Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 05 Jul 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Samsung Continues to Lessen Android Dependence

Filed under
OS
Linux

Samsung's partnership with members of the Linux Foundation appears to be bearing fruit. The partnership's mobile operating system -- dubbed Tizen -- is Linux-based. Samsung's initial Tizen phone rollout was rocky: The company's highly anticipated Samsung Z launch in Russia was quickly canceled last year, and the company blamed concerns about the ecosystem for the delay. Unfortunately, in many cases, ecosystem development presents a "chicken and egg" problem: Developers won't build apps until you have users, and users won't select your product until you have apps.

Read more

Linux 4.2 Offers Performance Improvements For Non-Transparent Bridging

The Non-Transparent Bridge code is undergoing a big rework that has "already produced some significant performance improvements", according to its code maintainer Jon Mason. For those unfamiliar with NTB, it's described by the in-kernel documentation, "NTB (Non-Transparent Bridge) is a type of PCI-Express bridge chip that connects the separate memory systems of two computers to the same PCI-Express fabric. Existing NTB hardware supports a common feature set, including scratchpad registers, doorbell registers, and memory translation windows." Or explained simply by the Intel Xeon documentation that received the NTB support, "Non-Transparent Bridge (NTB) enables high speed connectivity
between one Intel Xeon Processor-based platform to another (or other IA or non-IA platform via the PCIe interface)."

Read more

Benchmarks Of 54 Different Intel/AMD Linux Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week in celebrating 200,000 benchmark results in our LinuxBenchmarking.com test lab, I ran another large comparison against the latest spectrum of hardware/software in the automated performance test lab.

Read more

Snappy Open House Is Your Chance to Get Familiar with Ubuntu Snappy

Filed under
Ubuntu

Nicholas Skaggs had the great pleasure of announcing a couple of days ago yet another innovation from Canonical, Snappy Open House, a new way for Ubuntu developers, contributors, and members of the community to get familiar with the Snappy technology created by Canonical for its Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Read more

Also: First Ubuntu Snappy Open House Announced, UbuCon Germany Planning Continues

Linux 4.2 Bringing Support For ARCv2, HS38 CPU Cores

Filed under
Linux

The ARC architecture updates for the Linux 4.2 kernel have landed.

With the ARC architecture updates in Linux 4.2 comes support for HS38 cores, which in turn are based on the Synopsys next-gen ISA known as ARCv2. The ARCv2 ISA is faster and more feature-rich than their original instruction set architecture. The HS38 cores have a 10-stage pipeline core with MMU support, SMP up to four cores, and other new features. The HS38 processor is still 32-bit and is "optimized for high-performance embedded applications running Linux."

Read more

Also: Radeon & AMDGPU DRM Fixes Queue Up For Linux 4.2

Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Will Bring a New Thumbnailer in Unity 8, Support for Refunds

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Alejandro J. Cura had the great pleasure of reporting a few hours ago that the upcoming OTA-5 update for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system will get some attractive new features in the Unity 8 user interface.

Read more

The July 2015 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

Read more

The Linux Setup - Neil McGovern, Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Interviews
Debian

I’m the current Debian Project Leader—which is a very impressive title that boils down to being a figurehead for the Debian project.

I first started getting involved with Debian in 2003, and have wended my way through various roles in the project, from designing t-shirts to being the Release Manager for the last three releases, Lenny, Squeeze and Wheezy.

In my day job, I’m the engineering manager for Collabora, an open source software consultancy which is fairly similar—basically making sure that all the engineers are happy and helping unblock any problems that come along.

Read more

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 to Finally Switch to GNOME 3.16, Linux Kernel 4.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

The Parsix GNU/Linux developers were happy to announce that the first snapshot towards the anticipated Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 distribution is now available for download and testing.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.3.2 Lands in Kubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf)

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

The KDE community recently announced a new version of KDE Plasma, 5.3.2, and that version has been already implemented in the upcoming Kubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf).

