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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 1:54pm
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 1:45pm
Story Apricity OS 09.2016 Release Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:46am
Story LXQt 0.11 Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:02am
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Is the First Linux Distro to Offer the GNOME 3.22 Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 7:52am
Story GNU/Linux and Hardware Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2016 - 11:51pm
Story Linux on Servers Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2016 - 11:50pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2016 - 11:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2016 - 11:48pm
Story SUSE and GNOME Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2016 - 11:47pm

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Google open sources image captioning model in TensorFlow
  • Google open sources TensorFlow-based image captioning project 'Show and Tell'
  • Google's AI caption-creation technology, Show and Tell, is now open source
  • All Open Source UPSat CubeSat Delivered to ISISpace as Part of ESA's QB50 Project

    The UPSat team of engineers is proud to announce the delivery of the first completely open source software and hardware satellite.

    A major step towards UPSat's launch has being completed. Its successful delivery to Innovative Solutions In Space (ISISpace) took place on August 18th in Delft, Netherlands.

    UPSat is the first complete delivery to ISISpace as part of the QB50 project. Engineers from the University of Patras (Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics & Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering) and Libre Space Foundation, the makers of UPSat, in cooperation with Von Karman Institute and ISISpace engineers have successfully concluded all checkout tests and delivery procedures, to enable UPSat's integration to the NanoRacks launch system.

  • 50 Shades of Open Source: It's No Longer Black or White

    After attending my first ever GitHub Universe (yes, it was awesome) as Axosoft’s evangelist for GitKraken, I learned that open source is super sexy. And, well…closed source is delightfully naughty, too! So, basically, two spaces that are supposed to be mortal enemies are now friends with benefits.

  • The Dynamic World of Open Source

    With no disrespect intended to the other geomatics conferences around (and there are many with high-quality and extremely relevant programmes), the FOSS4G (‘Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial’) conferences are different. FOSS4G 2016 (24-26 August) was held in the former plenary chamber of the German Bundestag in Bonn yet, despite this prestigious setting, the atmosphere was very laid-back. Participants dressed in shorts and FOSS4G T-shirts, a beer (or two) in the (late) afternoon, a sense of humour throughout the whole event and a very vibrant social programme (the ice-breaker at the wonderful BaseCamp Hostel Bonn and the Rhine cruise were instant hits!) summed up the vibe at FOSS4G.

  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 to Take Place November 15-16, 2016

    On September 22, 2016, Canonical's Daniel Holbach had the great pleasure of informing the Ubuntu Linux community that the next UOS (Ubuntu Online Summit) event will be taking place in mid-November.

    That's right, we're talking about the Ubuntu Online Summit event for the next major release of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, namely Ubuntu 17.04, whose codename is yet to be announced by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth shortly after the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) on October 13, 2016.

  • LibreOffice wins Bossie Awards 2016

    Every year, InfoWorld editors and contributors pick the top open source software for data centers, clouds, developers, big data analysts, and IT pros. LibreOffice has been selected amongst InfoWorld’s top picks in open source business applications, collaboration, and middleware.

  • Open-source Translation Productivity Tool Finds a Dozen Backers

    A dozen companies have chipped in to develop an open-source, cloud-based translation productivity tool (aka CAT tool). On September 13, 2016, the translate5 project closed a second financing round among supporters, bringing the total raised to EUR 40,000.

  • Mautic Raises $5M to Fund Open Source Marketing Automation Project

    Mautic, the open source marketing automation software vendor, has successfully closed a $5 million A Round, led by G20 Ventures and Underscore.VC. A big win for the growing cloud-based marketing company.

  • Calling all free software supporters: It's time to renew our shop inventory!

    In advance of the Fall fundraiser and Winter holidays, we at the Free Software Foundation (FSF) want to make sure we have the snazziest possible selection of useful and stylish apparel, books, and other items.

