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Monday, 25 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu: On Ubuntu Touch, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, and Ubuntu 21.04 Release Date Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 5:13am
Story Firefly dual-lens AI camera module comes with Rockchip RV1109 or RV1126 processor Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 5:10am
Story Software: Radare2, Joplin, and Vizex Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 5:04am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 1 26/01/2021 - 4:55am
Story OpenSUSE: YaST Development Sprint and Digest of YaST Development Sprint Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:48am
Story The 10 Best Linux Server Distributions [2021 Edition] Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:42am
Story openSUSE "Leap" 15.2 - Any Good? Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:39am
Story Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:34am
Story Devices and Open Hardware Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:30am
Story 4MLinux 35.1 released. Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 4:25am

Ubuntu: On Ubuntu Touch, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, and Ubuntu 21.04 Release Date

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Touch Q&A 92 | Ubports
  • UBports Aiming For An Exciting 2021 With Ubuntu Touch - Phoronix

    Last week marked the last Q/A session for the UBports' Ubuntu Touch team working to advance the Linux smartphone platform where they laid out some of their upcoming objectives.

    From the Ubuntu Touch Q&A 92 session various interesting bits of information were shared as far as their plans over the coming months for this community that continues to advance the Ubuntu Touch effort primarily for smartphones -- various Android devices and also the likes of the PinePhone.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 667

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 667 for the week of January 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Ubuntu 21.04 Release Date & Planned Features

    While development on Ubuntu 21.04 is still (somewhat) early, rumours are already circling about what to expect from the release that Ubuntu developers have dubbed the “Hirsute Hippo”.

    In this post we rundown everything we know so far, including when Ubuntu 21.04 will be released, how long it’ll be supported for, and what kind of new features and key changes its likely to include.

    Plus, we also give you the link to download Ubuntu 21.04 daily builds if you want to try the release out ahead of its Stable release in the spring.

Firefly dual-lens AI camera module comes with Rockchip RV1109 or RV1126 processor

Filed under
Hardware

The camera module runs Linux, and it supported by Rockchip RKNN toolkit working in Windows, Linux (64-bit x86 and Arm), and Mac OS. The AI camera module connects to a host platform such as an Android tablet. Considering the cameras are all fixed focus with a 80 cm focus distance, the main application is face recognition and detection. There’s no documentation in English for now, but the Chinese version of the Wiki has plenty of information and resources to get started.

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Software: Radare2, Joplin, and Vizex

Filed under
Software
  • Explore binaries using this full-featured Linux tool

    It's natural to ask why you need yet another tool if existing Linux-native tools do similar things. Well, it's for the same reasons you use your cellphone as your alarm clock, to take notes, as a camera, to listen to music, to surf the internet, and occasionally to make and receive calls. Previously, separate devices and tools handled these functions — like a physical camera for taking pictures, a small notepad for taking notes, a bedside alarm clock to wake up, and so on. Having one device to do multiple (but related) things is convenient for the user. Also, the killer feature is interoperability between the separate functions.

    Similarly, even though many Linux tools have a specific purpose, having similar (and better) functionality bundled into a single tool is very helpful. This is why I think Radare2 should be your go-to tool whenever you need to work with binaries.

  • Use Joplin to find your notes faster

    To store my digital notes, I needed to pull them all into one place. The tool needed to be accessible from multiple devices, have a useful search function, and be able to export or share my notes. I chose Joplin after trying many, many different options. Joplin lets me write notes in markdown, has a pretty good search function, has applications for all the OSs (including mobile), and supports several different ways to sync between devices. As a bonus, it has folders and tags, so I can group my notes together in ways that make sense to me.

  • Renowned Disk usage visualization terminal tool Vizex released a new version

    Want to view disk usage in terminal then you will think about Vizex only. Basically Vizex is a terminal program which enables users to visualize the disk space usage for every partition & media. This tool is highly customizable and you can customize it as per your needs.

OpenSUSE: YaST Development Sprint and Digest of YaST Development Sprint

Filed under
SUSE

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 116

    Let’s start with an installer improvement quite some people was waiting for. Both openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise can use either wicked or NetworkManager to handle the system’s network configuration. Only the former can be fully configured with YaST (which is generally not a problem because there are plenty of tools to configure NetworkManager). Moreover, during the standard installation process, wicked is always used to setup the network of the installer itself. If the user decides to rely on wicked also in the final system, then the configuration of the installer is carried over to it. But, so far, if the user opted to use NetworkManager then the installer configuration was lost and the network of the final system had to be be configured again using NetworkManager this time. Not anymore!

