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Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week NVIDIA announced the GeForce GTX 1660 as the newest RTX-less Turing GPU but costing only $219+ USD. The GTX 1660 is a further trimmed down version of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti that launched several weeks prior. After picking up an ASUS GeForce GTX 1660 Phoenix Edition, here are Linux OpenGL/Vulkan gaming benchmarks compared to a wide assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards under Ubuntu.

The GeForce GTX 1660 features 1408 CUDA cores (compared to 1536 with the GTX 1660 Ti) while having a 1785MHz boost clock frequency and 1530MHz base clock frequency. The GeForce GTX 1660 opts for 6GB of GDDR5 unlike the 6GB GDDR6 used by the GTX 1660 Ti, which means only around 192GB/s of video memory bandwidth compared to 288GB/s with the Ti model. The other specifications are largely in common with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and the other Turing GPUs aside from lacking the RT/tensor cores.

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Handling Complex Memory Situations

Filed under
Linux

Jérôme Glisse felt that the time had come for the Linux kernel to address seriously the issue of having many different types of memory installed on a single running system. There was main system memory and device-specific memory, and associated hierarchies regarding which memory to use at which time and under which circumstances. This complicated new situation, Jérôme said, was actually now the norm, and it should be treated as such.

The physical connections between the various CPUs and devices and RAM chips—that is, the bus topology—also was relevant, because it could influence the various speeds of each of those components.

Jérôme wanted to be clear that his proposal went beyond existing efforts to handle heterogeneous RAM. He wanted to take account of the wide range of hardware and its topological relationships to eek out the absolute highest performance from a given system.

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From/on the Linux Foundation:

  • Sysdig Joins the Linux Foundation's New Foundation to Support Continuous Delivery Collaboration
  • Linux Foundation Launches Red Team Project

    The Linux Foundation has launched a new project aimed at incubating open source cybersecurity tools. The Red Team Project's main goal is to make open source software safer to use.

    The aim is to create cybersecurity tools for areas including cyber range automation, containerized pentesting utilities, binary risk quantification, and standards validation and advancement.

    [...]

    Current tooling from the project start with a Linux Exploit Mapper (LEM) that scans a Linux system for local exploits and maps them to known exploit code. When exploits are discovered using the mapper, they are curated, tested for efficacy and ease-of-use using a variant of the STRIDE scoring mechanism. An Ansible role called cyber-range-target is used to deliberately downgrade OS packages to a version vulnerable to a given CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure) for assessment purposes. The project also provides a Red Container. This offers containerized pentesting tooling, which can be launched from whole OSes or containerized environments like Kubernetes.

Some Quick Graphics/Game Tests With GNOME 3.32 On Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME
Gaming

For about one week already Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux distribution has been shipping with GNOME 3.32. Here are some quick graphics and gaming benchmarks comparing GNOME 3.30.2 to 3.32.0.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card, I tested Clear Linux between its releases having GNOME Shell 3.30 and the move to GNOME Shell 3.30.2. On both builds of Clear Linux, Linux 5.0.1 was in use along with X.Org Server 1.20.4 (they aren't yet defaulting to a Wayland session), and Mesa 19.1-devel.

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LLVM 8.0.0 Released

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • LLVM 8.0.0 released

    I'm pleased to announce that LLVM 8 is now available.

    Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#8.0.0

    This release contains the work on trunk up to Subversion revision
    r351319, plus work on the release branch. It's the result of the LLVM
    community's work over the past six months, including: speculative load
    hardening, concurrent compilation in the ORC JIT API, no longer
    experimental WebAssembly target, a Clang option to initialize
    automatic variables, improved pre-compiled header support in clang-cl,
    the /Zc:dllexportInlines- flag, RISC-V support in lld. And as usual,
    many bug fixes, optimization and diagnostics improvements, etc.

    For more details, see the release notes:
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/clang/docs/ReleaseN...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/clang/tools/extra/d...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/lld/docs/ReleaseNot...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/projects/libcxx/docs/Rele...