  • The MIT License, Line by Line

    The MIT License is the most popular open-source software license. Here’s one read of it, line by line.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Audacious 3.8 Free Music Player Is Out, Finally Lets You Run Multiple Instances

    A new stable version of the Audacious open-source and cross-platform audio playback application has been announced for both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows platforms, version 3.8.

    Audacious 3.8 has been in development since early August when the first Beta milestone was announced, and it received a second Beta build in early September. But now the wait is finally over, and you can get your hands on the final release, which brings tons of new features and improvements.

    Probably the most important change implemented in Audacious 3.8 are the ability to run multiple instances of the application, something that wasn't possible with any of the previous releases except the Beta versions of the 3.8 milestone. Best of all, each running Audacious instance remembers its own configuration.

  • WadC 2.1

    Today I released version 2.1 of Wad Compiler, a lazy functional programming language and IDE for the construction of Doom maps.

  • Vivaldi browser: Interview with Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner

    Vivaldi browser has taken the world of internet browsing by storm, and only months after its initial release it has found its way into the computers of millions of power users. In this interview, Mr.Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner talks about how he got the idea to create this project and what to expect in the future.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Are Getting KDE Plasma 5.7.5 and Applications 16.08.1

    Today, September 22, 2016, Chakra GNU/Linux maintainer Neofytos Kolokotronis announced that the rolling operating system is now getting the latest software updates and technologies.

  • Blender nightly in Flatpak

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Phoronix Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • More AMD PowerPlay Fixes Queued For Linux 4.9
  • The Open-Source Intel Vulkan Linux Driver's Anatomy

    Intel Open-Source Technology Center developer Jason Ekstrand presented earlier today at XDC2016 with a presentation entitled "The Anatomy of a Vulkan Driver" where he covers how he and fellow Intel developers brought up the first open-source Vulkan driver and had it ready for launch-day when Khronos formally unveiled the specification earlier this year.

    The early part of the presentation will be boring to anyone who frequently reads Phoronix with the dozens of articles I've written since February concerning progress on the Intel Vulkan driver, Vulkan itself, etc. The early part of the presentation just provides a basic overview of what is Vulkan, the need for Vulkan, etc etc... But the latter half of the presentation is what's interesting when he talks more about the design decisions, how he and basically three Intel developers brought up this driver (along with the support of many other Intel developers), and other commentary surrounding the Intel Linux Vulkan driver's design.

  • SPV_KHR_shader_ballot Is The First Cross-Vendor SPIR-V Extension
  • Nouveau 1.0.13 X.Org Driver Released

    The latest stable release of the Nouveau X.Org driver is now available for users of this open-source NVIDIA DDX component in conjunction with the Nouveau DRM kernel driver.

    The xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.12 release happened nine months ago so there are some changes that came together in that tine, but then again the most interesting innovations in the open-source Linux graphics stack fall outside the DDX drivers the past few years. In total since the v1.0.12 release were just seven commits.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat ships out OpenShift container platform, pushes new Docker initiative

    Red Hat Inc. appears to be shaking up the Docker ecosystem with the launch of its OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 along with a new project called the Open Container Initiative Daemon (OCID) that aims to optimize production deployments of containers.

    OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 is Red Hat’s Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) offering, formerly known as OpenShift Enterprise. The project underwent a major evolution in version 3, with Red Hat making it a container-based system built on top of Kubernetes.

    The latest version is based on Kubernetes 1.3, which was released last July, and integrates Docker Engine 1.10 instead of the latest 1.12 release, as that’s not currently supported by Kubernetes.

  • ​Red Hat Platform-as-a-Service cloud loves containers

    When Red Hat launched its OpenShift Platform as a Service (PaaS) cloud in 2013, the focus was on making life easier for developers. OpenShift's theme remains the same but Red Hat has made it crystal clear that developing on the cloud today means using containers. The name says it all: Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.3.

  • Big biz happy to whip out credit cards for pay-as-you-go – Red Hat

    Linux and open-source cloud supremo Red Hat is looking at adapting its licensing to please enterprise customers who want greater flexibility in the way they pay for software and services, including a possible pay-as-you-go model.

