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Friday, 14 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story QEMU 5.1.0 released Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 5:00pm
Story Norbert Preining: Switching from KDE/Plasma to Gnome3 for one week Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 4:44pm
Story Kali Linux and Pentesting Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 3:29pm
Story Python Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 3:19pm
Story Games: Android, GNU/Linux and New Titles Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 2:24pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 2:21pm
Story Love Ubuntu but want the latest KDE Plasma? KDE neon now sits atop Ubuntu 20.04 Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 1:29pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 1:03pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 12:15pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2020 - 11:15am

IBM/Red Hat: ApacheDS LDAP, OpenEEW, Command Line Heroes

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Secure authentication with Red Hat AMQ 7.7 and ApacheDS LDAP server

    In this article, we will integrate Red Hat AMQ 7.7 with the ApacheDS LDAP server. However, any version of the AMQ 7.x series can be integrated with the steps mentioned in this article.

    For this example integration, we’ll use Apache Directory Studio, which is an LDAP browser and directory client for ApacheDS. You will learn how to set up the ApacheDS LDAP server from scratch, and how to integrate the new LDAP configuration changes that are required in AMQ 7.7. Finally, we’ll test the integration with an AMQ 7.7 shell-based client, using Hawtio as a graphical user interface (GUI). This will be helpful to system administrators and developers as they can quickly create a proof of concept for LDAP and AMQ integration. This will help in enabling role-based access control(RBAC) for accessing AMQ 7.7.

  • Red Hat Insights delivers easier RHEL management with Red Hat knowledge base integration and enhanced customer portal applications

    As a system administrator, working quickly and efficiently is important. There is a good chance that you manage a large estate of Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems and that it continues to grow in complexity. In this post, we'll look at some ways Red Hat Insights can help you deal with that complexity.

    Red Hat Insights, an operational efficiency and vulnerability risk management service that provides continuous, in-depth analysis of registered RHEL systems, is included in your Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription. Some users have referred to Insights as "like having an extra pair of eyes" to help you identify and manage risks to security, compliance, and operations across your evolving environments.

    Now, we’ve added three new integrations between Insights and the Red Hat Customer Portal to help you become even more productive.

  • IBM-backed Grillo open sources earthquake early-warning system through The Linux Foundation

    Earlier today, The Linux Foundation announced it will host a new initiative to accelerate the standardization and deployment of earthquake early-warning (EEW) systems for earthquake preparedness around the world. Created by Grillo with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation, and Arrow Electronics, the OpenEEW project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system composed of integrated capabilities to sense, detect, and analyze earthquakes and to alert communities.

    IBM was originally connected to Grillo through the Clinton Foundation at a convening of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Action Network. Now, IBM is assisting Grillo by adding the OpenEEW earthquake technology into the Call for Code deployment pipeline supported by The Linux Foundation.

    We sat down with Call for Code Chief Technology Officer Daniel Krook and IBM Developer Advocate Pedro Cruz to learn more about OpenEEW.

  • IBM, Grillo, and the Linux Foundation partner on early earthquake detection systems

    The Linux Foundation — in partnership with IBM and startup Grillo — today announced an initiative called OpenEEW to accelerate the deployment of open source earthquake early warning (EEW) detection systems around the world. The organizations say OpenEEW will incorporate sensing, detection, and analysis components from Grillo’s EEW platform, along with a Docker software version of the detection component that can be deployed to Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud.

    An estimated 3 billion people live with the threat of earthquakes globally. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, in California, there’s a 94% chance that an earthquake will not be just a foreshock. Yet only a few countries — like Mexico, Japan, Turkey, Romania, China, Italy, portions of the U.S., and Taiwan — have EEWs, in part because they can cost upwards of $1 billion.

  • The Linux Foundation, Grillo and IBM Announce New Earthquake Early-Warning Open Source Project

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host Grillo’s OpenEEW project in collaboration with IBM to accelerate the standardization and deployment of earthquake early-warning systems (EEWs) for earthquake preparedness around the world. The project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system comprised of integrated capabilities to sense, detect and analyze earthquakes as well as alert communities. OpenEEW was created by Grillo with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation and Arrow Electronics.

