Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 16 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 3:31am
Story Blockchains and FOSS Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 3:30am
Story CHIPS Alliance Brings Powerful Players into Open Source Hardware Collaboration Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 3:14am
Story Linux 5.2 Roy Schestowitz 12 15/07/2019 - 3:03am
Story Review: Debian 10 "Buster" Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 2:36am
Story Best free email program for Windows, Mac and Linux Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2019 - 2:25am
Story Linux 5.2.1 Roy Schestowitz 1 15/07/2019 - 2:24am
Story Top 10 Best Typing Tutor Software for Linux to Increase Your Typing Skill Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2019 - 8:36pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/07/2019 - 6:42pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/07/2019 - 5:15pm

Ultra low-power i.MX7 ULP SoC ships on NXP EVK and two compute modules

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

NXP’s 28nm, FD-SOI fabbed i.MX7 ULP SoC has arrived along with a Linux-powered eval board. The power-sipping SoC is also being showcased in F&S’ PicoCore MX7ULP and SoMLabs’ ActionSOM-7ULP modules.

In June, NXP began volume shipments of its super power-efficient i.MX7 ULP, which it announced in 2017. The SoC is billed as the most power-efficient processor on the market that also includes a 3D GPU.

Read more

Septor Linux For Surfing Internet Anonymously

Filed under
Debian

Septor Linux is based on Debian, and uses Tor technologies to make users anonymous online. Septor 2019.4 has Linux kernel 4.19 and customized version of KDE Plasma 5.14.3.

If you do not know what Tor is, you can read this guide to know Tor in detail. But in short, Tor network transfers users requests through different other Tor clients used by people in other parts of the World which makes users completely anonymous. Due to this nature of transferring requests through many clients, it is also called the onion network.

Read more

Top 30 Best Game Emulator Consoles for Linux System in 2019

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Everybody cherish those days when we used to play classic games all the time on retro consoles such as Sega, early PlayStations, and Nintendos. With personal computers getting beefier than ever and smartphones packing way much power than people imagined in those times, retro consoles are indeed in decline. However, you’re not the only one who’d like to play such old games on their modern, more recent hardware. There’s many like you and developers have created robust game emulator console systems which enable everyday Linux users to re-live those childhood nostalgias again. It’s our earnest desire to present you the best retro games emulator in this guide.

Read more

Project Trident 19.07 Available

Filed under
BSD

This is a packages update with some important bugfixes from upstream TrueOS.

Read more

Towards Guix for DevOps

Filed under
GNU

Hey, there! I'm Jakob, a Google Summer of Code intern and new contributor to Guix. Since May, I've been working on a DevOps automation tool for the Guix System, which we've been calling guix deploy.

The idea for a Guix DevOps tool has been making rounds on the mailing lists for some time now. Years, in fact; Dave Thompson and Chris Webber put together a proof-of-concept for it way back in 2015. Thus, we've had plenty of time to gaze upon the existing tools for this sort of thing -- Ansible, NixOps -- and fantasize about a similar tool, albeit with the expressive power of Guile scheme and the wonderful system configuration facilities of Guix. And now, those fantasies are becoming a reality.

"DevOps" is a term that might be unfamiliar to a fair number of Guix users. I'll spare you the detour to Wikipedia and give a brief explanation of what guix deploy does.

Imagine that you've spent the afternoon playing around with Guile's (web) module, developing software for a web forum. Awesome! But a web forum with no users is pretty boring, so you decide to shell out a couple bucks for a virtual private server to run your web forum. You feel that Wildebeest admirers on the internet deserve a platform of their own for discussion, and decide to dedicate the forum to that.

As it turns out, C. gnou is a more popular topic than you ever would have imagined. Your web forum soon grows in size -- attracting hundreds of thousands of simultaneous users. Despite Guile's impressive performance characteristics, one lowly virtual machine is too feeble to support such a large population of Wildebeest fanatics. So you decide to use Apache as a load-balancer, and shell out a couple more bucks for a couple more virtual private servers. Now you've got a problem on your hands; you're the proud owner of five or so virtual machines, and you need to make sure they're all running the most recent version of either your web forum software or Apache.