    The move was mooted by chief executive Jim Whitehurst during a conference call for Red Hat’s Q2 2017 financial results this week. The firm detailed the progress it has been making in expanding its cloud business based around its OpenStack distribution, OpenShift application platform, JBoss middleware and tools such as its Ceph software-defined storage.

  • Red Hat sentiment largely positive on Q2 earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Lowered to Hold at Vetr Inc.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 2, Kubuntu 16.10 Beta too

Filed under
-s

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio today announced the availability of Leap 42.2 Beta 2. This beta includes a beta of Plasma 5.8 LTS. Elsewhere, Valorie Zimmerman announced a beta for Kubuntu 16.10 for testers as well. Red Hat dominated the headlines today and not just for their continued success on Wall Street while the Microsoft/Lenovo story is running a close second. The Free Software Foundation needs input for their new swag line and LibreOffice won a Bossie Award.

Read more

A brief history of Drupal from 1.0 to 8.0

Filed under
Drupal

Drupal began as a forum for a few friends to monitor their shared Internet connection, which "was expensive and being spliced between them," according to Jared Whitehead's The rise of Drupal and the fall of closed source. Today, it's one of the most popular content management systems out there, competing with powerhouses like WordPress.

So, what has the Drupal community done to ensure continued competitiveness, usability, and overall sustainability? In this article, I'll walk you through Drupal's evolution chronologically, including key design decisions and feature upgrades. My sources include the History of Drupal: from Drop 1.0 to Drupal 8.0 slideshow by WebSolutions HR and Drupal's CHANGELOG.txt.

Read more

AndEX Live CD Now Ships Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow with Linux Kernel 4.4.20 LTS

Filed under
Android
Linux

Today, September 22, 2016, Softpedia was informed by Arne Exton about the the immediate availability of an updated version of his popular, yet commercial AndEX Live system.

Read more

SystemRescueCd 4.8.2 System Recovery Live CD Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.21 LTS

Filed under
Linux

Today, September 22, 2016, SystemRescueCd developer François Dupoux proudly announced the availability of an updated version of his Linux-based system recovery Live CD.

Read more

Best Android Phones 5.2-inches And Under

Filed under
Android

Folks, if you're looking for a compact smartphone that's got as much power and capability as the laptop on your desk, the Galaxy S7 is the way to go. It has all of the latest features you want wrapped up in a water resistant shell that's somewhat impervious to life's little accidents. And it's a mere 5.1-inches, which makes it comfortable enough for a variety of hand sizes. But if you're not entirely keen on going the Samsung route because of its not-stock Android software, we've also offered up a few other choices for your consideration. We won't let you traverse this journey alone.

Read more

Mozilla Firefox 49.0 and Thunderbird 45.3 Land in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

Filed under
Moz/FF

Today, September 22, 2016, Chris Coulson from Canonical published two security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of the latest Mozilla products in all supported releases.

Read more

You Can Now Have a Single Live ISO Image with All the Linux Mint 18 Flavors

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Softpedia was informed today, September 22, 2016, by Željko Popivoda from the Linux AIO team about the general availability of an updated version of their Linux AIO Linux Mint project, based on Linux Mint 18.

That's right folks, the moment you've all been waiting for is here, and you can now have a single, live, bootable ISO image that contains all the official flavors of the Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" operating system, including Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon, Linux Mint 18 MATE, Linux Mint 18 KDE, and Linux Mint 18 Xfce.

Read more

Classic Damage Control: Lenovo and Microsoft Got Their 'Official' Lie/Denial Together, Now Engage in Revisionism by Contacting Journalists

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Plasma 5.7.5, Applications 16.08.1 and Frameworks 5.26.0 by KDE now available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users.

The Plasma 5.7.5 release is the final bugfix update for the 5.7.x series, as 5.8.0 will be released soon. It includes a month's worth of bugfixes and new translations, with notable changes found in the plasma workspace, sddm-kcm and networkmanager packages.

