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Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FESCo Approves More Feature Changes For Fedora 26 Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 1:58pm
Story Tired of Windows? Switching to Linux Will Be Easy If You Know This Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 1:48pm
Story New User Distros, Powered By Linux, No Opera for You Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 1:42pm
Story What Is Conky And How To Configure Conky On Ubuntu 16.04 Mohd Sohail 14/01/2017 - 11:45am
Story Debian vs. Ubuntu Standoff – Comparing the Top Linux Solutions Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 9:14am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 9:00am
Story Games Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 8:59am
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 8:58am
Story Linux Kernel News and Linux Foundation Projects Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 8:57am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2017 - 8:55am

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Announcing Remacs: Porting Emacs to Rust

    I am delighted to announce Remacs, a project to port Emacs to Rust!

    Emacs, at its heart, is a lisp interpreter written in C. In Remacs, we’re replacing this C code with Rust, and all the elisp you know and love will just work.

    If you’ve ever fancied contributing to core Emacs, this is a great opportunity to learn the internals. There’s tons of low hanging fruit, we have a list of good first bugs and even a walkthrough of writing your first elisp function using Rust.

  • Remacs: Re-Implementing Emacs In Rust

    For those looking at other new uses for the Rust programming language, there is now a Rust implementation of the popular Emacs editor.

  • It’s Time to Ditch Skype and TeamSpeak, Discord Launches Its App for Linux Users

    In a very brief announcement posted on Twitter earlier today, January 11, 2016, Discord, the company behind the popular, free, and secure all-in-one voice and text chat for gamers announced the first stable release of their app for Linux platforms.

    Linux was the missing piece for them to achieve full status and offer their services across all major platforms, both on desktop and mobile. Discord is currently available for Android, iOS, Mac, and Windows, but you can also use it directly from the Web, using a compatible web browser.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 2017 January Elections: Interviews

    The 2017 January cycle of Elections is in full swing. Voting officially began on Tuesday, January 10th, and ends Monday, January 16th at 11:59 UTC. Voting takes place on the Voting application website. As part of the Elections coverage on the Community Blog, most of the candidates running for seats published their interviews and established their platforms here. Are you getting ready to vote and looking for this information? You can find the full list of candidates and links to their interviews below.

  • Free your Desktop (or the tools I use)

    Quite some time ago I wrote a Free Your Android post, as an overview of the software I use on my mobile phone. I decided to write this similar post as an overview of the software I regularly use on my laptop. This can also be considered as a "Free Your Desktop" post, although the biggest step here would be to change the operation system if you are not already using a Linux distribution.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Third Party Patch Roundup – December 2016
  • The MongoDB hack and the importance of secure defaults

    If you have a MongoDB installation, now would be the time to verify that it is secure. Since just before Christmas, over 28,000 public MongoDB installs have been hacked. The attackers are holding the hacked data ransom, demanding companies pay using Bitcoins to get their data back. From the looks of it, at least 20 companies have given in and paid the ransom so far. This post explains the hack, how to protect yourself, and what we can learn from it.

  • Implantable Cardiac Devices Could Be Vulnerable to Hackers, FDA Warns

    Low-level hackers can play with your heart. Literally. Pacemakers, defibrillators and other devices manufactured by St. Jude Medical, a medical device company based in Minnesota, could have put patients’ lives at risk, the US Food & Drug Administration warned on Monday, the same day a new software patch was released to address these vulnerabilities.

    There are several confirmed vulnerabilities that could have granted hackers remote access a person’s implanted cardiac device. Then, they could change the heart rate, administer shocks, or quickly deplete the battery. There hadn’t been any report of patient harm related to these vulnerabilities as of Monday, the FDA said.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Will Soon Make It Easier to Enable Unity 7 Low Graphics Mode in Ubuntu

    Canonical's Eleni Maria Stea is reporting today on the upcoming availability of a new option that would allow users to easily enable the low graphics mode for the Unity 7 desktop environment in Ubuntu Linux.

  • Man, I Used To Think My Ubuntu Desktop Looked So Cool…

    It is crazy how fast — and how drastically — tastes change.