Read more

Friends of GNOME Update – June 2019

Filed under
GNOME

In April we visited FOSS North in Gothenburg, Sweden and Linux Fest Northwest in Bellingham, Washington, USA. Our table at FOSS North was staffed by Kristi and Neil, and volunteers Bastian, Anisa and Stefano. GNOMEie Zeeshan Ali presented on open source geolocation. Molly and Sri were at LFNW, where Molly spoke about following through on a code of conduct. Kristi participated remotely in FLISOL. There were two hackfests in May, Rust+GNOME 2019 Hackfest#5 in Berlin and Gstreamer Spring Hackfest 2019 in Oslo. We’ll be in Portland, OR, USA in July for OSCON. After OSCON we‘ll be hosting a West Coast Hackfest, July 18th – 21st.

Read more

Also: Librem 5 July Update

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Installing normal (non-ESR) Firefox on Debian 10 Buster (works on other distributions too)

    If you enjoyed this video, please click the like button, and share it on your favorite social networking platform (Facebook, Twitter, etc)

  • Add-Ons Outage Post-Mortem Result

    The first question that everyone asks is “how did you let this happen?” At a high level, the story seems simple: we let the certificate expire. This seems like a simple failure of planning, but upon further investigation it turns out to be more complicated: the team responsible for the system which generated the signatures knew that the certificate was expiring but thought (incorrectly) that Firefox ignored the expiration dates. Part of the reason for this misunderstanding was that in a previous incident we had disabled end-entity certificate checking, and this led to confusion about the status of intermediate certificate checking. Moreover, the Firefox QA plan didn’t incorporate testing for certificate expiration (or generalized testing of how the browser will behave at future dates) and therefore the problem wasn’t detected. This seems to have been a fundamental oversight in our test plan.

  • SUSECON 2020 is coming to the Emerald Isle!

    Get ready! SUSECON 2020 is coming to Dublin, Ireland, March 23-27, 2020 at the Convention Centre Dublin!

  • We can make it better than it was. Better...stronger...faster.

    It is not a novel observation that computers have become so powerful that a reasonably recent system has a relatively long life before obsolescence. This is in stark contrast to the period between the nineties and the teens where it was not uncommon for users with even moderate needs from their computers to upgrade every few years.

    This upgrade cycle was mainly driven by huge advances in processing power, memory capacity and ballooning data storage capability. Of course the software engineers used up more and more of the available resources and with each new release ensured users needed to update to have a reasonable experience.

    And then sometime in the early teens this cycle slowed almost as quickly as it had begun as systems had become "good enough". I experienced this at a time I was relocating for a new job and had moved most of my computer use to my laptop which was just as powerful as my desktop but was far more flexible.

    As a software engineer I used to have a pretty good computer for myself but I was never prepared to spend the money on "top of the range" equipment because it would always be obsolete and generally I had access to much more powerful servers if I needed more resources for a specific task.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (dbus), Debian (firefox-esr, python3.4, and redis), Mageia (ffmpeg), Oracle (firefox, libvirt, and qemu), Red Hat (firefox and virt:8.0.0), Scientific Linux (firefox), and SUSE (kernel).

  • Canonical’s GitHub account hacked [Ed: A Microsoft GitHub account hacked; how conveniently they attribute breaches of Microsoft things to others]
  • Paragon Software Group Releases Free Paragon APFS SDK [Ed: Just openwashing patent traps using Microsoft GitHub]

Upcoming FSF Talks and Alex Oliva (Linux-libre/GNU) Leaves Red Hat

Filed under
GNU
Red Hat

Find lost files with Scalpel

Filed under
Red Hat
Software
HowTos

As a system administrator, part of your responsibility is to help users manage their data. One of the vital aspects of doing that is to ensure your organization has a good backup plan, and that your users either make their backups regularly, or else don’t have to because you’ve automated the process.

However, sometimes the worst happens. A file gets deleted by mistake, a filesystem becomes corrupt, or a partition gets lost, and for whatever reason, the backups don’t contain what you need.