    Special thanks to the release testers and packagers: Amy Kwan, Bero
    Rosenkränzer, Brian Cain, Diana Picus, Dimitry Andric, Kim Gräsman,
    Lei Huang, Michał Górny, Sylvestre Ledru, Ulrich Weigand, Vedant
    Kumar, and Yvan Roux.

    For questions or comments about the release, please contact the
    community on the mailing lists. Onwards to LLVM 9!

    Thanks,
    Hans

  • LLVM 8.0.0 released

    Version 8.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out. "It's the result of the LLVM community's work over the past six months, including: speculative load hardening, concurrent compilation in the ORC JIT API, no longer experimental WebAssembly target, a Clang option to initialize automatic variables, improved pre-compiled header support in clang-cl, the /Zc:dllexportInlines- flag, RISC-V support in lld." For details one can see separate release notes for LLVM, Clang, Extra Clang Tools, lld, and libc++.

  • LLVM 8.0 Released With Cascade Lake Support, Better Diagnostics, More OpenMP/OpenCL

    After being delayed the better part of one month, LLVM 8.0 officially set sail this morning.

Games: Stadia, System Shock and Wizard of Legend

Filed under
Gaming

Software: Curl, Messaging Software, Terminal Software and Shallot for File Management

Filed under
Software
  • Daniel Stenberg: Happy 21st, curl!

    Another year has passed. The curl project is now 21 years old.

    I think we can now say that it is a grown-up in most aspects. What have we accomplished in the project in these 21 years?

    We’ve done 179 releases. Number 180 is just a week away.

    We estimate that there are now roughly 6 billion curl installations world-wide. In phones, computers, TVs, cars, video games etc. With 4 billion internet users, that’s like 1.5 curl installation per Internet connected human on earth

    669 persons have authored patches that was merged.

  • Choosing an open messenger client: Alternatives to WhatsApp

    Like many families, mine is inconveniently spread around, and I have many colleagues in North and South America. So, over the years, I've relied more and more on WhatsApp to stay in touch with people. The claimed end-to-end encryption appeals to me, as I prefer to maintain some shreds of privacy, and moreover to avoid forcing those with whom I communicate to use an insecure mechanism.

  • 4 cool terminal multiplexers

    The Fedora OS is comfortable and easy for lots of users. It has a stunning desktop that makes it easy to get everyday tasks done. Under the hood is all the power of a Linux system, and the terminal is the easiest way for power users to harness it. By default terminals are simple and somewhat limited. However, a terminal multiplexer allows you to turn your terminal into an even more incredible powerhouse. This article shows off some popular terminal multiplexers and how to install them.

    Why would you want to use one? Well, for one thing, it lets you logout of your system while leaving your terminal session undisturbed. It’s incredibly useful to logout of your console, secure it, travel somewhere else, then remotely login with SSH and continue where you left off. Here are some utilities to check out.

    One of the oldest and most well-known terminal multiplexers is screen. However, because the code is no longer maintained, this article focuses on more recent apps. (“Recent” is relative — some of these have been around for years!)

  • Shallot – Qt-based file manager with plugin interface

    We recently published a comprehensive roundup of the best 15 Qt file managers, finally plumping on Krusader and Dolphin as our recommended tools to manage your file system.

    A few of our readers have emailed us requesting we take a spin of Shallot. Never one to disappoint, here’s our take on this file manager. It’s Qt-based with a plugin interface. We compare Shallot with the 15 Qt file managers.

    Shallot is billed as a file manager with the maximum degree of flexibility and customizability.

Games: More on Stadia, OpenXR, Albion Online

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stadia, A Gaming Platform From Google

    Google has launched much-anticipated game streaming service Stadia. The announcement was made during the company’s keynote at the GDC (Game Developers Conference) in San Francisco.