    That’s not the only installer behavior we have refined based on feedback from our users. In some scenarios, the logic used to decide whether an existing EFI System Partition (ESP) could be reused was getting in the way of those aiming for a fine-grained control of their partitions. That should now be fixed by the changes described in this pull request, that have been already submitted to Tumbleweed and will be part of the upcoming releases (15.3) of both openSUSE Leap and SLE.

  • Session One Meetup Generates Enhancements, Actions

    The first session of the openSUSE Project’s meetup regarding the End of the Year Survey Results on Jan. 23 is already starting produce some actionable items from contributors.

    The session on openSUSE’s Jitsi instance had engagement from about 20 people from around the globe.

    Topics discussed in the two-hour session focused on addressing pain points, transferring knowledge and promoting openSUSE projects.

    Members of the “let’s improve the openSUSE learning experience” shared statics and analysis from the survey and attendees engaged in generating ideas and actions to enhance and improve the above mentioned items.

The 10 Best Linux Server Distributions [2021 Edition]

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

One of the best things about Linux is the various types of distributions it has to offer. No matter how you plan to use your Linux PC, there’s a Linux distro optimized with all the necessary tools and functionalities to meet your needs. And this brings us to Linux server distributions – Linux distros optimized to be used on servers. These are lightweight Linux distros, sometimes even stripped of a desktop environment, and packed with tools to improve speed, stability, and security – the traits of a good server OS.

But with that being said, there are literally hundreds of Linux server distros circulating the internet. So which one should you choose for your home server or even for professional use? Well, to answer your question, we have put together a comprehensive list of the 10 best Linux Server Distributions for 2021.

[...]

So this brings us to the end of our list of the 10 best Linux server distributions of 2021. We hope this was useful and helped you find the right Linux server distro for your specific needs and requirements.

All the server distros come with their own unique advantages and disadvantages, as you can see. If you are completely new, we recommend starting with a Ubuntu server. With time, you’ll understand what features you need and then migrate to a distro that delivers those functionalities.

But that being said, this is by no means a comprehensive list of all the best Linux server distros out there. So if your favorite distro didn’t make it up on this list, then feel free to mention it down in the comments along with why you prefer it over the options discussed here. We would surely like to know.

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openSUSE "Leap" 15.2 - Any Good?

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

This is a review I've been wanting to write since forever. Having tried many iterations of SUSE Linux over its long life before, during and after the Novell era, it always left me feeling ambivalent. And I really wanted to like it. The last time I set out to write a review but then canned the idea was for 12.3, when images would work in VMware Player but did not boot on my real hardware. Now THAT is a long time ago and it also means a lot may have changed, hopefully for the better.

SUSE is known and often praised for their offering of a highly polished KDE desktop. This is what I will go for in this little experiment. On the download page we can choose between a netinstall image for openSUSE "Leap" approx. 125 MB in size for x86_64 and the full DVD image of 4.3 GB. This is the equivalent of the box set of olden days. Live images are available with the KDE Plasma and Gnome desktops as well as a Rescue Live CD which are all staying under 1 GB in size, but only the rescue image is small enough to burn to CD. All images can be written to USB and DVD. Community maintained ports are also available for ARM, the Raspberry Pi and PPC architectures.

Instructions to install or change to "Leap" as well as minimum system requirements are further down the page. Quite a traditional selection really. The web page layout is simple and clear and conveys the most pertinent information right away.

Years ago installing from live image was not recommended so the choice here is basically between downloading the entire library or the netinstall image. I decided to go for the netinstall. Not having an installable live image obviously robs us of the test run people have become accustomed to unless we down yet another image just for testing. I decided against that as we can see from the netinstall image whether openSUSE will boot up or not. The rest is just desktop showcasing.

I downloaded images for the x86_64 architecture.