Read more

Intel Has More Graphics Code For Testing, Plans For Linux 4.3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While the Linux 4.2 kernel merge window isn't even over yet, Intel developers already have new code ready for testing that will be merged eventually for Linux 4.3.

With their updated -testing Git repository, there are DSI improvements, more enablement for Broxton hardware, Cherryview improvements, PPGTT polishing, the kernel mode-setting Kconfig option is no longer exposed as it's a requirement, and there's the continuing code churn around atomic mode-setting.

Read more

Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) to Reach End of Life Soon

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has just announced that Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) will reach end on life in just a couple of weeks, on July 23.

Read more

You Can Now Upgrade to Linux Mint 17.2 "Rafaela"

Filed under
Linux

Now that Linux Mint 17.2 "Rafaela" has been officially released, both for the MATE and Cinnamon flavors, the upgrade path has been opened for the users of older versions.

Read more

YotaPhone drops Android for Sailfish OS

Filed under
OS
Android

You may not have heard of them but Yota is a Russian company who dared to be different with their YotaPhone 2 smartphone. While most manufacturers tend to stick to tried-and-tested designs, Yota took a risk with the YotaPhone 2 and if you somehow haven’t heard of it, the dual-screen smartphone was one of the most unique Android devices ever made.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Key Question: Is Bundling Proper?

    In both cases, bundling is either a restraint of trade or simply a wasted motion. You don’t paint a house green only to paint it red if you have any sense. The right way to do IT is to make your choice and buy/acquire what you need to accomplish your goals in the most efficient manner possible. Bundling exclusively That Other OS with all PCs was only good for an illegal monopolist and its “partners” in crime. This is not about denying businesses profits. It’s about competition in the market and freedom for users/buyers to have choice.

  • Dell Gets An Airplane Mode Switch Driver In Linux 4.2
  • Call for hosts for GUADEC 2016

    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year. It includes conference days, the GNOME Foundation annual general meeting and hacking in a week of coding and discussion.

  • 4MLinux 13.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Tumbleweed is rolling again

    Opensuse Tumbleweed has been static since the 20150612 snapshot. But today the 20150630 snapshot was released. We are moving again.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed net-tools vs net-tools-deprecated
  • PostgreSQL 9.5 in Debian

    The package is also waiting in NEW to be accepted for Debian experimental.

  • DUCK challenge at DebConf15
  • Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update

    Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it’s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally.

    Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won’t be the last.

  • Avalue debuts Braswellian COMs and an SBC

    Avalue unveiled three Linux-friendly embedded boards based on Intel’s 14nm Braswell SoCs: a Qseven COM, a COM Express Type 6 COM, and a 5.25-inch SBC.

  • Tizen In-App Purchases(IAP) for Unity Applications goes Live!
  • 5 Best Enterprise Apps and Extensions for Google Chrome

    We have already covered a lot of enterprise applications on our site before. However, one would never expect apps in this genre to exist on a browser like Google Chrome. But, nothing could be further from the real truth. Google's effort to outsmart even the biggest players in the enterprise market are gradually paying off. Slowly spreading its wings into the business world, Google is venturing into arenas where Microsoft once reigned supreme. While the competition doesn't concern us much, but what has happened, in effect, is that the rivalry is bringing out the best in both companies.

  • Platform9 Aims to Control the Private Cloud from the Cloud [Video]
  • Teaching Email Self-Defense: Campaigns intern leads a workshop at PorcFest

    My workshop on Email Self-Defense took place at the 12th annual Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, New Hampshire. Around eight people attended, which was a few more than I expected. Christopher Waid and Bob Call of ThinkPenguin joined me in helping everyone who brought a laptop to set up GnuPG properly. Those who didn't bring a laptop participated by observing the process on the system most similar to their own and asking questions about particular steps, so as to enable them to achieve the same configuration when they returned home.

  • Security advisories for Thursday
Syndicate content