    Earthquakes often have the most severe consequences in developing countries, due in part to construction and infrastructure issues. Timely alerts have the potential to help save lives in the communities where earthquakes pose the greatest threat. EEW systems provide public alerts in countries including Mexico, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, but nearly three billion people globally live with the threat of an earthquake and don’t have access to nation-wide systems, which can cost upwards of one billion U.S. dollars. OpenEEW wants to help reduce the costs of EEW systems, accelerate their deployments around the world and has the potential to save many lives.

    “The OpenEEW Project represents the very best in technology and in open source,” said Mike Dolan, Senior Vice President and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re pleased to be able to host and support such an important project and community at the Linux Foundation. The open source community can enable rapid development and deployment of these critical systems across the world.”

  • [S5:E3] Command Line Heroes: What Kind Of Coder Will You Become?

Kernel: Linux 5.9 Features and Linux Plumbers Releasing More Passes

Filed under
Linux

  • Intel Adds Capability To Linux 5.9 For NVDIMM Firmware Updates Without Reboots

    For Intel NVDIMMs like DC Persistent Memory there is support on the way with Linux 5.9 to support firmware updates to the non-volatile memory device without the need for a system reboot. 

    The LIBNVDIMM changes for Linux 5.9 include "Runtime Firmware Activation" as the Intel-devised feature for accommodating device firmware updates to supported NVDIMM modules without needing a reboot. The intent is on being less disruptive than a reboot and allow loading the firmware still via the ndctl user-space utility and then the new ability to "activate" the new firmware. 

  • F2FS With Linux 5.9 Adds Secure TRIM, New Garbage Collection Option

    The Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) changes have been sent in for the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel. 

    The prominent changes this cycle include a new garbage collection mode (GC_URGENT_LOW) and a "secure" TRIM option (F2FS_IOC_SEC_TRIM_FILE) in the name of security. 

    The F2FS_IOC_SEC_TRIM_FILE functionality is intended as secure erase functionality. For drives not supporting TRIM/DISCARD, zeroing out the given data range for the regular file is performed to ensure the data is wiped on disk. 

  • Linux 5.9 Bringing Mellanox VDPA Driver For Newer ConnectX Devices

    There are a few changes worth mentioning out of the VirtIO updates submitted today for the Linux 5.9 kernel. 

    The latest Mellanox driver going mainline in the Linux kernel is a VDPA (Virtual Data Path Acceleration) for their ConnectX6 DX and newer devices. 

    The VDPA standard is an abstraction layer on top of SR-IOV and allows for a single VirtIO driver in the guest that isn't hardware specific while still allowing wire-speed performance on the data plane. VDPA is more versatile than the likes of VirtIO full hardware offloading. More details for those interested via this Red Hat post. 

  •        

  • Linux Plumbers Releasing More Passes

    After a careful review we have decided to release more passes. We are thrilled with the interest for this first ever online Linux Plumbers. The highlight of Linux Plumbers is the microconferences which are heavily focused on discussion and problem solving. To give the best experience for discussion, we have chosen to use an open source virtual platform that offers video for all participants. The platform recommends not having more than a certain number of people in each room at a time, hence putting a cap on registration to avoid hitting that limit. We do have solutions that will hopefully allow as many people as possible to experience Plumbers. We appreciate your patience and enthusiasm.

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The best frontend JavaScript framework for Django

    A question I've seen asked a lot is "what's the best frontend JavaScript framework to use with Django".

    Django itself doesn't make any recommendation on which frontend framework to use, or even assumes you're using a frontend framework at all.

    So, which frontend framework should you be using? And which one "plays well" with Django?

  • Ned Batchelder: You should include your tests in coverage

    This seems to be a recurring debate: should you measure the coverage of your tests? In my opinion, definitely yes.

    Just to clarify: I’m not talking about using coverage measurement with your test suite to see what parts of your product are covered. I’ll assume we’re all doing that. The question here is, do you measure how much of your tests themselves are executed? You should.

  • Is Java and Python similar?

    I don't think python and Java have anything in common. I enjoy the simple clean utilitarian nature of python. As long as simple pep8 guidelines are followed it is very easy to read any strangers code. Most people write python in an OO sort of way. However one can get pretty far in writing with an FP lite methodology. Many people complain about indents. To me it is just different and something easy to get used to. Python has idioms that values being clean and concise. It is trivial to deploy. My main critique of python is that if one uses too much python it is easy to get dumbed down by all the magic. It is important to use other languages in addition to python just to keep ones skills sharp. Thinking about writing high performing Python usually means thinking about doing it in some other language.

