Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 19 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

7 Most Beautiful Linux Distributions in 2020

Filed under
Linux

Here are some drop dead gorgeous Linux distributions that provide an overall pleasant desktop experience out of the box.
Read more

MX-19.1 now available!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Updated iso images

–direct download:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/mx-linux/files/Final/

Mirrors will populate over time. Other download locations: https://mxlinux.org/download-links/

Torrents here: https://mxlinux.org/torrent-files/

We are pleased to offer MX-19.1. for your use.

MX-19.1 is a refresh of our MX-19 release, consisting of bugfixes and application updates since our original release of MX-19. If you are already running MX-19, there is no need to reinstall. Packages are all available thru the regular update channel.

Migration notes are here:

Due to the increasing presence of users with newer hardware (particularly newer AMD or Intel hardware), with this release, in addition to the standard 32 bit and 64 bit isos with 4.19 LTS kernels, we are producing a third iso that we call “Advanced Hardware Support” or AHS (pronounced Oz) for short. AHS is 64 bit and ships with a debian 5.4 kernel, Mesa 19.2 as well as newer xserver drivers and various recompiled apps that will utilize the newer graphics stack. We debuted the AHS repository sometime ago (blog post here), and we thought the time was right for an iso with the AHS repo enabled by default. AHS is a little untested, but the idea is that it will receive updates to the graphics stack over time, so for those that don’t need the newer open source graphics stack, there is little point is using AHS.

Read more

Also: MX Linux 19.1 Released with New “Advanced Hardware Support” ISO

MyPaint 2.0 Open-Source Drawing and Paining App Adds Major New Features

Filed under
OSS

After more than a year in development, MyPaint 2.0 is finally here and it looks like it’s a major release adding many goodies for passionate digital artists. This version replaces the MyPaint 1.2 series as the latest stable release due to important changes to brush parameters and a whole new layer mode.

The developers explain that layer mode featured in this release uses a brand new compositing method, making files created with MyPaint 2.0 incompatible with earlier releases. Furthermore, the brush stroke data created in MyPaint 2.0 won’t work properly in previous versions of the software.

Read more

Maui Project Wants to Bring Convergent Apps to Linux Desktops and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Maui Project is creating MauiKit, a free and open-source modular front-end framework built with KDE Project’s Kirigami UI framework for creating mobile and convergent apps and Qt Quick Controls 2, a collection of templated controls and tools for building complete user interfaces in Qt Quick.

MauiKit aims to help application developers build convergent apps that work seamlessly on desktop computers and mobile phones, but a lot faster, using known technologies like C++, QML, and Qt.

Read more

Reiser5 Updates For Linux 5.5 Along With Reiser4

Filed under
Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 and Reiser5 (Reiser4 v5) patches have been updated against the recently stabilized Linux 5.5 kernel.

Main Reiser4 developer Edward Shishkin re-based the Reiser4 file-system patch against Linux 5.5.1 along with the experimental Reiser5.

At the end of 2019 is when Shishkin announced Reiser5 file-system development with introducing the concepts of local volumes capable of parallel scaling out and other key iterations over the current Reiser4 design.

Read more

Detailed tests of search engines: Google, Startpage, Bing, DuckDuckGo, metaGer, Ecosia, Swisscows, Searx, Qwant, Yandex, and Mojeek

Filed under
Google
Reviews
Web

Since my last in-depth comparison review of alternative search engines in 2014, a lot has changed, and a lot has stayed the same. Google is appearing as a loan-verb in more and more languages due to its continued dominance in the search engine market. But at the same time, Google is being increasingly demonized by privacy focused users. An even more more interesting development is the trend of complaints that Google’s algorithm is producing results that are less relevant and more indicative of artificial stupidity than artificial intelligence. I belong in this latter camp, as I am more of a pragmatist than a privacy pundit. I simply want the best search results with minimal effort and no nonsense. Back in my 2014 article, I was hopeful that DuckDuckGo was quickly becoming a viable and attractive alternative to Google. While DuckDuckGo continues to be the darling of privacy conscious users and is enjoying more popularity than ever, I am concerned that its core search infrastructure and algorithms have largely stagnated. Since my last article, many other alternatives have cropped up, bringing some very interesting features and concepts, but it still remains to be seen if they offer acceptable results in the fundamentally important area of relevant search results. This comparison sets out to analyze and compare the current batch of alternatives in 2020.

