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Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:27pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:26pm
Story Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:25pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:22pm
Story Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:20pm
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 1:18pm
Story Btrfs Getting RAID 5/6 Fixes In Linux 4.12 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 12:27pm
Story Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapata - Viva la revolucion! Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 11:20am
Story Ubuntu 17.04 Review: Except for the Horrible DNS Issue (now ‘fixed’), a Good Release. Oh and, Farewell Unity! Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 11:16am
Story arkOS Sunset Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2017 - 11:12am

Big Data and OpenStack

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Open Source Tools for Enterprise Data Science
  • Open for business: Hortonworks aims for open source profitability

    It used to be the Hadoop Summit, but the strategic focus at Hortonworks the enterprise-ready open source Apache Hadoop provider, has evolved. So, this year it was renamed DataWorks Summit. The company now encompasses data at rest (the Hadoop Data Platform now in version 2.6), data in motion (the Hadoop Data Flow) and data in the cloud (the Hadoop Data Cloud). Hortonworks aims to become a multi-platform and multi-cloud company. The focus is on the data in data driven organisations. Just a few years ago Hortonworks connected with IT architects. Today it’s launching conversations with lines of business and chief marketing officers.

  • What's new in OpenStack Ocata

    OpenStack Ocata has now been out for a little over a month and we're about to see the first milestone of the Pike release. Past cycles show that now's about the time when people start looking at the new release to see if they should consider moving to it. So here's a quick overview of what's new in this release.

  • Research: OpenStack user satisfaction ratings drop, as adoption of the open source cloud rises

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

Unity and I never saw eye to eye, but it did a good job of pushing the Linux desktop in new directions and it emphasised something that, particularly when it arrived, was otherwise lacking – innovation in design.

Unity might have borrowed a few elements from Apple's OS X, but it quickly outgrew those initial imitations and forged its own path and its own aesthetic, something that's all too rare in open-source software.

Read more

UK GDS looking for architects with open source expertise

Filed under
OSS

The UK Government Digital Service (GDS) has released a 'Technical Architects recruitment guide'. The agency hopes to attract more technical architects by describing its recruitment process, thereby helping candidates to prepare better for the job interviews and making these more accessible to people unfamiliar with the Civil Service Commission recruitment principles.

Read more

Debian Derivatives: Elive, TeX Live, and deepin

Filed under
Debian
  • Elive 2.9.0 beta released

    The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.0

  • TeX Live 2017 pretest started

    Preparations for the release of TeX Live 2017 have started a few days ago with the freeze of updates in TeX Live 2016 and the announcement of the official start of the pretest period. That means that we invite people to test the new release and help fixing bugs.

  • deepin 15.4 Released With New Features — One Of The Best Looking Linux Distros

    The deepin development team has released deepin 15.4 Linux distro. This release is powered by Linux kernel 4.9.8, which means that now more number of devices are supported. The major highlights of this elegant operating system are new designs for control center and desktop, improvements in the installer and hot corners, etc.

Hardware/Modding

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Atreus: Building a custom ergonomic keyboard

    As mentioned in my Working on Android post, I’ve been using a mechanical keyboard for a couple of years now. Now that I work on Flowhub from home, it was a good time to re-evaluate the whole work setup. As far as regular keyboards go, the MiniLa was nice, but I wanted something more compact and ergonomic.

  • Intel Open Sources All Lustre Work, Brent Gorda Exits

    In a letter to the Lustre community posted on the Intel website, Vice President of Intel’s Data Center Group Trish Damkroger informs that effective immediately the company will be contributing all Lustre development to the open source community. Damkroger also announced that Brent Gorda, General Manager, High Performance Data Division at Intel is leaving the company. Gorda is the former CEO of Whamcloud, the Lustre specialist acquired by Intel in 2012.

  • Korean researchers develop open source 3D bioprinter

    Researchers from Seoul National University of Science and Technology in Korea have published the schematics for an open source 3D bioprinter.

  • 3d-Printing is cool

    I've heard about 3d-printing a lot in the past, although the hype seems to have mostly died down. My view has always been "That seems cool", coupled with "Everybody says making the models is very hard", and "the process itself is fiddly & time-consuming".

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • 5 ways to succeed at learning a programming language

    Whether you're taking up programming for the first time, or learning your 50th language, you might ask, "What's the best way to learn to program?" I surveyed dozens of people who taught themselves to program in Rust as part of my OSCON talk in 2016, and asked the expert autodidacts what advice they would give to others for picking up a new language. I found that despite their diverse backgrounds, all of my interviewees shared five common approaches to building new programming skills.

