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Tuesday, 16 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tizonia – powerful open source cloud music player for the Linux terminal Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 1:23am
Story What Is AppImage in Linux? Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 1:21am
Story 5 Business Tools for Start-ups Running on Linux in 2019 Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 1:07am
Story Q4OS 3.8 Centaurus, stable Rianne Schestowitz 1 16/07/2019 - 12:59am
Story D9VK 0.13f Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 12:54am
Story LXD 3.15 has been released Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 12:48am
Story If You Are a Linux User, Make Your Next PC Powered By AMD Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 12:41am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2019 - 12:36am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 7:21pm
Story Octa-core MediaTek i700 SoC offers APU 2.0 for edge AI Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 7:13pm

Blockchains and FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open-Source Platform Lets Users Build Their Own Blockchain in Under 10 Min

    An out-of-the-box solution says it enables anyone, even with no experience, to build their own blockchain in under 10 minutes.
    According to Nuls, businesses are going through a similar evolution as they did with the early internet, when every company wanted their own website: They now want their own blockchain. And although these firms may not fully understand how to deploy blockchain technology, they are aware of how their business may benefit from it.
    Nuls aims is to “dismantle some of the biggest barriers” that are stopping individuals and companies of all sizes from creating their own blockchains. Hurdles for adoption include the need to ensure that networks are fully secure and the sheer cost of bringing them to fruition. On top of this, it can be an incredibly time-consuming process — not least because there aren’t enough skilled developers to keep on top of demand.

  • Open-Source Tool Lets Anyone Experiment With Cryptocurrency Blockchains

    Blockchain technology records information to a ledger shared between thousands of nodes. In the technology’s purest form, those nodes are not controlled by any central authority, and information cannot be changed once written to the ledger. Because of the security and autonomy this technology offers (in theory at least), blockchains now underpin many popular cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.

    But as Kazuyuki Shudo, an associate professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, points out, "It has been nearly impossible to test improvements on real-world blockchain networks, because that would mean having to update the software of all the thousands of nodes on a network."

  • Blockchain founders raised $822m by Q2 – with enterprises focused on open source

    According to the latest State of Blockchains report from Outlier Ventures, blockchain startups raised $822 million by Q2 – but the ecosystem continues to lag behind the 2017 and early 2018 peak.

    $822m was raised across 279 deals over the second quarter of 2019, with more than half of them being seed stage deals indicating continued fresh talent into the space.

    Yet while the numbers may be lower, the scope is much more advanced – particularly with how enterprises are associating with the technology.

    The report explores case studies which will be familiar to readers of this publication. Last month The Block reported that retailer Target had posted a job advert for a blockchain engineer, with the right candidate being able to contribute to ConsenSource, a certificate registry blockchain application based on Hyperledger Sawtooth. The company’s interest in blockchain has been noted, working with agribusiness provider Cargill on a Hyperledger-built project around the supply chain.

    [...]

    The Block spoke with Burke at the Blockchain Expo Global event in London around the data and platform monopolies which exist today.

CHIPS Alliance Brings Powerful Players into Open Source Hardware Collaboration

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Will open source hardware become as ubiquitous as open-source software, such as Linux and Android?
Linux changed the world with its open approach to operating systems. The Linux Foundation has now partnered with a new initiative, CHIPS Alliance, to bring the same open source ethos to hardware design.

All About Circuits had a chance to speak to Ted Marena, Interim Director of CHIPS Alliance, about CHIPS Alliance, its mission, and its inaugural event this June, which was hosted by Linux, itself.

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Review: Debian 10 "Buster"

Filed under
Debian

Debian is one of the world's oldest Linux distributions and, in terms of the number of developers involved, also one of the largest. Around 1,300 contributors worked on Debian 10, which was released on July 6th.

Debian 10 offers package upgrades across the entire operating system, but the main changes for this release include enabling AppArmor by default and running GNOME Shell on Wayland. (GNOME running on X.Org is available as an alternative desktop session.) The project's release announcement also mentions nftables can be used to manage the operating system's firewall and Secure Boot is enabled for some architectures. This version of Debian will receive a total of five years of support, thanks to the project's long-term support team.

