Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish


Syndicate content
Linux and beyond!
Updated: 2 hours 37 min ago

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.

More Security News (and FUD)

Leftovers: Software

  • Easy, Automated Benchmarking On Linux With PTS
    It's easy to run benchmarks on Linux as well as Solaris, BSD, and other operating systems, using our own Phoronix Test Suite open-source benchmarking software. For those that haven't had the opportunity to play with the Phoronix Test Suite for Linux benchmarking, it's really easy to get started. Aside from the official documentation, which is admittedly limited due to time/resource constraints, there are a few independent guides, Wiki pages, and other resources out there to get started.
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Alpha Tagged, New Features Inbound
    The first alpha release of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite was tagged a short time ago in Git. LibreOffice 5.3 is a major update to this distant fork of LibreOffice 5.3.0 is planned to be officially released in late January or early February while this week's alpha one is just the first step of the process. The hard feature freeze on 5.3 is at the end of November followed by a series of betas and release candidates. Those interested in more details on the release schedule can see this Wiki page.
  • MPV 0.21 Player Adds CUDA, Better Raspberry Pi Support
    MPV Player 0.21 is now available as the latest version of this popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2. MPV 0.21 adds support for CUDA and NVDEC (NVIDIA Decode) as an alternative to VDPAU. The NVIDIA decode support using CUDA was added to make up for VDPAU's current lack of HEVC Main 10 profile support. Those unfamiliar with NVDEC can see NVIDIA's documentation.
  • MPV 0.21.0 Media Player Adds Nvidia CUDA Support, Raspberry Pi Hardware Decoding
    Today, October 20, 2016, MPV developer Martin Herkt proudly announced the release of another maintenance update of the very popular MPV open-source and cross-platform media player software based on MPlayer. Looking at the release notes, which we've also attached at the end of the story for your reading pleasure, MPV 0.21.0 is a major update that adds a large amount of new features, options and commands, but also addresses dozens of bugs reported by users since the MPV 0.20.0 release, and introduces other minor enhancements. Among the most important new features, we can mention the ability to allow profile forward-references in the default profile, as well as support for Nvidia CUDA and cuvid/NvDecode, which appears to be a welcome addition to GNU/Linux distributions where HEVC Main 10 support is missing.
  • anytime 0.0.4: New features and fixes
    A brand-new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the three earlier releases since mid-September. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

KDE Leftovers

  • Choose Your Own Experience in Plasma 5.8 and beyond
    One of the key points of Plasma is while giving a simple default desktop experience, not limiting the user to that single, pre-packed one size fits all UI.
  • KDevelop 5.0.2 released for Windows and Linux
    Four weeks after the release of KDevelop 5.0.1, we are happy to announce the availability of KDevelop 5.0.2, a second stabilization release in the 5.0 series. We highly recommend to update to version 5.0.2 if you are currently using version 5.0.1 or 5.0.0.
  • Wayland improvements since Plasma 5.8 release
    Two weeks have passed since the Plasma 5.8 release and our Wayland efforts have seen quite some improvements. Some changes went into Plasma 5.8 as bug fixes, some changes are only available in master for the next release. With this blog post I want to highlight what we have improved since Plasma 5.8.
  • Wayland For KDE Plasma 5.9 Should Shape Up Quite Nicely
    Plasma 5.8 was only released at the beginning of October but already there has been a number of Wayland improvements queuing up for the next milestone, Plasma 5.9. KWin maintainer Martin Gräßlin wrote a blog post yesterday about some of the early Wayland changes coming for Plasma 5.9. Some of this early work for the next KDE Plasma 5 release includes resize-only borders, global shortcut handling, support for keyboard LEDs via libinput, relative pointer support, the color scheme syncing to the window decoration, window icon improvements, multi-screen improvements, panel imporvements, and more.
  • Autumn Sale in the Krita Shop
  • .