    The desktop screencast in the video player aboves my Ubuntu 8.10 desktop as it looked back in 2008, in all its gaudy over-glossed glory. AWN? Check. Screenlets? Check. Compiz cube? Ch-ch-check!

    Like an old photo of a bad haircut, this video is very much of its its time.

    But aside from being a bit cringe, it shows how far the Linux desktop aesthetic has come, and how far our own tastes have too.

  • Does Ubuntu Budgie Need a New Logo?

    Now that Ubuntu Budgie is an official Ubuntu flavor we're excited to see what developers plan to do this cycle — but could that mean a new logo?

  • Ubuntu Budgie Devs Would Like You to Vote for New or Old Logos of the Linux OS

    It would appear that the Ubuntu Budgie development team is now complete. They were looking for a graphics designer in December, and it looks like they found the right person for the job.

    We told you a while ago that Ubuntu Budgie, the GNU/Linux distribution formerly known as budgie-remix and based on the latest Budgie desktop environment and Ubuntu Linux operating system, achieved official Ubuntu flavor status from Canonical, and will join all the other editions as part of the Ubuntu 17.04 release in April.

Oi, Mint 18.1! KEEP UP! Ubuntu LTS love breeds a laggard

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Linux Mint project dropped a last-minute gift during the Christmas period – Mint 18.1.

Mint 18.1 builds on the same Ubuntu LTS release base as Mint 18.0, the result being a smooth upgrade path for 18.0 users and the relative stability of Ubuntu's latest LTS effort, 16.04.

In keeping with Ubuntu's LTS releases, Mint isn't stuck chasing Ubuntu updates. Rather the project can pursue its own efforts like the homegrown Cinnamon and MATE desktops, and the new X-Apps set of default applications.

Read more

3 to-do list managers for the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

There are dozens, if not more, tools out there that can help you manage your ever-expanding lists of tasks and to-dos. If you want to manage your tasks like a techie, or just feel like going back to basics, the best way to do that is to turn to the command line.

With the software choices that are available, there's no reason why you can't effectively manage your tasks from the command line. You don't need to worry about sacrificing features and functions, either. The three task management tools I look at in this article have something for everyone.

Read more

My first three contributions to open source

Filed under
OSS

Getting started with an open source project can be intimidating. I wanted to contribute to open source projects, but struggled with where to start. When the time came and I finally took the shot, I ended up having an excellent learning experience. Here is my experience with my first three open source contributions.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Scientific Linux 7.3 to Launch of January 25, First Release Candidate Is Out Now

Filed under
Red Hat

Scientific Linux's Pat Riehecky reports on the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) development build of the upcoming Scientific Linux 7.3 open-source operating system based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3.

Now that Red Hat launched the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 enterprise-ready operating system, it was just a matter of time for CentOS, Scientific Linux, and other forks to up their game and announce new, updated versions of their GNU/Linux distributions, based, of course, on the freely distributed sources of the former.

Read more

Mint 18.1 review: Forget about Wayland and get comfy with the command line

Filed under
Reviews

All that changed a couple of years ago when Mint opted to stop chasing Ubuntu and built off the LTS cycle. Mint is no longer quite as cutting edge as it once was, which shows up in some important areas like the kernel (which is only at 4.4 even now). Mint is also still plagued by the some of the poorly implemented update and security issues that have dogged it for years. You can keep Mint up-to-date and secure, but Mint actively encourages users (especially inexperienced) users to avoid updates. That more than anything else would prevent me from picking Mint 18.1 over, well, any other distro.

Read more

GNU/Linux Workstations, Major Linux Companies

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux People Should Say, ‘You’re Welcome, Windows Users’

    There was a time when a computer operating system called Windows totally dominated the market, and it sucked. I mean, really sucked. Blue screens of death, unexplained crashes, viruses and worms galore, re-re-reboots all the darn time…and still, despite all the problems, people used this Windows thing. Why? Because except for the artsy/hipster $MacOS, it was the only computer OS you could get for your desktop, and it was the one that ran all the 17 jillion programs businesses wanted their office workers to use. Luckily, Windows has gotten a lot better over the years. Except…was it luck or was it Linux that made Windows improve?