The new version of Debian, codenamed "Buster", runs on over half a dozen CPU architectures and is available in net-install, full DVD install, and seven live desktop editions. This gives users many install options and avenues for trying the distribution. Though not mentioned in the distribution's release announcement Debian's media does not include non-free firmware which is often required to connect with wireless networks. People who need wireless networking have the option of downloading unofficial live images with non-free firmware.

Some more experimental users may be interested in knowing that Debian not only has a Linux flavour, but also offers builds with alternative kernels. The Debian GNU/Hurd team published new install media alongside the main Linux editions.

I ended up downloading the DVD install media, which is 3.6GB in size. I also downloaded the official live GNOME edition which is 2.3GB. My observations in this review come from installing and running Debian based on the install DVD media, unless otherwise specified.

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Best free email program for Windows, Mac and Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF

You’ve got mail! Who doesn’t these days? With the number of business and consumer emails sent and received every day expected to exceed 293 billion this year, according to the Radicati Group, it seems everyone’s got mail.

One downside to such a volume of email is that most inboxes are cluttered and unmanageable. While many email users opt for utilizing multiple services such as Gmail, Outlook, or Yahoo to tame the mess and keep personal emails from getting mixed up with work emails, it is still a challenge.

One method for reigning in emails and keeping your accounts separate without the hassles many email clients come with is using a free email program that Kim recommends, Mozilla Thunderbird. This handy tool works across all platforms, including Windows, Mac, Linux systems, and Android and Apple devices.

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Top 10 Best Typing Tutor Software for Linux to Increase Your Typing Skill

Filed under
Software

Most of us know how to type using a keyboard still, don’t have satisfied typing skill. Actually, it is not that much easier to control the movement of all the 10 fingers at the same time even without looking at the keyboard. Only practice can help you in this case. And you must have the idea about how much fast and accurate typing is essential in this technology-based era. However, I am here to help you increase your typing skill by recommending some useful typing tutor software for the Linux platform. Hopefully, these applications will help you to be a pro typist.

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Leftovers: Podcasts, Fedora to Stop Providing i686 Kernels, Debian Video and Talk, Open Data and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Tim Falls on Developer Relations, Open Source, Free Education and Ethics

    In this podcast, Shane Hastie, Lead Editor for Culture & Methods, spoke to Tim Falls of Digital Ocean about developer relations, the importance of embracing and providing open-source software, the need to offer free education in software development and the importance of ethics in education.

  • Linux Action News 114

    Another project breach raises significant questions, Fedora considers dropping Snaps in Gnome Software, and has the ISPA let Mozilla off the hook?

    Plus Microsoft makes it into linux-distros, the Raspberry Pi 4 charger issue, and more.

  • Fedora To Stop Providing i686 Kernels, Might Also Drop 32-Bit Modular/Everything Repos

    The proposed change to no longer build i686 Linux kernel packages beginning with the Fedora 31 release later this year has been approved. Additionally, they might also begin removing some 32-bit repositories.

    The F31 change proposal to stop building 32-bit x86 (i686) kernels was approved at Friday's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting. So that's the end of the road for 32-bit x86 kernels on Fedora and any installation media.

  • Debian 10 "Buster" Full Review and My Thoughts
  • Talk: What goes into a Debian package?

    No, I'm not in Chicago. This was a trial run of giving a talk remotely, which I'll also be doing for DebConf this year. I set up an RTMP server in the cloud (nginx) and ran OBS Studio on my laptop to capture and transmit video and audio. I'm generally very impressed with OBS Studio, although the X window capture source could do with improvement. I used the built-in camera and mic, but the mic picked up a fair amount of background noise (including fan noise, since the video encoding keeps the CPU fairly busy). I should probably switch to a wearable mic in future.

  • How I put order in my bookmarks and found a better way to organise them

    I currently have still a few dozen bookmarks that I need to tag in Memex and delete from my Firefox bookmarks. And a further several dozen in OneTab.

