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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 11:43am
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 11:42am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 11:41am
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 11:38am
Story pfSense 2.3.3 RELEASE Now Available! Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 11:12am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 10:29am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 10:28am
Story Best Linux File Sharing Tips Rianne Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 5:47am
Story Plasma 5.9.2, Applications 16.12.2 and Frameworks 5.31.0 available in Chakra Rianne Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 1:55am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 21/02/2017 - 1:02am

Snapdragon 820 lands on an Android Pico-ITX SBC

Filed under
Android
Hardware

Inforce Computing’s model 6640 Pico-ITX SBC is based on a Snapdragon 820 SoC and features 4GB RAM, 4K video, WiFi/BT/GPS wireless, GbE, SATA, and Android 7.

Read more

New Releases: Manjaro XFCE, Vine Linux, IPFire

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Manjaro XFCE 17.0-rc1 released

    Manjaro Fringilla was a great release! Now we are proud to announce our first release candidate of our next release, we call “Gellivara”. It took us more than two month to prepare this new release series for 2017.

  • Vine Linux 6.5 beta8 (final)
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 Hits Stable with Python 3 Support and OpenSSL 1.0.2k

    After being in development for the past two weeks, IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 has today hit the stable channel and it's a recommended upgrade for all those who use the IPFire 2.19 series of the open-source, Linux-based firewall distro.

    As noted in our previous report, the most important feature of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 is the inclusion of the unbound 1.6.0 recursive and caching DNS resolver in the distro's built-in DNS proxy to address some important bugs, re-activate QNAME minimisation and hardening below NX domains, and implement the ability for the firewall to check if a router loses longer DNS responses.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Ten Features You Will Not Find In The Mainline Linux 4.10 Kernel

    With last weekend mentioning ten exciting features of Linux 4.10, the tables have turned and now we are looking at ten features not found in the mainline our complete Linux 4.10 feature overview for all of the great stuff shipping in this kernel that should be out on Sunday. You may consider this article now as a bit of satire with some of these features weren't expected to appear in Linux 4.10 in the first place, but I am just mentioning several things that aren't in Linux 4.10 but some users would have found nice if they in fact happened.

  • SystemTap 3.1 has been released

    The SystemTap team has announced the 3.1 release of the tool that allows extracting performance and debugging information at runtime from the kernel as well as various user-space programs. New features include support for adding probes to Python 2 and 3 functions, Java probes now convert all parameters to strings before passing them to probes, a new @variance() statistical operator has been added, new sample scripts have been added, and more.

  • The X.Org Foundation Is Preparing For Their 2017 Elections

    This year's X.Org Foundation elections are warming up and will be getting underway shortly.

RadeonSI Mesa 17.1-dev vs. AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 OpenGL Linux Gaming

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I ran some fresh Vulkan RADV vs. AMDGPU-PRO benchmarks using the freshest AMD Linux drivers available. For getting your benchmarking fix today are some OpenGL benchmarks of RadeonSI Gallium3D on Mesa 17.1-devel plus Linux 4.10 compared to AMDGPU-PRO 16.60.

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Linus The Man Behind Linux

Filed under
Linux

Well, we all have heard somewhere (if not using it already) about Linux an Operating System that hardly gets a virus, that runs applications created to run only on Linux and can’t run Windows and MacOS applications (at least not out of the box), and it's free, as in free beer or as in speech. But how was Linux created? Why is it free? Who created it?

Read<br />
more

Mozilla Thunderbird Email Client Finally Makes Its Way Back into Debian's Repos

Filed under
Moz/FF

After a long wait, Debian developer Christoph Goehre was proud to announce a couple of days ago that the Mozilla Thunderbird email and news client has officially landed in the repositories of Debian GNU/Linux, de-branding Icedove.

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Canonical Outs Snapcraft 2.27 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.10 & Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Sergio Schvezov proudly announced today, February 17, the immediate availability for download of the Snapcraft 2.27 open-source tool that lets application developers package their apps as Snaps.

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Top 6 best Linux terminal emulators of 2017

Filed under
Linux

The terminal is the beating heart of Linux, no matter how hard today’s user-friendly graphical distros might try to push it into the background. If you need something done quickly and efficiently, chances are the best way to do it is with some complex keyboard wrangling. Exactly what to type is beyond the scope of this article – check out our guide here to get yourself started.

The key, if you’re a terminal-slinging Linux badass, is making sure you type those commands with as much style and panache as possible. And while you’ll likely never be in a position where you’re not able to drop to a straight full-screen shell, having a quick window to the command line on your desktop is always handy.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker's tops for devops, AWS is the cloud king

    Docker is the king of devops tools, hybrid cloud is beating public-only and private-only clouds, and Microsoft Azure is making sizable headway in public cloud.

  • How input works – touch input

    Touch input is the new kid in the block concerning input events. It’s a technology which was created after X11 got created and thus it is not part of the X11 core protocol. On X11 this makes touch a weird beast. E.g. there is always an emulation to a pointer event. Applications which do not support touch can still be used as the touch events generate pointer events. Now this is actually a huge sacrifice for the API and means that touch feels – at least to me – as a second class citizen in X11.

  • Boot to Qt on embedded HW using Android 7.0 and Qt 5.8

    One can have real pain trying to create a demo setup or proof-of-concept for an embedded device. To ease the pain Qt for Device Creation has a list of supported devices where you can flash a “Boot to Qt” image and get your software running on the target HW literally within minutes.

  • IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 109 released
  • [openSUSE] Review of the week 2017/07

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    This week we ‘only’ delivered 5 snapshots. But at least it was big ones, so that makes up for it. The review covers the snapshots {0211..0215}.

  • Buy or Sell? Average Brokerage Ratings on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), The Hershey Company (HSY)
  • Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS released -Find Out More

    Ubuntu 16.04.X segment line has gotten its' next maintenance and bug-fix update, Ubuntu 16.04.2, so basically it is the second point update after the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS final for Desktop, Server, Cloud-based ones as well as the different flavored versions of Ubuntu like Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu GNOME have also been availed with their updated images of 16.04.2 version.

Linux/OSS Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Commoditising 5G and IoT base stations through open-source

    Following up their successful $1million crowdfunding campaign for an open-source, 5G and IoT capable Software-Defined Radio (LimeSDR), Lime Microsystems and Canonical announced a second round of crowdfunding for SDR-based LimeNET.

    Described as a high capacity network in a box for mobile and IoT applications, the compact unit is based on an Intel i7 processor and the open source LimeSDR PCIe card.

  • Pico-ITX SBC taps quad- or dual-core Intel Apollo Lake

    Axiomtek’s “PICO312” Pico-ITX SBC offers Intel “Apollo Lake” SoCs and up to 8GB RAM, dual-display support, plus GbE, USB, SATA, and mini-PCIe expansion.

  • GPD Pocket “7-inch” Windows 10, Ubuntu “ laptop now available on Indiegogo at $399

    GPD, a Hong Kong-based portable gaming company, that has produced a number of handheld Android-based gaming devices, is running a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to fund a device known as the ‘GPD Pocket’. Crowdfunding for the GPD Pocket has already reached past its $200,000 fixed funding goal.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Happy Birthday, Hyperledger!

    Last February, The Linux Foundation announced 30 founding members and six of those proposed contributions of code to advance blockchain technology under Hyperledger. Fast forward to today, Hyperledger is now the fastest growing project ever hosted by The Linux Foundation. More than 110 member companies that span numerous industries make up the project and support five incubated open source projects. Hyperledger membership is truly global with 39% in APAC (25% in China), 20% in EMEA and 41% spread across North America. Below is an overview highlighting the important achievements in Hyperledger’s first year.

  • Hyperledger Blockchain Turns One – Director Brian Behlendorf Updates

    Today is the first day of the invite-only Lake Tahoe based Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit, where Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf is to give an update to the community on Hyperledger, the largest open source private Blockchain currently being managed by the Linux team.

  • How The Linux Foundation is Advancing Next-Gen Internet Infrastructure

    The breadth of the The Linux Foundation (affectionately known as The LF) is often overlooked due to its eponymous name. However, what may not be apparent to the layman is that The LF is providing a true foundation for the next generation of Internet infrastructure by cultivating the biggest shared technology investment in history. The LF is so much more than Linux. Our work encompasses projects from security and IoT, to networking and cloud computing, and beyond.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS

The State of Plasma

Filed under
KDE

Over the years, my experience with KDE can best be described as a rollercoaster – on ice, with rocket thrusters. KDE3.5 was a great release, followed by a somewhat mellow, emotionally curbed KDE4, which took years blossoming, and then when it finally gained solid form, it was replaced with KDE5, or rather, Plasma 5.

Since 2014, Plasma has kept me entertained and disappointed in equal measures. At some point, I had it crowned my favorite desktop, and then it went downhill steeply, fast, struggling to recover. Not helping was the slew of bugs and regressions across the distro space, which exacerbated the quality of Plasma and what it could show the world. Today, I would like to explore Plasma from a different angle. Not from the user perspective, but usability perspective. AKA Everything What Plasma Does. After me.

Read more

Wine 2.2

Filed under
Software

Development News:/Trools

Filed under
Development
  • Builder’s Build Pipeline

    One of the core features of Builder is, well, building. So we need to provide the best experience we can. That means we need wide support for build systems and languages. How we get from source code to a product can vary in a multitude of ways.

  • littler 0.3.2

    The third release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in the summer of 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

  • What's coming in Weblate 2.12

    Weblate should be released by end of February, so it's now pretty much clear what will be there. So let's look at some of the upcoming features.

    There were many improvements in search related features. They got performance improvements (this is especially noticeable on site wide search). Additionally you can search for strings within translation project. On related topic, search and replace is now available for component or project wide operations, what can help you in case of massive renaming in your translations.

Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit

Filed under
Linux
  • Video: Linus Torvalds on How to Build a Successful Open Source Project

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds took the stage at Open Source Leadership Summit this week to share some of his secrets to success in building one of the world’s largest and most successful open source projects.

    After 25 years of development, the Linux kernel last year reached more than 22 million lines of code with more than 5,000 developers from about 500 companies contributing, according to the 2016 Linux Kernel Development Report.

  • Tech industry innovation is bullshit

    Open sauce's Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds has waded into tech companies who keep banging on about innovation.

    Swearing at the Open Source Leadership Summit, Torvalds said he really hates the technology industry's celebration of innovation. He thinks it is smug, self-congratulatory, and self-serving.

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more