Read More

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tux Linux 18.04 overview | lightweight, complete & looks great!

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Tux Linux 18.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Looking for an open-source VPN? We've got the answer

    After undergoing a successful independent security audit earlier this year, IVPN has announced that it will open source all of its VPN clients.

    The VPN provider's Android, macOS, iOS and Windows apps are now open source under the GPLv3 license.

    However, this is just the first step in IVPN's multi-year plan to open source many other parts of its service. The company's next step is to release key parts of its infrastructure to the public with end goal of enabling anyone to set up and verify its VPN server configuration.

  • Is Google cooling on open-source foundations?

    Google has been one of big tech's biggest supporters of open-source software. But customers, partners and members of the open-source community say the company is shifting its priorities.

    Consider the case of the open-source project Istio, whose future was thrown into question late last year.

    Istio is a "service mesh," a tool that helps technology organizations manage application strategies built around microservices. Microservices allow developers to work on various parts of an application without having to worry about screwing up the whole thing — and help ensure that if one service goes down, the impact is relatively minor. For example, adopting microservices helped Twitter end the days of the fail whale.

    Google, IBM and Lyft introduced Istio in May 2017, and discussion about donating the project to a nonprofit foundation — which is common practice for open-source projects — took place almost immediately, according to several people familiar with the talks. Google controls six seats on the 10-seat steering committee that governs Istio, and the parties agreed to table further decision-making until the project found its footing, with consensus that Istio would eventually wind up in a foundation when the timing was right.

    By 2019, that momentum had arrived, as usage of Istio grew inside big companies and major organizations, like the U.S. Air Force. Throughout the year, Google continued to make vague promises to its partners about donating Istio to a foundation, which would mean ceding control of the project's trademarks and overall direction. The most natural time to make that announcement seemed to be November's Kubecon, a software convention dedicated to Kubernetes, the open-source project Google gave to a foundation in 2015.

  • Resolve data breaches with Firefox Monitor

    Corporate data breaches are an all too common reality of modern life. At best, you get an email from a company alerting you that they have been hacked, and then you’re left to figure out how to protect yourself from there. It’s lonely, daunting and leaves you seeking closure.

    With Firefox’s newest update to Monitor, you can track the breaches you’ve been involved in, follow steps to protect yourself, and mark a breach as “resolved” when you’re ready for some satisfying closure.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 69
  • MariaDB 10.5.1 Release Notes

    MariaDB 10.5 is the current development series of MariaDB. It is an evolution of MariaDB 10.4 with several entirely new features not found anywhere else and with backported and reimplemented features from MySQL.

  • Kiwi TCMS: We're not participating in 'QA of the year' award

    Hello testers, this is the story of how our team is not taking part of the "QA of the year" contest organized by the QA: Challenge Accepted conference despite being nominated by Alex.

  • People of WordPress: Kori Ashton

    You’ve probably heard that WordPress is open-source software, and may know that it’s created and run by volunteers. WordPress enthusiasts share many examples of how WordPress changed people’s lives for the better. This monthly series shares some of those lesser-known, amazing stories.

    [...]

    Like many other web development agencies, WebTegrity started out with the “one-time fee and you’re done” business model. This business model is known for unpredictable revenue streams. Hearing about recurring revenue business models at WordCamp Austin was a lightbulb moment for Kori. She started drafting a more sustainable business model on the way back home.

    Support packages were key to their new business plan. Clients needed ongoing support. They decided to include at least 12 months of post-launch support into their web development projects. This doubled their revenue in one year and allowed them to even out their revenue streams.

  • 2020-02-14 | Linux Headlines

    OpenSSH plans for the future of cryptography, NetBSD launches its first fundraising drive in a decade, Blender releases version 2.82, and Corona Labs announces its shutdown.

