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Friday, 04 Sep 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Five Linux-Ready, Cost-Effective Server Control Panels

Filed under
Linux
Server

Each of the following control panels can be installed on your Linux distribution of choice. Some of the offerings are completely free to use (some even open source), whereas others offer inexpensive premium versions. Read on and see if one of these tools is what you’re looking for.

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Wine Announcement

Filed under
Software

The Wine development release 1.7.51 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
- XAudio2 implementation using OpenAL Soft.
- Support for the new Universal C Runtime DLL.
- Dropdown menu support in the standard Open Dialog.
- Grayscale rendering mode in DirectWrite.
- Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/wine/wine-1.7.51.tar.bz2
http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/1.7/wine-1.7.51.tar.bz2

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Kodi 16 Is Dubbed Jarvis, Arrives Later This Year with DirectX 11 Support, More

Filed under
Movies
OSS

After pushing the first Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming Kodi 15.2 maintenance version of Isengard (Kodi 15) to testers worldwide on the last day of August, the developers of the popular media center software formerly known as XBMC have the pleasure of informing us all about the codename and features of Kodi 16.

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Alcatel built a 17-inch Android tablet for your kitchen

Filed under
Android

Alcatel wants its new 17.3-inch Xess tablet to be a multipurpose hub for the family, providing recipes in the kitchen, films in the living room, and a digital whiteboard for to-do lists and upcoming events. However, the severely underpowered Android device doesn't seem to be capable of entertaining even a single individual, let alone a whole household. The device has a fine 1920 x 1080 display, but an unspecified 1.5 GHz processor and 2GB of RAM mean that even swiping through pages of apps becomes a chore as icons are dragged slowly across the screen. Alcatel has stressed that the Xess is still a prototype at this stage, but it's in need of some serious upgrades.

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Elive 2.6.10 beta released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.6.10

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Second openSUSE 42.1 Leap Milestone Has Linux Kernel 4.1.6, Libreoffice 5.0, More

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, has announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the second Milestone build towards the openSUSE 42.1 Leap operating system.

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Half a Century Later Mainframes, Together with Linux, Still Run Much of Today’s Infrastructure

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Linux started to take off in the mid-1990s, primarily in the supercomputing community, which saw it as a way of replacing their expensive machines with clusters of Linux-based commodity servers.

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Ubuntu-Powered Tablets Coming From Startup MJ Technology

Filed under
Ubuntu

We first reported on MJ Technology back in December and were excited at the prospect of an OEM bringing Canonical's Ubuntu Touch operating system to a mobile device. It seems the dream is finally a reality, and Ubuntu users can now look forward to a tablet with some serious performance sporting the OS.

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Open source meets bankers' agility demands

Filed under
OSS
SUSE

Open source technology can be particularly useful in the financial and banking sectors, says Matthew Lee, regional manager for Africa at SUSE.

In the fields of banking and stock trading, agility is of critical importance, as is maintaining top performance and around-the-clock availability for the business systems that underpin trading and banking activity, Lee says.

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ChaletOS, New & Beautiful Linux Distribution Based On Xubuntu And A Clone Of Windows

Filed under
Linux
Reviews


ChaletOS, New & Beautiful Linux Distribution Based On Xubuntu And A Clone Of Windows

Now when Linux is becoming more & more popular among non-Linux users, there is a Linux distribution dedicated for such users who are blank about Linux. ChaletOS is a new, sleek & beautiful operating system that is very much Like modern Windows. ChaletOS aims for making ease in learning Linux, taking away from complexities for new users. Personally I think about their aim, "Great!". Let's take a look at this new & sleek Linux distro.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Debian-Based Q4OS 1.4.1 Linux Distro Lands with Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.1

Filed under
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based Q4OS Linux distribution sent an email to Softpedia earlier today to inform us about the release and immediate availability for download of the Q4OS 1.4.1 operating system.

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Canonical Patches Critical Linux Kernel Issues in Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

On September 3, Canonical informed its users about new Linux kernel updates for its Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems, patching two critical issues, one for each of the aforementioned distributions.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Xiaomi is rumored to be working on a Laptop... running Linux!
  • Xiaomi aims to knock Apple off its branch with move into computers
  • Xiaomi's Macbook Pro killer will run Linux

    Xiaomi is known for its popular clones of Apple's iPhone and iPad. Now the Chinese company is rumored to be working on a Linux-based alternative to Apple's Macbook Pro laptop.

