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Friday, 14 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Love Ubuntu but want the latest KDE Plasma? KDE neon now sits atop Ubuntu 20.04

Filed under
KDE

Merging together a solid Ubuntu 20.04 LTS foundation and the latest KDE Plasma packages, KDE neon has a fresh rebase out for you to try out.

So what exactly is it? Is it another Linux distribution? Well, sort of. Not quite. It's just the long-term supported versions of Ubuntu with the freshest releases of the KDE Plasma desktop environment (plus Qt and other KDE software) stuck on top of it. They said it's for people who want "the latest and greatest from the KDE community but the safety and stability of a Long Term Support release". So unlike Kubuntu, the official Ubuntu KDE distribution variant, you're not stuck to the main version of Plasma it launches with.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots bring Kernel 5.8, Hypervisor FS Support with Xen Update

Filed under
SUSE

This week openSUSE Tumbleweed delivered four snapshots that brought in a new mainline kernel for the distribution as well as a package for Xen that removes previous requirements of parsing log data or writing custom hypercalls to transport the data, and custom code to read it.

The latest snapshot, 20200810, brought the 5.8.0 Linux Kernel that had a fix for missing check in vgacon scrollback handling and an additional commit from the previous version improves load balancing for SO_REUSEPORT, which can be used for both TCP and UDP sockets. The GNU Compiler Collection 10 update includes some Straight Line Speculation mitigation changes. GNOME had a few package updates in the snapshot with updates to accerciser 3.36.3, web browser epiphany 3.36.4 and GNOME games gnome-mines 3.36.1 and quadrapassel 3.36.04. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Qt Creator 4.13 RC released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.13 RC !

For an overview of the improvements in Qt Creator 4.13, please head over to the first Beta blog post.

The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Pre-releases", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.13 RC is also available under Preview > Qt Creator 4.13.0-rc1 in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

You can read the Qt Creator Manual in Qt Creator in the Help mode or access it online in the Qt documentation portal.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.13 RC Released With Initial Meson Integration, Updated C++ Code Model

CAELinux 2020 Released: A Linux Distro For Computer-Aided Engineering

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

After almost half and year, Joël Cugnoni has announced the new 2020 version of CAELinux. The latest CAELinux 2020 is based on the long-term Xubuntu 18.04 release, and comes with several new tools and updated CAELinux core packages.

Focusing on computer-aided design (CAD), CAELinux is a LiveDVD Linux distribution, which you can boot directly from DVD or USB flash drive without installation.

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Our favorite open source writing tools

Filed under
OSS

Writing is one of the primary ways we communicate, and it's endlessly fascinating to see the different ways writers work. I can hardly imagine writing before computers and their ability to instantly edit and rearrange the words I've typed onto a screen. Likewise, I wonder whether people who started out writing on a typewriter process their thoughts differently, even on a modern word processor, or whether their workflow has changed and adapted because of these new tools.

We asked some of our correspondents how they get their thoughts into comprehensible words and what open source tools they prefer while doing so. As you might expect, we got different answers from everyone who answered.

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Lightweight Linux Distros for Old Laptop (2020)

Filed under
Linux

Do not discard that old PC or laptop yet. You can use a lightweight Linux distro to make them as good as new. Some of these Linux distros are specifically for use in older machines.

You can use any of the lightweight Linux distros and bring your old machine back to life. In as much we focus on the old distros, we do have some new releases that do not require many resources that can re-invent your old computers.

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The 40 Best Raspberry Pi Blogs For The Pi Geeks

Filed under
Linux

If you are a Raspberry Pi Geek, then this article about the Raspberry Pi blogs is sure to take the nerves out of you. It is often that you get stuck with a new project and crave for the accurate tutorials. Also, some beginners get confused about where to start and wish they had a resource to start with. To help with that, many Raspberry Pi enthusiasts like you have created blogging sites that are being updated regularly. In this modern world, with the emerging importance of IoT and machine learning, Raspberry Pi is a must to learn.