    [...]

    Note: I recognize Java is the most popular language in the world. Many great successfull applications use Java. One can eventually use Java to solve almost any problem. That doesn't mean I like it or think it is good for the industry.

  • Real Python: Identify Invalid Python Syntax

    Python is known for its simple syntax. However, when you’re learning Python for the first time or when you’ve come to Python with a solid background in another programming language, you may run into some things that Python doesn’t allow. If you’ve ever received a SyntaxError when trying to run your Python code, then this guide can help you. Throughout this course, you’ll see common examples of invalid syntax in Python and learn how to resolve the issue.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #6 (2nd Aug - 9th Aug)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #11
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 10 Check-in
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 10
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week 11: InputEngine.add(paths)

Emacs 27.1 released

Filed under
GNU

  • Emacs 27.1 released

    Version 27.1 of the Emacs editor is out. New features include support for arbitrary-sized integers, HarfBuzz support, improved drawing with Cairo, and the obligatory new JSON parser.

  • Don’t look, vi users: Emacs 27.1 waves bye to ImageMagick, adds native JSON parsing support

    The GNU project’s text editor Emacs is now available in version 27.1, which introduces native JSON parsing and tab bar support, allows basic image transformations without ImageMagick, and uses HarfBuzz, a tool also employed in GNOME, KDE, and Android, to make text look nice.

    Amongst other things, Emacs has learned to work with arbitrary-size integers, and graduated the option –with-cairo for building the editor with support for the drawing tool from its experimental state. Emacs now also uses the GNU Multiple Precision library GMP if not told otherwise, and replaces unexec with a portable dumper as the default. The latter is meant to improve compatibility with memory allocation on modern systems, which lets the tool work with techniques such as address space layout randomisation which is supposed to improve security.

Mozilla is laying off 250 people and planning a ‘new focus’ on making money

Filed under
Moz/FF

As part of the layoffs, Baker laid out a series of new focuses for Mozilla to set a stronger course for the company. That includes focuses on building community, building new products that “mitigate harms” and “that people love and want” to use, and crucially, to build out new revenue streams.

Mozilla makes most of its money from companies paying to make their search engine the default in Firefox. This includes deals with Baidu in China, Yandex in Russia, and most notably, Google in the US and most of the rest of the world. The company also makes money from royalties, subscriptions, and advertising, but those search deals still represent the “majority” of its revenue.

Baker says Mozilla will initially focus on products such as Pocket, its VPN service, its VR chatroom Hubs, and new “security and privacy” tools. The company started launching paid consumer services over the past year, offering a news subscription and access to a VPN from directly within Firefox.

Firefox is also getting a stronger focus on user growth “through differentiated user experiences.” That means reducing investment in other areas, though, such as in building out developer tools.

Mozilla has had a rough decade, as Firefox’s market share dwindled and attempts at bigger projects — like a Firefox phone running Firefox OS — fell apart. Baker seems to recognize that Mozilla needs to meet people where they are, building products that people want to use on the platforms they’re already using. She became CEO in April and was appointed interim CEO in December 2019; Baker has been the chair of the Mozilla Foundation since 2003.

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Stable Kernels: 5.8.1, 5.7.15, 5.4.58, and 4.19.139

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.8.1

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.8.1 kernel.

    All users of the 5.8 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.8.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.8.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.7.15
  • Linux 5.4.58
  • Linux 4.19.139

Games: Drink More Glurp, RimWorld, Jumpala and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Party game 'Drink More Glurp' is an absolute barrel of laughs - out now

    Drink More Glurp, a party game that thoroughly parodies sporting events like the Olympic Games and also pokes fun at sponsorship systems is out now. Note: key provided by the developer.

    Set on an alien world where the inhabitants attempted to copy our sporty games, however they got everything just a little bit wrong which has resulted in a serious of ridiculous contests with completely mental physics. This might be the funniest party game I've played all year. After trying the original demo during the Steam Game Festival, I was hooked.