    The most viewed websites, I have in the “Top Sites” in Firefox.

    Most of the “tabs” in OneTab, I have already migrated to Memex and I am looking very much forward to trying to use it instead of OneTab. So far it seems a bit more work, as I need to 1) open all tabs into a tab tree (same as in OneTab), 2) open that tab tree in a separate window (extra step), and then 3) use the “Tag all tabs in window” or “Add all tabs in window” option from the extension button (similar as in OneTab), and finally 4) close the tabs by closing the window (extra step). What I usually do is to change a Tab Group from OneTab to a Collection in Memex and then take some extra time to add tags or notes, if appropriate.

    So, I am quite confident Memex will be able to replace OneTab for me and most likely also (most) normal bookmarks. I may keep some bookmarks of things that I want to always keep track of, like my online bank’s URL, but I am not sure yet.

    The annotations are a god-send as well, which will be very hard to get rid of, as I already got used to them.

    Now, if I could only send stuff to my eInk reader (or phone), annotate it there and have those annotations auto-magically show up in the browser and therefore stored locally on my laptop … Big Grin

    Oh, oh, and if I could search through Memex from my KDE Plasma desktop and add/view annotations from other documents (e.g. ePub, ODF, PDF) and other applicatios (e.g. Okular, Calibre, LibreOffice). One may dream …

  • Beth Israel Deaconess' open-source patient database enabled a decade of AI research

    Since Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston launched the MIMIC compendium of de-identified medical records in 2009, the database has proved essential to the advancement of artificial intelligence research in medicine, STAT reports.

    MIMIC is free to use, with more than 12,000 researchers from around the world granted access to it in the last decade. The database is estimated to have been used in more than 500 research papers and presentations, and is widely considered to be the only open-source dataset comprehensive enough to aid in such advanced research, despite unavoidable flaws such as occasionally incomplete data and the inherent bias due to its being sourced from just one hospital.

  • How To Tell Stories: A Beginner’s Guide For Open Source Researchers

    Many open source researchers rely on journalists to turn data into a narrative that will then reach a wider audience. Yet journalism today is in a crisis! You can trust me as a person who comes from a traditional journalism background — oh, the sheer amount of horror stories I can tell over whiskey.

    In the U.S., for example, the media is facing its worst layoffs since the Great Recession. This is just one of the reasons why it is important for open source researchers to fill in the gaps traditional media outlets are leaving in their wake.

  • Vintage Style Astronomy Maps Made from Open Source Data of the Universe

    Biology graduate student Eleanor Lutz uses her spare time working on Tabletop Whale. This science illustration blog is an outlet for her creativity, allowing her to publish drawings, infographics, and data visualizations relating to science. Her latest project, Atlas of Space, is an exciting set of astronomy maps. Using open source datasets, she’s designed incredibly artistic visualizations that have a vintage feel to them.

    Attracted to the large quantities of data available within the astronomy community, Lutz mined organizations like NASA and the United States Geological Survey to pull together the maps. The graduate student benefitted from her knowledge of Python, a high-level programming language she uses for her Ph.D. research. Using the program, she was able to crunch the incredible quantities of open source data and transform it into something you’d want to hang on your wall.

    Lutz has been working on the project for the past year and a half, just announcing it to the public in June 2019. Since then, she’s been releasing a map each week. Every map is accompanied by an interesting explanation of how she achieved her results, as well as the sources used in the work.

Feren OS July 2019 Snapshot has been released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It?s been 3 months since the last Snapshot, so? if you don?t know what that means: It calls for a New Feren OS Snapshot, and it?s now released for the 64 Bit Architecture and the 32 Bit Architecture.

This release comes with a set of minor changes and improvements over the April 2019 Snapshot, with the most noteworthy changes that users will notice summarised below.