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Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

  • Two Powerful SSD Benchmark Utilities for Linux

    The 21st century has seen unprecedented growth in the technological sector, and many upgrades have been made in the past several years. The evolution of phones from landlines to smartphones is a clear indicator of this technological phenomenon. The latter has become a key part of our lives, providing us a means to connect with the world around us. The desktops and laptops that we use today have also seen major progression, and this can be observed in the improvement in the quality of tools and games in the world of computers.

    One such sector in the computer world is that of memory storage, which has quickly moved on from traditional hard disks to a newer, faster type of storage called a solid-state drive, or SSD for short. SSDs are extremely fast, require less power, and are more shock-resistant than HDDs. You can see this for yourself by benchmarking your SSDs. Benchmarking is the process of measuring the performance of any tool, which can be done using a benchmarking utility.

    This article looks at two of the best utilities available for SSD benchmarking in the Linux operating system, Disks and hdparm.

  • Radeon ROCm 4.0.1 Released For AMD Open-Source GPU Compute

    Last month marked the release of the big Radeon Open eCosystem 4.0 update (ROCm 4.0) while today that has been replaced by a v4.0.1 point release.

    ROCm 4.0 brought CDNA / MI100 (Arcturus) compute support and other "Exascale Era" preparations in making this open-source GPU compute stack competitor more competitive with NVIDIA's CUDA. For now though it's still been leaving out the Navi GPU support.

  • Linux Foundation Public Health Joins The Fight Against COVID-19 Pandemic

    Brian Behlendorf is one of the most respected luminaries of the open-source world. He has been heading the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project since its inception and recently took over additional responsibilities of the Linux Foundation Public Health.

Devices and Open Hardware Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware

  • Rugged mini-PC dips into Elkhart Lake

    Neousys unveiled a fanless, 112 x 87 x 50mm “POC-40” computer with an up to 3.0GHz, dual-core Atom x6211E plus up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x M.2, and DP, 2x serial, and isolated DIO.

    Last month, Neousys announced one of the first Intel Elkhart Lake based embedded PCs with its ultra-compact (153 x 108 x 56mm) POC-400. The company has followed up with an even smaller (112 x 87 x 50mm) and similarly rugged POC-40 using the same 10nm processor family. The industrial, DIN-rail mountable mini-PC supports applications such as space-constrained factory data collection systems, rugged edge computers, and mobile gateways.

  • Pipo W12 Arm Windows 10 Laptop finally launched for $422 and up

    The project provides a Debian image for the aforementioned Yoga C630, so with some efforts a port to Pipo W12 may be possible.

  • Arduino Blog » Access control unit designed with a Raspberry Pi CM4 and an Arduino Micro

    Whether granting access to public transit or restricting unauthorized personnel in buildings, NFC card readers can be extremely useful. Although most might not consider how they work – and simply happy getting through a turnstile – there’s a lot going on behind the scenes.

    In his video, Daniel Raines shows off a pair of prototype access control units (ACUs) that he’s constructed. The two networked devices are each based on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 along with an Arduino Micro that controls six relays to allow or deny entry, provide feedback, fire, and lock up.

  •   

  • Arduino Blog » 2002 Audio TT dashboard gets a digital speedometer upgrade with a custom CAN bus shield

    While it’s hard to beat analog instruments for instantaneous automotive feedback, Finnish electrical engineering student Jussi Ristiniemi also wanted a digital speed readout on his 2002 Audi TT.

    His particular model normally uses the car’s controller area network (CAN) to transmit the radio station or CD track to the uppermost section of the digital display. For this speedometer mod, audio data was replaced with “KM/H” readings, supplied by the vehicle’s CAN bus system via an Arduino Nano and custom interface shield.

4MLinux 35.1 released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 5.4.85. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.46, MariaDB 10.5.8, and PHP 7.4.13 (see this post for more details).
You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process).

Read more

NumPy (Python) Series

Filed under
Development
  • How to Use Python NumPy Array – Linux Hint

    Many libraries exist in Python to perform different types of tasks. NumPy is one of them. The full form of NumPy is Numerical Python, and it is mainly used for scientific computing. Multi-dimensional array objects can be defined by using this library that is called the Python NumPy array. Different types of functions exist in the NumPy library to create the array. NumPy array can be generated from the python list of numeric data, range of data, and random data. How NumPy array can be created and used to do different operations types have shown in this tutorial.

