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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:27pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:16pm
Story GNOME: Belated GUADEC Report, "Is GNOME Just Lazy?" Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:15pm
Story Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:09pm
Story Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:07pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 6:05pm
Story Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 5:33pm
Story Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0 and Pattern Choices Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 5:32pm
Story Security: Intel, Norton, Bug Bounty, Defacements, OnePlus, ICO Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 5:30pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2018 - 5:24pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • X.Org Server 1.20 Gets Another XWayland Improvement: Prevents Overflowing

    There is yet another change for X.Org Server 1.20 that has now been in development for more than one year.

    The XWayland code within the xorg-server will now better safeguard against potentially overflowing the Wayland connection that could trigger the connection being aborted within the Wayland client library.

  • Etnaviv Working On Initial Bring-Up Of GC7000L/i.MX8M Graphics

    Prominent Etnaviv driver developer Lucas Stach for working on open-source, reverse-engineered Vivante graphics support has posted initial patches for the GC7000L support as found on the i.MX8M SoC.

    This bring-up is important especially with Purism hoping to use the i.MX8M for their Librem 5 smartphone and as part of that using the open-source Etnaviv graphics driver.

  • Tableau goes 'Hyper' on data ingestion & query

    Tableau 10.5 also introduces Tableau Server on Linux so that users can combine Tableau’s analytics platform with Linux’s enterprise capabilities.

    With identical end user functionality to Tableau on Windows, customers already using Linux in their IT environments can integrate Tableau Server into their processes and workflows.

GNOME: Belated GUADEC Report, "Is GNOME Just Lazy?"

Filed under
GNOME
  • Alberto Ruiz: GUADEC 2017: GNOME’s Renaissance

    This is a blog post I kept as a draft right after GUADEC to reflect on it and the GNOME project but failed to finish and publish until now. Forgive any outdated information though I think the post is mostly relevant still.

    I’m on my train back to London from Manchester, where I just spent 7 amazing days with my fellow GNOME community members. Props to the local team for an amazing organization, everything went smoothly and people seemed extremely pleased with the setup as far as I can tell and the venues seemed to have worked extremely well. I mostly want to reflect on a feeling that I have which is that GNOME seems to be experiencing a renaissance in the energy and focus of the community as well as the broader interest from other players.

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.5 | Is GNOME Just Lazy?

    GNOME is dropping Active Desktop, Ubuntu is holding back Nautilus and I have been writing a lot of scripts.

Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?

     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open

    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.

  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking

    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).

  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2

    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.

  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO

    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.

  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO

    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.

  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries

    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.

  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access

    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public.

    The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).

  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?

    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER.

    PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR.

    PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.

  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors

    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.

  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source

    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction.

    Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released

Filed under
OSS

Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0 and Pattern Choices

Filed under
LibO
  • Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0

    This is a short preview of how Notebookbar will look like on LibreOffice 6.0. Notebookbar is a new toolbar appearance on LibreOffice since version 5.3 that look similar to Microsoft Office 2007 Ribbon Toolbar. It's tabbed, column based, and categorized. We can use Notebookbar on Writer, Calc, and Impress already. It's still a experimental feature for now, so it's not recommended for production use. However, it's already good looking at LibreOffice 6.0 and we need to see more. I show here screenshots of Writer's Notebookbar from all tabs with some commentary.

  • LibreOffice bitmap pattern

    Do you like to use nice bitmap pattern in LibreOffice for area fill. So if you draw a rectangular, a start, … whatever you can use this bitmaps.

    With the help of designers from openclipart, pixabay, publicdomainpictures, … I made 42 seamless area bitmap pattern but only 50% are needed. So which one do you like which one can be dropped.

Security: Intel, Norton, Bug Bounty, Defacements, OnePlus, ICO

Filed under
Security

Linux Kernel Developer: Julia Lawall

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

This year I have been working with Bhumika Goyal on making various kernel structures read-only. We have constified over 1500 structures this year. This work has also motivated various bug fixes and performance improvements in Coccinelle.

I have also been working on automatically identifying patches that should be considered for backporting to stable kernels, in collaboration with Greg K-H, Sasha Levin, and colleagues at Singapore Management University. Our approach is still work in progress, but several hundred commits that were not originally tagged for stable have been identified and applied to stable versions.

Read more

Qt 5.9.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.9.4 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.4 does not add any new functionality, but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.3, the new Qt 5.9.4 contains nearly 200 bug fixes and in total more than 500 changes since Qt 5.9.3. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.4.