  • Last week of SoK 2020

    To this one I have made an checkable action in the menu “edit”, you can select it if you want to auto save a json or xml file automatically in the current working directory. This functionality can be pretty handy when annotating a big amount of items.

  • Akademy 2019 – Late Report

    There has been some time since my last blog post. It has happened because of a good cause, since I was focusing on my undergraduate thesis. Now I have finished it and finally have completed my graduation, yay! Soon I will include my thesis on my blog and share it with the world… I have just decided to fix some details in the project before that. Anyway, this post is to comment about my participation in Akademy 2019. I will give a brief report, share my experiences and tell you about how this experience was for me.

  • How to use an LED with Raspberry Pi

    Learn how to use an LED with Raspberry Pi in our latest How to use video on YouTube.

  • Accelerating IoT device time to market

    Launching IoT devices and managing them at scale can be a time intensive and complex process. With 85% of IoT initiatives not launched after a year of development, it is inevitable that change is needed.

    To overcome these challenges, Canonical has introduced Smart Start, a package that reduces business and technical decision making into a 2-week, fixed-cost decision. Smart Start provides a guided journey through the infrastructure needed to develop, customise, and distribute software to fleets of devices. With consulting services to de-risk the journey at critical points, an enterprise’s IoT strategy is fast tracked to market.

    This webinar details the learnings from over 30 project summaries and case studies of Canonical customers. Nilay Patel, Product Manager for IoT and Devices, will speak about the lessons to take away, and why businesses such as Rigado, Cyberdyne and Fingbox chose Canonical to launch their IoT devices.

  • Register today for LibrePlanet -- or organize your own satellite instance

    LibrePlanet started out as a gathering of Free Software Foundation (FSF) associate members, and has remained a community event ever since. We are proud to bring so many different people together to discuss the latest developments and the future of free software. We envision that some day there will be satellite instances all over the globe livestreaming our annual conference on technology and social justice -- and you can create your own today! All you need is a venue, a screen, and a schedule of LibrePlanet events, which we'll be releasing soon. This year, a free software supporter in Ontario, Canada, has confirmed an event, and we encourage you to host one, too.

    Of course, ideally you'll be able to join us in person for LibrePlanet 2020: "Free the Future." If you can come, please register now to let us know -- FSF associate members attend gratis. We are looking forward to receiving the community at the newly confirmed Back Bay Events Center this year. We've put together some information on where to eat, sleep, and park in the vicinity of the new venue.

    However, we know that not every free software enthusiast can make it to Boston, which is why we livestream the entire event. You can view it solo, with friends, or even with a large group of like-minded free software enthusiasts! It is a great opportunity to bring other people in your community together to view some of the foremost speakers in free software, including Internet Archive founder and Internet Hall of Famer Brewster Kahle.

  • Why I am not using Grindr

    Grindr is proprietary software that only runs on Android and iOS. It also depends on a centralized server infrastructure that stores data in unencrypted form. The company that hosts Grindr, Amazon is known for violating users privacy. Grindr also sends data to Third-Party Websites and is known for sharing users HIV status without their consent. The terms of use and privacy policy are much too long (about 50 pages), therefore most users don’t read them. If a user has read only parts of those terms, they should become suspect that Grindr violates their privacy and not use the service. I think that sensitive information should be visible only to the intended recipients and not the administrators of any servers or routers, therefore I never use Grindr.

  •                    

  • Microsoft temporarily blocked from beginning Pentagon project

                         

                           

    Amazon had asked the judge to force a temporary stay of work on the Joint Enterprise Defence Infrastructure, or JEDI, project until the court can rule on Amazon’s protest over Pentagon awarding it to Microsoft.

                           

    AWS had earlier alleged that the contract was awarded to Microsoft last October after US President Donald Trump exercised his influence over the country’s Defence Department.