  • Vulkan 1.1.105 Adds New Extensions For Google Games Platform (Stadia)

    While Vulkan 1.1.104 was just released on Sunday with new extensions ahead of this week's Game Developers Conference, today marks the availability of Vulkan 1.1.105 with new extensions for the "Google Games Platform", a.k.a. their just announced Stadia cloud game streaming platform.

    Google Games Platform is a new Vulkan platform and dubbed GGP. This Vulkan update comes immediately following Google announcing Stadia as a Linux/Vulkan-powered game streaming platform that sounds quite interesting and will be interesting to learn more over the weeks ahead. Today's Vulkan 1.1.105 update has added the VK_GGP_frame_token and VK_GGP_stream_descriptor_surface extensions.

  • OpenXR from The Khronos Group and Monado from Collabora could unify VR & AR

    The Khronos Group recently announced a provisional specification of OpenXR, a royalty-free open-standard aimed at unifying access to VR and AR (collectively known as XR) devices. Also, Collabora announced Monado, a fully open source OpenXR runtime for Linux.

    [...]

    Sounds like OpenXR is already gaining pretty good industry support too with Epic Games, Microsoft, Oculus, HTC, Tobii, Unity and more giving their backing to it. Hopefully this means it really will become a standard that's actually used preventing more fragmentation. Since no one headset has truly taken over just yet, with so many already throwing their support around for OpenXR it's looking pretty good.

  • The MMO Albion Online is officially going free to play next month

    Sandbox Interactive just announced that their MMO Albion Online, which currently requires an initial purchase to access it is going free to play on April 10th.

    They say their business model isn't changing, with Premium accounts that can be purchased with in-game money or real money, as well as cosmetic items. Free accounts will have full access to everything, since they don't lock any actual content behind any walls with this free to play release.

Security: Elsevier Left Users’ Passwords Exposed Online and Norsk Hydro of Norway Got Windows Cracked

Filed under
Security
  • Education and Science Giant Elsevier Left Users’ Passwords Exposed Online

    It’s not entirely clear how long the server was exposed or how many accounts were impacted, but it provided a rolling list of passwords as well as password reset links when a user requested to change their login credentials.

  • Norwegian aluminium firm goes manual after Windows ransomware attack

    Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro has been under what it describes as "an extensive cyber attack" that has affected several areas of the company's operations. The malware affecting the firm is believed to the LockerGoga ransomware that attacks Windows systems.

  • “Severe” ransomware attack cripples big aluminum producer

    Norsk Hydro of Norway said the malware first hit computers in the United States on Monday night. By Tuesday morning, the infection had spread to other parts of the company, which operates in 40 countries. Company officials responded by isolating plants to prevent further spreading. Some plants were temporarily stopped, while others, which had to be kept running continuously, were switched to manual mode when possible. The company’s 35,000 employees were instructed to keep computers turned off but were allowed to use phones and tablets to check email.

GnuPG 2.2.14 and Kiwi TCMS 6.6

Filed under
Software

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ First Impressions

Filed under
Linux

I have always been curious about the tiny computer called Raspberry Pi but I didn’t have the time or opportunity to buy one until now. I got the latest version (Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+) along with bundled accessories from AliExpress for $65. I think it was a good deal considering what I got which I will explain to you later on. But before that and for your convenience, here are some quick facts about Raspberry Pi that I got from Wikipedia...

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GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and More

Filed under
GNOME
  • Parental controls & metered data hackfest: days 1 & 2

    I’m currently at the Parental Controls & Metered Data hackfest at Red Hat’s office in London. A bunch of GNOME people from various companies (Canonical, Endless, elementary, and Red Hat) have gathered to work out a plan to start implementing these two features in GNOME. The first two days have been dedicated to the parental control features. This is the ability for parents to control what children can do on the computer. For example, locking down access to certain applications or websites.