  • How to Use Python NumPy arange() Function – Linux Hint

    Many functions exist in the Python NumPy library to perform different types of numerical and scientific operations. Creating different types of arrays for various purposes is one of the practical uses of the NumPy library. Python has a built-in function named arange() to create a list of sequential numbers. arange() is one of the array creation functions of the NumPy library to create an array of numeric ranges. The uses of the NumPy arange() function have explained in this tutorial.

  • How to Use Python NumPy reshape() Function – Linux Hint

    NumPy library has many functions to work with the multi-dimensional array. reshape () function is one of them that is used to change the shape of any existing array without changing the data. The shape defines the total number of elements in each dimension. The array’s dimension can be added or removed, and the number of elements in each dimension can be modified by using the reshape() function. The one-dimensional array can be converted into a multi-dimensional array, but the multi-dimensional array can’t be converted into a one-dimensional array by this function. How to reshape() function works and its uses are explained in this tutorial.

  • How to Use Python NumPy zeros() and ones() Functions – Linux Hint

    NumPy library is one of the useful libraries of python that can be used to create arrays. zeros() and ones() are the NumPy library functions to create two different arrays. zeros() function is used to create an array based on the particular shape and type. All array elements are initialized to 0, which is created by the zeros() function. ones() function works like the zeros() function. But the elements of the array created by the ones() function are initialized to 1. The uses of both functions have shown in this tutorial by using multiple examples.

  • How to convert Python NumPy array to python list – Linux Hint

    Array object is used to store multiple values, and the list object is used in Python to do a similar task to an array object. NumPy array object is used to do different types of numerical operations in Python. The multi-dimensional array can be created by using this library. NumPy library has a built-in tolist() function to convert the NumPy array to the python list. This function does not take any argument and returns the python list. If the array is one-dimensional, then the function will return a simple python list. If the array is multi-dimensional, then the array will return the nested python list. If the array’s dimension is 0, then the function will return a python scalar variable instead of a list. How tolist() function can convert different types of NumPy array to python list is shown in this tutorial.

  • How to install NumPy python development environment on Ubuntu – Linux Hint

    Python is a modern programming language now for supporting a large number of libraries. Various types of tasks can be done by using these libraries. NumPy is one of the useful libraries of Python to perform scientific operations. This library can be used to create a multi-dimensional array of objects. Different types of mathematical tasks can be done quickly using this library, such as sorting the array, reshaping array, statistical operation, arithmetical operations, etc. It works faster because it is developed by using the C programming language.

  • Python Unittest Tutorial

    Unit testing is a testing method used in software engineering for individual units of any code. Users can put the individual tests to determine the status of the source and how much the code is suitable to be used. This way users can test the code quality.

    Testing is done once the process of development is complete. Users can also begin testing when the test script is to be verified based on the criteria of the testing. Developers are expected to write the manual types of the source code. Generally, manually writing unit testing codes is a hectic task but in Python, it is done using an in-built function called unittest.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install and Use Fail2ban on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8

    Top on the list of every IT operation team is ensuring that servers are secure from unauthorized users or malicious scripts. There are a number of solutions that you can apply to ward off attacks and breaches. Among them is the implementation of the Fail2ban software tool.

    Fail2ban is an open-source intrusion detection measure that mitigates brute-force attacks that target various services such as SSH, and VSFTPD to mention a few. It comes with an array of filters – including SSH – that you can customize to update the firewall rules and block unauthorized SSH login attempts.

    The fail2ban utility monitors the server’s log files for any intrusion attempts and blocks the IP address of the user after a predefined number of failed attempts for a specified duration. The user’s IP is placed in a ‘jail’ which can be set, enabled, or disabled in the /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf configuration file. This way, it helps to secure your Linux server from unauthorized access, and more specifically from botnets and malicious scripts.

  • How to install WPS Office 2019 on Linux Mint 20.1 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install WPS Office 2019 on Linux Mint 20.1.

  • Installing Google Chrome on Fedora Linux – Linux Hint

    Google Chrome is one of the top browsers for all platforms. It’s a product released by Google. The browser comes with numerous features, including synchronization with Google services, fast performance, fast performance, etc.

    In this guide, check out how to install Google Chrome on Fedora Linux.

