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Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: More on Stadia, OpenXR, Albion Online Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 11:52am
Story Security: Elsevier Left Users’ Passwords Exposed Online and Norsk Hydro of Norway Got Windows Cracked Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 11:10am
Story GnuPG 2.2.14 and Kiwi TCMS 6.6 Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 10:32am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 10:28am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 10:08am
Story Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ First Impressions Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 10:01am
Story GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and More Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 8:25am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 8:18am
Story Managing changes in open source projects Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 8:02am
Story Servers: Google, Kubernetes, Red Hat and SUSE Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2019 - 7:37am

Graphics: NVIDIA, Nouveau and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux Driver Brings Host Query Reset & YCbCr Image Arrays

    NVIDIA has issued new Vulkan beta drivers leading up to the Game Developers Conference 2019 as well as this next week there being NVIDIA's GPU Technology Conference (GTC) nearby in California.

    The only publicly mentioned changes to this weekend's NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux driver update (and 419.62 on the Windows side) is support for the VK_EXT_host_query_reset and VK_EXT_ycbcr_image_arrays extensions.

  • Nouveau NIR Support Lands In Mesa 19.1 Git

    It shouldn't come as any surprise, but landing today in Mesa 19.1 Git is the initial support for the Nouveau Gallium3D code to make use of the NIR intermediate representation as an alternative to Gallium's TGSI.

    The Nouveau NIR support is part of the lengthy effort by Red Hat developers on supporting this IR as part of their SPIR-V and compute upbringing. The NIR support is also a stepping stone towards a potential NVIDIA Vulkan driver in the future.

  • Vulkan 1.1.104 Brings Native HDR, Exclusive Fullscreen Extensions

    With the annual Game Developers' Conference (GDC) kicking off tomorrow in San Francisco, Khronos' Vulkan working group today released Vulkan 1.1.104 that comes with several noteworthy extensions.

    Vulkan 1.1.104 is the big update for GDC 2019 rather than say Vulkan 1.2, but it's quite a nice update as part of the working group's weekly/bi-weekly release regiment. In particular, Vulkan 1.1.104 is exciting for an AMD native HDR extension and also a full-screen exclusive extension.

  • Interested In FreeSync With The RADV Vulkan Driver? Testing Help Is Needed

    Since the long-awaited introduction of FreeSync support with the Linux 5.0 kernel, one of the missing elements has been this variable rate refresh support within the RADV Vulkan driver.

    When the FreeSync/VRR bits were merged into Linux 5.0, the RadeonSI Gallium3D support was quick to land for OpenGL games but RADV Vulkan support was not to be found. Of course, RADV is the unofficial Radeon open-source Vulkan driver not officially backed by AMD but is the more popular driver compared to their official AMDVLK driver or the official but closed driver in their Radeon Software PRO driver package (well, it's built from the same sources as AMDVLK but currently with their closed-source shader compiler rather than LLVM). So RADV support for FreeSync has been one of the features users have been quite curious about and eager to see.

New Screencasts: Xubuntu 18.04.2, Ubuntu MATE, and Rosa Fresh 11

Filed under
GNU
Linux

9 Admirable Graphical File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Being able to navigate your local filesystem is an important function of personal computing. File managers have come a long way since early directory editors like DIRED. While they aren’t cutting-edge technology, they are essential software to manage any computer.

File management consists of creating, opening, renaming, moving / copying, deleting and searching for files. But file managers also frequently offer other functionality.

In the field of desktop environments, there are two desktops that dominate the open source landscape: KDE and GNOME. They are smart, stable, and generally stay out of the way. These use the widget toolkits Qt and GTK respectively. And there are many excellent Qt and GTK file managers available. We covered the finest in our Qt File Managers Roundup and GTK File Managers Roundup. But with Linux, you’re never short of alternatives.

There are many graphical non-Qt and non-Gtk file managers available. This article examines 9 such file managers. The quality is remarkably good.

