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Wednesday, 19 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU/Linux Devices and Open Hardware Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 3:44am
Story Graphics: Nouveau, Wayland, Mesa and RADV Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 3:27am
Story Sparky 2020.02 Special Editions Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 3:22am
Story OpenSSH 8.2 was released on 2020-02-14. Roy Schestowitz 5 18/02/2020 - 3:12am
Story Games: Aquamarine, Humble Store, Paradox Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 3:03am
Story Windows 10 vs. Eight Linux Distributions On The Threadripper 3970X Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 2:59am
Story GNU Social Contract version 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 2:54am
Story Best Wallpaper Slideshow Apps for Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 2:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2020 - 2:40am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2020 - 7:03pm

3 steps for product marketing your open source project

Filed under
OSS

I frequently get questions from open source project creators or new founders of commercial open source software (COSS) companies about the best way to market their product. Implicit in that inquiry lies more foundational questions: "What the hell is product marketing? How much time should I spend on it?"

This article aims to share some knowledge and specific action items to help open source creators understand product marketing as a concept and how to bootstrap it on their own until a project reaches the next level of traction.

Read more

Amlogic A113L Dual-Core Cortex-A35 Processor Targets Smart Audio and IoT Applications

Filed under
Linux

Over two years ago, we reported about Amlogic A111, A112, A113 processors designed for audio applications such as smart speakers. A111 features four Cortex-A5 32-bit core, while A112 and A113D/A113X processors come with four Cortex-A53 cores instead.

We have not heard much about those since then, but all those processors are still listed on Amlogic website, A112 is supposedly used in Xiaomi AI smart speaker, and Amlogic A113X1 Far-Field Dev Kit is still listed on Amazon’s list of devkits for Alexa voice service, but currently out of stock.

Read more

Void Linux 20.02 Image Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Project Trident is pleased to announce the first official release image based on Void Linux, available on the Project Trident download page.

Please note the Project Trident installer supports four different installation “levels”...

[...]

Note: These installation levels provide pre-defined lists of packages to install for user convenience. The installed system can be easily be changed afterwards using the built-in package system.

Read more

CoreOS Container Linux Will No Longer Be Supported After May 26, 2020

Filed under
OS

Based on Gentoo Linux, CoreOS Linux saw the light of day more than six years ago, on October 3rd, 2013. It was well received by the community for being a lightweight operating system designed for distributing payload applications inside software containers and it gained a lot of popularity in a short time span.

Three years later, in late 2016, CoreOS Linux changed its name to Container Linux by CoreOS or CoreOS Container Linux, in an attempt to distinguish the company’s name, CoreOS, from the container-focused Linux distribution, Container Linux, making things more clear to newcomers.

Read more

Coffee Lake system has a pair each of PCIe slots and removable SATA bays

Filed under
Linux

Lanner’s rugged, Linux-friendly “LEC-2290” embedded system combines an 8th Gen CPU with 2x GbE, 4x PoE, 2x HDMI, 6x serial, 4x USB, 2x removable SATA bays, and 2x PCIe slots plus mini-PCIe, M.2, and DP.

Lanner announced an industrial edge PC with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake S-series processors, following earlier embedded systems such as its 6th Gen Skylake-U LEC-2580. The rugged LEC-2290 supports Win 10 IoT plus Linux 3.12 based distributions including Ubuntu 16, Fedora 25, and CentOS 7. It’s intended for “intelligent edge computing applications such as compute-intensive video analytics,” says Lanner.

Read more

Blender 2.80

Filed under
Software

The second update of the Blender 2.80 milestone release is here!

With again over a thousand fixes and several important updates that were planned for the 2.8 series. In this release you will find UDIM and USD support, MantaFlow fluids and smoke simulation, AI denoising, Grease Pencil improvements, and much more!

Read more

Also: Blender 2.82 Released with AI Denoiser for Nvidia RTX GPUs, More

Blender 2.82 Released With Many Improvements, 1000+ Fixes

Simplicity Does More Than Simplify Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Simplicity Linux, even with its more modern retooling, maintains the distro's earlier goals of providing a simpler way to run a fully powered Linux desktop. The addition of the Gaming Edition makes it easy to get started with computer gaming.

This new offering no doubt could be merged with the Desktop Edition for a more compact selection. That might allow the developer to release a new X Edition offering in the next release cycle.

I am not sure if the Mini Edition needs a full-function heavyweight desktop the likes of Cinnamon. I would like to see a return to the Xfce desktop there.