  • Russell Coker: Self Assessment

    A significant problem in large parts of the computer industry is that it’s not easy to compare various skills. In the sport of bowling (which Erik uses as an example) it’s easy to compare your score against people anywhere in the world, if you score 250 and people in another city score 280 then they are more skilled than you. If I design an IT project that’s 2 months late on delivery and someone else designs a project that’s only 1 month late are they more skilled than me? That isn’t enough information to know. I’m using the number of months late as an arbitrary metric of assessing projects, IT projects tend to run late and while delivery time might not be the best metric it’s something that can be measured (note that I am slightly joking about measuring IT projects by how late they are).

    If the last project I personally controlled was 2 months late and I’m about to finish a project 1 month late does that mean I’ve increased my skills? I probably can’t assess this accurately as there are so many variables. The Impostor Syndrome factor might lead me to think that the second project was easier, or I might get egotistical and think I’m really great, or maybe both at the same time.

    This is one of many resources recommending timely feedback for education [4], it says “Feedback needs to be timely” and “It needs to be given while there is still time for the learners to act on it and to monitor and adjust their own learning”. For basic programming tasks such as debugging a crashing program the feedback is reasonably quick. For longer term tasks like assessing whether the choice of technologies for a project was good the feedback cycle is almost impossibly long. If I used product A for a year long project does it seem easier than product B because it is easier or because I’ve just got used to it’s quirks? Did I make a mistake at the start of a year long project and if so do I remember why I made that choice I now regret?

Red Hat: IBM Looses Grip on Hardware, Fedora and rpminspect Release

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The OpenPOWER ISA EULA Draft Published - Generous For Libre Hardware

    Last summer it was announced that IBM's POWER ISA would be open-source and the OpenPOWER Foundation joining the Linux Foundation. Finally we're getting a look at how the end-user license agreement (EULA) is looking for those wishing to make use of the POWER CPU instruction set architecture.

    The final draft of the Power ISA EULA was published this week that allows anyone to build their own POWER ISA compliant hardware royalty-free and with a pass-through patent license from IBM regarding the ISA.

    The EULA is quite generous and should allow anyone (well, anyone capable of spinning their own SoCs / FPGAs) to create a POWER ISA compliant chip and quite accommodating for "libre" hardware projects. The final draft of this EULA can be found at OpenPOWERFoundation.org.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-07

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • AAA: FAS replacement project update

    The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team and community contributors began building our new Fedora Account System (FAS) application system on the 8th of January 2020 and completed the first two-week sprint on the 21st of January 2020.

  • rpminspect-0.11 released

    The first release of rpminspect in 2020! I release rpminspect-0.11 today. Aside from the usual load of bug fixes and performance improvements, this release comes with a range of new features. New inspections, expanded configuration file options, and runtime profiles.

  • Do not upgrade to Fedora 32, and do not adjust your sets

    If you were unlucky today, you might have received a notification from GNOME in Fedora 30 or 31 that Fedora 32 is now available for upgrade.

    This might have struck you as a bit odd, it being rather early for Fedora 32 to be out and there not being any news about it or anything. And if so, you’d be right! This was an error, and we’re very sorry for it.

    What happened is that a particular bit of data which GNOME Software (among other things) uses as its source of truth about Fedora releases was updated for the branching of Fedora 32…but by mistake, 32 was added with status ‘Active’ (meaning ‘stable release’) rather than ‘Under Development’. This fooled poor GNOME Software into thinking a new stable release was available, and telling you about it.

NetBSD 9.0 available!

Filed under
BSD

Sixth months after the start of the release engineering process, NetBSD 9.0 is now available.

Since the start of the release process a lot of improvements went into the branch - over 700 pullups were processed!

This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface.

We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 - hopefully later this year).

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.0 Debuts As The "Best NetBSD Release Ever"

Games: Urtuk: The Desolation, Bite the Bullet, Barkour, Things I Hate About Linux Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Tactical turn-based RPG 'Urtuk: The Desolation' now on Steam for Linux

    With a low-fantasy setting, Urtuk: The Desolation has now jumped from itch.io to Steam to give Early Access turn-based tactics to a wider audience.

    You take on the role of Urtuk, an escapee from a facility that conducts experiments on people and during your stay you suffered some kind of "severe" mutation from being exposed to Life Essence extracted from long extinct ancient Giants. Every day your health gets worse and you wander the world for a cure. Definitely a setting that grabs your attention.