  • GitHub Developer Program shows bigger love

    The GitHub Developer Program (programme, if we’re using Her Majesty’s English) has been around for around three years now.

    Essentially, this initiative exists to encourage developers to test out application builds that integrate with GitHub.

  • GitHub Opens Developer Program to All

    GitHub Inc. has revamped its developer program with several changes, including opening it up to all developers for the first time.

    Previously, the three-year-old GitHub Developer Program was available to only those developers who had paid accounts at the open source code repository and software development platform specializing in Git-based version control.

  • RcppQuantuccia 0.0.1
  • 3 open source code libraries to handle MARC-formatted records

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Black Duck Attacks FOSS Again, for Marketing Purposes, Pretends It's "Research"

Filed under
OSS
Security

Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

    The Sunnyvale, Calif. company is doing this by launching a new single integrated distribution of OpenStack and Kubernetes: Mirantis Cloud Platform (MCP) 1.0. This new release also offers a unique build-operate-transfer delivery model.

  • Mirantis launches its new OpenStack and Kubernetes cloud platform

    Mirantis, one of the earliest players in the OpenStack ecosystem, today announced that it will end-of-life Mirantis OpenStack support in September 2019. The Mirantis Cloud Platform, which combines OpenStack with the Kubernetes container platform (or which could even be used to run Kubernetes separately), is going to take its place.

    While Mirantis is obviously not getting out of the OpenStack game, this move clearly shows that there is a growing interest in the Kubernetes container platform and that Mirantis’ customers are now starting to look at this as a way to modernize their software deployment strategies without going to OpenStack. The new platform allows users to deploy multiple Kubernetes clusters side-by-side with OpenStack — or separately.

A group of middle-school girls is learning to program, courtesy of Red Hat

Filed under
Development
Red Hat

If you're walking in the area of Boston's City Hall Plaza today, you might find yourself the subject of unique photo collage tomorrow.

Twenty-five local middle school girl are out roaming the city with digital cameras they built themselves as part of Red Hat Inc.'s (NYSE: RHT) CO.LAB initiative. On Friday, they'll turn the photos into a digital art installation that will be displayed at City Hall and Boston University.

The girls built the cameras on Wednesday out of Raspberry Pi computer kits — small, simple devices that teach the basics of programming. (Click through the gallery above to see the building process.)

Read more

Financial news:

Fedora:

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 'Benign' worm seeks out vulnerable smart devices

    A "benign" worm is scouring the net seeking out poorly protected smart gadgets.

    CCTV systems, routers, digital video recorders and other internet-of-things (IoT) devices are now believed to be harbouring the Hajime worm.

  • How to manage the computer-security threat

    COMPUTER security is a contradiction in terms. Consider the past year alone: cyberthieves stole $81m from the central bank of Bangladesh; the $4.8bn takeover of Yahoo, an internet firm, by Verizon, a telecoms firm, was nearly derailed by two enormous data breaches; and Russian hackers interfered in the American presidential election.

    Away from the headlines, a black market in computerised extortion, hacking-for-hire and stolen digital goods is booming. The problem is about to get worse. Computers increasingly deal not just with abstract data like credit-card details and databases, but also with the real world of physical objects and vulnerable human bodies. A modern car is a computer on wheels; an aeroplane is a computer with wings. The arrival of the “Internet of Things” will see computers baked into everything from road signs and MRI scanners to prosthetics and insulin pumps. There is little evidence that these gadgets will be any more trustworthy than their desktop counterparts. Hackers have already proved that they can take remote control of connected cars and pacemakers.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Open Source Remote Access Trojan Targets Telegram Users

    Remote access Trojans are mainly used to steal consumer data, either for consumers themselves or the conglomerate keeping this information safe from prying eyes. However, it appears criminals are looking at a different approach for these tools right now. A new open source remote access Trojan can now be used to extract data from the Telegram communication platform.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Fasd – A Commandline Tool That Offers Quick Access to Files and Directories

    Fasd (pronounced as “fast“) is command-line productivity booster, a self-contained POSIX shell script which enables quick and more efficient access to files and directories.

  • What’s new in SSHGuard 2.0

    SSHGuard is an intrusion prevention utility that parses logs and automatically blocks misbehaving IP addresses with the system firewall. It’s less configurable than the better-known Fail2Ban but has a smaller resource footprint and ships with full IPv6 support. The newly released SSHGuard version 2.0 have been made easier to configure for new users. It also gained support for FirewallD, ipset, and ipfilter firewall backends on Linux; as well as Capsicum sandboxing support on *BSD.