    Before we get into that, let’s talk about cars for a minute. Specifically Volkswagens, Renaults and Fiats. Once upon a time. American cars ruled our nation’s highways and byways. They were big. They had 738 cubic inch Hemiverberator V-8 engines, and loved to stop at gas stations. But hey! Gas was cheap. A couple of friends, maybe me and Indian Ron, could put $5 worth of premium into the big black Chrysler and cruise Van Nuys Boulevard all night or until we found honeys to ride with us, after which…. Sorry, this is a family website.

  • The reason why I can’t use GNU/Linux (for now)

    2) The migration to systemd.

    I won’t write something long here. Because this is not an anti-systemd post.

    I don’t really care if a distribution have or not systemd. If somebody tell me to try X distribution, I do without paying attention of the init.

    What I don’t really like about this is that a lot of distributions are moving to systemd as it was the best thing ever. Some of the did it even when most of the users were against the change.
    For example, Slackware had some users just because it had BSD-style init scripts. But since they moved to systemd, they are like any other distribution but without dependencies handling.

  • Insights on RedHat, SUSE & Canonical; The Major Linux Companies

    Open source software were always promisable. Thanks for the collaboration, opportunities and infrastructure that it provides to both end users and enterprises. Linux is an amazing example for a successful open source code which shapes future.

    The 25-years-old operating system has grown so fast. Today, it is used almost everywhere. From web servers, android devices, supercomputers and to IoT devices. Linux became more than just an operating system to run some lab servers. And because of this, it created huge opportunities for enterprises to benefit from. This market allowed great tech companies to be established to fulfill its needs. Which gave us the 3 major1) Linux companies: Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical.

    The business model for each of the major companies was similar; selling support services and subscriptions for their own open source and Linux-based products. It was the case for most business models in the open source world as well; profit from around the product, not the product itself.

Why Mint's Not Best, Tumbling Tumbleweed, Fedora Elections

Filed under
-s

It's that time of year again when all good blue hatters rush to the virtual polls to vote for their trusted leaders. The 2017 January Fedora elections are in full swing and Fedora account holders are urge to vote in the three categories this term. Elsewhere, Scott Gilbertson felt the need to explain his best distribution of the year choice and Douglas DeMaio is back from holiday with a report from Tumbleweed development. M.Hanny Sabbagh summarized Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical today and VAR Guy contributor Christopher Tozzi concluded that the lines between Windows and Linux are blurring. Cynthia Harvey points out areas in everyday life that are already run by artificial intelligence and a cookie campaign convinced developers to bring Civilization 6 to Linux.

Read more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Swiss Data protection commissioner concludes Windows 10 investigation

    The FDPIC investigations revealed that data processing in connection with Windows 10 did not conform in every respect with the data protection legislation. The page layout and content on the ‘Quick access' und ‘Customize settings' pages failed to meet the transparency requirements in full. There was a lack of information on how long the transmitted data would be stored, on the content of browser data and on the content of feedback and diagnostic data. In addition, the users found it difficult during individual data processing operations to look up further information, e.g. from the relevant passages of the data privacy statement.

    In response, Microsoft made proposals to the FDPIC for rectifying these and other shortcomings, which the FDPIC assessed and amended. The modifications that have now been agreed will ensure that more precise information is provided on data processing. In addition, the new settings page will make it clear to users during the installation process that they must decide on and give their consent to the processing and transmission of data.

  • Linux Consolidates Support For Beast IV
  • Kaby Lake On Linux Plays Much Better With CPUFreq Than P-State

    After ordering a Core i5 7600K Kaby Lake CPU last week, I've been spending the past few days trying it out under Ubuntu Linux. If you happened to pick up an early Kaby Lake CPU and seeing low performance, I wanted to pass along a little PSA while I am still working on additional tests.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) is Initiated by Wells Fargo to Outperform
  • FreeOrion Turn-Based 4X Space Empire Conquest Game Is Coming to Fedora Linux

    In October last year, Fedora contributor Charles Profitt wrote a tutorial on how to compile and install the FreeOrion open-source turn-based 4X space empire and galactic conquest video game on the latest release of Fedora Linux.

