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Tuesday, 23 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Trying Out Fedora 25 With Wayland, Early Benchmarks Included Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:46pm
Story FOSS Policy in EU, NZ, US and Taiwan Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:42pm
Story NVMe over Fabrics Support Coming to the Linux 4.8 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:37pm
Story Linux 4.4.19 Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:35pm
Story Up to EUR 200,000 for Austria open source projects Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:30pm
Story DNF 1.1.10 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.21-3 Released Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:29pm
Story The Big Android Dev Interview: Maarten Edgar Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 8:23pm
Story Linux Messengers For Facebook Mohd Sohail 22/08/2016 - 3:59pm
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 1:55pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 11:19am

Android/Chrome

Filed under
Android

Intel Euclid: a brain, vision, sensor, hotspot module for robots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Intel demoed a “Euclid” robotics compute module running Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom, and equipped with a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi hotspot, and various sensors.

At the Intel Developer Conference in San Francisco this week, Intel showed off a prototype of an Intel Euclid robotics controller, equipped with a stereo depth-sensing Intel RealSense camera and running an Ubuntu/ROS stack. Designed for researchers, makers, and robotics developers, the device is a self contained, candy-bar sized compute module ready to pop into a robot. It’s augmented with a WiFi hotspot, Bluetooth, GPS, and IR, as well as proximity, motion, barometric pressure sensors. There’s also a snap-on battery.

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Android posts highest ever market share in latest mobile data

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Android

What’s even better is that Android’s market share typically grows for 2-3 quarters before dropping off a little when the new iPhone hits. That means Android’s market share in Q3 may well break the 88% barrier before slowing down again.

On the other hand, in the gutter of Statista’s graph, lies iOS, which still sits comfortably in second place above the myriad other flatlining mobile OSes on the list. Apple’s mobile market share has been on an ever-so-slight decline in the last five years, something the company is surely hoping to reverse with the upcoming iPhone 7.

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AMDGPU-PRO vs. Open-Source Gallium3D OpenGL Performance On Polaris Is A Very Tight Race

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how AMD's hybrid "AMDGPU-PRO" Linux driver stack compares to the latest pure open-source driver stack of the AMDGPU kernel driver and RadeonSI Gallium3D driver, here are side-by-side results for the Radeon RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480 Polaris hardware as well as the R9 Fury (Fiji) graphics card.

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The Big Android Dev Interview: Jolanda Verhoef

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Android
Interviews

My name is Jolanda Verhoef and I've been developing for Android for six years, focusing mainly on architecture. [At the Big Android BBQ] I gave a talk on architecture together with RxJava. So, how can RxJava help you create a nice clean architecture. I work at a company called Blendle, which is a startup in the Netherlands, and before that I worked at companies like Philips, Dutch railway stations, Enexis, stuff like that. And I built my own app for geocaching as well.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Foundation Picks Up a Big Data Platform

    The Linux Foundation announced today that it is adding Platform for Network Data Analytics (PNDA) as a Linux Foundation project. PNDA provides users with an open source big data platform for network analytics.

    PNDA’s vision is to remove the complexity of combining multiple technologies into an end-to-end system, using open source technology to provide a big data analytics platform. It has a streamlined data pipeline to surface the right data at the right time.

  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Linux

    Earlier this year I heard from an Intel PR representative they had no plans for a Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Linux driver and immediately heard after that from a developer it was bollocks from the media department as usual. Today patches have emerged for supporting Turbo Boost Max 3.0 in the Linux kernel.

    Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is a feature to the Intel Broadwell-E CPUs and presumably more forthcoming high-end CPUs. Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is about boosting the frequency of a single CPU core when a single-threaded application is busy on the system occupied. TBM Tech 3.0 is in contrast to Turbo Boost 2.0 that boosts the frequency of all CPU cores when needed for short periods of time. But over the older Turbo Boost tech, TBM 3.0 can maintain its single-boosted-core frequency for a longer duration.

  • Linux Foundation Offering New Online Security Course

    The Linux Foundation's new online Linux security training program will cover a broad range of topics, from application security to network security. The course is geared toward professionals who are already running Linux systems.
    IT security threats seem to be everywhere, but skilled IT security professionals do not seem to be nearly as pervasive. It's a conundrum that the Linux Foundation wants to help alleviate with the introduction of a new online Linux skills training program.

    The online course, called Linux Security Fundamentals (LFS216), is an attempt to help individuals evaluate their own organizations' security readiness. The course is not intended as an introduction for those who are new to Linux, but rather is targeted at those already running Linux systems.