    Day one began with presentations of the Endless OS implementation by Philip, followed by a demonstration of the Elementary version by Cassidy. Elementary were interested in potentially expanding this feature set to include something like Digital Wellbeing – we explored the distinction between this and parental controls. It turns out that these features are relatively similar – the main differences are whether you are applying restrictions to yourself or to someone else, and whether you have the ability to lift/ignore the restrictions. We’ve started talking about the latter of these as “speed bumps”: you can always undo your own restrictions, so the interventions from the OS should be intended to nudge you towards the right behaviour.

    After that we looked at some prior art (Android, iOS), and started to take the large list of potential features (in the image above) down to the ones we thought might be feasible to implement. Throughout all of this, one topic we kept coming back to was app lockdown. It’s reasonably simple to see how this could be applied to containerised apps (e.g. Snap or Flatpak), but system applications that come from a deb or an rpm are much more difficult. It would probably be possible – but still difficult – to use an LSM like AppArmor or SELinux to do this by denying execute access to the application’s binary. One obvious problem with that is that GNOME doesn’t require one of these and different distributions have made different choices here… Another tricky topic is how to implement website white/blacklisting in a robust way. We discussed using DNS (systemd-resolved?) and ip/nftables implementations, but it might turn out that the most feasible way is to use a browser extension for this.

  • GNOME ED Update – February

    Another update is now due from what we’ve been doing at the Foundation, and we’ve been busy!

    As you may have seen, we’ve hired three excellent people over the past couple of months. Kristi Progri has joined us as Program Coordinator, Bartłomiej Piorski as a devops sysadmin, and Emmanuele Bassi as our GTK Core developer. I hope to announce another new hire soon, so watch this space…

    There’s been quite a lot of discussion around the Google API access, and GNOME Online Accounts. The latest update is that I submitted the application to Google to get GOA verified, and we’ve got a couple of things we’re working through to get this sorted.

Managing changes in open source projects

Why bother having a process for proposing changes to your open source project? Why not just let people do what they're doing and merge the features when they're ready? Well, you can certainly do that if you're the only person on the project. Or maybe if it's just you and a few friends.

But if the project is large, you might need to coordinate how some of the changes land. Or, at the very least, let people know a change is coming so they can adjust if it affects the parts they work on. A visible change process is also helpful to the community. It allows them to give feedback that can improve your idea. And if nothing else, it lets people know what's coming so that they can get excited, and maybe get you a little bit of coverage on Opensource.com or the like. Basically, it's "here's what I'm going to do" instead of "here's what I did," and it might save you some headaches as you scramble to QA right before your release.

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Servers: Google, Kubernetes, Red Hat and SUSE

Filed under
Server
  • Google Open-sources Sandboxed API, a tool that helps in automating the process of porting existing C and C++ code

    Yesterday, the team at Google open-sourced Sandboxed API, a tool that Google has been using internally for its data centers for years. It is a project for sandboxing C and C++ libraries running on Linux systems. Google has made the Sandboxed API available on GitHub.

    Sandboxed API helps coders to automate the process of porting their existing C and C++ code in order to run on top of Sandbox2, which is Google’s custom-made sandbox environment for Linux operating systems. Sandbox2 has also been open-sourced and is included with Sandboxed API GitHub repository.

    Christian Blichmann & Robert Swiecki, from Google’s ISE Sandboxing team, said, “Many popular software containment tools might not sufficiently isolate the rest of the OS, and those which do, might require time-consuming redefinition of security boundaries for each and every project that should be sandboxed.”

  • Google open-sources its Sandboxed API tools for isolating application processes

    Google LLC has open-sourced a new tool for developers that lets them sandbox C and C++ libraries that run on Linux-based operating systems.

    Developed internally by Google, the Sandboxed API has been used in its data centers for several years already, the company said in a blog post Monday announcing the move. Google has made Sandboxed API available to download on GitHub, together with its documentation that describes how to get it up and running.

  • Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

    With Kubernetes evolving at supersonic speed and seeing a lot of adoption in the enterprise world, the developer community is now looking for solutions to common Kubernetes problems, such as patterns. In this article, I will explore a new Kubernetes pattern using Init Containers.