As we discussed in How to prevent and recover from accidental file deletion in Linux, before trying to recover lost data, you must find out why the data is missing in the first place. It’s possible that a user has simply misplaced the file, or that there is a backup that the user isn’t aware of. But if a user has indeed removed a file with no backups, then you know you need to recover a deleted file. If a partition table has become scrambled, though, then the files aren’t really lost at all, and you might want to consider using TestDisk to recover the partition table, or the partition itself.

What happens if your file or partition recovery isn’t successful, or is only in part? Then it’s time for Scalpel. Scalpel performs file carving operations based on patterns describing unique file types. It looks for these patterns based on binary strings and regular expressions, and then extracts the file accordingly.

Read more

BSD News: BSDCan and DragonFlyBSD

Filed under
BSD
    BSDCan 2019 Trip Report: Mark Johnston

    Thanks to the FreeBSD Foundation, I was able to make the trip from Toronto to Ottawa to attend BSDCan 2019 and the FreeBSD developer summit. Following the conference, I also made it to a small hackathon held at the University of Waterloo. I work from home, which can create a sense of isolation despite the ability to easily communicate with colleagues over the Internet; conferences are thus an important way to recharge my enthusiasm for working on FreeBSD. This year’s BSDCan was not a disappointment: I attended a number of interesting talks, collaborated on some designs for future projects, and helped review and debug some code.

  • DragonFlyBSD Gets Fix To Be Able To Boot AMD Zen 2 Processors

    Separate from the Linux boot issue affecting AMD Ryzen 3000 (Zen 2) processors that has been attributed to RdRand, DragonFlyBSD is the first BSD at least we've seen getting a separate fix to be able to boot these new AMD processors.

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon who has been mesmerized by the AMD Threadripper performance for the past year now has his hands on new Zen 2 hardware. But it turns out the current DragonFlyBSD releases can't boot with these processors due to a separate problem from what we've seen on the Linux side.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install phpMyAdmin with Apache (LAMP) on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install WonderCMS on Fedora 30
  • How to install Mageia 7
  • How To Install The Budgie Desktop on Ubuntu
  • How to install Skype on Debian Linux 9
  • Matthias Clasen: Settings, in a sandbox world
  • How to change hostname on Debian 10 Linux
  • How to install Debian 10 "Buster" (Net Install Method) Installation Walkthrough
  • How to install Debian 10 "Buster" (Live Media Method) Installation Walkthrough and Tutorial
  • How to Install Vanilla Forums on CentOS 7
  • 10 Useful Examples of the Sort Command in Linux
  • How to fix media keys not working on Linux

    Lots of desktop keyboards have media playback buttons the user can use to pause, stop, skip and play music with the press of a button. For the most part, the Linux kernel, and Linux operating systems have support for these devices, due to increased Linux driver development over the years. That said, not every single keyboard’s media keys are supported out of the box, and that’s a real shame.

    If you’re looking to get your play, pause, stop, and skip buttons on the keyboard to work with your favorite open-source media players, you’ve come to the right place. Follow along as we show you how to fix media keys not working on Linux!

  • How to Install Jenkins with Docker on Ubuntu 18.04

    What is Docker? Docker is a free and open source software tool that can be used to pack, ship and run any application as a container. It has not any packaging system or frameworks, it can be run from anywhere from a small computer to large servers. You can easily deploy and scale your applications, databases and other services without depending on any provider.

  • Install Nagios Monitoring Tool On RHEL 8

    In this tutorial, we will show you the method to install the Nagios monitoring tool on Redhat operating system. Nagios or Nagios Core is an open-source IT monitoring, server, network monitoring, and application monitoring tool. You can monitor servers, switches, applications, and services.

  • How to make the Plasma desktop look like a Mac

    The world of things falls into three categories - the things you don't want to do but have to, the things you want to do but can't and the things you can do. Skinning your KDE desktop to look like macOS falls in the third category. It serves no higher purpose, philosophical or existential, but it is something that Plasma users have the option to try, and try they will.

    I've dabbled in the Mac transformation packs for many years now. The original Macbuntu test was the best. Ever since, the subsequent attempts came out somewhat short. However, I've always done this on Gnome- and Unity-based desktops, never Plasma. Well, that's about to change. We're attempting the unattemptable.