  • Geary User? Here’s A Question For You…

    If you’ve ever used the (frankly awesome) desktop e-mail app Geary, its maintainer has a question for you. He’s launched a poll asking for your feedback on whether the app should switch to instant search and away from the single-keystroke commands it currently uses. Not sure what either of those are? I’ll explain.

  • keysafe alpha release

    Keysafe securely backs up a gpg secret key or other short secret to the cloud. But not yet. Today's alpha release only supports storing the data locally, and I still need to finish tuning the argon2 hash difficulties with modern hardware. Other than that, I'm fairly happy with how it's turned out.

    Keysafe is written in Haskell, and many of the data types in it keep track of the estimated CPU time needed to create, decrypt, and brute-force them. Running that through a AWS SPOT pricing cost model lets keysafe estimate how much an attacker would need to spend to crack your password.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.3: Lots of new Fixed Income functions
  • Wammu 0.42
  • Full Metal Backup Using the dd Command
  • Basics of Backups
  • Monit is not limited to Monitor Linux system performance, also doing auto repair action for dead services
  • Latest Steam Client Update Now Rolling Out, This Is What’s New

    A new update to the Steam desktop client on Linux is rolling out. Though short on big new features there are some welcome fixes on offer.

  • The BeagleBone's I/O pins: inside the software stack that makes them work

    This article focuses on the BeagleBone Black, the popular new member of the BeagleBoard family. If you're familiar with the Arduino, the BeagleBone is much more complex; while the Arduino is a microcontroller, the BeagleBone is a full computer running Linux. If you need more than an Arduino can easily provide (more processing, Ethernet, WiFi), the BeagleBone may be a good choice.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Taming KDEwallet

    On opensuse forums, I often see complaints about KDEwallet (or “kwallet” for short). It can be annoying at times. In this post, I’ll indicate ways of keeping it under control.

    While this is oriented toward opensuse, it should also apply to other distros with one caveat. In opensuse, some of the applications have their settings and configuration under the directory “$HOME/.kde4”. For other distros, it is more typical to use “$HOME/.kde” (without that final “4”). So just adjust my suggestions accordingly.

  • KDE Applications 16.08 Released, Canonical Becomes A Patron

    KDE Applications 16.08 was released today as the newest bundle of KDE applications built atop KDE Frameworks 5.

    KDE Applications 16.08 features the KF5 ports of Kolourpaint, Cervisia, and KDiskFree. KDE's Kontact suite has also been improved upon, Marble 2.0 was added, Ark archiving support can now handle ApplImage and more, the Konsole terminal has been improved, and much more.

  • Emoji Toolbar Control
  • Contributors to Nautilus

    At GUADEC Andre Klaper made a report of top most contributors to GNOME in the last year, and to my surprise I saw my name in the top 5 of patch reviewers. Did I really review so many patches?

  • Mutter Now Supports Virtual Input Devices, GNOME Shell Improved Wayland Keyboard

    The GNOME 3.21.90 packages were released this week in preparation for next month's GNOME 3.22 desktop release.

    GNOME Shell 3.21.90 features an improved on-screen keyboard for Wayland. Also various bugs were fixed as part of this update.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • What’s Zacks EPS Estimates For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Friday Trading Session Review for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora 25 To Run Wayland By Default

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee has decided that Fedora 25 will indeed ship the Wayland display server by default in place of the X.Org Server.

    While many were doubting whether Fedora Workstation with its GNOME-based desktop would be ready for a Wayland default on Fedora 25, FESCo has determined it's feasible. This is great to see after Fedora Wayland didn't end up making it the past few cycles it was proposed while for a long time now it's been exposed as a non-default log-in option.

  • Fedora QA onboarding call tomorrow (2016-08-20) at 1700 UTC

    Hi folks! We are having another ‘onboarding’ video call to help new Fedora QA recruits get started tomorrow. Sumantro will be leading the call, I’ll try and stop by if I can. To join the call, just keep this piratepad open. The call agenda is shown there and it will be used for notes when the call is happening, plus there’s a chat panel. Ten minutes before the call starts, Sumantro will post the URL for people to join. Then just join the call and follow along! Please make sure to mute yourself on the call when you’re not talking.

    Thanks everyone, and welcome to the group, new members!

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • [New page] Open source alternatives
  • AT&T: What Is 'Open Source,' Anyway?

    Companies evaluating open source technology need to be careful that they get all the open source benefits. That's sometimes tricky, which is why AT&T has defined "three key characteristics of open source software that we consider paramount," says Greg Stiegler, AT&T assistant vice president of cloud.

    AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) is a leader among big network operators making a big open source commitment, with involvement in multiple projects and aggressive code-sharing. Last month, it released its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) for network management and orchestration (MANO) as open source. (See AT&T Offers 'Mature' ECOMP as Open Source MANO, AT&T Makes Case for Open Source Sharing and AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer.)

  • Mozilla Spurring Tech Project Development with Sprints and Grants

    At Mozilla, there is momentum gathering around new open source projects and the Internet of Things (IoT). The company is hosting an IoT sprint development weekend this September. Mozilla’s Hive Chattanooga, in collaboration with The Company Lab, is hosting 48Hour Launch: Internet of Things (IoT) Edition, on September 9-11. 48Hour Launch is a weekend-long competition that challenges teams of entrepreneurs and specialists to spend 48 hours transforming a startup concept into a viable business model, prototype, policy proposal, or piece of curriculum.

    The experience culminates with a Demo Night, where participants debut their work for a chance to win cash prizes, free business services, and a free trip to MozFest in London.

  • Crowdfunding closing on $5 Linux + Wifi tiny IoT compute module

    Omega 2 is a Linux compute module designed specifically for building connected hardware applications. It combines, say its designers Onion, “the tiny form factor and power-efficiency of the Arduino, with the power and flexibilities of the Raspberry Pi.”

  • FSFE summit 2016

    Imagine a European Union that builds its IT infrastructure on Free Software. Imagine European Member States that exchange information in Open Standards and share their software. Imagine municipalities and city councils that benefit from decentralized and collaborative software under free licenses. Imagine no European is any longer forced to use non-Free Software.

  • Google's new OS, Intel's open source VR headset, and more news
  • How to build your own maker workbench

    Maker projects can be tough if you don't have a good workspace. For a long time, mine was an ESD mat on the dining room table. But as my projects (and family) grew, I was under increased pressure to find somewhere else to work. Really, the 3D printer is what put my wife over the edge (and rightfully so).

  • Dutch consider mandatory eGovernment standards

    The Dutch government wants to make the use of open standards mandatory for public administrations, to provide business and citizens with easier access to eGovernment services. The government is developing a generic digital infrastructure, and its services and standards are to be used by all public administrations, writes Henk Kamp, the country’s Minister of Economic Affairs in a letter to Parliament.

Development News

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Tips on adding Linux to Your Developer Skill Set

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The time when developers and administrators can get by with only Microsoft in their bag of tricks is over. With Linux's continuing dominance and growth in server space and with Redmond now embracing open source with actions as well as words, even those who develop exclusively for the Windows platform are almost certain to find times when they need to wrap their heads around an aspect of the Linux kernel or some open source application.

If you've been following tech news, you know that across the board there is an increasing need for people with Linux skills, which has pushed the salaries available for those with certifiable Linux talents to record highs. This opens an opportunity in traditional Windows shops where fully certified Linux people might not be necessary, but where certified Windows people with good Linux skills have extra value.

In other words, you can increase your value as an employee simply by honing your Linux and open source skills, without the need to necessarily shell out big bucks to Red Hat or the Linux Foundation for certification. There are plenty of educational opportunities available online, some free and others offered with a very low price tag.

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Also: Talent remains the biggest issue for deploying open source in the enterprise

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Sony announces $500 Android Auto head unit, its first, says it's "Android Auto 2" compatible

    Sony has a new Android Auto head unit - its first, actually - the catchily-named XAV-AX100. The main draw of the device seems to be the sound quality, with four "55-watt Dynamic Reality Amp 2" amplifiers and Sony's EXTRA BASS low-boost circuitry supposedly overcoming engine noise to deliver crystal clear sound.

  • $349 ConsoleTab Tablet to Include Windows 10 and Android

    Users will be able to switch between Windows and Android when using the tablet, which has a 10.1-inch display, according to the company.

    Preorders open on Aug. 22 for the upcoming ConsoleTab tablet computer, a $349 device with a 10.1-inch touch-screen HD display, an Intel Atom processor, and the inclusion of both Windows 10 and Android operating systems.

    The new machine, which was announced at the Intel Developer Forum event in San Francisco this week, will allow users to choose between the two operating systems each time they use the machine, according to its maker, Console.

  • White House Official Cozied Up to Google Before Antitrust Lawsuit Was Shelved
  • Polish developer hacks Android rewards app for free beer

    A cunning Polish developer has hacked an Android food and drink rewards app to grant himself unlimited free beer.