Either way, I look forward to the next release of Simplicity Linux. This distro holds considerable promise.

Read more

Sparky 2020.02.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Sparky 2020.02.1 “Po Tolo” of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”.

This is a minor update, which temporary fixes a problem of installing Sparky via Calamares with kpmcore 4.

Changes between Sparky 2020.02 and 2020.02.1:
• system upgraded from Debian testing repos as of February 13, 2020
• kpmcore downgraded to version 3.3.0
• Calamares installer rebuild using libkpmcore7 3.3.0

No system reinstallation is required, simply keep Sparky up to date.

Read more

Security: Updates, Chrome Malware (ish) and Risk of Exposing Ports in Docker

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (debian-security-support, postgresql-11, and postgresql-9.6), Fedora (cutter-re, firefox, php-horde-Horde-Data, radare2, and texlive-base), openSUSE (docker-runc), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (sudo), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • 500 Chrome Extensions Caught Stealing Private Data of 1.7 Million Users

    Google removed 500 malicious Chrome extensions from its Web Store after they found to inject malicious ads and siphon off user browsing data to servers under the control of attackers.

    These extensions were part of a malvertising and ad-fraud campaign that's been operating at least since January 2019, although evidence points out the possibility that the actor behind the scheme may have been active since 2017.

    The findings come as part of a joint investigation by security researcher Jamila Kaya and Cisco-owned Duo Security, which unearthed 70 Chrome Extensions with over 1.7 million installations.

  • PSA: Beware of Exposing Ports in Docker

    Docker is an awesome technology, and it’s prevalent in nearly every software developer’s workflow. It is useful for creating identical environments and sharing them between development, testing, production, and others. It’s a great way to ship a reliable software environment between systems or even to customers. However, like with any technology, one must know how to be secure when using it.

NEXTSPACE: a NeXTSTEP-like desktop environment for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

KDE, GNOME, Xfce, and later MATE and Cinnamon have sucked up so much of the Linux desktop space that there’s very little room left for anything else. You’re either mainly a Qt desktop, or mainly a GTK+ desktop, and anything that isn’t based on either of those toolkits will either waste time recreating lots of wheels, or accept that half – or more – of your applications are Qt or GTK+-based, at which point the temptation to run one of the aforementioned desktop environments becomes quite strong.

This project, while very welcome and having my full support and attention, will have a very hard time, but that’s not going to deter me from being hopeful against all odds. Reading through the documentation and descriptions, it does seem the developers have the right attitude. They’re not claiming to take on the other players – they just want to make something that appeals to and works for them.

Read more

Programming: Outreachy, PHP, and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Anisa Kuci: Outreachy post 4 - Career opportunities

    As mentioned in my last blog posts, Outreachy is very interesting and I got to learn a lot already. Two months have already passed by quickly and there is still one month left for me to continue working and learning.

    As I imagine all the other interns are thinking now, I am also thinking about what is going to be the next step for me. After such an interesting experience as this internship, thinking about the next steps is not that simple.

    I have been contributing to Free Software projects for quite some years now. I have been part of the only FLOSS community in my country for many years and I grew up together with the community, advocating free software in and around Albania.

    I have contributed to many projects, including Mozilla, OpenStreetMap, Debian, GNOME, Wikimedia projects etc. So, I am sure, the FLOSS world is definitely the right place for me to be. I have helped communities grow and I am very enthusiastic about it.

  • PHP 7.4 Slated To Land In Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    PHP 7.4 should be landing in the Ubuntu 20.04 archive in the next week or so.

    PHP 7.4 was released at the end of November with some really great features. Ubuntu developers now feel comfortable enough with PHP 7.4 that they intend to land it for the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release, which also pans out well since that provides them with an extra year of upstream support compared to shipping PHP 7.3.

    PHP 7.4 brings the interesting FFI for accessing C structures / functions / variables from native PHP code, Opcache preload, more performance improvements, support for typed properties, and much more... It's quite a hefty annual update to PHP7 and I'm quite glad that it is indeed set to be bundled for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • PHP Development on Fedora with Eclipse
  • How to Get the Column Names from a Pandas Dataframe – Print and List

    The post How to Get the Column Names from a Pandas Dataframe – Print and List appeared first on Erik Marsja.

    In this short post, we will learn 6 methods to get the column names from Pandas dataframe. One of the nice things about Pandas dataframes is that each column will have a name (i.e., the variables in the dataset). Now, we can use these names to access specific columns by name without having to know which column number it is.