  • AntiMicro | Map Keyboard and Mouse Controls to Gamepad on openSUSE

    Installed a game called Pokemon Insurgence on Lutris and there was no way to play the game with a gamepad. Rather than try to fight things, set out for an application that would map the keyboard controls to the WiiU Pro Controller that has become my gamepad of choice.

    I know I heard it was possible on a podcast some time ago and since I was probably doing something else and didn’t have a notebook handy to write down whatever it was, I began my search and found this AntiMicro as a solution.

  • Vibrant twin-stick slasher 'Breakpoint' gives you exploding weapons

    Enjoy some classic fast-paced vibrant arcade-style action? Breakpoint looks like it's worthy of some attention for putting a nice unique spin on it.

    With bright neon graphics, they mixed in elements from the classic arcade games with "modern sensibilities". It's a top-down highscore chaser with melee weapons that…explode? Yes. No ranged attacks, no laser weapons, no pew-pew-pew. Instead you slice, crush, and blast your way through the swarm and when you push your weapons to their breaking point (it's called Breakpoint—get it?), they unleash a big explosion.

  • Steelbreakers turns the feel of classic Zelda into local multiplayer action

    The developer mentioned their idea with it was to make a game they wanted to play that they felt didn't exist already. As they said they "always wanted to play a Zelda game that demanded technical skill and would let you fight with your friends on a top-down 2d playing field" and so Steelbreakers was created.

    Together up to four players can fight for dominance in small arenas with traps and all sorts. At release, the developer is planning to have online play, additional game modes, plenty of maps and weapons, AI enemies and the list goes on. The demo is just a small slice of what to expect.

  • RimWorld gets a big 1.2 update out with lots more options to tweak your game

    The brilliant colony-building sim RimWorld has another mega post-release update available now, with content included for both the base game and the Royalty expansion.

    Looking over the changelog, which is as long as expected, it sounds excellent. RimWorld has gained a whole new way to tweak your experience with a "custom playstyle system", which allows you to adjust a large number of settings to how you want your game to be. So you could make it a lot easier and more of a building sim and less of a "oh my god everyone is going to die from raiders" sim. There's also a bunch of new visual effects and many new sound effects added in for free too. There's loads more, especially for the Royalty DLC like an entirely new major quest that involves defending a damaged shuttle or assaulting a bandit camp.

  • Competitive platform-jumper 'Jumpala' reveals new character, getting a free version

    Jumpala is an upcoming fast-paced competitive platformer that sees you constantly hopping across tiny little pads, it's actually brilliant fun and they've done a few new reveals recently.

    When you think about platformers, traditionally this would mean running along different floors, a little tricky jumping here and there and perhaps various enemy encounters. Jumpala is none of that. Instead, the whole arena scrolls upwards with small platforms each player needs to jump across, to turn it into their colour before it drops of the screen. It's highly competitive and from the early builds we played—a huge amount of fun.

  • Hilarious slapstick comedy game West of Loathing had an anniversary update

    Three years after launching, Asymmetric have given West of Loathing a big anniversary update to get rid of some issues and add in some silly new content. Even their version numbering is ridiculous, with this being update v1.11.11.11.1.

    From the creators of the browser-based comedy MMORPG Kingdom of Loathing, don't let the stick figures and super-simple style fool you, this is a great game worthy of your time and it's definitely funny. Easily on of 2017's best indie games. This is where you get to pick a character class between a Cow Puncher, a Beanslinger and a Snake Oiler so you know you're in a for a wild ride right away.

  • Check out the new trailer and demo for the sci-fi puzzle platformer Transmogrify

    Your facility appears to be overrun by strange creatures, with a forgetful research AI trying to help you escape but you do at least have a gun that can turn creatures into useful objects. This is Transmogrify, an upcoming sci-fi platformer that was partly funded on Kickstarter a few years back.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Use a Linux terminal on your Android phone

Filed under
Android
Linux

When it comes to ultra-mobile computing, I prefer the PocketCHIP or a Raspberry Pi with a screen rather than a mobile phone or tablet. These solutions offer a pure Linux environment that's as open source as the hardware allows and make no assumptions about how I expect to work.

Sometimes, though, the only thing I have on me is a mobile phone. While there are some really great Android apps out there, many feel like overkill for simple tasks, especially knowing how much can be done in a simple terminal on my Linux desktop. I'm not the only person who feels this way, and that's why the Termux project was born.