In this article, I am going to talk about 40 best Raspberry Pi blogs you should really look into. If you are thinking of starting a new project or making your own invention using the Raspberry Pi, you are ought to need these blog sites.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Unfettered Freedom, TLLTS and Noodlings

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Destination Linux 186: Quality Control in Linux, System76 Keyboard & DLN Game Fest!

    00:00 Intro
    00:44 Welcome to DL186
    01:06 Lower Deck
    01:48 What Ryan has been up to
    02:46 What Noah has been up to
    07:11 What Michael has been up to
    10:05 Digital Ocean https://do.co/dln
    11:34 Community Feedback: Linux Mint’s System Reports
    12:47 Noah’s suggestion to the Linux Foundation to help with Tech Support in Linux
    13:59 What does the Linux Foundation do?
    16:33 Send Us Feedback: comments@destinationlinux.org
    17:06 News: System76 Reimagining The Keyboard
    22:26 Security Advisory: Snapdragon Vulnerabilities (Android Users Need To Update)
    25:21 Bitwarden https://bitwarden.com/dln
    26:56 Topic of the Week: Quality Control in Linux (DLN Forum Thread)
    41:21 DLN Game Fest on August 30th at 4PM Eastern!
    43:48 Linux Gaming: Camp Canyonwood
    45:18 Tip of the Week: /boot
    47:17 ShellShock Added to DLN Game Fest by Patron Request
    48:19 Software Spotlight: ProtonMail Bridge
    48:52 Become a Patron of Destination Linux
    50:15 DLN Store https://dlnstore.com
    50:39 Join the DLN Community! (Ryan made Noah give up on the \being hip\ stuff this week lol)
    52:14 More Great Content at DestinationLinux.Network
    52:33 Journey itself . . .
    52:39 Preview of the Patron Post Show

  • FLOSS Weekly 591: PLATO & The Rise of Cyberculture - Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations

    P.L.A.T.O. is an acronym for Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations. Before the internet, there was the PLATO system which was not only computer-based education but, surprisingly, the first online community. Doc Searls talks with Shawn Powers and Brian Dear who was the author of Friendly Orange Glow which is the first book on PLATO. The book discusses the importance of PLATO. PLATO was the original incubator for social computing: instant messaging, chat rooms, message forums, the world's first online newspaper, and so much more. PLATO also created flat-panel gas plasma displays and was one of the first systems with touch panels built-in to the screen. They discuss how PLATO and the rise of the cyberculture and the internet were due to the "Hacker Method" an agreement among early developers to share and have open code.

  • Unfettered Freedom, Ep. 2 - FSF Elects President, Emacs 27.1, Mozilla Layoffs, HBO Drops Linux

    Unfettered Freedom is a video podcast that focuses on news and topics about GNU/Linux, free software and open source software. On this freedom-packed episode: 0:00 - Intro 1:27 - Free Software Foundation finally elects a new president.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 870

    samsung chromebook review, developing on chromebook, arduino, keypad programming

  • Noodlings | BIOS Games Serving the NDI™ Plugin

    18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

Java Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Java date format

    Date value needs to format for various programming purposes. One of the essential reasons to format the date is to represent the date value in a human-readable format. Many classes exist in Java to format the date value. DateTimeFormatter and SimpleDateFormat are two of them. These classes can be used to format date values in different ways. How these two classes can be used to format the date in Java is explained in this tutorial.

  • Java Enum Tutorial

    Java enum is a special Java type that defines by a Java class. It is also called the Java enumeration type. It is introduced in Java version 5 first, which is mainly used to define the collection of constants. The compile type of safety is ensured by using the enum type. So, when all possible values of the variable are known before compile time, then it is better to use enum type. It defines a class that always extends from java.lang.Enum. How enum type can be declared and used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java Abstract Class

    The concept of the abstraction is to highlight the task of the object instead of highlighting, “how the object does the task”. This type of concept can be implemented by using two ways in Java. These are the abstract class and interface. Abstract class contains the keyword abstract. This class can not be initiated like other normal classes, but a subclass can be derived by inheriting the abstract class. The features of the abstract class can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass. An abstract class can also contain the constructor that can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass class. How you can use an abstract class in Java is shown in this tutorial.