  • Get ready to eat your enemies in Bite the Bullet - releasing on March 27

    We have it confirmed now that the crazy action-platformer RPG 'Bite the Bullet' where you quite literally eat your enemies is releasing in March.

    A mix of rogue-lite randomness with the action you would expect from a shooter, plus some RPG elements thrown in for good measure. Bite the Bullet is certainly attention grabbing, especially since the headline feature is gameplay driven by what your character eats. It's weird I know—and Mega Cat Studios have now confirmed March 27 is the date and Linux support is online and ready.

  • Simple pleasures - bouncing and barking my way to victory in Barkour

    Sometimes it really is the simplest things that you need to make you laugh. Taking away from all the seriousness of the gaming industry we have Barkour.

    It's a small 2D indie platformer where you play as some sort of robotic dog with a powered jump ability. You need to find your way across an obstacle course, one that's designed to be difficult and it will take you some time to do. Get a gamepad ready for this one, you're going to need it.

  • 5 Things I Hate About Linux Gaming

    5 Things I Hate About Linux Gaming We did Linux and now it is time to go over the things I hate about Gaming on Linux.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Free From Epic Games Exclusivity, ‘Metro Exodus’ Is Coming To Linux

Filed under
Gaming

First the good news. As of Valentine’s Day 2020, Metro Exodus has been liberated from its Epic Games exclusivity agreement and is now available to purchase on Steam. And now the great news, especially for my regular readers: it looks like Deep Silver and developer 4A Games are working on bringing the post-apocalyptic shooter to Linux.

Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.5.4, 5.4.20, 4.19.104, 4.14.171, 4.9.214, and 4.4.214

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.5.4

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.5.4 kernel.

    All users of the 5.5 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.5.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.5.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.20
  • Linux 4.19.104
  • Linux 4.14.171
  • Linux 4.9.214
  • Linux 4.4.214

Programming: Interviews, Snek, JavaScript, Perl and Python

                   

  • The Horrifically Dystopian World of Software Engineering Interviews

                     

                       

    I am rather confused with the advertised rankings of a software engineer. There seem to be only two rankings: non-senior and senior. In general job ads ask for 5 years of experience in order to be considered a senior. There seem to be some missing rankings. What do we call someone with 20 years of experience? Are they really the same thing as someone with 5? In my case, what do we call someone with 4 years of experience? I am not a new grad. I know how to write software on my own. I know how version control works and how to exist in an Agile environment. Depending on the situation I need people to set the direction for my work. To add further complexity to the issue, there is the the issue of years of experience in a technology. If a person has 5 years of experience writing Java and moves to a team that uses Python and is made up of only people who have less than two years of experience in Python should this person be considered a junior? This is such a confusing topic that it warrants an entire article of its own and even then I am not sure I can make any sense of it. My point is that I lie somewhere between junior and senior and it seems to be slim pickings for my experience level.

  •                

  • Decomposing Splines Without Recursion

    To make graphics usable in Snek, I need to avoid using a lot of memory, especially on the stack as there's no stack overflow checking on most embedded systems. Today, I worked on how to draw splines with a reasonable number of line segments without requiring any intermediate storage. Here's the results from this work:

  • JavaScript Internationalization in 2020

    2020 is shaping up to be an amazing year for JavaScript Internationalization API.

    After many years of careful design we’re seeing a lot of the work now coming close to completion with a number of high profile APIs on track for inclusion in ECMAScript 2020 standard!

  • av_fetch can return NULL

    If you create an array by inserting values, in the following way,

    $thing{key}[10] = 1;
    and then don't populate the rest of the array, a call to av_fetch in the array to retrieve values lower than the tenth one may return a NULL value.

  • Selection Sort in Python

    Sorting, although a basic operation, is one of the most important operations a computer should perform. It is a building block in many other algorithms and procedures, such as searching and merging. Knowing different sorting algorithms could help you better understand the ideas behind the different algorithms, as well as help you come up with better algorithms.