  • Creating Debian 10 Bootable USB Thumb Drive for Installing Debian 10

    In this age, very few people use CDs and DVDs to install a new operating system on computers. The USB thumb drive has replaced bootable CDs and DVDs. It is cheaper as you can reuse the USB thumb drive over and over again. It is also simpler.
    There are many ways to make a bootable USB thumb drive on Windows and Linux.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to create a Debian 10 Buster (the new kid in town) bootable USB thumb drive on Windows and Linux.

  • Bash History: How To Show A Timestamp When Each Command Was Executed

    With the help of the HISTTIMEFORMAT Bash variable you can show the date and time when each command was executed. This can be useful in various occasions, including to remember which commands you ran in a specific time-frame, to undo various operations, and so on.

    It's worth noting that if this variable is set, the time stamps are written to the history file so they are preserved across shell sessions. So the first time you enable it, you won't see the correct date and time for your previously used commands.

  • Upgrade Debian 9 Stretch to Debian 10 Buster

    Debian 10 Buster was released recently. Debian 10 comes with Linux Kernel 4.19, GNOME 3.30, KDE Plasma 5.14, Cinnamon 3.8, LXDE 0.99.2, LxQt 0.14, MATE 1.20, Xfce 4.12 and many more. Debian 10 also comes with awesome new artworks.

    Debian may be your daily driver. So, you may have a lot of important files and softwares in your Debian 9 installation. In that case, you can simply upgrade your existing Debian 9 installation to Debian 10.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to upgrade your existing Debian 9 Stretch installation to Debian 10 Buster.

  • Vim Split Screen

    The controls of Vim circulate around keyboard and the keyboard only. This is especially useful when you’re dealing with code and tasks that require full focus. The “keyboard-only” nature allows more focus headroom for your code. Well, you’re free to interact using the mouse.

    Say, you’re working with a file that requires keeping an eye on multiple parts of the file. For programming, that’s a common scenario. There are also other scenarios when a split view can be useful. Yes, let’s check out how to split view and edit on Vim.

  • How to Install the latest WPS Office on Linux

    The Free and Open-Source alternative to Microsoft’s widely popular Office Suite of apps is evolving and the latest update is rather controversial. Other than dropping support for 32 bit operating systems, it picks up a bunch of new tricks.

    WPS Office 11.1.0.8722 features a stack of iterative improvements, but no major new features to speak of, besides the ability to open and display PDF documents natively.

Games: Gibbous, Street Uni X, Age of Wonders 3 and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Gibbous - A Cthulhu Adventure officially releasing with Linux support on August 7th

    Comedy cosmic horror adventure, Gibbous - A Cthulhu Adventure, from developer Stuck In Attic now has a release date! Another game that was funded thanks to the help of people on Kickstarter, where Stuck In Attic managed to get CHF (Swiss franc) 53,862 from 1,929 backers.

  • Street Uni X, an extreme sports unicycling game will support Linux that's on Kickstarter

    I will be honest, unicycling is not something that comes to mind when I think about any kind of sports but it's apparently quite big. So big in fact, a game is being made called Street Uni X as a homage to classic sports games.

    Street Uni X plans to include some of the top street-unicyclists from around the world and have a bunch of tricks from the "street/trials/flatland unicycling disciplines". It will have videos of those included stars to unlock, as well as additional levels to unlock, secret characters, secret parts of levels to find and so on.

  • Something for the weekend: Age of Wonders 3 free to keep, Humble Store sale again

    It's Friday, which means the weekend is almost ready to crash into our lives once again. Here's a few tips in case you need a new game or two to try out.

    First of all, on Steam you can pick up Age of Wonders 3 which supports Linux for free and keep it. The deal lasts until July 15th. Anyone who has Age of Wonders 3, will also then be eligible for 10% off on Age of Wonders: Planetfall’s Premium Edition, although that title will not be supporting Linux (may work in Steam Play).

