new person in a long time. My teammates had most of the infrastructure instructions for the kernel in their brains. Part of my new hire tasks were documenting the steps for working with the Fedora kernel. These days, I can do most of the day to day tasks in my sleep. The tasks are still somewhat manual though which leaves room for error. I've decided to correct this by scripting some of the more manual parts.

  • Going to FUDCon: Phnom Penh Edition

    A little over a year ago, FUDCon APAC happened in Pune. I know because I lost a lot of nights sleep over it. The event also marked a turning point in my life because it coincided with my decision to move on from Red Hat and accept an offer with Linaro, a decision that I can say now was among the best I have taken in my life despite the very difficult choice I had to make to leave arguably the best team one could ever work with. FUDCon also brought me in touch with many volunteers from across Asia and it was interesting to see the kinds of challenges they faced when talking about Fedora and Open Source in general. That was also when I got to know Nisa and Somvannda from Cambodia better, especially when I had the chance to go over to Phnom Penh for APAC budget discussions. They had wanted to do a FUDCon in Phnom Penh in 2015 and we simply put out a better bid then.

  • Tommorow FOSSASIA meets PyLadies Pune

    Tomorrow we have a special PyLadies meetup at the local Red Hat office. Hong Phuc Dang from FOSSASIA is coming down for a discussion with the PyLadies team here. She will be taking about various projects FOSSASIA is working on, including codeheat. In the second half I will be taking a workshop on creating command line shell using Python.

  • Deploy containers with Atomic Host, Ansible, and Cockpit
  • How to Install Atom in Fedora

    A text editor is an important tool for developers, since they spend a lot of time using one. This article is about Atom, a cool modern editor.

    Atom is a free and open source text editor developed in 2015 by Github. Its developer calls it “the hackable text-editor for the 21st century.” It offers vast language support, and easy customization. It also works as an integrated development environment, or IDE. It comes with some built-in packages, but you can install other packages too. Most of these are freely licensed and maintained by community. Of course, it’s also free of cost.

  • debugging koji build failures

    From time to time builds fail in koji (The Fedora build system), and it’s good to know how to figure out where to look for the reason. Koji has a central hub that manages jobs and a bunch of builders that actually do the builds. When someone initiates a build you are talking to the hub and either uploading a src.rpm (for a scratch build) or telling it to use a particular git hash/repo for an official Fedora build. For official builds, koji will first generate a job to build the src.rpm from git and the packages lookaside cache with the source. This job will run on some builder thats ready and has capacity for it. Once the src.rpm is generated (or if you are providing it for a scratch build), the hub will generate build tasks for all the arches that are set in the target tag you are building to. Each one of those will go out to a builder of the right arch type that is enabled and has capacity, etc. If any of these fail, the entire build fails.

Security News

Filed under
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • Security bug lifetime

    In several of my recent presentations, I’ve discussed the lifetime of security flaws in the Linux kernel. Jon Corbet did an analysis in 2010, and found that security bugs appeared to have roughly a 5 year lifetime. As in, the flaw gets introduced in a Linux release, and then goes unnoticed by upstream developers until another release 5 years later, on average. I updated this research for 2011 through 2016, and used the Ubuntu Security Team’s CVE Tracker to assist in the process. The Ubuntu kernel team already does the hard work of trying to identify when flaws were introduced in the kernel, so I didn’t have to re-do this for the 557 kernel CVEs since 2011.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 77 in Stretch cycle

    After discussions with HW42, Steven Chamberlain, Vagrant Cascadian, Daniel Shahaf, Christopher Berg, Daniel Kahn Gillmor and others, Ximin Luo has started writing up more concrete and detailed design plans for setting SOURCE_ROOT_DIR for reproducible debugging symbols, buildinfo security semantics and buildinfo security infrastructure.

  • Veracode security report finds open source components behind many security vulnerabilities [Ed: not a nice firm]

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
  • Linux kernel bugs: we add them in and then take years to get them out

    Kees Cook is a Google techie and security researcher whose interests include the Linux Kernel Self Protection Project.

    The idea of “self-protection” doesn’t mean giving up on trying to create secure code in the first place, of course.

    It may sound like an irony, but I’m happy to accept that writing secure code requires that you simultaneously write code that is predicated on insecurity.

  • storaged - next evolution step of udisks2

    What do you think about the above goals? Do you think GNU/Linux distributions should and will adopt storaged as a replacement for *udisks2"? Would you like your favorite distribution to do so? Or do you see a really bumpy road ahead? Please tell us what you think in the comments and if you know about somebody who should read this post and participate in the broader discussion, don't forget to let them know and send them the link!