    The Selection Sort algorithm sorts an array by finding the minimum value of the unsorted part and then swapping it with the first unsorted element. It is an in-place algorithm, meaning you won't need to allocate additional lists. While slow, it is still used as the main sorting algorithm in systems where memory is limited.

    In this article, we will explain how the Selection Sort works and implement it in Python. We will then break down the actions of the algorithm to learn its time complexity.

  • Multiple File/Image Upload with Django 3, Angular 9 and FormData

    In the previous tutorial we have seen how to implement file uploading in Django and Angular 9. In this tutorial, we'll see how to implement multiple file uploading.

    It's recommended that you start from the previous tutorial to see detailed steps of how to create a django project, how to install Angular CLI and generate a new Angular 9 project along with services and components as we won't cover those basics in this part.

  • Solving python error - ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10

    We can get this error when trying to convert a variable to an integer.

  • New features for Raspberry Pi, Wireguard in the Linux kernel, NSA Python course and more open source news

    The National Security Agency has released its own Python tutorial for beginners. It is a 118-megabyte PDF download that provides a complete course of study from a first Python project to advanced programming examples. While it’s not clearly licensed, it is declassified and available as a great resource to learn the language. Many thanks to Chris Swenson who submitted the FOIA request to the NSA for their Python training materials, which resulted in this treasure trove of Pythonics.

  • redirect-chain - Getting a comfortable insight input URL redirects history

    You can accomplish the same with curl -L but I've had this as a little personal hack script in my ~/bin folder on my computer. Thought I'd make it a public tool. Also, from here, a lot more can be done to this script if you wanna help out with ideas.

  • Solving python error - TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not iterable

    This is one of the most common errors we all faced at least once while working on a Python code. If you are facing a similar error then it is probably due to a for or while loop on an object.

  • Creating the ultimate terminal experience in Spyder 4 with Spyder-Terminal

    The Spyder-Terminal project is revitalized! The new 0.3.0 version adds numerous features that improves the user experience, and enhances compatibility with the latest Spyder 4 release, in part thanks to the improvements made in the xterm.js project.

Mesa Releases: 19.3.4 and 20.0 Release Candidate 3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.3.4
    Hi List,
    
    Mesa 19.3.4 is now available.
    
    There's lots of stuff here, but also a ton of release process data changes.
    We've got changes all over the tree, but aco and anv are leading the way in
    changes.
    
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (1):
          radv: Do not set SX DISABLE bits for RB+ with unused surfaces.
    
    Boris Brezillon (1):
          panfrost: Fix the damage box clamping logic
    
    Brian Ho (2):
          anv: Properly fetch partial results in vkGetQueryPoolResults
          anv: Handle unavailable queries in vkCmdCopyQueryPoolResults
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (2):
          i965: Do not set front_buffer_dirty if there is no front buffer
          st/mesa: Handle the rest renderbuffer formats from OSMesa
    
    Drew Davenport (1):
          radeonsi: Clear uninitialized variable
    
    Dylan Baker (17):
          docs: Add SHA 256 sums for 19.3.3
          .pick_status.json: Mark 58c929be0ddbbd9291d0dadbf11538170178e791 as backported
          .pick_status.json: Mark df34fa14bb872447fed9076e06ffc504d85e2d1c as backported
          .pick_status.json: Update to 997040e4b8353fe9b71a5e9fde2f933eae09c7a3
          .pick_status.json: Update to ca6a22305b275b49fbc88b8f4cba2fefb24c2a5d
          .pick_status.json: Mark 552028c013cc1d49a2b61ebe0fc3a3781a9ba826 as denominated
          .pick_status.json: Update to f09c466732e4a5b648d7503787777c926dd93c29
          bin/pick-ui: Add a new maintainer script for picking patches
          .pick_status.json: Update to b550b7ef3b8d12f533b67b1a03159a127a3ff34a
          .pick_status.json: Update to 9afdcd64f2c96f3fcc1a28912987f2e8066aa995
          .pick_status.json: Update to 7eaf21cb6f67adbe0e79b80b4feb8c816a98a720
          .pick_status.json: Mark ca6a22305b275b49fbc88b8f4cba2fefb24c2a5d as backported
          .pick_status.json: Update to d8bae10bfe0f487dcaec721743cd51441bcc12f5
          .pick_status.json: Update to 689817c9dfde9a0852f2b2489cb0fa93ffbcb215
          .pick_status.json: Update to 23037627359e739c42b194dec54875aefbb9d00b
          docs: Add release notes for 19.3.4
          VERSION: bump version for 19.3.4
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          Revert "gallium: Fix big-endian addressing of non-bitmask array formats."
    