    Since then, a lot of Linux gamers using the Fedora operating system showed interest in having an easy-to-install package that would allow them to enjoy the game instead of spending a lot of time compiling it.

  • Why a MacOS user switched to Ubuntu Linux

    Apple’s MacOS has long been the de facto alternative to Windows. But what happens when a MacOS user tires of doing things Apple’s way? He switches to Ubuntu Linux and doesn’t look back. Goodbye Apple, hello Linux!

  • It’s About To Get Easier to Enable Low Graphics Mode on Ubuntu

    We’ve shown you how to enable low-graphics mode in Unity 7 on both Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 — but there’s no denying that this method is far from user-friendly.

  • Panther MPC, Inc.'s Panther Alpha

    Panther Alpha combines full desktop functionality with an ultra-customizable Linux OS that fits in the palm of your hand. Panther says its new device could be possible only now thanks to a culmination of years of industry innovation and development, namely the power of today's ARM chips and an improved emphasis of Linux on ARM.

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • January 2017 PyLadies Pune meetup

    Like many of the previous PyLadies Pune meetups, I took a session in this month’s meetup too. System programming basics was the topic for my session. We did the session for around an hour, but as this month’s session also had a guest session over hangout, we could not go longer. We will do a full day workshop on the same topic in future.

  • Missing from the Trump Cabinet Nominee Hearings: Cybersecurity for Everyday Internet Users

    Protecting users’ privacy and security online is a crucial issue for all of us. Security protects elections, economies and our private online and offline lives. And many recent events (cyber attacks, hacks and threats by foreign governments) show that a secure Internet is currently under threat.

    I recently wrote about how cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. Governments, technology companies and users need to work together to strengthen cybersecurity. Mozilla knows that even one weak link — be it technical or legislative — can break the chain of security and put Internet users at risk. The chain only remains strong if technology companies, governments and users work together to keep the Internet as secure as it can be.

    You can help Mozilla stand up for a more secure Internet. We’re asking readers to pen a Letter to the Editor to their local newspaper in response to this week’s Senate hearings, and support personal security and privacy online. Get started here.

  • Open Web Development and Content Creation Tools Proliferate

    If you're involved with DevOps and web development, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find numerous and updated free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.

  • Single-cable motor interface goes open-source
  • Quantum Computing Is Real, and D-Wave Just Open-Sourced It
  • D-Wave Initiates Open Quantum Software Environment
  • The Linux and Windows Ecosystems are Converging. Here's Why It Matters [Ed: Microsoft “embrace, extend, extinguish” tactics mean one should avoid Windows; it's a trap that complicates and increases exit barriers]
  • EasyStack raises $50M Series C Round, Setting New Single Round Record in China Open Source
  • China's Cash Capital Leads $50M Series C Round In EasyStack
  • China: Investment firm Cash Capital leads $50m Series C round in EasyStack
  • DragonFlyBSD Working On NUMA-Awareness, Memory Changes

    Matthew Dillon's latest work on the DragonFlyBSD kernel includes steps towards supporting NUMA-awareness, locking, and other memory allocation related changes.

  • FSFE Annual Report 2016

    It has been a busy year for the FSFE. Upholding the principles of Free Software and protecting citizens' from being exploited are ongoing challenges we tackled from a variety of angles. We (and by "we", we mean the staff and volunteers at the FSFE) pored over hundreds of pages of policies and legislations, looking for loopholes through which Free Software could be attacked.

    We travelled to events all over Europe, often carrying with us dozens of heavy boxes of merchandising, to explain what Free Software is all about as speakers and attendees. We have organised our own events too including our first international summit.