  • Java exception handling

    When the normal flow of the program execution interrupts for any error, then it is called an exception. This type of event can be handled by using a try-catch-finally block. An exception is an object that is used to catch the error and run the statement based on the error condition that is called exception handling. Mainly two types of error are handled by exception handling. These are compiled time errors and run-time errors. The run-time errors are handled by exception handling. How you can handle exceptions in Java is explained in this tutorial.

KDE Neon 20.04 Review: Fast and Stable

Filed under
KDE

If you are a KDE fan, like always, this is good news. The latest KDE Neon 20.04 operating system is here. #kde #KDENEON
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Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

Filed under
Linux

Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional.

Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

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Endless OS 3.8.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Endless OS 3.8.5 was released for existing users today, August 10th, 2020.
Downloadable images for new users will be available in the next few days.

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Linspire 9.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today our development team is excited to announce the release of Linspire 9.0; packed with a TON of improvements and security updates, this is a major update that we’ve been working hard to get out to our faithful users. The global pandemic has delayed its release, but the development team has worked diligently and meticulously behind-the-scenes over the past few months, fine-tuning every detail of what is widely considered to be the premier Linux desktop on the market today.

The Linspire 9.0 series will be the last one featuring the 18.04 LTS codebase; upcoming Linspire X will be based on the 20.04 LTS code and kernel.

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Also: Linspire 9.0 Officially Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Linux 5.4 LTS

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fast Bare Metal provisioning and infrastructure automation with MAAS
  • [Updated] Michael Stapelberg: Optional dependencies don’t work

    In the i3 projects, we have always tried hard to avoid optional dependencies. There are a number of reasons behind it, and as I have recently encountered some of the downsides of optional dependencies firsthand, I summarized my thoughts in this article.

  • Benchmarking NetBSD, second evaluation report

    This report was written by Apurva Nandan as part of Google Summer of Code 2020.

    This blog post is in continuation of GSoC Reports: Benchmarking NetBSD, first evaluation report blog and describes my progress in the second phase of GSoC 2020 under The NetBSD Foundation.

    In this phase, I worked on the automation of the regression suite made using Phoronix Test Suite (PTS) and its integration with Anita.

    The automation framework consists of two components Phoromatic server, provided by Phoronix Test Suite in pkgsrc, and Anita, a Python tool for automating NetBSD installation.

  • Interest in Kodi Declines After a Turmultuous Few Years of Piracy Headlines

    After many years of being mentioned in the same breath as movie and TV show piracy, interest in the Kodi media player appears to have peaked and is now on the decline. That's according to Google Trends data which suggests that after reaching a high in early 2017, interest via search is now on a continuous downward trend.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • RcppSimdJson 0.1.1: More Features

    A first update following for the exciting RcppSimdJson 0.1.0 release last month is now on CRAN. Version 0.1.1 brings further enhancements such direct parsing of raw chars, working with compressed files as well as much expanded querying ability all thanks to Brendan, some improvements to our demos thanks to Daniel as well as a small fix via a one-liner borrowed from upstream for a reported UBSAN issue.

    RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

  • Jonathan Dowland: Generic Haskell

    When I did the work described earlier in template haskell, I also explored generic programming in Haskell to solve a particular problem. StrIoT is a program generator: it outputs source code, which may depend upon other modules, which need to be imported via declarations at the top of the source code files.

    The data structure that StrIoT manipulates contains information about what modules are loaded to resolve the names that have been used in the input code, so we can walk that structure to automatically derive an import list. The generic programming tools I used for this are from Structure Your Boilerplate (SYB), a module written to complement a paper of the same name.

  • 9 reasons I upgraded from AngularJS to Angular

    In 2010, Google released AngularJS, an open source, JavaScript-based frontend structure for developing single-page applications (SPAs) for the internet. With its move to version 2.0 in 2016, the framework's name was shortened to Angular. AngularJS is still being developed and used, but Angular's advantages mean it's a smart idea to migrate to the newer version.