  • How to install TupiTube Desk on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install TupiTube Desk on a Chromebook Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install Spreed WebRTC Server on Ubuntu | FOSS Linux

    preed isn’t like any other video chat platform – it is much better and powerful in every way. It is a free and open-source audio/video call server designed with privacy in mind. Spreed uses WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communication), which enables web browsers and mobile apps to communicate in real-time via APIs (Application Programming Interfaces). WebRTC enables peer-to-peer communication making it possible for audio and video to work inside web pages.

    Additionally, Spreed WebRTC uses end-to-end encryption, thus ensuring ultimate privacy and security to users’ data.

  • How to Use Btrfs Scrub? – Linux Hint

    The Btrfs filesystem is a multi-device filesystem that has built-in support for RAID. In a multi-device Btrfs filesystem or RAID, the data/metadata blocks may be stored in one or more storage devices. The Btrfs scrub tool will read all the data/metadata blocks from all the storage devices added to a Btrfs filesystem or RAID and find all the corrupted data/metadata blocks. Once the corrupted data/metadata blocks are found, the Btrfs scrub tool will automatically repair those corrupted data/metadata blocks if possible.

    In a multi-device Btrfs filesystem or Btrfs RAID, depending on the filesystem configuration, there may be multiple copies of the data/metadata blocks stored in different locations of the storage devices added to the Btrfs filesystem. When the Btrfs scrub tool finds a corrupted data/metadata block, it searches all the storage devices added to the Btrfs filesystem for duplicate copies of that data/metadata block. Once a duplicate copy of that data/metadata block is found, the corrupted data/metadata block is overwritten with the correct data/metadata block. This is how the Btrfs scrub tool repairs corrupted data/metadata blocks in a multi-device Btrfs filesystem or Btrfs RAID.

  • How to Use Btrfs Balance? – Linux Hint

    The Btrfs filesystem has built-in multi-device support, so you can create different levels of RAID using it.
    Once you’ve created a Btrfs RAID, you can add more storage devices to the RAID to expand the RAID. But, once you have added more storage devices to the RAID, Btrfs won’t spread the existing data/metadata/system-data to the new storage devices automatically. So, you may not get the desired throughput (read/write speed) out of the RAID, and it may not be able to populate the new storage devices with the required redundant data. So, the RAID array may fail to survive the desired number of drive failures.

    To solve these problems, the Btrfs filesystem provides a built-in balancing tool. The Btrfs balance utility will spread the data/metadata/system-data of the existing storage devices of the RAID to the newly added storage devices.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to use the Btrfs balance utility to spread the data/metadata/system-data of the existing storage devices of the RAID to the newly added storage devices. So, let’s get started!

  • How to Install and Configure NIS Server on Debian 10? – Linux Hint

    NIS stands for Network Information Service, and it is used extensively for sharing configuration data about different systems across the whole network. In today’s article, we will be talking about the methods of installing and configuring this server on a Debian 10 system.

  • How to Install Swift in Debian 10 – Linux Hint

    Swift is a famous language that was developed by Apple to create software applications. Swift is an open-source language that is used as a fast and interactive programming language to develop various software for all platforms and servers. Writing a Swift code is interactive since the syntax is quite concise. Swift also contains multiple features that are useful for developers. The code written in Swift is safe for designing and extremely fast, as well. This article shows you how to install Swift on a Debian 10 server.

    This tutorial will be of great help to all Debian users who wish to install Swift on their computers. We will be using Debian 10, but even if you do not have the latest version of Debian installed on your system, feel free to follow the same procedure on your computer.

  • How to Enable Automatic Updates on Ubuntu 20.04

    One of the crucial administration roles that any sysadmin is tasked to do is to ensure that the security patches and feature updates are regularly applied. Security updates address pre-existing vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious users to breach the system. Delayed patching of system packages may result in system breaches where confidential information is access and exfiltrated. Manually updating packages on Ubuntu - and any Linux system for that matter - is a tedious task and wastes a lot of your precious time. This is time that could have been spent elsewhere performing more productive tasks. As a workaround, configuring automatic updates on a Linux server comes highly recommended. In this guide, we walk you through how to enable automatic updates on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Configure LDAP Client in Debian 10 – Linux Hint

    LDAP is an acronym for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol. LDAP allows users to store the usernames and passwords of users in a single place. This place is then used by multiple services for validating the users claiming these services. To use a service, you always need to have a client-end program that can help you to access that service. This article shows you how to install and configure the LDAP client on your Debian 10 system.