Read more

Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 6

Filed under
KDE

Here we are gathered, for another episode of drama, thrill and technological escapades in the land of Tux. Starring one Slimbook Pro2 in the main role, with a trusty sidekick called Bionic Beaver of the Kubuntu clan. We've had quite a few episodes so far, and they tell a rather colorful story of progress, beauty and bugs.

Over the past few months, I've detailed my usage of the laptop and its operating system in serious, real-life situations, with actual productivity needs and challenges. This isn't just a test, this is running the machine properly. Many things work well, but then, there are problems, too. Of course, you can read all about those in the previous articles, and again, for the sake of simplicity, I'm only going to link to only the last report here. If you're truly intrigued, I'm sure you can find your way around.

[..].

I believe the Slimbook - with its Kubuntu brains - is slowly settling down. The one thing that is certain is that system updates bring in small tweaks and fixes all the time, and it's a shame that we can't have that from the very first minute. On the other hand, the system is stable, robust, and there are no regressions. I am quite pleased.

But there are still many things that can improved. Small things. The nth-order fun that isn't immediate or obvious, and so people don't see it until they come across a non-trivial use case, and then things start falling apart. This is true for all operating system, it's only the matter of how much. Plasma has made great strides in becoming semi-pro, and I hope it will get better still. Onwards.

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Also: Krita Interview with Svetlana Rastegina

Security: Cult of the Dead Cow, Huawei, and LastPass

Filed under
Security
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 137.5 - Holy cow Beto was in the cDc, this is awesome!

    Josh and Kurt talk about Beto being in the Cult of the Dead Cow (cDc). This is a pretty big deal in a very good way. We hit on some history, why it's a great thing, what we can probably expect from opponents. There's even some advice at the end how we can all help. We need more politicians with backgrounds like this.

  • Is Huawei a security threat? Seven experts weigh in

    Regardless of how the suit shakes out, it will hardly be the last volley in the ongoing battle. Is the US right to target Chinese equipment makers like Huawei, or has the company, as it maintains, been unfairly maligned? The Verge convened experts, from prominent China-watchers to Sen. Marco Rubio, to give their views.

  • Should you be concerned about LastPass uploading your passwords to its server? [Ed: Wladimir Palant says what I have been saying for years. Alas, it fell on some deaf ears. LastPass is a dangerous trap. Very bad, and not even for convenience. Faith-based security.]

    I’ve written a number of blog posts on LastPass security issues already. The latest one so far looked into the way the LastPass data is encrypted before it is transmitted to the server. The thing is: when your password manager uploads all data to its server backend, you normally want to be very certain that the data visible to the server is useless both to attackers who manage to compromise the server and company employees running that server. Early last year I reported a number of issues that allowed subverting LastPass encryption with comparably little effort. The most severe issues have been addressed, so all should be good now?

    Sadly, no. It is absolutely possible for a password manager to use a server for some functionality while not trusting it. However, LastPass has been designed in a way that makes taking this route very difficult. In particular, the decision to fall back to server-provided pages for parts of the LastPass browser extension functionality is highly problematic. For example, whenever you access Account Settings you leave the trusted browser extension and access a web interface presented to you by the LastPass server, something that the extension tries to hide from you. Some other extension functionality is implemented similarly.

Programming: RQuantLib, Python and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • RQuantLib 0.4.8: Small updates

    A new version 0.4.8 of RQuantLib reached CRAN and Debian. This release was triggered by a CRAN request for an update to the configure.ac script which was easy enough (and which, as it happens, did not result in changes in the configure script produced). I also belatedly updated the internals of RQuantLib to follow suit to an upstream change in QuantLib. We now seamlessly switch between shared_ptr<> from Boost and from C++11 – Luigi wrote about the how and why in an excellent blog post that is part of a larger (and also excellent) series of posts on QuantLib internals.

    QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance, and RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language.