    Florian Will (1):
          radv/winsys: set IB flags prior to submit in the sysmem path
    
    Georg Lehmann (3):
          Correctly wait in the fragment stage until all semaphores are signaled
          Vulkan Overlay: Don't try to change the image layout to present twice
          Vulkan overlay: use the corresponding image index for each swapchain
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          freedreno/ir3: put the conversion back for half const to the right place.
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          intel/fs: Don't count integer instructions as being possibly coissue
    
    Jan Vesely (1):
          clover: Use explicit conversion from llvm::StringRef to std::string
    
    Jason Ekstrand (6):
          anv: Insert holes for non-existant XFB varyings
          anv: Improve BTI change cache flushing
          anv,iris: Set 3DSTATE_SF::DerefBlockSize to per-poly on Gen12+
          genxml: Add a new 3DSTATE_SF field on gen12
          intel/fs: Write the address register with NoMask for MOV_INDIRECT
          anv/blorp: Use the correct size for vkCmdCopyBufferToImage
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          i965: Use brw_batch_references in tex_busy check
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          isl: drop CCS row pitch requirement for linear surfaces
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: fix the DCC MSAA bug workaround
    
    Marek Vasut (1):
          etnaviv: Destroy rsc->pending_ctx set in etna_resource_destroy()
    
    Michel Dänzer (6):
          winsys/amdgpu: Keep a list of amdgpu_screen_winsyses in amdgpu_winsys
          winsys/amdgpu: Keep track of retrieved KMS handles using hash tables
          winsys/amdgpu: Only re-export KMS handles for different DRM FDs
          util: Add os_same_file_description helper
          winsys/amdgpu: Re-use amdgpu_screen_winsys when possible
          winsys/amdgpu: Close KMS handles for other DRM file descriptions
    
    Neha Bhende (1):
          svga: fix size of format_conversion_table[]
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (2):
          radeonsi: disable display DCC
          radeonsi: stop using the VM_ALWAYS_VALID flag
    
    Rafael Antognolli (1):
          intel: Load the driver even if I915_PARAM_REVISION is not found.
    
    Rhys Perry (6):
          aco: fix operand to scc when selecting SGPR ufind_msb/ifind_msb
          aco: ensure predecessors' p_logical_end is in WQM when a p_phi is in WQM
          aco: run p_wqm instructions in WQM
          aco: don't consider loop header blocks branch blocks in add_coupling_code
          aco: don't always add logical edges from continue_break blocks to headers
          aco: fix target calculation when vgpr spilling introduces sgpr spilling
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: do not allow sparse resources with multi-planar formats
          nir: do not use De Morgan's Law rules for flt and fge
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          mapi: add GetInteger64vEXT with EXT_disjoint_timer_query
          mesa: allow bit queries for EXT_disjoint_timer_query
    
    Thomas Hellstrom (1):
          svga: Fix banded DMA upload
    
    Vasily Khoruzhick (1):
          lima: ppir: don't delete root ld_tex nodes without successors in current block
    
    Vinson Lee (1):
          swr: Fix GCC 4.9 checks.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.4
    
    
  • mesa 20.0.0-rc3
    Hi list,
    
    Mesa 20.0.0-rc3 is now available. This is a much smaller release than last time,
    things seem to be slowing down nicely, and the number of opened issues/MRs
    against the 20.0 release milestone is 2; I'm hopeful that means we can have the
    20.0 release next week, and begin the normal release process without a dozen
    RCs.
    