  • GPT vs. MBR Booting

    Most of the time, we let our computers’ boot just happen, but sometimes we need to control it. One of those times is when you want to dual boot. The way your disk is organized affects what you need to do and think about. The way computers boot and have been booting is by using the Master Boot Record. That was the old way, but you will still see partitioning software give you the option to use this system. GPT means GUID Partition Table; it was introduced to address BIOS limitations, one being the size of disk it can address. To use GPT, you must have a UEFI based computer. In 2021, you do! Just watch out for decades-old hardware if you are a tinkerer. Note that you can still keep using MBR if you wish to do so.

  • 4 Ways to Install Firefox Browser 85 in Ubuntu / LinuxMint / CentOS

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to download and install Mozilla Firefox 85 in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Linux Mint 20.1, and CentOS 8.1 / 7.x.

    Mozilla Firefox is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla foundation and generally utilized by thousands and thousands of individuals in their daily actions.

    Firefox 85 Started its development in November Mid 2020 and released its stable version 85 on Jan 25, 2021 and it is ahead of its official release date for all supported OS Platforms.

GNOME 40 Alpha Released for Public Testing with New Activities Overview Design

Filed under
GNOME

After about four months since it entered development, the upcoming GNOME 40 desktop environment series, due for release at the end of March 2021, now has an initial development release that anyone can test it to get an early taste of the new features and improvements.

The biggest new feature in GNOME 40 looks to be a reimagined Activities Overview that promises better overview spatial organization, improved touchpad navigation, more engaging app browsing and launching, as well as better boot performance.

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Graphics: GPUOpen, Vulkan, and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Celebrates Five Years Of GPUOpen

    Today marks five years since AMD began the GPUOpen initiative for providing more open-source Radeon GPU code projects, code samples, and more for better engaging GPU/game developers in the open.

    As any longtime Phoronix reader will know, AMD's open-source Linux driver initiative is going on for more than a decade while the celebration today is just over their GPUOpen initiative turning five years old. The three principles that continue to guide GPUOpen are providing code and documentation to PC developers to exert more control on the GPU, a commitment to open-source software, and a collaborative engagement with the developer community.

  • Vulkan 1.2.168 Released With Two New Extensions

    Today's Vulkan 1.2.168 specification update brings the usual specification corrections/clarifications while also introducing two new KHR extensions.

  • VKD3D-Proton Begins Working On DirectX 12 Ray-Tracing Atop Vulkan

    Those working on VKD3D-Proton as the Direct3D 12 implementation atop the Vulkan API are beginning to work on DirectX Ray-Tracing support but it isn't yet ready for gamers.

    Hans-Kristian Arntzen has opened the initial pull request for enabling ray-tracing extensions with VKD3D-Proton.

  • NVIDIA release the Vulkan Beta Driver 455.50.03, new extensions supported

    Need to be on the bleeding edge of what NVIDIA have to offer? They just released driver version 455.50.03, as part of their Vulkan Beta Driver series. This is actually the second driver released this month, with 455.50.02 appearing on January 19. Here's a look over all that's new in them together.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (crmsh, debian-security-support, flatpak, gst-plugins-bad1.0, openvswitch, python-bottle, salt, tomcat9, and vlc), Fedora (chromium, python-pillow, sddm, and xen), Gentoo (chromium, dnsmasq, flatpak, glibc, kdeconnect, openjdk, python, thunderbird, virtualbox, and wireshark), Mageia (blosc, crmsh, glibc, perl-DBI, php-oojs-oojs-ui, python-pip, python-urllib3, and undertow), openSUSE (gdk-pixbuf, hawk2, ImageMagick, opera, python-autobahn, viewvc, wavpack, and xstream), Red Hat (dnsmasq), Slackware (seamonkey), SUSE (hawk2, ImageMagick, mutt, permissions, and stunnel), and Ubuntu (pound).

  • Apache Software Foundation Security Report: 2020

    Synopsis: This report explores the state of security across all Apache Software Foundation projects for the calendar year 2020. We review key metrics, specific vulnerabilities, and the most common ways users of ASF projects were affected by security issues.