  • 10 Python image manipulation tools

    Today's world is full of data, and images form a significant part of this data. However, before they can be used, these digital images must be processed—analyzed and manipulated in order to improve their quality or extract some information that can be put to use.

    Common image processing tasks include displays; basic manipulations like cropping, flipping, rotating, etc.; image segmentation, classification, and feature extractions; image restoration; and image recognition. Python is an excellent choice for these types of image processing tasks due to its growing popularity as a scientific programming language and the free availability of many state-of-the-art image processing tools in its ecosystem.

    This article looks at 10 of the most commonly used Python libraries for image manipulation tasks. These libraries provide an easy and intuitive way to transform images and make sense of the underlying data.

  • PyDev of the Week: Bruno Roche

    This week we welcome Bruno Roche (@rochacbruno) as our PyDev of the Week! Bruno works for Red Hat and participates in the Python, Flask and Rust communities.

  • HTTP Method and Accept headers

    Zato 3.1 includes new means to manage access to REST services based on input Method and Accept headers in HTTP requests - here is how they can be employed in practice.

  • Text Processing in Rust

    This article is about text processing in Rust, but it also contains a quick introduction to pattern matching, which can be very handy when working with text.

    Strings are a huge subject in Rust, which can be easily realized by the fact that Rust has two data types for representing strings as well as support for macros for formatting strings. However, all of this also proves how powerful Rust is in string and text processing.

    Apart from covering some theoretical topics, this article shows how to develop some handy yet easy-to-implement command-line utilities that let you work with plain-text files. If you have the time, it'd be great to experiment with the Rust code presented here, and maybe develop your own utilities.

  • Plotting the Chaikin AD line graph
  • Create a sports score application with python

Canonical Releases Important Linux Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The new Linux kernel security update is here to address five security issues discovered by various security researchers in the Linux 4.4 kernel used in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and official derivatives that aren't using the Linux 4.15 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

These include a flaw (CVE-2017-18241) in Linux kernel's F2FS file system implementation, which incorrectly handled the noflush_merge mount option, and multiple integer overflows (CVE-2018-7740) in the hugetlbfs implementation. Both issues could allow local attackers to crash the vulnerable system through a denial of service.

Read more

2019 OSI Board Election Results

Filed under
OSS

The OSI recently held our 2019 Board elections to seat six Board Directors, two elected from the affiliate membership, and four from the individual membership. We would like to congratulate, Pamela Chestek (nominated by The Document Foundation), and Molly de Blanc (nominated by the Debian Project) who captured the most votes from OSI Affiliate Members. We would also like to congratulate, Elana Hashman, Hong Phuc Dang and Carol Smith for securing Individual Member seats on the Board. Due to a tie for the fourth Individual Member seat, between Christine Hall and Mariatta Wijaya, a run off election will be required to identify the final OSI Board Director.

[...]

Affiliate Member Election Results (two open seats)

29 Pamela Chestek (The Document Foundation)
28 Molly de Blanc (Debian Project)
18 Bruce Perens (Open Research Institute)
13 Charles-H. Schulz (Open Information Security Foundation)
12 Olawale Fabiyi (American International University West Africa)
12 Kate Stewart (Linux Foundation)
9 Lior Kaplan (Debian Project)
8 Frank Matranga (Rensselaer Center for Open Source)
7 Rowan Hoskyns-Abrahall (Joomla / Open Source Matters, Inc.)
3 Hugh Douglas-Smith (Joomla / Open Source Matters, Inc.)