  • Acer Announces Predator 8 Gaming Tablet With Intel Atom x7 And Android 5.1
  • Acer Predator 8: A $299 Android gaming tablet

    Acer is launching its first Android tablet designed for gaming. The company’s been showing off the device for months, but now it’s official: the Acer Predator 8 is a tablet with an 8-inch IPS display, an Intel Atom x7 Cherry Trail processor, and a $299 price tag.

  • Acer Launch New $299 Convertible Chromebook
  • Acer offers convertible Chromebook for $299

    Chromebooks have been burning up the sales charts on Amazon. And now convertible Chromebooks seem to be where the market is headed. Acer has jumped on the convertible bandwagon by announcing the Chromebook R11. This new model offers notebook and tablet functionality built into one Chromebook.

  • Linux Foundation is giving away Chromebooks

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization that sponsors Linus Torvalds and runs many programs to accelerate the growth of Linux, is now giving away free Chromebooks to those who enroll in one of its training courses during September.

    Free Chromebook. To everyone. Throughout September.

    The foundation has chosen Dell’s Chromebook 11 for this program. The $299 Chromebook features a 11.6" display, is powered by 1.4Ghz processor, and comes with 4GB of RAM.

  • CloudRouter now live

    The collaborative open-source CloudRouter project has come out of beta.

  • Linux Kernel Engineer opportunity at Collabora!

    Collabora is a software consultancy specialising in bringing companies and the open source software community together and it is currently looking for a Core Software Engineer, that works in the Linux kernel and/or all the plumbing around the kernel. In this role the engineer will be part of worldwide team who works with our clients to solve their Linux kernel and low level stack technical problems.

  • DevOps: An Introduction

    Not too long ago, software development was done a little differently. We programmers would each have our own computer, and we would write code that did the usual things a program should do, such as read and write files, respond to user events, save data to a database, and so on. Most of the code ran on a single computer, except for the database server, which was usually a separate computer. To interact with the database, our code would specify the name or address of the database server along with credentials and other information, and we would call into a library that would do the hard work of communicating with the server. So, from the perspective of the code, everything took place locally. We would call a function to get data from a table, and the function would return with the data we asked for. Yes, there were plenty of exceptions, but for many application-based desktop applications, this was the general picture.

  • The Comparison and Context of Unikernels and Containers

    Talk about unikernels is starting to gain momentum. Still, these are such early days for this technology that implements the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions. Its functionality is a topic we discussed last month in a post by Russell Pavlicek of Citrix. As Pavlicek wrote, unikernels implement the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions — just enough to enable the application it powers.

  • FISH – A smart and user-friendly command line shell for Linux
  • This is what we do if someone offers us some constructive criticism

    We in KDE don’t ignore constructive feedback, so at Akademy, we set out to find solutions to the issues he pointed out. In order to maximize the reach of our efforts’ documentation, I decided to write a two-part series about it over at Linux Veda, a “web-magazine to share and spread knowledge about Linux and Open Source technologies” which has always been very interested in – and generally supportive of – KDE.

  • Calligra 2.9.7 Open-Source Office Suite Adds Multiple Kexi and Krita Improvements
  • [Krita] Updating the Shop!
  • GNOME 3.18 Beta 2 Officially Released, Final Version Coming on September 23

    The GNOME Project sent an email to Softpedia a few minutes ago, informing us of the release of the second Beta build of the upcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.

  • Why Samsung’s new smartwatch doesn’t run Android

    Samsung has released some more information on its next generation of smartwatches, the Gear S2. Unlike most of the spate of non-Apple watches being released this week, it’s not running Android Wear. Instead, Samsung has opted to continue using Tizen, the Linux-based operating system that powers its smart TVs and some phones in India.

  • How to Make Unbreakable Passwords In Your Head Using Mental Cryptography

    You're supposed to have distinct passwords for every one of your different accounts, and, what's more, those passwords are supposed to be difficult. Use some numbers and symbols and weird capitalization, they tell us. But it's hard, and so we wind up just using the same password for everything and taking the risk.

  • Thursday's security advisories

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Why Does the Government Use Open Source Code?
  • Twitter open-sources Diffy, a tool for automatically spotting bugs in code

    Twitter is today announcing the availability of Diffy, a new piece of open-source software that developers can use to spot bugs when they’re making updates to certain parts of code.