Read more

OSS in the Back End

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Objects! Aaah-ah ... the savior of software-defined storage?

    Software-defined storage (SDS) is one of those terms that has been readily hijacked by vendors over the past few years.

    The term developed from the adoption of software-defined networking (SDN), used to define the separation of control and data traffic in the networking world, which provides the abstraction needed to deliver more efficient network management and to virtualise network functionality.

    Where SDN was reasonably easy to define, SDS has been less clear. Looking at the SDS Wikipedia page, there is far less detail there than on the page for SDN, with only a vague definition of what SDS characteristics should be.

  • Managing Log Files and More With Elastic Stack

    Managing log files is becoming increasingly harder with growing amounts of data and differing file formats. Giovanni Bechis, in his upcoming talk at LinuxCon Europe, describes a solution using the ELK stack (ElasticSearch, Logstash, Kibana), which he says let's you easily collect, parse, and manage log files from different sources.

    We talked with Bechis, a Software Engineer at SNB S.r.l., a to learn more about how ELK can be used to aggregate any kind of data in a productive way.

  • Red Hat, Google Engineers Work on a Way for Kubernetes to Run Containers Without Docker

    In 2015, when the Open Container Initiative (OCI) was launched to create industry standards around containers, it used Docker’s container runtime and image format as the base. But now a number of companies are undertaking a project that would break the OCI stack away from Docker in preference of Kubernetes, Google’s open source container orchestration engine.

    This new project is geared for Kubernetes. It will directly interface with Kubernetes pods. It will enable Kubernetes — not Docker — to launch and manage containers at scale.

    “What we want is a daemon that can be used by Kubernetes for running container images that are stored on Docker registries,” said Dan Walsh, the long-time SELinux project lead, and consulting engineer with Red Hat, speaking with The New Stack. Red Hat’s and Google’s developers are taking the lead with this project, for now, called simply OCID (OCI daemon). “In order to do that,” Walsh continued, “we wanted to build a series of libraries, to be able to facilitate running these container images.”

  • Linux Professional Institute Launches New Website and Brand Identity to Reflect Rededication to Its Mission

    Linux Professional Institute (LPI) is pleased to announce the launch of its new website, film, and brand identity. These efforts enforce LPI's purpose: to enable economic and creative opportunities for everybody by making Open Source knowledge and skills certification universally accessible.

  • The future’s hiring - Linux Professional Institute
  • Cloudera Tests Impala Against Competitive Analytics Engines

    In the cloud and on the Big Data scene, there is a pronounced need for advanced data analytics and database-driven insigts. Apache Impala has emerged as an important tool providing these solutions, and Cloudera is out with some notable test results for Impala. Cloudera, focused on Apache Hadoop, released benchmark results that show that its analytic database solution, powered by Apache Impala (incubating), delivers very fast capabilities for cloud-native workloads but does so at better cost performance compared to alternatives.

  • Learn how to deploy OpenStack for free

    The course is designed for those who want a high-level overview of OpenStack to gauge whether their organization needs OpenStack solutions or not. The course also helps users in getting started with a small scale OpenStack test environment so they can test and experiment with it.

  • Support Is Now the Differentiator in the OpenStack Race

    When it comes to OpenStack cloud computing distributions, now offered by a variety of vendors, we are at a tipping point. As businesses and organizations demand flexible solutions for deploying cloud solutions based on OpenStack, competition is fierce. With so many vendors competing in this arena, market consolidation was bound to arrive, and it is here. What will the key differentiator be going forward? That would be support.

    Just last month, Red Hat announced its latest platform: OpenStack Platform 9. One day later, VMware introduced VMware Integrated OpenStack 3. Both distributions are based on the OpenStack Mitaka release. From Mirantis to Canonical, Hewlett-Packard and others, there are now several OpenStack distribution providers competing with each other, and updates arrive at a rapid-fire pace.

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME and GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • #photos happenings

    We recently released GNOME 3.22. It will be in Fedora Workstation 25. Go look at the video — it’s awesome!