  • [Old/Odd] 5 news feautures of PHP-7.2

    Before PHP 7.2 the object keyword was used to convert one data type to another (boxing and unboxing), for example, an array to an object of the sdtClass class and/or vice versa, as of PHP 7.2 the object data type can be used as parameter type or as function return type.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 351

Proprietary Software and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • [PCLinuxOS] Opera Browser updated to 70.0.3728.106

    Opera is a Chromium-based browser using the Blink layout engine. It differentiates itself because of a distinct user interface and other features.

  • Vivaldi Explains Why They Make "Proprietary Garbage"

    It is unfair to say that Vivaldi is not open source at all as someone like Distrotube has done, the way the company behind Vivaldi has decided to handle this application is by using a dual licensing system where the open source portion of the application is licensed under an open source BSD license but that's not the point of today, the point is to explain why they have decided to license their software in such a way.

  • Scientists Forced To Change Names Of Human Genes Because Of Microsoft's Failure To Patch Excel

    Six years ago, Techdirt wrote about a curious issue with Microsoft's Excel. A default date conversion feature was altering the names of genes, because they looked like dates. For example, the tumor suppressor gene DEC1 (Deleted in Esophageal Cancer 1) was being converted to "1-DEC". Hardly a widespread problem, you might think. Not so: research in 2016 found that nearly 20% of 3500 papers taken from leading genomic journals contained gene lists that had been corrupted by Excel's re-interpretation of names as dates. Although there don't seem to be any instances where this led to serious errors, there is a natural concern that it could distort research results. The good news is this problem has now been fixed. The rather surprising news is that it wasn't Microsoft that fixed it, even though Excel was at fault. As an article in The Verge reports:

  • The Linux Foundation Wants Open-Source Tech to Address Future Pandemics

    The Linux Foundation, which supports open-source innovation in blockchain tech, launched the Linux Foundation Public Health Initiative (LFPHI) at the end of July. The LFPHI’s goal is to promote the use of open source by public health authorities, which can be scrutinized by anyone, to fight not just COVID-19 but future pandemics as well.

  • LF Edge’s Akraino Project Release 3 Now Available, Unifying Open Source Blueprints Across MEC, AI, Cloud and Telecom Edge

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of Akraino Release 3 (“Akraino R3”). Akraino’s third and most mature release to date delivers fully functional edge solutions– implemented across global organizations– to enable a diversity of edge deployments across the globe. New blueprints include a focus on MEC, AI/ML, and Cloud edge. In addition, the community authored the first iteration of a new white paper to bring common open edge API standards to align the industry.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Jenkins X Training Course

    Linux Foundation has launched a new training course, LFS268 – CI/CD with Jenkins X. Developed in conjunction with the Continuous Delivery Foundation, the course will introduce the fundamentals of Jenkins X.

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today's howtos

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The modern developer experience

    We hear from many clients that developer productivity and efficiency continue to be pain points. Cloud adoption can help normalize developer experiences across application stacks and runtimes. The path and steps for your developers to push code should be clear, simple, and easy to implement, even on Day 1. The modern developer experience provides a unified and normalized practice with modern tools. Developers thrive in the inner loop where unit tests and code come together, and in a penalty-free runtime execution environment where no one gets hurt, no processes take down precious workloads, and no one knows that it took 20 minutes to resolve that pesky runtime error. The inner loop occurs in a developer workspace that is easy to set up, manage, prepare, maintain, and, more importantly, easy to allocate. If a new developer is added to your squad, they can have all of the mechanical things they need to push code changes into the pipeline on their first day. An important part of the modern developer experience is expressed as Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, which provides a set of constructs to provision a developer workspace in the cloud where they can perform their inner loop. A save action to a workspace file initiates an inner loop build in their local workspace, and an endpoint for the developer to see their changes quickly.