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FreeBSD 12 Runs Refreshingly Easy On AMD Ryzen 9 3900X - Benchmarks Against Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD
Ubuntu

While newer Linux distributions have run into problems on the new AMD Zen 2 desktop CPUs (fixed by a systemd patch or fundamentally by a BIOS update) and DragonFlyBSD needed a separate boot fix, FreeBSD 12.0 installed out-of-the-box fine on the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X test system with ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO WiFi motherboard.

[...]

I also attempted to try DragonFlyBSD with its latest daily ISO/IMG following the Zen 2 fix this week by Matthew Dillon. Unfortunately, even with the latest daily ISO I ran into a panic at boot time. So as a result, today are just some FreeBSD 12.0 vs. Ubuntu 18.04 benchmarks for reference. Matthew Dillon did have some interesting comments in our forums about his (great) experiences with these new CPUs, some limitations, and about the original DragonFlyBSD issue.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • France Says Ransomware Attacks on Big Companies Are on the Rise [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Attackers changed strategy in the second half of 2018, ditching smaller companies to go after big corporations, sometimes strategic or vital to the nation’s economy, the ministry said on Tuesday in its 2019 cyber threats report. The trend accelerated this year.

  • New Elections Systems Vulnerable to Hacks, AP Analysis Shows

    An Associated Press analysis has found that like many counties in Pennsylvania, the vast majority of 10,000 election jurisdictions nationwide use Windows 7 or an older operating system to create ballots, program voting machines, tally votes and report counts.

    That’s significant because Windows 7 reaches its “end of life” on Jan. 14, meaning Microsoft stops providing technical support and producing “patches” to fix software vulnerabilities, which hackers can exploit. In a statement to the AP, Microsoft said Friday it would offer continued Windows 7 security updates for a fee through 2023.

  • Unusual Linux Ransomware Targets NAS Servers [Ed: Does not explain how the malware/ransomware gets onto there in the first place and whether it has anything at all to do with "Linux" rather than reckless people who install malware ot very weak passwords. They use a Tux logo/mascot anyway.]

    As for the decision to target NAS, Chris Morales, head of security analytics at Vectra, told Threatpost that it isn’t as common to deploy endpoint monitoring to a Linux dedicated network file server — thus, the QNAPCrypt malware represents the evolution and adaptation of an attack to bypass security controls.

  • Why Trump Caved to China and Huawei

    Everything about the trade war between the United States and China is bewildering. The world’s two largest economies entered a titanic struggle with harsh words and high tariffs, sending shudders through the global economy. Hundreds of billions of dollars of goods on either side stood before tariff walls that seemed unbreachable. Truces would come out of nowhere—as at the 2018 G20 meeting in Buenos Aires—but then they would be set aside by U.S. President Donald Trump in a stream of tweets at odd hours.

    In May, Trump went after Huawei, one of the world’s largest technology firms. The attack this time was not on economic grounds. Trump accused Huawei of being an espionage arm of the Chinese government. Firms from the United States that supplied Huawei with software and chips would no longer be permitted to do so. Trump’s diplomats went on the road to strongarm U.S. allies into no longer using Huawei technology in their countries. Pressure on China resulted in the arrest of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, on charges of bank and wire fraud in relation to U.S. sanctions against Iran. Meng Wanzhou is the daughter of Huawei’s founder, Ren Zhengfei.

Hardware/Modding: Fuchsia OS, ODROID, RISC-V Foundation, and SHAOS

Filed under
Hardware
  • Fuchsia adds official Snapdragon 835 support, same chip as in Google Pixel 2

    In the past few months, especially during Google I/O, we’ve learned a great deal about Google’s Fuchsia OS and the types of devices it’s currently expected to run on. While Hiroshi Lockheimer urged fans to consider the possibility that Fuchsia may not necessarily be for smartphones, new evidence has come to light indicating that the Fuchsia team is working to support the Snapdragon 835 processor, found in phones like the Google Pixel 2.

  • ODROID-H2 Review – Part 2: Ubuntu 19.04

    ODROID-H2 Review - We've thoroughly tested Ubuntu 19.04 on Hardkernel's Intel Celeron J4105 single board computer.