    To access the names of a Pandas dataframe, we can the method columns(). For example, if our dataframe is called df we just type print(df.columns) to get all the columns of the pandas dataframe.

  • PyCharm 2020.1 EAP 3

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website.

    We have concentrated on fixing the issues that needed to be fixed and making lots of improvements so the final PyCharm 2020.1 will be everything you hoped for. Here is a rundown of some of the things you can expect from this build.

  • Python Basics: How To Print in Python?

    It’s quite common to make mistakes when you try to print something using Python considering you’re new to Python scripting.

    No matter what program you write, you will always be needing to print something or the other (most of the time).

    So, in this article, I’ll be explaining how to print something in Python and list out some common mistakes that you can avoid.

Linux 5.7 Getting A "Tiny Power Button" Driver

Filed under
Linux

A new driver already queued in the power management code for the Linux 5.7 cycle not opening up until April is a "tiny power button" driver.

This ACPI tiny power button driver is not for a physically tiny power button, but rather a simple ACPI power button driver out of Intel intended for virtual machines and more basic than the generic ACPI button driver given the limited scope of VMs.

Read more

Also: Imagination Working On A New Open-Source Linux Graphics Driver Project

Xiaomi AIoT Router AX3600 WiFi 6 Router Sells for $135

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The router runs a customized version of OpenWrt called “MiWiFi ROM”, and can be configured via a web interface, or Mi Wi-Fi mobile app for Android or iOS.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Multiboot, Pinebook Pro, Linux Academy and User Error

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Multiboot USB UEFI & Legacy All In One

    Multiboot USB UEFI & Legacy All In One This video shows how to create the ultimate multiboot drive for uefi and legacy in both Windows and Linux!

  • Review - Manjaro ARM (xfce edition) running on the Pinebook Pro!

    The more I use the Pinebook Pro, the more I love it. In this video, I check out Manjaro running on this awesome Linux laptop, and give you my overall thoughts. Is there anything else you'd like me to run on this laptop?

  • Brunch with Brent: Broadus Palmer | Jupiter Extras 55

    Brent sits down with Broadus Palmer, Google Cloud Training Architect at Linux Academy and Cloud Career Coach at Level Up with Broadus. We explore his history as a musician and banker, sneaker bots, the value of mentorship, what gets people hired in tech, leveling up as a lifestyle, and more.

  • Name Your Shoes | User Error 85

    Open source at work, learning languages, naming cars, and innovations that haven't appropriately delivered.

    Plus permission vs apologies, who has the most shoes, and more.

openSUSE Tumbleweed, openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, LibreOffice/LibOCon 2020

Filed under
LibO
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/07

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    At SUSE we had so-called hackweek. Meaning everybody could do something out of their regular tasks and work for a week on something else they wish to invest time on. I used the time to finally get the ‘osc collab’ server back in shape (Migrated from SLE11SP4 to Leap 15.1) – And in turn handed ‘The Tumbleweed Release Manager hat’ over to Oliver Kurz, who expressed an interest in learning about the release Process for Tumbleweed. I think it was an interesting experiment for both of us: for him, to get something different done and for me to get some interesting questions as to why things are the way they are. Obviously, a fresh look from the outside gives some interesting questions and a few things translated in code changes on the tools in use (nothing major, but I’m sure discussions will go on)

    As I stepped mostly back this week and handed RM tasks over to Oliver, that also means he will be posting the ‘Review of the week’ to the opensuse­factory mailing list. For my fellow blog users, I will include it here directly for your reference.

  • Call for Papers, Registration Opens for openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

    Both openSUSE and LibreOffice are combining their conferences (openSUSE Conference and LibOcon) in 2020 to celebrate LibreOffice’s 10-year anniversary and openSUSE’s 15-year anniversary. The conference will take place in Nuremberg, Germany, at the Z-Bau from Oct. 13 to 16.

  • Call for Paper for LibOCon 2020 is now open

    The openSUSE and LibreOffice Projects are combining their annual conferences together for one year in 2020 to have a joint openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference. This joint conference, which is combined this one year to celebrate 10 years of the LibreOffice Project and 15 years of the openSUSE Project, will take place at the Z-bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from October 13 to 16, 2020. The goal of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, brings together fun, smart and open-source minded community members to discuss and present topics relative to the two projects as well as open-source software development topics.

    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s event. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice, the Document Liberation Project or the Open Document Format, we want to hear from you!