  • Talking at mrmcds 2016 in Darmstadt, Germany

    My own talk on GNOME (video) was well visited. I explained why I think GNOME is a good candidate for shipping security software to the masses. I said that GNOME cares about its users and goes the extra mile to support as many users as possible. That includes making certain decisions to provide a secure by default system. I gave two examples of how I think GNOME pushes the envelope when it comes to making security usable. One was the problem of OpenPGP Keysigning. I mentioned that it’s a very geeky thing which mortals do not understand. Neither do many security people, to be honest. And you can’t even blame them because it’s a messy thing to do. Doing it properly™ involves a metric ton of OpSec to protect the integrity of the key to be signed. I think that we can make the process much more usable than it is right now while even maintaining security. This year, I had Andrei working with me to make this happen.

  • Who wrote GTK+ and more

    I’ve just posted on the GTK+ development blog the latest article in the “who writes GTK+” series. Now that we have a proper development blog, this is the kind of content that should be present there instead of my personal blog.

    If you’re not following the GTK+ development blog, you really should do so now. Additionally, you should follow @GTKToolkit on Twitter and, if you’re into niche social platforms, a kernel developer, or a Linus groupie, there’s the GTK+ page on Google Plus.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.14 and the Web Engines Hackfest

    Carlos Garcia has recently released WebKitGTK+ 2.14, the latest stable release. This is a great release that brings a lot of improvements and works much better on Wayland, which is becoming mature enough to be used by default. In particular, it fixes the clipboard, which was one of the main missing features, thanks to Carlos Garnacho! We have also been able to contribute a bit to this release =)

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 10 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools for Linux
    In this post, we shall cover a few of the top, open-source artificial intelligence (AI) tools for the Linux ecosystem. Currently, AI is one of the ever advancing fields in science and technology, with a major focus geared towards building software and hardware to solve every day life challenges in areas such as health care, education, security, manufacturing, banking and so much more.
  • List of FLOSS International Conferences September 2016 Materials
  • This Week In Servo 78
    Our overall roadmap is available online and now includes the initial Q3 plans. From now on, we plan to include the quarterly plan with a high-level breakdown in the roadmap page.
  • Firefox 49 Release: Find out what is new
    Firefox 49.0 is the next major stable release of the web browser. Firefox 48.0.2 and earlier versions of Firefox can be updated to the new release.
  • Open-Source Climate Change Data From NASA, NOAA, & Others Available For 1st Time
    Climate change has many components — rising sea levels, alterations in rainfall patterns, and an increase in severe storm activity, among others. Communities around the world are faced with the need to plan for climate change but don’t have the information available to do so effectively.
  • Another Setback for 3D Printed Gun Advocate Cody Wilson as Court of Appeals Rules That National Security Concerns Outweigh Free Speech
    It’s been a long, drawn-out battle, beginning in 2013 when Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, published the open source files for his 3D printed handgun, the Liberator, online. The State Department ordered that he take the files down, and Wilson complied, but not before thousands had downloaded them and spread them elsewhere on the Internet. In 2015, with the help of gun rights organization The Second Amendment Foundation, Wilson filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Department had violated not only his Second Amendment but his First Amendment rights. By suppressing his right to share information online, Wilson argued, the State Department was violating his right to free speech.
  • In 3D-Printed Gun Case, Federal Court Permits Speech Censorship in the Name of Alleged National Security
  • Oracle tries playing nice with Java EE rebels
    With Oracle now trying to get back on track with advancing enterprise Java, the company is seeking rapprochement with factions that had sought to advance the platform on their own. The two groups involved are mostly amenable to patching up the relationship. Oracle's Anil Gaur, group vice president of engineering, said this week he had already been in touch with some of the concerned parties. The two factions include Java EE Guardians, led by former Oracle Java EE evangelist Reza Rahman, and Microprofile.io, which has included participation from Red Hat and IBM.

GNU News