    Let’s start with the use case that gave birth to this problem: Quarkus—Supersonic and Subatomic Java—has excited the Java developer community with its amazing speed and all new native build artifact for Java applications. As one of those excited developers, I want to quickly build and deploy a Quarkus application on to Kubernetes.

  • KubeEdge, a Kubernetes Native Edge Computing Framework

    Open source edge computing is going through its most dynamic phase of development in the industry. So many open source platforms, so many consolidations and so many initiatives for standardization! This shows the strong drive to build better platforms to bring cloud computing to the edges to meet ever increasing demand. KubeEdge, which was announced last year, now brings great news for cloud native computing! It provides a complete edge computing solution based on Kubernetes with separate cloud and edge core modules. Currently, both the cloud and edge modules are open sourced.

    Unlike certain light weight kubernetes platforms available around, KubeEdge is made to build edge computing solutions extending the cloud. The control plane resides in cloud, though scalable and extendable. At the same time, the edge can work in offline mode. Also it is lightweight and containerized, and can support heterogeneous hardware at the edge. With the optimization in edge resource utlization, KubeEdge positions to save significant setup and operation cost for edge solutions. This makes it the most compelling edge computing platform in the world currently, based on Kubernetes!

  • Red Hat Security: The Product Security Blog has moved!

    Red Hat Product Security has joined forces with other security teams inside Red Hat to publish our content in a common venue using the Security channel of the Red Hat Blog. This move provides a wider variety of important Security topics, from experts all over Red Hat, in a more modern and functional interface. We hope everyone will enjoy the new experience!

  • From virtualization to emerging workloads: How Red Hat and NVIDIA are driving enterprise innovation

    Innovations like artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and other emerging workloads present a vision of IT’s future, one where intelligent solutions can more effectively analyze and address evolving business needs. But this vision can be limited by current IT infrastructure, which can often require significant investments in order to enable new workloads.

    One answer to this challenge is through workload acceleration, which uses specialized computational resources, like graphic processing units (GPUs) to tackle intense computing tasks. Established in scientific and research computing, GPUs such as those offered by NVIDIA are now catching the attention of enterprise IT as a technology that can accelerate compute-intensive operations found in data science and AI, extending their reach to a broader range of end users.

  • SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Beta Program

    SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, the upcoming release from SUSE, enables IT organizations to seamlessly adapt to changing business demands while reducing IT operational expense with new features focused on containerized and cloud workload support, improved integration with public cloud and enhanced data protection capabilities. This release of SUSE Enterprise Storage will be available for first customer ship in early June. However, you can download a BETA version today and give release 6 a test drive. It is built on the upstream Ceph release: Nautilus and updated to run on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP1 BETA. There are a lot of new features in SUSE Enterprise Storage 6.

  • From Paris with Love

    Last week, I had the great pleasure of being among the team representing SUSE at HPE’s Technology and Solutions Summit (aka HPE TSS) in Paris. HPE’s largest and most comprehensive technical and solutions knowledge transfer event is aimed at presales consultants and solutions architects from HPE and their partners, bringing together teams from within HPE and their partner community all with the aim of sharing knowledge about their products and services.

    Around 3,000 delegates converged upon the City of Lights to learn, exchange ideas and have a little fun in the city that is home to Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre Museum, the legendary Eiffel Tower, and of course the many creperies serving up delicious treats to hungry visitors!

Development on Devices: Aaeon, Nageru on GPUs, CircuitPython Hacking by Keith Packard, Coreboot and More

Filed under
Development
  • Latest UP board combines Whiskey Lake with AI Core X modules

    Aaeon has posted specs for a Linux-ready “UP Xtreme” SBC with a 15W, 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U CPU, up to 16GB DDR4 and 128GB eMMC, 2x GbE, 6x USB, SATA, and optional AI Core X modules via M.2 and mini-PCIe.

    Aaeon’s community-backed UP project, which most recently brought us the Intel Apollo Lake based Up Squared and UP Core Plus SBCs, has announced an UP Xtreme hacker board built around Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake U-series Core processors. This is likely the fastest open-spec, community-backed SBC around, depending on your definition.