'Opening' Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source reaches processor core

    Whether for budgetary, philosophical, or other reasons, an increasing number of embedded systems are being designed using open source elements. For the most part, these elements are software based, although there are some open source board designs in use as well. Now, the microcontroller that empowers a PCB design is available as an open source design.

    A little over a month ago, startup SiFive announced a milestone product in the development of the RISC-V (pronounced risk-five) open source microprocessor instruction set architecture (ISA). Originally developed for research and education, the architecture began moving toward industry implementation with the creation of the RISC-V Foundation in 2015. SiFive advanced that movement by developing a microcontroller design implementing the RISC-V ISA. The company has now proven that design in silicon and donated the RTL code for the design to the open source community.

  • A $12,000 open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles

    The automotive industry has always been capital-intensive and therefore, it has often been difficult for startups to carve themselves a space in it. But the electric vehicle revolution is disrupting the industry enough that it is opening up opportunities for startups to accelerate the pace of innovation.

    OSVehicle, a company based in Italia, is trying to help them to just that with their new platform.

    They released the second generation of the TABBY EVO, an open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles and electric vehicle parts. The platform enables companies or individuals wishing to develop parts for electric vehicles, or even full EVs, to leapfrog some of the development and test the parts in an open platform.

  • Renault will release its Twizy EV hardware system as an opensource platform

    The Renault POM represents the first foray by a big automaker into truly open-sourcing its vehicle platform.

  • Renault announces partners for open-source electric-vehicle platform

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE Edition Beta is available for download now

A Beta release for Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE is here. There are already versions available featuring other desktop environments, such as Cinnamon, Mate, and Xfce. You'd think that would be enough, but no! Apparently a fourth edition is needed. Some people feel that a KDE version is a waste of resources, but either way, here we are. So what is new? The KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment is the star of the show -- after all, if you do not want KDE, you wouldn't choose this version. The shipping Linux kernel is 4.4.0-53, which is surprisingly outdated. Ubuntu-based operating systems are never known for being bleeding-edge, however. Read more

64-bit Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 ships for $25 to $30

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 has arrived with 1GB RAM and the same quad-core -A53 SoC as the RPi 3, available for $30, or $25 without 4GB eMMC. Raspberry Pi Trading’s first 64-bit computer-on-module version of their flagship single board computer has finally arrived. Despite the name, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is only the second generation of the CM1. Its name syncs up with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B SBC, which uses the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom SoC. The CM3 is now shipping in $30 Standard (4GB eMMC) or $25 Lite versions, while the CM1 drops in price to $25. Read more

Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space

Panasonic Jan. 12 unveiled a new tablet in its Toughpad series of devices designed for the corporate world. But unlike so many other rugged Panasonic machines, the FZ-A2 doesn’t run Windows. Instead, the device is running on Google’s Android Marshmallow, an operating system not typically associated with rugged PCs and mobile devices designed for rough-and-tumble field-service work. But the FZ-A2 is just the latest model in Panasonic's expanding line of Android tablets. This new Toughpad includes several corporate-friendly features such as robust security, a hot-swappable battery and plenty of ports that allow connection to a wide range of accessories. The Toughpad is launching at a time when market reports have consistently shown a steady decline in popularity of tablets. But Panasonic says its device is coming along at the right time. This slide show will take a look at the Toughpad to see whether its features will convince field-service workers and corporate hardware buyers that the tablet really is as appealing a buy as Panasonic claims it is. Read on to learn more about Panasonic’s FZ-A2 Toughpad. Read more

LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26

A new spin/flavor has been proposed for Fedora 26, one integrating the LXQt desktop environment. For those late to the party, LXQt is the formation of the LXDE and Razor-qt projects and built around the Qt5 tool-kit. Fedora currently has an LXDE spin while this proposed Fedora LXQt would continue to co-exist alongside the existing LXDE version. Christian Dersch who proposed the LXQt spin explained, "LXDE spin will exist until its maintainer will stop it, LXQt is independent from LXDE spin. So nobody is forced to change ;) Also both projects are maintained upstream so there is no reason to drop anything here." Read more Also: F26 Self Contained Change: LXQt Spin