  • The RISC-V Foundation Receives Donation from Arduino to Further Strengthen its Open Source Community

    The RISC-V Foundation, a non-profit corporation controlled by its members to drive the adoption and implementation of the free and open RISC-V instruction set architecture (ISA), today announced that it received a donation of $5,000 USD from Arduino to advance the RISC-V ecosystem and efforts focused on open source hardware and software development. The RISC-V Foundation is laser focused on accelerating the RISC-V ecosystem, driving tech innovation forward and fostering industry-wide collaboration. This donation will further support the Foundation’s mission in delivering future developments of open silicon and hardware implementations.

  • A PDP Laptop, For Various Definitions Of A Laptop

    Digital Equipment Corp.’s PDP-11 is one of the most important computers in history. It’s the home of Unix, although that’s arguable, and it’s still being used in every application, from handling nuclear control rods to selling Ed Sheeran tickets on Ticketmaster. As the timeline of PDP-11 machines progressed, the hardware did as well, and by the time the PDP was eclipsed by the VAXxen, there were PDP-11s on a single chip. The Eastern Bloc took notice and produced their own PDP-11 on a chip. This is the 1801-series CPU, and like most soviet electronics from the Cold War, they’re readily available on eBay.

    [SHAOS] has an interesting project in mind for this PDP-on-a-chip. It’s a standalone computer built around the Soviet re-implementation of the PDP-11, built into a form factor that could be described as a single board computer.

    This project is the outgrowth of [SHAOS]’ project for last year’s Hackaday Prize, the PDPii. This was a computer built around a backplane that replicated the PDP-11 using a KR1801VM2 CPU, the Soviet not-a-clone clone of the PDP-11. This project is basically a PDP-11/03 system, except it was made in this century, and you can put it in any computer case, with bonus points awarded for RGB lighting and liquid cooling.

Lightweight i3 developer desktop with OSTree and chroots

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’ve always liked a clean, slim, lightweight, and robust OS on my laptop (which is my only PC) – I’ve been running the i3 window manager for years, with some custom configuration to enable the Fn keys and set up my preferred desktop session layout. Initially on Ubuntu, for the last two and a half years under Fedora (since I moved to Red Hat). I started with a minimal server install and then had a post-install script that installed the packages that I need, restore my /etc files from git, and some other minor bits.

But over time there’s always some cruft that accumulates – that quick and dirty sudo make install to test some upstream project, some global pip install, or simply the increasing delta coming from upgrading through many OS releases.

Immutable OS installs with atomic upgrades are very appealing to me, as they are always “clean”, and more importantly, they enforce not taking shortcuts during development and scribbling over /usr. But the known ones – Fedora Silverblue or Ubuntu Core – demand using Flatpaks or snaps, which I really don’t believe in and want to avoid.

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Linux 5.2.1

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.1 kernel.

All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git;a=summary

thanks,

greg k-h

Read more

Also: Linux 5.2.1 Released For Riding The Latest Stable Kernel

Games: Ribbiting Saga, Electronic Super Joy 2, RPCS3 and Unreal Engine 4.23 Preview

Filed under
Gaming
  • SNES-inspired action adventure game "Ribbiting Saga" going to Early Access, after crowdfunding fails

    Ribbiting Saga from Happy Ogre sadly didn't pass the crowdfunding test but it's not the end. This SNES-inspired action adventure game is instead now taking pre-orders, with Early Access coming instead.

    Writing on Kickstarter, the developer noted how they've "learned a ton from the process" and so they're going onto Steam with Early Access in around 2-3 months. They've put a pre-order page up, which is clearly stating Linux support.

  • Electronic Super Joy 2 releasing soon with Linux support

    Mixing difficult platforming with some "brain-smashing" electronic music, Electronic Super Joy 2 from Michael Todd Games is releasing soon and like previous games it will support Linux.

  • Progress Report: May 2019

    Welcome to May’s Progress Report! Firstly we would like to apologise for the delay in publishing this report. RPCS3’s progress reports are solely written by volunteers and a few of our regular writers could not contribute to this report due to personal commitments. If you hate seeing RPCS3’s reports get delayed and would like to contribute to them, please apply here.