  • When your profiler fools you

    If you've been following my blog, you'll know about Nageru, my live video mixer, and Futatabi, my instant replay program with slow motion. Nageru and Futatabi both work on the principle that the GPU should be responsible for all the pixel pushing—it's just so much better suited than the CPU—but to do that, the GPU first needs to get at the data.

    Thus, in Nageru, pushing the data from the video card to the GPU is one of the main CPU drivers. (The CPU also runs the UI, does audio processing, runs an embedded copy of Chromium if needed—we don't have full GPU acceleration there yet—and not the least encodes the finished video with x264 if you don't want to use Quick Sync for that.) It's a simple task; take two pre-generated OpenGL textures (luma and chroma) with an associated PBO, take the frame that the video capture card has DMAed into system RAM, and copy it while splitting luma from chroma. It goes about as fast as memory bandwidth will allow.

    [...]

    Seemingly after a little more tuning of freelist sizes and such, it could sustain eight 1080p59.94 MJPEG inputs, or 480 frames per second if you wanted to—at around three cores again. Now the profile was starting to look pretty different, too, so there were more optimization opportunities, resulting in this pull request (helping ~15% of a core). Also, setting up the command buffers for the GPU copy seemingly takes ~10% of a core now, but I couldn't find a good way of improving it. Most of the time now is spent in the original memcpy to NVIDIA buffers, and I don't think I can do much better than that without getting the capture card to peer-to-peer DMA directly into the GPU buffers (which is a premium feature you'll need to buy Quadro cards for, it seems). In any case, my original six-camera case now is a walk in the park (leaving CPU for a high-quality x264 encode), which was the goal of the exercise to begin with.

    So, lesson learned: Sometimes, you need to look at the absolutes, because the relative times (which is what you usually want) can fool you.

  • Keith Packard: metro-snek

    When I first mentioned Snek a few months ago, Phillip Torrone from Adafruit pointed me at their Metro M0 board, which uses an Arduino-compatible layout but replaces the ATMega 328P with a SAMD21G18A. This chip is an ARM Cortex M0 part with 256kB of flash and 32kB of RAM. Such space!

    Even though there is already a usable MicroPython port for this board, called CircuitPython, I figured it would be fun to get Snek running as well. The CircuitPython build nearly fills the chip, so the Circuit Python boards all include an off-chip flash part for storing applications. With Snek, there will be plenty of space inside the chip itself for source code, so one could build a cheaper/smaller version without the extra part.

  • Intel Working On Some Interesting Coreboot Improvements: Multi-CPU Support, SMM

    Last week during Facebook's Open Compute Project (OCP) Summit, some interesting details were revealed by Intel and their work on this open-source hardware initialization effort alternative to proprietary BIOS/firmware.

    One is that Intel is working on multi-CPU support within Coreboot for multi-socket server platforms. The code for this has yet to be published.

  • gym-gazebo2 toolkit uses ROS 2 and Gazebo for reinforcement learning

    The first gym-gazebo was a successful proof of concept, which is being used by multiple research laboratories and many users of the robotics community. Given its positive impact, specially regarding usability, researchers at Acutronic Robotics have now freshly launched gym-gazebo2.

Sway – A Tiling Wayland i3-Compatible Compositor

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have covered window tiling editors/managers previously with apps like herbstluftwm and Tilix so check them out if you haven’t already.

Sway is a free and open source tiling Wayland compositor that is compatible with the i3 window manager, uses the same configuration syntax, and works with most of the software designed for i3.

Sway makes use of all the available space on your screen and automatically adjusts window sizes as you open more apps and you can navigate between apps with your keyboard.

App windows can be arranged horizontally, vertically, stacked, or tabbed and you can change their size as well as split windows into containers of several windows all without touching your mouse. You could, however, use your mouse to rearrange windows and even take windows out of the tiling grid and manipulate them.44

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