  • Ten Years of KVM

    We recently celebrated 25 years of Linux on the 25th anniversary of the famous email Linus sent to announce the start of the Linux project. Going by the same yardstick, today marks the 10th anniversary of the KVM project — Avi Kivity first announced the project on the 19th Oct, 2006 by this posting on LKML...

Bosch and Red Hat join initiative to develop cloud-based IoT platform components

Filed under
Red Hat

The Eclipse Foundation open source community is collaborating with Bosch Software Innovations, Red Hat and Eurotech to develop interoperable IoT components that can be deployed to a Cloud platform. We are constantly reminded that IoT is all about the ecosystem, but such extensive industry networks are only as valuable as their ability to work together and interoperate without unnecessary complications.

This latest collaboration will be part of the existing Eclipse IoT Working Group, a community of 26 open source IoT projects hosted by the Eclipse Foundation, though still a separate project. An ecosystem within an ecosystem then. This is getting very confusing.

Read more

Red Hat and Ericsson sign open source deal

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat is well known as probably the most successful company built entirely on open-source software. Building a business on top of open source is a hard thing, especially so back in the early days of open source when no one had any real idea how the economics of a product that was free would translate into commercial success.

But succeed it did, and Red Hat has created a huge business built entirely on offering services on top of open-source products.

Read more

Ericsson, Red Hat Partner on Open Source

Red Hat and Ericsson Announce Broad Alliance to Enable Pervasive Adoption of Open Source Solutions

Who killed Cyanogen?

Filed under

Analysis Does European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager's team pay close attention to the tech news? If not, perhaps they should.

Last week there was barely a murmur after Cyanogen Inc scaled back its ambitions. “Throwing in the towel” may be harsh – but the Android software company said it would henceforth be trying to interest phone makers in useful bits and bobs of code, rather than a platform alternative to Google, a customisable firmware.

Read more

Canonical Ltd.'s Ubuntu Core

Filed under

Canonical Ltd.'s "Snappy" Ubuntu Core, a stripped-down version of Ubuntu designed for autonomous machines, devices and other internet-connected digital things, has gained significant traction in the chipset/semiconductor market recently.

Read more

Live kernel patches for Ubuntu

Filed under

Kernel live patching enables runtime correction of critical security
issues in your kernel without rebooting. It’s the best way to ensure
that machines are safe at the kernel level, while guaranteeing uptime,
especially for container hosts where a single machine may be running
thousands of different workloads.

We’re very pleased to announce that this new enterprise, commercial
service from Canonical will also be available free of charge to the
Ubuntu community.

The Canonical Livepatch Service is an authenticated, encrypted, signed
stream of livepatch kernel modules for Ubuntu servers, virtual
machines and desktops.

Read more

Also: Hotfix Your Ubuntu Kernels with the Canonical Livepatch Service!

Apache on Ubuntu Linux For Beginners: Part 2

Filed under

You must set up your Apache web server to use SSL, so that your site URL is https:// and not http://. Sure, there are exceptions, such as test servers and lone LAN servers that only you and your cat use.

But any Internet-accessible web server absolutely needs SSL; there is no downside to encrypting your server traffic, and it's pretty easy to set up. For LAN servers it may not be as essential; think about who uses it, and how easy it is to sniff LAN traffic.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions
    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog. "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.
  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia
    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.
  • MySQL and database programming for beginners
    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL. In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.
  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air
    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times. Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd. Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was. That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.
  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped
    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future. Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.
  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency
    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain. The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent. We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.
  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware
    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.
  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?
    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

And More Security Leftovers

  • The NyaDrop Trojan for Linux-running IoT Devices
  • Flaw resides in BTB helps bypass ASLR
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    Though the attack might have some merits with regards to KASLR, the attack on ASLR is completely debunked. The authors of the paper didn't release any supporting code or steps for independent analysis and verification. The results, therefore, cannot be trusted until the authors fully open source their work and the work is validated by trusted and independent third parties.
  • Spreading the DDoS Disease and Selling the Cure
    Earlier this month a hacker released the source code for Mirai, a malware strain that was used to launch a historically large 620 Gbps denial-of-service attack against this site in September. That attack came in apparent retribution for a story here which directly preceded the arrest of two Israeli men for allegedly running an online attack for hire service called vDOS. Turns out, the site where the Mirai source code was leaked had some very interesting things in common with the place vDOS called home.

Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.