    This month saw some major leaps by Nekotekina and kd-11 on the SPU and RSX fronts. Nekotekina implemented SPU PIC support while kd-11 improved the surface cache implementation. Meanwhile, Megamouse made multiple improvements to the UI, GalCiv overhauled the DualShock 3 pad handler and ruipin tackled regressions in the SPU LLVM backend when using Mega SPU block size.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 has the June report out, amount of playable titles continues increasing

    More fantastic work from the RPCS3 emulator team, with the report for May now available that highlights some more recent work done to improve the project. As a reminder, their reports are delayed by months as they're written by volunteers, you can apply to help here.

    Amusingly, the amount of games playable they're tracking is now at 1337, making it about 43.71% up from 1258 in April. They really are making quick progress, which is incredibly considering the huge task it is to create such software.

  • Unreal Engine 4.23 Preview

    Preview 1 of the upcoming 4.23 release is available now on the Launcher and GitHub. We are making this Preview available so that our developer community can try our new features and help us catch issues before the final release. As fixes are implemented, we will release updated previews throughout the development cycle.

    Please be aware that preview releases are not fully quality tested, that they are still under heavy active development, and that they should be considered as unstable until the final release. Developers should not convert their projects for active development on preview releases. Please test on copies of your project instead.

    Links to known and fixed issues for this release are provided below. If you discover any additional issues with this preview release, please report them using the guidelines in the link: How to Report a Bug.

  • Unreal Engine 4.23 Preview Brings Virtual Texturing, Other Enhancements

    Epic Games released the first public preview this week of Unreal Engine 4.23.

    Unreal Engine 4.23 Preview doesn't bring any significant Vulkan or Linux specific work, but there are some rendering enhancements and other features for those interested in game visuals and engine features. Well, there is one "fix" on the Vulkan front worth mentioning and that is tessellation support should now be working correctly with the Vulkan renderer.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 79

Filed under
KDE

After a somewhat light week, we’ve back with week 79 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative, and there’s a ton of cool stuff for you!

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Linux Mint 19.2 Beta Cinnamon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today we are looking at Linux Mint 19.2 Beta, the cinnamon edition. It comes with Cinnamon 4.2 and Nemo 4.2, which is the first point release after Cinnamon 4.0, so as we can expect this whole release is mainly bug fixes and smoothing things out and it is truly a great smooth release, and it is only the Beta!

It comes with Linux Kernel 5.15 and it uses about 800-1000MB of Ram when idling.

This Beta release is about a month later than usual as it was a difficult release cycle if you look at their last couple of monthly newsletters, but they did promise a very good release, and that is what we received. So thank you to the Linux Mint team!

Read more

Direct/video: Linux Mint 19.2 Beta Cinnamon Run Through

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Inside the IT industry’s largest commercial open source software ecosystem

    At Red Hat, our vision of an open hybrid cloud is simple. We believe they should be truly open platforms across any application, environment, and cloud, with portability and operational consistency. This reaches from public and private clouds, to bare metal and virtual environments in traditional datacenters, the extended datacenter (edge), and end-user devices.

    Delivering application portability for development and operations across a diverse set of environments, without vendor lock-in, requires ubiquitous open source technologies as well as commercial offerings based on these technologies. Open source technologies can provide layers of abstraction and offer an ecosystem worth investing in for customers and vendors alike. These technologies deliver a pathway to commercial offerings as stand-alone products or as solutions that help solve customer needs.

    Standardising with open source.

    Standardising on products that use open source technologies can help protect customers by offering an exit strategy. Linux, Linux containers, Kubernetes and Kubernetes Operators are key technologies for these abstractions in modern computing environments. A closer look reveals why:

  • Open Source TriggerMesh Operator Available for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform for Hybrid Serverless Computing

    TriggerMesh, a multi-cloud serverless management platform company, and Vshn, a DevOps consultancy, have announced the availability of the TriggerMesh Operator for Red Hat OpenShift 4. OpenShift 4 was recently announced by Red Hat to bring additional automation to Kubernetes applications. The TriggerMesh Operator allows OpenShift users to install the TriggerMesh management platform and integrate serverless workloads with other clouds and legacy infrastructure. In addition, TriggerMesh enables serverless function CI/CD as well as access to multi-cloud event sources from AWS and Google Cloud.