    While we’re still waiting for the next release of Fail2Ban with IPv6 support, I took a look around at some of the alternatives and found an interesting option in SSHGuard. I had to address some Linux compatibility issues when getting started with SSHGuard as the development team was mostly focused on FreeBSD. I submitted patches for those issues and got more involved in the development and release of SSHGuard 2.0 in the process.

  • Steghide – An Easy way to Hide Confidential Data Inside Images and Sound Objects in Linux

    As of now, we have wrote few articles about the same topics but the way of method is different, how to hide files and folders in Linux & how to protect files and folders with password to safe the personal documents from others. It help us to send the secret information over the Internet like mail.

    Today we are going to discuss the same topic once again but the method is completely different. I mean, i will show you, how to hide sensitive data inside image and audio files using steghide utility.

  • 3 Emacs extensions for getting organized

    In the colophon to his book, Just a Geek, actor and writer Wil Wheaton wrote that he wanted to use Emacs to write the book but "couldn't find the text editor." Wheaton was joking, of course, but he highlighted an important point about Emacs: it's gone way beyond its roots as a tool for editing text.

    Thanks to its many modes (extensions that change the way the editor behaves), you can use Emacs for just about anything: browsing the web, reading and sending email, publishing blog posts and books, managing databases, learning with flashcards, and much more.

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Meson considerations

    A number of GNOME modules are switching to meson for 3.26. I myself was an early adopter for this: recipes has had meson build support since the beginning of the year, and after the 1.0 release, I’ve dropped autotools support on the master branch.

    autotools are of course very familiar to most of us, and we know how to get most things done there. But it often isn’t pretty, and using meson feels like a breath of fresh air. Others have been praising meson for its simplicity, ease of use and speed, so I am not going repeat that here.

  • GStreamer 1.12 Is On Approach With New Features, Wayland Zero-Copy Playback

    GStreamer 1.12.0 will soon be released as the latest version of this widely-used, open-source multimedia framework.

    GStreamer 1.12 is bringing waylandsink DMA-BUF importation support so zero-copy multimedia playback will now work under Wayland. GStreamer 1.12 is also bringing Fraunhofer FDK AAC encoder/decoder support, Intel Media SDK support for accelerated video encode/decode on embedded Linux and Windows, OpenCV improvements, CineForm support, and more.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Mozilla Thunderbird, Firefox, and Google Blocking Ads?

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Mockups of a new Thunderbird style look quite incredible
  • Mozilla Firefox web browser may no longer be supported on your Linux computer

    Firefox is a wonderful open source web browser. As a result, it comes pre-loaded on many Linux-based operating systems, such as Ubuntu and Fedora. Yeah, some people choose to install Chromium or Chrome instead, but Mozilla's offering remains a staple in the Linux community.

  • Mozilla, Microsoft rebuilding their browsers’ foundations without anyone noticing

    Project Quantum is how Mozilla plans to adapt for this new age. Mozilla is using its safer Rust programming language for parts of Quantum. The company has an experimental rendering engine called Servo that's written in Rust, and pieces of this will make their way into Firefox. The initial focus will be on updating those parts of Gecko that are most amenable to parallel or GPU-based computation, and Firefox 53 contains the first element of this. Firefox 53 will (for most people; it requires Windows 7 with the Platform Update, or better, plus a GPU that isn't blacklisted) create a separate GPU process that's used to perform compositing. The compositor process takes the different elements of the page and the Firefox window and merges them together to create the finished product.

  • Will Google move to block adverts?

    Google's vast wealth and huge influence is built on one thing - advertising - so it might seem bizarre for the search giant to make it less likely that users would see ads.

    But the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google is planning to introduce ad-blocking in its popular Chrome web browser.

  • Google might roll out their own ad-blocker in Chrome

KDE Applications 17.04 and United KDE theme

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Unveiled
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.04.0

    April 20, 2017. KDE Applications 17.04 is here. On the whole, we have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier.

  • United, a new KDE theme gives you a Unity look and feel

    Yet another tick in the box for my love of how customizable Linux desktops are. United is a new theme for KDE that aims to emulate the Unity look and feel.