Mozilla: Q&A, Firefox/Gecko Codebase and Spying (Glean)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • I’m a (senior) staff engineer panel

    Last week, my colleague Chenxia Liu and I arranged a panel at our Berlin all-hands meeting called AMA: I’m a (senior) staff engineer. Our goal for this panel was to provide a Q&A session where staff and senior staff engineers could share their stories what that a typical day in that role looks like, how their career progressed to that level and their advice for others interested in the role.

    [...]

    Everyone company’s career ladder for individual contributors is different. At Mozilla, the change for senior engineer to staff engineer is the progression where the role changes to be substantially more self-directed. You aren’t just landing code to address issues identified by your manager or peers. Your role is to determine what problems the team should focus on. What value will solving these problems bring to the business? How can you elevate the work of your team from a technical perspective? How can you level the skills of early career engineers on your team? As a result, the promotion to staff engineer requires promotion paperwork to be approved by higher level of management than the individual’s direct manager.

    Ahead of the panel, we reached out to five staff or senior staff engineers and asked them to participate. We reached out to people from several geographies and domains of expertise within the company and also different demographics. The day before panel, Chenxia arranged a lunch with the panellists so we could share the logistics of the panel, proposed initial questions and allow the panellists to get to know each other a bit before the session. We also shared a doc in a company wide channel where attendees could add questions before the session.

  • ESLint now turned on for all of the Firefox/Gecko codebase

    About 4 years and 2 months ago, Dave Townsend and I landed a couple of patches on the Mozilla codebase that kick-started rolling out ESLint across our source code. Today, I’ve just landed the last bug in making it so that ESLint runs across our whole tree (where possible).

    ESLint is a static analyser for JavaScript that helps find issues before you even run the code. It also helps to promote best practices and styling, reducing the need for comments in reviews.

    Several Mozilla projects had started using ESLint in early 2015 – Firefox’s Developer Tools, Firefox for Android and Firefox Hello. It was clear to the Firefox desktop team that ESLint was useful and so we put together an initial set of rules covering the main desktop files.

    Soon after, we were enabling ESLint over more of desktop’s files, and adding to the rules that we had enabled. Once we had the main directories covered, we slowly started enabling more directories and started running ESLint checks in CI allowing us to detect and back out any failures that were introduced. Finally, we made it to where we are today – covering the whole of the Firefox source tree, mozilla-central.

    Along the way we’ve filed over 600 bugs for handling ESLint roll-out and related issues, many of these were promoted as mentored bugs and fixed by new and existing contributors – a big thank you to you all for your help.

  • Extending Glean: build re-usable types for new use-cases

    The philosophy of Glean has always been to offer higher-level metric types that map semantically to what developers want to measure: a Timespan metric type, for instance, will require developers to declare the resolution they want the time measured in. It is more than just a number. The build-time generated APIs will then offer a set of operations, start() and stop(), to allow developers to take the measurements without caring about the implementation details or about the consistency of times across platforms. By design, a Timespan will record time consistently and predictably on iOS, Android and even desktop. This also empowers the rest of the Glean ecosystem, especially pipeline and tooling, to know about the quality guarantees of the types, their format and, potentially, ways to aggregate and visualize them.

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Android Leftovers

Canonical Outs New Major Kernel Update for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Available for the Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update is here to fix a vulnerability (CVE-2019-14615) affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a race condition (CVE-2019-18683) discovered in the Virtual Video Test Driver (VIVID), which could allow an attacker with write access to /dev/video0 to gain administrative privileges, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-19241) in Linux kernel’s IO uring implementation that could also allow a local attacker to gain administrative privileges. Another race condition (CVE-2019-19602) was fixed on x86 platforms, which could let a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory corruption) or gain administrative privileges. Moreover, issues (CVE-2019-18786 and CVE-2019-19947) discovered in the Renesas Digital Radio Interface (DRIF) and Kvaser CAN/USB drivers could allow local attackers to expose sensitive information (kernel memory). Read more

10 Best Linux Terminal Emulators [2020 Edition]

Do you prefer terminal emulators over GUI? But there are times when the terminal’s decent styling seems boring. In such cases, you look for more options to customize the terminal just like we do while choosing Linux distros. If that’s the case, your wait is over as we bring the list of best terminal emulators for Linux that you can use to refresh your monotonous daily work. Along with the styling, you can also turn the single terminal into a multigrid, observing the activity of each terminal simultaneously. Read more