    Twitter uses the code internally. Now the social networking company is releasing it to the rest of the world.

  • We wrote an open source bank parser

    Our first project is something I was already working on, an extensible parser to chew bank statements and shit out transaction sheets. We made a gem, made an API and learnt a lot in the process. (We even wrote a java API to unlock pdf files given a password. Whew!). We currently have a meager three bank support, but we've managed to build a framework that makes it super easy to add other banks and statement formats.

  • Google Patches Critical Vulnerabilities in Chrome 45
  • Chrome Browser Nearing 30 Percent Market Share [Ed: Calling Microsoft-connected firm “a prominent Web analytics company”]

    It's no secret that Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--both open source browsers--were locked in a neck-and-neck market share battle for a long time. The two browsers have remained on rapid release cycles, and for years they tended to leapfrog each other for market share in small increments each month.

  • FossaMail Open-Source Mail Client Launches Update

    FossaMail is built on the Mozilla Thunderbird client but without all the will-they-or-won’t-they of the rumors that Mozilla has done with Thunderbird. Even better, FossaMail is compatible with both Windows and Linux, while offering a 64-bit download in Windows to up the speed, address more memory, and perform other 64-bit operations.

    At the same time, FossaMail looks and feels just like Thunderbird, despite the oval tab fiasco. It still offers a contacts list, calendar, and chat, just like most users have come to expect from their email platforms. It’s so close to Thunderbird, in fact, that the developers didn’t bother with an extensive tutorial or FAQ, but instead just point users to the Thunderbird help section if they have any problems.

  • Proprietary vs. open source WCM [Ed: pro-proprietary]

    As it turns out, open source software is not always so free, proprietary software is not necessarily closed, and help from the open source community isn’t nearly as comprehensive as the level of support you get from a professional vendor.

  • Releases 1.19.1 of Tioga and 0.13.1 of ctioga2
  • ORNL Building Efficiency Software Available as Open Source Code
  • Autotune Code from ORNL Tunes Your Building Energy Efficiency
  • ORNL Offers Automated Calibration Software for Building Efficiency Studies as Open Source Code
  • Book cover for the Free Culture book finally done

    Creating a good looking book cover proved harder than I expected. I wanted to create a cover looking similar to the original cover of the Free Culture book we are translating to Norwegian, and I wanted it in vector format for high resolution printing. But my inkscape knowledge were not nearly good enough to pull that off.

  • Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

    goes against one of the arguments used more frequently to promote Free Software (which, in and by itself, is intrinsically weak, and therefore not used as the main one by the most experts) that is licensing costs. The graph clearly show that such costs (the leftmost column) are only a small part of the total. From left to right the columns show “software license costs”, “immaterial goods” (whatever that means…), “software acquisition and development”, “litigation and other legal expenses” (as much as licenses..), “software assistance and maintenance”

  • M$’s Licensing Costs Are Only The Tip Of The Iceberg Of IT – Look Below
  • There’s still a chance to save WiFi

    You may not know it, but wifi is under assault in the USA due to proposed FCC regulations about modifications to devices with modular radios. In short, it would make it illegal for vendors to sell devices with firmware that users can replace. This is of concern to everyone, because Wifi routers are notoriously buggy and insecure. It is also of special concern to amateur radio hobbyists, due to the use of these devices in the Amateur Radio Service (FCC Part 97).

Sam Varghese on Ada Initiative and Linux Australia

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Ada Initiative runs out of puff, shuts its doors

    This manifested itself largely in attempts to force conference organisers to adopt draconian codes of conduct. In 2013, Aurora was very much in the public eye when she forced the organisers of the Security BSides conference in San Francisco to cancel a talk that she deemed unsuitable.

    The presenter was well-known speaker Violet Blue and the talk was titled "sex +/- drugs: known vulns and exploits".

    Though Aurora tried her level best to make out that she had been asked to look over the conference programme by the organisers, it became apparent that she was the one who had poked her nose into the whole affair and tried to muscle the organisers into cancelling the talk.

  • Australian Linux conference back in the black, says Linux Australia president

    The Australian national Linux conference has not made a loss in 2015 after a disastrous 2014, according to the president of Linux Australia, Joshua Hesketh.

    Hesketh said LCA 2015, which was held in Auckland earlier his year, was expected to return to profit once the books were fully closed and audited.

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