    This could be a good option for those Unity fans who want to keep a similar experience, but maybe try something a little different.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenELEC 8.0.2 Embedded Linux Entertainment OS Is Out with Mesa 17.0.4, More

The OpenELEC 8.0 open-source embedded Linux entertainment operating system received its second maintenance update, versioned 8.0.2, which fixes various issues reported by users lately and updates some core components. Read more

Red Hat Financial News

  • Red Hat announces latest version of Ansible
  • Red Hat On An Expansion Spree In India
    Red Hat is aggressively expanding its operations in India. The company recently announced the opening of two new offices in Bangalore and New Delhi. With the opening of the new offices, Red Hat is expanding its footprint in India with a goal of supporting interest for open source solutions and services from customers and partners and further promoting the benefits open source solutions can offer enterprises in India. Red Hat now has six offices in India, including additional facilities in Bangalore and New Delhi, and offices in Mumbai and Pune. Red Hat’s new Bangalore office is a 14,000 sq. ft. facility at Lavelle Road. It is designed to act as a training and enablement center for customers and partners. Through the new facility, which features a cafeteria, and space for networking, meetings, training and certification exams, and an indoor game zone, Red Hat aims to bring its open, collaborative culture to life. The additional New Delhi office is a 12,405 sq.ft facility located close to the international airport at Aerocity, designed with an eye toward enabling collaboration with customers throughout the region.
  • Somewhat Positive Press Coverage Very Likely to Affect Red Hat (RHT) Stock Price
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Releases Q1 Earnings Guidance

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Recursive DNS Server Fingerprint Problem

    Our goal is to identify hijacked resolvers by analyzing their fingerprints, in order to increase safety of Internet users. To do that, we utilize data collected via RIPE Atlas (atlas.ripe.net).

  • Online developer tutorials are spreading XSS and SQL injection flaws

    The researchers, from across three universities in Germany and Trend Micro, checked the PHP code bases of more than 64,000 projects on Github and uncovered more than 100 vulnerabilities that they believe might have been introduced as a result of developers picking up the code that they used from online tutorials.

  • BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance

    BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 104 in Stretch cycle
  • Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files
    Webroot's security tools went berserk today, mislabeling key Microsoft Windows system files as malicious and temporarily removing them – knackering PCs in the process. Not only were people's individual copies of the antivirus suite going haywire, but also business editions and installations run by managed service providers (MSPs), meaning companies and organizations relying on the software were hit by the cockup. Between 1200 and 1500 MST (1800 and 2100 UTC) today, Webroot's gear labeled Windows operating system data as W32.Trojan.Gen – generic-Trojan-infected files, in other words – and moved them into quarantine, rendering affected computers unstable. Files digitally signed by Microsoft were whisked away – but, luckily, not all of them, leaving enough of the OS behind to reboot and restore the quarantined resources.
  • How The Update Framework Improves Security of Software Updates
    Updating software is one of the most important ways to keep users and organizations secure. But how can software be updated securely? That's the challenge that The Update Framework (TUF) aims to solve. Justin Cappos, assistant professor at New York University, detailed how TUF works and what's coming to further improve the secure updating approach in a session at last week's DockerCon 17 conference in Austin, Texas. Simply using HTTPS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure a download isn't enough as there have been many publicly reported instances of software repositories that have been tampered with, Cappos said.
  • Security Updates for Ubuntu Phone to End in June
    Security updates for Ubuntu phone and tablet will end this June, Canonical has confirmed. Current OTA updates are currently limited to critical fixes and security updates — a decision we were first to tell you back in January. But after June 2017 Canonical “will no longer deliver any further updates”.
  • Canonical to stop supporting Ubuntu Phone in June
    Canonical had already announced development of its Ubuntu Phone software was ending. Now we know when the final nail goes in the coffin: June.
  • Malware Hunts And Kills Poorly Secured Internet Of Things Devices Before They Can Be Integrated Into Botnets
    Researchers say they've discovered a new wave of malware with one purpose: to disable poorly secured routers and internet of things devices before they can be compromised and integrated into botnets. We've often noted how internet-of-broken-things devices ("smart" doorbells, fridges, video cameras, etc.) have such flimsy security that they're often hacked and integrated into botnets in just a matter of seconds after being connected to the internet. These devices are then quickly integrated into botnets that have been responsible for some of the worst DDoS attacks we've ever seen (including last October's attack on DYN).

GNOME/GTK News

  • The Way GNOME Handles Wallpapers Really Annoys Me
    I love GNOME Shell — and no, not just because I’ve little choice now that is Ubuntu’s default desktop! But the more I use GNOME the more I learn that the desktop environment, like every other, has its own share of quirks, bugs and inconsistencies. Like the following appreciably niche niggle in the the way GNOME handles desktop wallpapers.
  • Drag-and-drop in lists
    I’ve recently had an occasion to implement reordering of a GtkListBox via drag-and-drop (DND). It was not that complicated. Since I haven’t seen drag-and-drop used much with list boxes, here is a quick summary of what is needed to get the basics working.