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Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 5:27pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 5:25pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 11:10am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 11:07am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 11:06am
Story 6 smart settings to make your Android phone anticipate your needs Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 11:00am
Story Android and Tizen Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 10:08am
Story Update: Convictions Upheld, Sentences Extended In Romanian Microsoft Bribery Trial Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 9:59am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 9:57am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2016 - 9:56am

Android Leftovers

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Tizen News

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  • Samsung’s Quantum Dot SUHD named ‘TV of the Year’ in UK

    It is evident that Samsung has been having a hard time to gain back customers’ trust after the Note 7 disaster. However, not everything’s going wrong for the South Korean Electronics giant. The company’s Tizen Based Quantum DOT SUHD (2016) TV was named as the “2016 TV of the year” by some of the top IT magazines in the UK. Samsung’s Quantum DOT SUHD TVs bagged 5 out 5 points from “WHAT HI-FI” internet tech magazine which also obviously had to be the top score.

  • FootLOL – Crazy Football game for Tizen

    Last week lots of games were added to the Tizen store. Zombie Derby 2 is one of them by Herocraft Ltd. Today they added another game in the Tizen Store named FootLOL – Crazy Football.

  • Putin’s standard for IoT is the new 1984

    As the Internet of Things gets more popular new questions arise: which protocol will become the open standard for supporting IoT networks across a huge array of devices around the world? Today we start hearing some answers from Russia.

    Igor Shchyogolev, former Minister of Telecommunications between 2008 and 2012, is thinking about a service that involves both an Internet card and a City card for citizen to use the Internet, hence named “Internet + City card” or just “Internet + City”. Long story short, Russia is contemplating the hypothesis of domestic regulation, rather than an intergovernmental agreement between major countries involved. Testament to this intent are Russian focus towards cryptographic protection and the plan of the country to substain such autarchics drives with national production of chips and direct control of both analog and digital TV frequencies.

  • App: ASMR Sounds by Dreamroad Production is available on Tizen Store
  • Samsung’s Announces its First 8GB LPDDR4 DRAM Package

GitHub open-sources tool to track and preview Puppet changes

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If tweaks to your Puppet setups are causing breakage across your deployments, GitHub's Octocatalog-diff ensures that new Puppet settings don't wreck old ones

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The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election

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The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board provides the development community (primarily the kernel development community) with a voice in the Foundation's decision-making process. Among other things, the TAB chair holds a seat on the Foundation's board of directors. The next TAB election will be held on November 2 at the Kernel Summit in Santa Fe, NM; five TAB members (½ of the total) will be selected there. The nomination process is open until voting begins; anybody interested in serving on the TAB is encouraged to throw their hat into the ring.

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Remote Linux Support Software: Top Picks for Linux Support

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Having remote support for Linux work with one release, then completely stopping Linux support with the next application release is a frustrating experience. Sometime ago, we watched this happen with Splashtop. What's even lazier on their part, is that they can't be bothered to remove the obsolete Linux packages.

Then you had options like Mikogo. They went from supporting remote support for Linux users to acknowledging in a blog post that this is no longer the case. To be fair, the software is still available if you know where to look for it. However it's not a good idea to rely on unsupported software.

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From There to Here (But Not Back Again)

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Red Hat

Red Hat Product Security recently celebrated our 15th anniversary this summer and while I cannot claim to have been with Red Hat for that long (although I’m coming up on 8 years myself), I’ve watched the changes from the “0day” of the Red Hat Security Response Team to today. In fact, our SRT was the basis for the security team that Mandrakesoft started back in the day.

In 1999, I started working for Mandrakesoft, primarily as a packager/maintainer. The offer came, I suspect, because of the amount of time I spent volunteering to maintain packages in the distribution. I also was writing articles for TechRepublic at the time, so I also ended up being responsible for some areas of documentation, contributing to the manual we shipped with every boxed set we sold (remember when you bought these things off the shelf?).

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Android Leftovers

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Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

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Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration.

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Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

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Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law.

Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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What is the GRUB2 boot loader?

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Red Hat

There are various things that make up an operating system. In any operating system, one of the most critical parts is powering on the machine. During this process, the computer will execute a small program in read-only memory (ROM) to begin initiating the startup process. This small program is known by many names, but most often called a boot loader. In almost every Linux distribution, including Fedora, GRUB2 (or GRand Unified Bootloader 2) is the default boot loader. Even though it is a critical piece of the operating system, many people aren’t aware of the boot loader, all that goes into it, or how it can be customized.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.8.3 Soon, GNOME 3.22.1 Landed

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openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger informs the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software projects that landed in the stable repositories.

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KDE Applications 16.12 Software Suite Lands December 15 for KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

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KDE Plasma's KDE Applications 16.08 software suite series will receive just one more point release, namely KDE Applications 16.08.3, which lands November 10, so it's time for the next major branch.

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Android Leftovers

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Security News

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  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack

    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us.

    The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality.

    An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.

  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet

    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords.

    On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.

  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords

    Fingerprints aren’t authentication.

    Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames.

    Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.

  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux

    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime

    It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.

  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu

    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.

  • Everything you know about security is wrong

    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure.


    If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.

  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT

    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

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  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd

    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD.

    During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.

  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using

    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

    But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”

  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement

    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

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After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.