Individual Member Election Results (four open seats)

199 Carol Smith
172 Elana Hashman
143 Hong Phuc Dang
104 Christine Hall*
104 Mariatta Wijaya*
92 Duane O'Brien
90 Chris Aniszczyk
81 Van Lindberg
77 Justin Colannino
76 Samson Goddy
64 Luke Faraone
55 Marc Jones
44 Ian Skerrett
33 Brendan Hickey
32 Gustavo G Marmol Alioto
23 Tobie Langel
17 Rakesh Ranjan Jena
16 Dave McAllister

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Fedora 29 Linux Gaming Report: The Nvidia, Radeon And Steam User Experience

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Gaming on Linux. Depending on who you talk to, getting stuff like Steam up and running and graphics drivers installed can be a tedious exercise, or ridiculously straightforward. That's because people don't really game on Linux. They game on Fedora, Manjaro, Ubuntu, Deepin, Solus. They game on Debian-based distributions or Arch-based distributions. Each with their own philosophies on free (as in open source and freely distributed) versus non-free (Steam and proprietary Nvidia drivers) software. Each with their own approaches to stability, affecting which versions of drivers are available out of the box.

While there are certain procedures and best practices that persist across any distro, the variances can be daunting for new users. And that's the jumping-off point for this series.

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

These are some of the major reasons why you should use Fedora. It might not be popular as Ubuntu or comes with advanced tools by default as Kali Linux or user-friendly as Linux Mint, but it has a solid base when it comes to latest features and security. Another fact is, anyone, can build a Linux distribution but you should not use one run by a single or few people. Fedora is backed by RedHat, one of the most reputable names in Linux industry and hence you will have peace of mind.

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OpenXR 0.90 Released For AR/VR Standard - Monado Is An Open-Source Implementation

Filed under
OSS

Last year we were expecting The Khronos Group to introduce OpenXR 1.0 for this standard to address fragmentation and provide interoperability in the VR space followed by AR. That debut last year didn't happen although they did show off the first demonstration at SIGGRAPH. This week though at GDC they are announcing the OpenXR 0.90 provisional specification release.

The OpenXR 0.90 provisional specification is now available today. Yes, v0.90 and not 1.0... This caught me by surprise too when being briefed last week. This provisional specification ended up incorporating not only VR support but also AR (augmented reality) into the design. They are hoping for more feedback from AR/VR developers before officially declaring 1.0 especially with the AR support squeezing in when originally they only anticipated to get that in post-1.0.

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Best 15 Fractal Software for Linux For Beginners and Professionals

Filed under
Software

Are you seriously seeking to know about some fantastic fractal software for Linux? It may seem to be a common and normal thing to find, but only a few resources will show you the right solution. Yes, you came one of the proper places to check! I am gonna show you the best 15 Linux fractal tools that are excellent in the drawing, shading, and creating a perfect and appealing artistic work.

Before going the main part, let’s have a look what actually the tool means. From the dictionary, fractal means a geometrical figure which holds the same statistical character as the whole. It may define as a complex pattern showing self-similarity in different scales. That means, whatever you do with any part (like zooming or the opposite), it shows the same amount of detail as before.

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FOSS: On the Road to Nowhere

Filed under
OSS

I started using free and open source software 20 years ago. In many ways, I’m delighted in how it has developed and spread. I can use KDE’s Plasma, the most advanced desktop on any platform, and it’s been 15 years since I needed to buy software for my professional work. From being an outlying oddity, FOSS has become the norm — so much so that invitations for bids often specify that the resulting software must be open source.

Yet I can’t help thinking that FOSS as a whole has lost its sense of shared values. Nor do groups that might provide those shared values, like the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Linux Foundation, seem capable of providing the leadership that could provide those shared values.

Oh, I’m aware that projects and foundations continue to provide leadership on a local scale. I am aware, too, of the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit, which helps to promote cooperative development. What is missing, though, is often the sense of everyone working towards the same goals for shared reasons.

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Games: Second Earth, Two Point Hospital, SDL2, Battle for Wesnoth, Linux Gaming News Punch, GameHub, Football Story, RPCS3

Filed under
Gaming
  • Second Earth, a base-building game from the developer of Broforce has a Linux build

    Broforce is the game from developer Free Lives that made me fall in love with platformers again, can they do the same for base-building tower defense games? Second Earth could be good when further developed.