  • Are Open Source Active Path Testing Tools Viable for You?

    An open source path testing tool could be an alternative to a commercial product, but you must understand the tradeoffs.

  • What Is Open-Source Software? (+The Benefits and Risks)

    Many open-source applications are also freely distributed. This is referred to as free and open-source software, or FOSS. Often, vendors only ask for donations to help keep them afloat, along with costs for additional plugins, support and services.

    These brands provide a solution they believe in without attaching a price tag or subscription plan to the product. The most successful releases usually generate a profit from a passionate community of users. But the prevalence of zero-cost software goes hand in hand with the transparency of open-source code.

    Not only do these features increase a vendor’s chances of reaching a wider audience, but they also offer opportunities to inspire innovation. It is all about paying it forward.

    There are twists and turns in the timeline of open-source technology, and there is still a substantial place in B2B for proprietary code. But the spread of free, open-source software is a defining story of the 2000s, leading to the rise of many products and careers. Popular products like Blender and MySQL remain free and open source even with millions of downloads. These success stories helped to fortify the movement and rewrite the rules of software development and usership.

  • Zim is a free, open source, text editor with wiki like features

    One unusual text editor which I came across a while ago, was Zim. This isn't your average text editor. If you have used hierarchical text editors like AllMyNotes Organizer or Tree Notes (commercial), it is sort of similar.

    Zim can be used to create pages, and link to those pages, kind of like a wiki functions, hence the tagline, A Desktop Wiki. The application which is written in Python, is available for Windows and Linux. Both versions are identical in usage and features, though the PC version is a few builds behind.

    [...]

    Tip: You can use Zim as a text-editor and use it to edit TXT files using the import option. The export options can be used to save the documents to other formats like HTML, MHTML, Latex, Markdown and RST.

    The toolbar has a few navigation options, some formatting styles, and the attach files option. Opening the Calendar option creates a Journal notebook which has automatically categorized sub-pages for the selected year, month and date. The format menu has a lot more options including headings, list styles (numbered, bulleted, checkbox list), scripts, etc. This means can use the program for anything, like keeping a journal, maintaining a record of your expenses, a collection of notes, use it for note-taking in class or meetings, to-do lists, etc. It's up to you.

    Tip: Though the toolbar says Strong, Emphasis, etc., the program supports universal keyboard shortcuts for Bold, Italics, Underline etc.

  • ThoughtWorks Releases Taiko - A Free and Open Source Browser Automation Tool

    ThoughtWorks, a global software consultancy, today announced the availability of Taiko 1.0, an open source browser automation tool which is available to download for free. Taiko is sponsored by the same ThoughtWorks team that created the free and open source test automation framework Gauge.

  • Open Source's Role in UC & Networking on the Rise

    Exploring the impact of the software revolution that's quietly empowering more open source networking and communications solutions.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Qinling

    This week’s SD Times Open Source Project of the Week — OpenStack’s Qinling — allows users to run code without provisioning or managing servers and only pay for the compute time they consume. The release is still under development and the current supported release is Stein.

    According to the makers of Qinling, the project was created to provide “Functions-as-a-Service” for serverless functions such as AWS Lambda. Through plugins, Qinling supports container orchestration platforms such as Kubernetes and Swarm as well as function package storage backends.

  • AMD Picasso Support For Coreboot Appears Finally Ready

    Back in April I wrote about Coreboot seeing AMD Picasso APU enablement work as the first Zen/Ryzen processor target being handled by this open-source BIOS alternative. It now looks like that Picasso support is all squared away and ready for use by future AMD-powered Google Chromebooks.