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5 Best SSH and FTP Android Apps for Linux

Filed under
Android
Linux

My most recent coverage on remote sessions was on takeover.sh, an open-source script for operating Linux using SSH. Today’s eye is on the best apps that enable us to operate Linux from any modern Android device.

All these applications are loved for their speed, low memory requirement, price tag, and ease of use. Do you have any suggestions that should be on the list? Add your comments below.

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GNU, GTK/GNOME, and More Development News

Filed under
Development
GNU
GNOME
  • GNU Emacs 27.1 Adds HarfBuzz Text Shaping, Native JSON Parsing

    GNU Emacs 27.1 is the latest feature release for this very extensible text editor. With Emacs 27.1 there is support for utilizing the HarfBuzz library for text shaping. HarfBuzz is also what's already used extensively by GNOME, KDE, Android, LibreOffice, and many other open-source applications.

    Emacs 27.1 also adds built-in support for arbitrary-size integers, native support for JSON parsing, better support for Cairo drawing, support for XDG conventions for init files, the lexical binding is now used by default, built-in support for tab bar and tab-line, and support for resizing/rotating images without ImageMagick, among other changes.

  • Philip Withnall: Controlling safety vs speed when writing files

    g_file_set_contents() has worked fine for many years (and will continue to do so). However, it doesn’t provide much flexibility. When writing a file out on Linux there are various ways to do it, some slower but safer — and some faster, but less safe, in the sense that if your program or the system crashes part-way through writing the file, the file might be left in an indeterminate state. It might be garbled, missing, empty, or contain only the old contents.

    g_file_set_contents() chose a fairly safe (but not the fastest) approach to writing out files: write the new contents to a temporary file, fsync() it, and then atomically rename() the temporary file over the top of the old file. This approach means that other processes only ever see the old file contents or the new file contents (but not the partially-written new file contents); and it means that if there’s a crash, either the old file will exist or the new file will exist. However, it doesn’t guarantee that the new file will be safely stored on disk by the time g_file_set_contents() returns. It also has fewer guarantees if the old file didn’t exist (i.e. if the file is being written out for the first time).

  • Daniel Espinosa: Training Maintainers

    Is not just help others to help you, is a matter of responsibility with Open Source Community. Your life have wonders and should change for better, so you will be lost opportunities or simple can’t work on your favorite open source project. Prepare your self to be a maintainer professor, change your mind for the beginning and help others, that is also a great contribution to open source software.

    Be kind. Your potential contributors will take over when required. Making sure they have the abilities and use best practices in the project, is not just good for your project, is good for all others out there; they will use them to help other projects.

  • nanotime 0.3.1: Misc Build Fixes for Yuge New Features!

    The nanotime 0.3.0 release four days ago was so exciting that we decided to do it again! Kidding aside, and fairly extensive tests notwithstanding we were bitten by a few build errors: who knew clang on macOS needed extra curlies to be happy, another manifestation of Solaris having no idea what a timezone setting “America/New_York” is, plus some extra pickyness from the SAN tests and whatnot. So Leonardo and I gave it some extra care over the weekend, uploaded it late yesterday and here we are with 0.3.1. Thanks again to CRAN for prompt processing even though they are clearly deluged shortly before their (brief) summer break.

  • Explore 10 popular open source development tools

    There is no shortage of closed-source development tools on the market, and most of them work quite well. However, developers who opt for open source tools stand to gain a number of benefits.

    In this piece, we'll take a quick look at the specific benefits of open source development tools, and then examine 10 of today's most popular tooling options.

    [...]

    Git is a distributed code management and version-control system, often used with web-based code management platforms like GitHub and GitLab. The integration with these platforms makes it easy for teams to contribute and collaborate, however getting the most out of Git will require some kind of third-party platform. Some claim, however, that Git support for Windows is not as robust as it is for Linux, which is potentially a turnoff for Windows-centric developers.

    [...]

    NetBeans is a Java-based IDE similar to Eclipse, and also supports development in a wide range of programming languages. However, NetBeans focuses on providing functionality out of the box, whereas Eclipse leans heavily on its plugin ecosystem to help developers set up needed features.