    To be clear, Second Earth is in the very early stages to the point that they're calling it a prototype. Even so, I've played with it for a little while and the Linux version seems to run pretty well.

  • Two Point Hospital | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Native

    Two Point Hospital has a free weekend on Steam right now!

  • SDL2 has pulled in support for the Wii U/Switch USB GameCube controller adapter

    SDL2, the cross-platform development library has now merged in support for the Wii U/Switch USB GameCube controller adapter.

    This work is the result of the successful IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign from Ethan Lee, who previously ported a ton of games to Linux and Lee now also works with CodeWeavers to help with Steam Play/Proton development. This campaign was a personal project of Lee's, done across a few weekends.

  • Looks like Battle for Wesnoth is being ported to Godot Engine

    Battle for Wesnoth, the classic open source turn-based strategy game has been around for a long time and it seems they're going to switch over to the Godot Engine.

    In a Twitter post sent out yesterday, the team teased "Are we working on a thing?

  • List Of 30+ Best Linux Games That You Should Play in 2019

    There are thousands of Games available for Linux based operating systems. Those used to be the day when it was hard to find Linux games but these days there are several gaming marketplace, gaming platforms and games being developed for the Linux based operating systems.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 4

    For those who have trouble keeping up with all the happenings, here's another bite-sized round-up of some interesting Linux gaming news recently.

    The Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 4 is officially here. As usual, it comes in both video and audio-only flavours.

  • GameHub is another open source game launcher, giving Lutris some competition

    Not a fan of Lutris or just want to try something different? GameHub could be a pretty good option for you.

    I've been meaning to try this for a while, after many people emailed it in over the last few months. I finally sat down with it this weekend to give it a good run and honestly, I'm pretty impressed. While it claims it is "designed for elementary OS" it of course works across different distributions.

  • Football Story blends a narrative campaign with competitive multiplayer, coming to Linux

    For those who love their games that involve sports, Football Story sounds like it could be one to watch. It's being developed by fructus temporum, with publishing by Crytivo (The Universim).

  • The latest progress report for PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is looking good

    The RPCS3 team have a huge mountain to climb to get more PlayStation 3 titles playable but it's all coming together now.

    The latest report shows that 1,119 titles are now class as playable, up from 1,081 reported the month before. Considering the amount of effort required in such an emulator, it's really impressive. Some of these newly playable titles include Skate 3, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Z, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch, No More Heroes: Heroes’ Paradise, Ragnarok Odyssey Ace and more!

Setting up Continuous Integration With GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial is about continuous integration between GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube. At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to view the quality reports of GitLab repository codes at SonarQube by using Jenkins as a Continuous Integrator and sonar-scanner as code analyzer.
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Review: Kubuntu versus KDE neon

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Often times when I'm browsing open source forums I run into variations of the query "Why do we need KDE neon when we have Kubuntu?" Or, possibly the inverse: "What is the benefit to running Kubuntu when we have KDE neon?" Sometimes the question is more neutral: "What is the difference between running Kubuntu with backports and running KDE neon?"

These are fair questions. While Kubuntu tends to be seen as being more geared toward end users and KDE neon tends to be regarded as being a way for curious testers to try out the latest KDE technology, there is a lot of overlap between the two projects. Both are based on Ubuntu, both feature recent releases of the KDE Plasma desktop, and both stick pretty close to a vanilla KDE experience. This got me wondering if there is much of a difference between the two projects from the end-user's point of view. Are they basically the same experience with slightly different configurations, or are there practical differences in play that would make a users choose one over the other?

I decided to find out. I downloaded a snapshot of the User edition of KDE neon and a copy of Kubuntu. Since KDE neon is based on Ubuntu long-term support (LTS) releases, specifically Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I opted to download Kubuntu 18.04.2 in order to make sure the base operating systems were as close to the same as I could get. Then I started comparing the two side-by-side.

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