  • Lessons from the GraphQL Documentary: Never Underestimate the Power of Open Source Communities

    Honeypot, a tech-focused job platform based in Europe, has produced a documentary that offers a fascinating look at the origins of GraphQL. The 28-minute video explores how quickly the project began to have an impact on the wider tech industry after Facebook publicly released it as an open source project.

    GraphQL co-founder Nick Schrock, who was interviewed along with fellow co-creators Lee Byron and Dan Schafer, said the documentary “captured both the urgency and joy of the early months of the GraphQL.” It was filmed over two months in San Francisco and Berlin, where Honeypot runs the GraphQL Conf in cooperation with Prisma.

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Program for ApacheCon™ Europe

    The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the event program for the European edition of ApacheCon™, the ASF's official global conference series. ApacheCon Europe will take place 22-24 October 2019 at the Kulturbrauerei in Berlin, Germany.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Thread Synchronization, Python, C++

  • Thread Synchronization in Linux and Windows Systems, Part 1

    In modern operating systems, each process has its own address space and one thread of control. However, in practice we often face situations requiring several concurrent tasks within a single process and with access to the same process components: structures, open file descriptors, etc.

  • Intro to Black – The Uncompromising Python Code Formatter

    There are several Python code checkers available. For example, a lot of developers enjoy using Pylint or Flake8 to check their code for errors. These tools use static code analysis to check your code for bugs or naming issues. Flake8 will also check your code to see if you are adhering to PEP8, Python’s style guide.

  • Report from the February 2019 ISO C++ meeting (Library)

    Back in February, I attended the WG21 C++ standards committee meeting in rainy Kona, Hawaii (yes, it rained most of the week). This report is so late that we’re now preparing for the next meeting, which will take place mid-July in Cologne. As usual, I spent the majority of my time in the Library Working Group (for LWG; for details on the various Working Groups and Study Groups see Standard C++: The Committee). The purpose of the LWG is to formalize the specification of the C++ Standard Library, i.e. the second “half” of the C++ standard (although in terms of page count it’s closer to three quarters than half). With a new C++20 standard on the horizon, and lots of new features that people want added to the standard library, the LWG has been very busy trying to process the backlog of new proposals forwarded by the Library Evolution Working Group (LEWG). One of the main tasks at the Kona meeting was to review the “Ranges Design Cleanup” proposal. The cleanup involves a number of fixes and improvements to the new Ranges library, addressing issues that came up during the review of the previous (much larger) proposal to add the Ranges library, which is one of the biggest additions to the C++20 library (most of the other significant additions to C++20 affect the core language, without much library impact). In fact, I’d say it’s one of the biggest additions to the C++ standard library since the first standard in 1998. The Ranges library work overhauls the parts of the standard that originated in the Standard Template Library (STL), i.e. iterators, algorithms, and containers, to re-specify them in terms of C++ Concepts. This has been a multi-year effort that has now landed in the C++20 working draft, following multiple proposals and several meetings of wording review by LWG.

  • Save and load Python data with JSON

    JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. This format is a popular method of storing data in key-value arrangements so it can be parsed easily later. Don’t let the name fool you, though: You can use JSON in Python—not just JavaScript—as an easy way to store data, and this article demonstrates how to get started.

Android Leftovers

SysAdmin Day Sale: Get 60% off on Linux Foundation Certification & Training

To celebrate the Sysadmin day, the Linux Foundation is giving 60% off on its training courses on sysadmin, Kubernetes, Hyperledger etc. Advance your career with these certifications. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster: Hands-On

In my previous two posts I looked at the Raspberry Pi 4 hardware and at the procedure for installing and booting the new Raspbian Buster Operating System on the Pi 4. With those basic steps out of the way, now it's time to look at both the hardware and software in more detail. The first thing I want to mention is that when I wrote the previous post about Raspbian, I had not noticed that there is an updated version of Raspbian Buster (2019-07-10) available. This version was released sort of quietly (without the usual blog post announcing and explaining it), although there are release notes for it if you are interested. This release is extremely good news, because it fixes some of the biggest problems that I mentioned in my previous post... Read more