  • Call for Code Daily: Grillo, and how your code can help

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 10th:

  • Culture of Innovation and Collaboration: Hybrid Cloud, Privacy in AI and Data Caching

    Red Hat is continually innovating and part of that innovation includes researching and striving to solve the problems our customers face. That innovation is driven through the Office of the CTO and includes OpenShift, OpenShift Container Storage and use cases such as the hybrid cloud, privacy concerns in AI, and data caching. We recently interviewed Hugh Brock, research director for the office of the CTO, here at Red Hat about these very topics.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 has branched from Rawhide. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Magazine: Come test a new release of pipenv, the Python development tool

    Pipenv is a tool that helps Python developers maintain isolated virtual environments with specifacally defined set of dependencies to achieve reproducible development and deployment environments. It is similar to tools for different programming languages, such as bundler, composer, npm, cargo, yarn, etc. A new version of pipenv, 2020.6.2, has been recently released. It is now available in Fedora 33 and rawhide. For older Fedoras, the maintainers decided to package it in COPR to be tested first. So come try it out, before they push it into stable Fedora versions. The new version doesn’t bring any fancy new features, but after two years of development it fixes a lot of problems and does many things differently under the hood. What worked for you previously should continue to work, but might behave slightly differently.

  • Introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Tekton (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    If you’re interested in cloud-native CI/CD and Tekton but haven’t had a chance to get hands-on with the technology yet, the KubeCon Europe Virtual event provides an opportunity to do that. Tekton is a powerful and flexible open source framework for creating cloud-native CI/CD pipelines. It integrates with Kubernetes and allows developers to build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers and on-premises clusters as shown in Figure 1.

  • Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    Apache Kafka has emerged as the leading platform for building real-time data pipelines. Born as a messaging system, mainly for the publish/subscribe pattern, Kafka has established itself as a data-streaming platform for processing data in real-time. Today, Kafka is also heavily used for developing event-driven applications, enabling the services in your infrastructure to communicate with each other through events using Apache Kafka as the backbone. Meanwhile, cloud-native application development is gathering more traction thanks to Kubernetes. Thanks to the abstraction layer provided by this platform, it’s easy to move your applications from running on bare metal to any cloud provider (AWS, Azure, GCP, IBM, and so on) enabling hybrid-cloud scenarios as well. But how do you move your Apache Kafka workloads to the cloud? It’s possible, but it’s not simple. You could learn all of the Apache Kafka tools for handling a cluster well enough to move your Kafka workloads to Kubernetes, or you could leverage the Kubernetes knowledge you already have using Strimzi.

  • OpenShift for Kubernetes developers: Getting started

    If you are familiar with containers and Kubernetes, you have likely heard of the enterprise features that Red Hat OpenShift brings to this platform. In this article, I introduce developers familiar with Kubernetes to OpenShift’s command-line features and native extension API resources, including build configurations, deployment configurations, and image streams.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July. Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl. The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Making open decisions in five steps

    The group's leader made a decision, and everyone else accepted it. The leader may have been a manager, a team lead, or the alpha in a social group. Was that decision the best one for the group? Did it take all relevant factors into account? It didn’t really matter, because people didn’t want to buck authority and face the ramifications. But this behavior was typical of life in hierarchical systems.

  • 7 tips for giving and receiving better feedback

Wine 5.15 and Beyond

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.15 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Initial implementation of the XACT Engine libraries.
      - Beginnings of a math library in MSVCRT based on Musl.
      - Still more restructuration of the console support.
      - Direct Input performance improvements.
      - Exception handling fixes on x86-64.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.15 Release Brings Initial Work On XACT Engine Libraries

    Wine 5.15 is out as the latest bi-weekly development snapshot for this program allowing Windows games/applications to generally run quite gracefully on Linux and other platforms. 

  •        
  • Wine Developer Begins Experimenting With macOS ARM64 Support

    Over the months ahead with Apple preparing future desktops/laptops with their in-house Apple silicon built on the ARM 64-bit architecture, Wine developers are beginning to eye how to support these future 64-bit ARM systems with macOS Big Sur.  Wine developer Martin Storsjo has been experimenting with the macOS + ARM64 support and has got the code along far enough that "small test executables" can run on the patched copy of Wine. 

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

echNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe. In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus. Read more