  • Andre Roberge: Rich + Friendly-traceback: first look

    After a couple of hours of work, I have been able to use Rich to add colour to Friendly-traceback. Rich is a fantastic project, which has already gotten a fair bit of attention and deserves even more.

    The following is just a preview of things to come; it is just a quick proof of concept.

  • Growing Dask To Make Scaling Python Data Science Easier At Coiled

    Python is a leading choice for data science due to the immense number of libraries and frameworks readily available to support it, but it is still difficult to scale. Dask is a framework designed to transparently run your data analysis across multiple CPU cores and multiple servers. Using Dask lifts a limitation for scaling your analytical workloads, but brings with it the complexity of server administration, deployment, and security. In this episode Matthew Rocklin and Hugo Bowne-Anderson discuss their recently formed company Coiled and how they are working to make use and maintenance of Dask in production. The share the goals for the business, their approach to building a profitable company based on open source, and the difficulties they face while growing a new team during a global pandemic.

TDF Annual Report and LibreOffice Latest

Filed under
LibO

           

  • TDF Annual Report 2019

    The Annual Report of The Document Foundation for the year 2019 is now available in PDF format from TDF Nextcloud in two different versions: low resolution (6.4MB) and high resolution (53.2MB). The annual report is based on the German version presented to the authorities in April.

    The 54 page document has been entirely created with free open source software: written contents have obviously been developed with LibreOffice Writer (desktop) and collaboratively modified with LibreOffice Writer (online), charts have been created with LibreOffice Calc and prepared for publishing with LibreOffice Draw, drawings and tables have been developed or modified (from legacy PDF originals) with LibreOffice Draw, images have been prepared for publishing with GIMP, and the layout has been created with Scribus based on the existing templates.

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: July 2020

    LibreOffice 6.4.5 was announced on July, 2

  • Physics Based Animation Effects Week#10

    This week, I was mainly working on cleaning up and migrating the patches from my experimental branch to LO master.

Better Than Top: 7 System Monitoring Tools for Linux to Keep an Eye on Vital System Stats

Filed under
Software

Top command is good but there are better alternatives to Top. Take a look at these system monitoring tools in Linux that are similar to top but are actually better.
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QML Online - Qt 5.15, Kirigami, Breeze and more!

Filed under
Development
KDE

I'm happy to announce that QML Online is now running with the last version of Qt (5.15) and with an initial Kirigami integration with breeze icons!

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Also: Old truths remain

New Prototype Builds Bringing Leap, SLE Closer Will be Available Soon

Filed under
SUSE

The release manager for openSUSE Leap, Lubos Kocman, has updated openSUSE’s develop community on efforts to bring the codes of Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together.

In an email to the openSUSE-Factory mailing list, Kocman explained that the prototype project openSUSE Jump should become available for early testing soon and that contributions to the project could become available in the next five weeks.

“First, I’d like to announce that we’ll start publishing images and FTP trees for openSUSE Jump, so people can get their hands on [it],” Kocman wrote. “Please be aware that Jump is still in Alpha quality. I expect data to be available later this week as there is still pending work on pontifex by Heroes.

The Alpha quality state of Jump is gradually progressing.

Jump is an interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service as developers try to synchronize SLE binaries for openSUSE Leap.

Kocman explained how feature requests will work, the process for how contributions will be handled and and he also explained how the submissions will lead to greater transparency.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The modern developer experience

    We hear from many clients that developer productivity and efficiency continue to be pain points. Cloud adoption can help normalize developer experiences across application stacks and runtimes. The path and steps for your developers to push code should be clear, simple, and easy to implement, even on Day 1. The modern developer experience provides a unified and normalized practice with modern tools. Developers thrive in the inner loop where unit tests and code come together, and in a penalty-free runtime execution environment where no one gets hurt, no processes take down precious workloads, and no one knows that it took 20 minutes to resolve that pesky runtime error. The inner loop occurs in a developer workspace that is easy to set up, manage, prepare, maintain, and, more importantly, easy to allocate. If a new developer is added to your squad, they can have all of the mechanical things they need to push code changes into the pipeline on their first day. An important part of the modern developer experience is expressed as Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, which provides a set of constructs to provision a developer workspace in the cloud where they can perform their inner loop. A save action to a workspace file initiates an inner loop build in their local workspace, and an endpoint for the developer to see their changes quickly.