  • A simple guide to Steam Play, Valve's technology for playing Windows games on Linux

    Looking to test the waters with Linux gaming and don't want to lose access to your favourite Windows games? Here's a simple no-nonsense guide to actually using Steam Play.

  • Help test the new demo of Devader, a very intense twin-stick shooter that's coming to Linux

    Developer Falkenbrew notified us of a new demo available for their crazy twin-stick shooter Devader, as they're looking for feedback on it.

    If you've not heard of Devader before, it's one that captured my interest a while ago due to the way it's being designed. The developer confessed they're "not an artist" so they came up with a way to make seriously cool, weird and sometimes quite freakish enemies which you can read more about here. The results are seriously impressive and while the gameplay feels similar to other twin-stick shooters, the design is firmly unique.

  • The chaotic and brilliant "Streets of Rogue" has left Early Access

    Easily in my top five releases this year, Streets of Rogue from Matt Dabrowski and tinyBuild has now left Early Access with Linux support in good shape.

    Streets of Rogue is pretty difficult to describe accurately. You're part of The Resistance, who are trying to take down the Mayor. How you go about doing that, is entirely your choice. You can run through every level guns blazing, you can sneak and hack, you can put everyone to sleep or take over their body. There's choices within choices with a sprinkle of absolute chaos.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

WinSystems and Beelink With GNU/Linux Options

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Beelink L55 Review – An Intel Core i3-5005U Mini PC Tested with Windows 10 & Ubuntu 18.04

    With the shortage of Gemini Lake processors, some manufacturers have taken to releasing new mini PCs using older CPUs.

  • Bay Trail mini-PC supports extended temperatures

    WinSystems’ Linux-friendly “SYS-ITX-N-3800” is an Intel Bay Trail based industrial mini-PC with dual GbE ports, SATA, DP, USB 3.0, mini-PCIe, and -25 to 60°C support.

    WinSystems has launched a fanless, Nano-ITX form-factor industrial computer that runs Linux, Windows 10, or Windows 10 IoT on Intel’s dual-core, 1.75GHz Atom E3827 or quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 Bay Trail processors. The specs don’t match up perfectly, but the SYS-ITX-N-3800 mini-PC might be built around a variation of the company’s SBC35-CC405 Nano-ITX SBC.

Meet Matthias Clasen

Filed under
Interviews
GNOME

I have been involved GNOME for a long time. My first commits to GTK are from sometime around 2002. GTK is where I spend most of my development and project maintenance time. But I’ve been involved in many other parts of GNOME at one point or another, from GLib to GNOME Software.
Apart from writing code and fixing bugs, I am a member of the release team, and do a few of the GNOME releases every cycle. In recent years, I’ve often done the .0 stable releases.

Read more

Initial Raspberry Pi 4 Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

It's been (and still is) a particularly busy few weeks for benchmarking. For those curious about the Raspberry Pi 4 performance that was announced at the end of June along with Raspbian 10, here are our initial performance benchmarks of the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B in 2GB and 4GB variants compared to various other ARM SBCs.

In case you missed the original announcement, the Raspberry Pi 4 features a quad-core Cortex-A72 CPU clocked up to 1.4GHz, new 1GB / 2GB / 4GB versions, dual HDMI outputs and can handle up to 4K displays with the new Broadcom VC4 hardware using their V3D open-source driver stack, full-throughput Gigabit Ethernet, dual-band 802.11ac WiFi, two USB 3.0 ports complementing two USB 2.0 ports, and various other improvements.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B and Raspbian Buster: How to set up your board

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

The glaring omission here is any kind of micro-HDMI cable or adapter. There are still no such cables in stock at the Pi-Shop (which probably also explains why there wasn't one included in this starter kit), so I had also ordered an adapter.

There is a limitation when using the micro-HDMI adapter, which is perhaps not obvious from just looking at these pictures. Because the two micro-HDMI connectors are relatively close together on the board, it is not possible to use two adapters side by side - there's just not enough room for the HDMI heads of both of them.

Read more

Debian Linux 10 'Buster' Places Stability Ahead of Excitement

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Debian

If you are relatively new to using Linux, Debian's design decisions will not pose obstacles to using it. If you insist on speedier application updates, you might spend excessive time grabbing newer versions from .deb repositories that are outside Buster's reach.