    Kuba Gretzky detailed his excellent exploits in a blog post on Breakdev – though, to deter copycats, he didn't name the rewards app or the precise location within Poland where it was operating.

    He did, however, name the makers of the tech used by the unnamed rewards app: beacon supplier Estimote.

  • 7 things Android owners can do that Apple iPhone users only dream of

    ANDROID users rejoice – your phones come with a range of unique features and functions that your fruit-flavoured rivals can only dream of. Here are Express.co.uk's selection of the top unique Android options.

Towards an Efficient Linux Photographic Workflow

Filed under
GNU
Linux

digiKam is the cornerstone of my photographic workflow. This powerful and versatile photo management application has all tools and features necessary for transferring, organizing, processing, and managing photos, RAW files, and videos. But even though digiKam can handle practically any photographic task you throw at it, there is still room for optimizing and improving parts of the Linux-based photographic workflow.

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Wayland Default Fedora 25, LibreOffice Emoji, Best Servers

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-s

Red Hat's cutting-edge test bed is moving from Xorg/X11 to Wayland its next release. This is a big step even for a distribution known for adopting early technology. In other news, Akshay Deep has announced Emoji support for LibreOffice and Robin Muilwijk discusses the various Web server choices for Linux deployments.

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Trump’s campaign donation website used open-source code sloppily, risking ridicule and worse

Filed under
OSS

Like tens of millions of other websites, the campaign donation website for US presidential candidate Donald Trump relies on open-source software called jQuery. But it seems that the software is being used in a sloppy way, which could put Trump supporters at risk of identity theft or worse.

Trump’s website uses a jQuery plug-in, or a bit of ready-made code, called jQuery Mask Plug-in to handle how donors fill in their name, address, and other information. The mask plug-in restricts the types of information users can enter in forms. This is useful because it increases the chances of accurate data being submitted for payment processing, and for the campaign’s records. It’s also free and available for download from GitHub, the popular platform for open-source software.

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Microsoft Powershell Is Now Available For Linux

Filed under
Linux
News

​Powershell is a Windows command line tool and associated scripting language built on the .Net framework for performing administrative tasks on both local and remote Windows systems. Powershell has been a part of Windows systems for 10 years(November 14, 2006 ). On 18th August Microsoft announced on their blog that they have brought Powershell to Mac OSX and Linux.

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more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Updating Firmware on 8Bitdo Game Controllers

    I’ve spent a few days adding support for upgrading the firmware of the various wireless 8Bitdo controllers into fwupd. In my opinion, the 8Bitdo hardware is very well made and reasonably priced, and also really good retro fun.

  • Have you seen ChromaGun? A first-person puzzler inspired by portal, but with paint

    The developer of ChromaGun sent in a copy of the game for me to test out and while I found the idea rather cool, shooting paint around to solve puzzles it does have major issues on Linux.

    I tried the game on last weeks livestream and while it was quite interesting to play, it repeatedly crashed to the desktop in a short amount of time. I waited a week after emailing the developer these issues to post this up, but after no reply sadly this is just how the game is.

  • Motorsport Manager can now be pre-purchased on Steam with Linux support

    The very cool looking Motorsport Manager game where you run your own F1 team is now available to pre-purchase on Steam.

    You know how I personally feel about pre-orders by now, but some still like to do it. I do love seeing that little tux at the end of a video though, very nice to see.

    I'm very interested in the game myself, but I will be waiting either for a review copy or to see how it's reviewed by others if I don't get a key myself.

  • Master an angry mob in Okhlos, now on Linux with some thoughts thrown in

    Okhlos is another new released that was provided to me by GOG, I tried it properly tonight during the livestream and sadly it isn't all that good. It wasn't my first time playing it, as the developer sent me an early copy a while ago which I remember well.

    Essentially, you're in control of a mob in ancient Greece with a twin-stick shooter feel to it. You control a single character with the WASD keys and the mob with the mouse. You're able to recruit new members automatically by rolling your mob through them, and hold the left mouse button on enemies to watch hell unfold as your mob takes them down.

  • Facebook teams up with Unity to create a gaming platform to rival Steam [Ed: Microsoft Mono trap]

    Facebook is starting to take gaming far more seriously. Not content with funneling the likes of Candy Crush through its servers, the social network is now joining forces with the company behind the Unity game engine to create its own desktop gaming platform.

  • FEZ has a massive 1.2 update that switches out MonoGame for FNA & SDL2
  • Wine 1.9.17 Released
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.17 Is Now Available
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