  • Call for Code Daily: Grillo, and how your code can help

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 10th:

  • Culture of Innovation and Collaboration: Hybrid Cloud, Privacy in AI and Data Caching

    Red Hat is continually innovating and part of that innovation includes researching and striving to solve the problems our customers face. That innovation is driven through the Office of the CTO and includes OpenShift, OpenShift Container Storage and use cases such as the hybrid cloud, privacy concerns in AI, and data caching. We recently interviewed Hugh Brock, research director for the office of the CTO, here at Red Hat about these very topics.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 has branched from Rawhide. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Magazine: Come test a new release of pipenv, the Python development tool

    Pipenv is a tool that helps Python developers maintain isolated virtual environments with specifacally defined set of dependencies to achieve reproducible development and deployment environments. It is similar to tools for different programming languages, such as bundler, composer, npm, cargo, yarn, etc. A new version of pipenv, 2020.6.2, has been recently released. It is now available in Fedora 33 and rawhide. For older Fedoras, the maintainers decided to package it in COPR to be tested first. So come try it out, before they push it into stable Fedora versions. The new version doesn’t bring any fancy new features, but after two years of development it fixes a lot of problems and does many things differently under the hood. What worked for you previously should continue to work, but might behave slightly differently.

  • Introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Tekton (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    If you’re interested in cloud-native CI/CD and Tekton but haven’t had a chance to get hands-on with the technology yet, the KubeCon Europe Virtual event provides an opportunity to do that. Tekton is a powerful and flexible open source framework for creating cloud-native CI/CD pipelines. It integrates with Kubernetes and allows developers to build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers and on-premises clusters as shown in Figure 1.

  • Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    Apache Kafka has emerged as the leading platform for building real-time data pipelines. Born as a messaging system, mainly for the publish/subscribe pattern, Kafka has established itself as a data-streaming platform for processing data in real-time. Today, Kafka is also heavily used for developing event-driven applications, enabling the services in your infrastructure to communicate with each other through events using Apache Kafka as the backbone. Meanwhile, cloud-native application development is gathering more traction thanks to Kubernetes. Thanks to the abstraction layer provided by this platform, it’s easy to move your applications from running on bare metal to any cloud provider (AWS, Azure, GCP, IBM, and so on) enabling hybrid-cloud scenarios as well. But how do you move your Apache Kafka workloads to the cloud? It’s possible, but it’s not simple. You could learn all of the Apache Kafka tools for handling a cluster well enough to move your Kafka workloads to Kubernetes, or you could leverage the Kubernetes knowledge you already have using Strimzi.

  • OpenShift for Kubernetes developers: Getting started

    If you are familiar with containers and Kubernetes, you have likely heard of the enterprise features that Red Hat OpenShift brings to this platform. In this article, I introduce developers familiar with Kubernetes to OpenShift’s command-line features and native extension API resources, including build configurations, deployment configurations, and image streams.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July. Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl. The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Making open decisions in five steps

    The group's leader made a decision, and everyone else accepted it. The leader may have been a manager, a team lead, or the alpha in a social group. Was that decision the best one for the group? Did it take all relevant factors into account? It didn’t really matter, because people didn’t want to buck authority and face the ramifications. But this behavior was typical of life in hierarchical systems.

  • 7 tips for giving and receiving better feedback

Wine 5.15 and Beyond

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.15 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Initial implementation of the XACT Engine libraries.
      - Beginnings of a math library in MSVCRT based on Musl.
      - Still more restructuration of the console support.
      - Direct Input performance improvements.
      - Exception handling fixes on x86-64.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.15 Release Brings Initial Work On XACT Engine Libraries

    Wine 5.15 is out as the latest bi-weekly development snapshot for this program allowing Windows games/applications to generally run quite gracefully on Linux and other platforms. 

  •        
  • Wine Developer Begins Experimenting With macOS ARM64 Support

    Over the months ahead with Apple preparing future desktops/laptops with their in-house Apple silicon built on the ARM 64-bit architecture, Wine developers are beginning to eye how to support these future 64-bit ARM systems with macOS Big Sur.  Wine developer Martin Storsjo has been experimenting with the macOS + ARM64 support and has got the code along far enough that "small test executables" can run on the patched copy of Wine. 

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

echNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe. In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus. Read more