    There's a bit of everything in here, gallium, freedreno, vulkan overlays, anv,
    radeonsi, svga, intel common, aco, nir, swr, and panfrost, but no on thing
    dominates the changes, which I like a lot.
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Dylan Baker (4):
          .pick_status.json: Update to d8bae10bfe0f487dcaec721743cd51441bcc12f5
          .pick_status.json: Update to 689817c9dfde9a0852f2b2489cb0fa93ffbcb215
          .pick_status.json: Update to 23037627359e739c42b194dec54875aefbb9d00b
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0-rc3
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          Revert "gallium: Fix big-endian addressing of non-bitmask array formats."
    
    Georg Lehmann (3):
          Correctly wait in the fragment stage until all semaphores are signaled
          Vulkan Overlay: Don't try to change the image layout to present twice
          Vulkan overlay: use the corresponding image index for each swapchain
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          freedreno/ir3: put the conversion back for half const to the right place.
    
    James Xiong (1):
          gallium: let the pipe drivers decide the supported modifiers
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          anv: set MOCS on push constants
    
    Marek Olšák (2):
          radeonsi: don't report that multi-plane formats are supported
          radeonsi: fix the DCC MSAA bug workaround
    
    Neha Bhende (2):
          svga: fix size of format_conversion_table[]
          svga: Use pipe_shader_state_from_tgsi to set shader state
    
    Rafael Antognolli (1):
          intel: Load the driver even if I915_PARAM_REVISION is not found.
    
    Rhys Perry (1):
          aco: fix gfx10_wave64_bpermute
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (4):
          aco: do not use ds_{read,write}2 on GFX6
          aco: fix waiting for scalar stores before "writing back" data on GFX8-GFX9
          aco: fix creating v_madak if v_mad_f32 has two sgpr literals
          nir: do not use De Morgan's Law rules for flt and fge
    
    Tapani Pälli (1):
          intel/vec4: fix valgrind errors with vf_values array
    
    Thomas Hellstrom (1):
          svga: Fix banded DMA upload
    
    Timur Kristóf (1):
          aco/optimizer: Don't combine uniform bool s_and to s_andn2.
    
    Vinson Lee (2):
          swr: Fix GCC 4.9 checks.
          panfrost: Remove unused anonymous enum variables.
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0-rc3
    
    
  • Mesa 20.0-RC3 Released Along With Mesa 19.3.4 As The Latest Of The Stable Series

    On the stable front, Mesa 19.3.4 is out as the newest point release in this driver series from Q4'2019. Mesa 19.3.4 has various RADV and ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a few Vulkan overlay fixes even, several AMDGPU winsys fixes, RadeonSI is now disabling display DCC over issues, and there are also a number of Valve ACO back-end fixes too. Overall, Mesa 19.3.4 is a pretty hefty stable update particularly for Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan driver users.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Canonical Outs New Major Kernel Update for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Available for the Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update is here to fix a vulnerability (CVE-2019-14615) affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a race condition (CVE-2019-18683) discovered in the Virtual Video Test Driver (VIVID), which could allow an attacker with write access to /dev/video0 to gain administrative privileges, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-19241) in Linux kernel’s IO uring implementation that could also allow a local attacker to gain administrative privileges. Another race condition (CVE-2019-19602) was fixed on x86 platforms, which could let a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory corruption) or gain administrative privileges. Moreover, issues (CVE-2019-18786 and CVE-2019-19947) discovered in the Renesas Digital Radio Interface (DRIF) and Kvaser CAN/USB drivers could allow local attackers to expose sensitive information (kernel memory). Read more

10 Best Linux Terminal Emulators [2020 Edition]

Do you prefer terminal emulators over GUI? But there are times when the terminal’s decent styling seems boring. In such cases, you look for more options to customize the terminal just like we do while choosing Linux distros. If that’s the case, your wait is over as we bring the list of best terminal emulators for Linux that you can use to refresh your monotonous daily work. Along with the styling, you can also turn the single terminal into a multigrid, observing the activity of each terminal simultaneously. Read more