Read more

Also: Qt 5.9.4 Released With Close To 200 Bug Fixes

Hardkernel updates Odroid NAS platform

Filed under
Linux

Hardkernel has launched a Linux-powered, open source $54 “Odroid-HC2” NAS platform with an SBC based on the octa-core Odroid-XU4 that features SATA III, plus a stackable metal frame to store a 2.5 inch HDD/SSD or 3.5-inch HDD.

The Odroid-HC2 Home Cloud 2 network attached storage (NAS) device updates a previously released Odroid-HC1, and similarly lets you share and stream multimedia files to mobile and desktop devices with support for multiple users. Compared to the HC1, the HC2 has a larger, stackable metal frame, and adds support for 3.5-inch HDDs in addition to 2.5-inch HDD/SSDs. The 197 x 115 x 42mm case supports storage of up to a height of 27mm, up from 15mm.

Read more

More on 'Complete and Utter Garbage' From Intel

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Linux Creator Calls Intel Meltdown, Spectre Patches 'Complete and Utter Garbage'
  • Linux creator slams Intel for crappy Meltdown/Spectre patches

    Intel’s had a (mostly) crappy start to the year, thanks to the revelation of Meltdown and Spectre, two major security flaws affecting a wide range of its processors that are present in hundreds of thousands of devices around the world. It’s working to release fixes for them, but Linux creator Linus Torvalds is not impressed by the company’s efforts.

  • ‘WTF is going on?!’ Linux creator attacks Intel as it retracts ‘garbage’ fix for critical bug

    Patches released by Intel Corp. to fix highly malicious Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities affecting its CPUs turned out to be faulty, the company admitted, urging customers to stop installing them until further notice.

    Earlier this month, security researchers at Google Project Zero disclosed that data processed by the majority of modern CPUs, be they desktop computers or smartphones, could be vulnerable to critical exploits they called ‘Spectre’ and ‘Meltdown.’ Tech companies reportedly had months to prepare, and since the public announcement of the vulnerabilities, Intel released at least three patches – before discovering that their fix led some PCs to reboot unexpectedly.

  • Spectre Patches, Snap, Happy Birthday LWN and More

    Are you using protection? Longtime kernel developer, Greg Kroah-Hartman, just posted a simple recipe for users to verify whether they are running a Spectre/Meltdown patched version of the Linux kernel.

  • Intel’s Spectre fixes are ‘complete and utter garbage,’ says Linux inventor

    Linux inventor Linus Torvalds has never been one for diplomacy. He previously said “fuck you” to Nvidia for not supporting Linux, and now Intel has angered him enough to generate some more expletives. In a message to the Linux kernel mailing list on the weekend, Torvalds has expressed his dismay at Intel’s security updates to protect against the major Spectre variant 2 CPU vulnerability. The industry has been scrambling to fix the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities, and the variant 2 of Spectre has been particularly challenging.

Games: Castle Game Engine, Battle Chasers: Nightwar, OBS Studio, Vaporum, DECEIVER, We Happy Few, Feral Interactive

Filed under
Gaming

Canonical Releases Spectre Patches for Ubuntu Linux, Meltdown Fix for PowerPC

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical published today a new set of kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases that include patches for the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities.

After pulling Intel's microcode firmware update from the software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10, 16.04 LTS, and 14.04 LTS, Canonical now released the Spectre patches for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including all official flavors and those using HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernels, and Meltdown kernel patches for PowerPC (PPC64el) architectures.

Read more

Also: Canonical announces Ubuntu product month for February

Top 4 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

Filed under
Google
OSS

If you have a website or run an online business, collecting data on where your visitors or customers come from, where they land on your site, and where they leave is vital. Why? That information can help you better target your products and services, and beef up the pages that are turning people away.

To gather that kind of information, you need a web analytics tool.

Many businesses of all sizes use Google Analytics. But if you want to keep control of your data, you need a tool that you can control. You won’t get that from Google Analytics. Luckily, Google Analytics isn’t the only game on the web.

Here are four open source alternatives to Google Analytics.

Read more

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here.

Read more

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

Filed under
Development
  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018

    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.

  • Ick: a continuous integration system

    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.

  • Introducing PowerFake for C++

    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing.

    It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates.

    Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.

  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0

    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.

  • nbdkit filters

    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released