Get Debian 10 Buster ISO downloads here.

You will have plenty of time to resolve those issues. The developers have a long slog to the release of Debian 11, aka "Bullseye."

I can only hope that the next Debian upgrade comes a lot closer to hitting an improved bull's-eye that is less boring.

Read more

GNOME Software in Fedora will no longer support snapd

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

In my slightly infamous email to fedora-devel I stated that I would turn off the snapd support in the gnome-software package for Fedora 31. A lot of people agreed with the technical reasons, but failed to understand the bigger picture and asked me to explain myself.

I wanted to tell a little, fictional, story:

In 2012 the ISO institute started working on a cross-vendor petrol reference vehicle to reduce the amount of R&D different companies had to do to build and sell a modern, and safe, saloon car.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Thread Synchronization, Python, C++

  • Thread Synchronization in Linux and Windows Systems, Part 1

    In modern operating systems, each process has its own address space and one thread of control. However, in practice we often face situations requiring several concurrent tasks within a single process and with access to the same process components: structures, open file descriptors, etc.

  • Intro to Black – The Uncompromising Python Code Formatter

    There are several Python code checkers available. For example, a lot of developers enjoy using Pylint or Flake8 to check their code for errors. These tools use static code analysis to check your code for bugs or naming issues. Flake8 will also check your code to see if you are adhering to PEP8, Python’s style guide.

  • Report from the February 2019 ISO C++ meeting (Library)

    Back in February, I attended the WG21 C++ standards committee meeting in rainy Kona, Hawaii (yes, it rained most of the week). This report is so late that we’re now preparing for the next meeting, which will take place mid-July in Cologne. As usual, I spent the majority of my time in the Library Working Group (for LWG; for details on the various Working Groups and Study Groups see Standard C++: The Committee). The purpose of the LWG is to formalize the specification of the C++ Standard Library, i.e. the second “half” of the C++ standard (although in terms of page count it’s closer to three quarters than half). With a new C++20 standard on the horizon, and lots of new features that people want added to the standard library, the LWG has been very busy trying to process the backlog of new proposals forwarded by the Library Evolution Working Group (LEWG). One of the main tasks at the Kona meeting was to review the “Ranges Design Cleanup” proposal. The cleanup involves a number of fixes and improvements to the new Ranges library, addressing issues that came up during the review of the previous (much larger) proposal to add the Ranges library, which is one of the biggest additions to the C++20 library (most of the other significant additions to C++20 affect the core language, without much library impact). In fact, I’d say it’s one of the biggest additions to the C++ standard library since the first standard in 1998. The Ranges library work overhauls the parts of the standard that originated in the Standard Template Library (STL), i.e. iterators, algorithms, and containers, to re-specify them in terms of C++ Concepts. This has been a multi-year effort that has now landed in the C++20 working draft, following multiple proposals and several meetings of wording review by LWG.

  • Save and load Python data with JSON

    JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. This format is a popular method of storing data in key-value arrangements so it can be parsed easily later. Don’t let the name fool you, though: You can use JSON in Python—not just JavaScript—as an easy way to store data, and this article demonstrates how to get started.

Android Leftovers

SysAdmin Day Sale: Get 60% off on Linux Foundation Certification & Training

To celebrate the Sysadmin day, the Linux Foundation is giving 60% off on its training courses on sysadmin, Kubernetes, Hyperledger etc. Advance your career with these certifications. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster: Hands-On

In my previous two posts I looked at the Raspberry Pi 4 hardware and at the procedure for installing and booting the new Raspbian Buster Operating System on the Pi 4. With those basic steps out of the way, now it's time to look at both the hardware and software in more detail. The first thing I want to mention is that when I wrote the previous post about Raspbian, I had not noticed that there is an updated version of Raspbian Buster (2019-07-10) available. This version was released sort of quietly (without the usual blog post announcing and explaining it), although there are release notes for it if you are interested. This release is extremely good news, because it fixes some of the biggest problems that I mentioned in my previous post... Read more