  • Apache Software Foundation Saw Assigned CVEs Up 24%, Security Issues Up 53% For 2020

    The Apache Software Foundation that oversees 340+ Apache projects saw a measurable rise in security related issues during the course of 2020.

  • This new botnet is targeting Linux servers running enterprise apps [Ed: TechRadar foolishly perpetuating ZDNet garbage]

Open Source Google Docs Alternative CryptPad 4.0 Releases With New Look and New Features

Filed under
Software

CryptPad is an impressive encrypted Google Docs alternatives that we’ve covered previously. Even though it does not offer all the features and goodies that you get with Google Docs, it is a usable privacy-friendly option for many.

Recently, they deployed a major upgrade (CryptPad 4.0) to their platform that involves a new logo, refreshed icons, and more new features.

In this article, I shall highlight some of the key changes with the latest major release.

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Movim: An Open-Source Decentralized Social Platform Based on XMPP Network

Filed under
Software

Just like some other XMPP desktop clients, Movim is a web-based XMPP front-end to let you utilize it as a federated social media.

Since it relies on XMPP network, you can interact with other users utilizing XMPP clients such as Conversations (for Android) and Dino (for Desktop).

In case you didn’t know, XMPP is an open-standard for messaging.

So, Movim can act as your decentralized messaging app or a full-fledged social media platform giving you an all-in-one experience without relying on a centralized network.

It offers many features that can appeal to a wide variety of users. Let me briefly highlight most of the important ones.

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Revive Classic Nintendo DS Games on Linux With Emulation

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Want to play Nintendo DS games on your Linux system but can't figure out how? Back in the day, Nintendo DS was a very popular handheld console with a huge collection of games. But over time, advanced consoles were launched in the market that rendered DS obsolete.

Luckily, several emulators are available that allow you to play classic Nintendo DS games on your system. DeSmuMe is a great example of a stable Nintendo DS emulator for a Linux machine.

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Patched Linux 5.11 Continues Looking Great For AMD Ryzen/EPYC Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While the initial AMD Linux 5.11 performance regression written about at the end of last year was of much concern given the performance hits to AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 processors with the out-of-the-box "Schedutil" governor, with a pending patch the regression is not only addressed but in various workloads we continue seeing better performance than even compared to Linux 5.10. Here is the latest from several more days of extensive performance testing.

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DIN-rail gateway offers dual LAN and dual RS485

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Linux

The Unipi Gate G110 and G100 are PLC-ready DIN-rail gateways that run Linux on a quad -A53 SoC with 16GB eMMC, GbE and 10/100 LAN ports, and up to 2x RS485 ports with modular extensions.

Czech based Unipi, which started out in 2014 with a Raspberry Pi based UniPi automation controller board and followed up with products including an Allwinner H5-based Axon automation controller, has now launched the $243 Unipi Gate G100 and $272 Unipi Gate G110 DIN-rail gateways.

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Telematics gateway connects with Iridium, GPS, 4G, WiFi/BT, and 433MHz RFID

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Linux

Appareo’s IP67-rated, -40 to 75°C tolerant “Gateway 370” telematics gateway runs Linux on a Cortex-A9 SoC and supplies Iridium SBD, 433MHz (RFID), 4G LTE, WiFi/BT, and GPS plus LAN, BroadR-Reach, DIO, and CAN links.

Fargo, ND based Appareo has launched a wireless telematics control unit (TCU) for heavy machinery in applications such as construction and agriculture. The Gateway 370 is based on a Gateway 270 that Appareo announced last May. That earlier model similarly provides Yocto-derived Linux with Docker container support on an unnamed dual-core, Cortex-A9 SoC — probably the i.MX6 Dual or DualLite.

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OpenSUSE: YaST Development Sprint and Digest of YaST Development Sprint

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 116

    Let’s start with an installer improvement quite some people was waiting for. Both openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise can use either wicked or NetworkManager to handle the system’s network configuration. Only the former can be fully configured with YaST (which is generally not a problem because there are plenty of tools to configure NetworkManager). Moreover, during the standard installation process, wicked is always used to setup the network of the installer itself. If the user decides to rely on wicked also in the final system, then the configuration of the installer is carried over to it. But, so far, if the user opted to use NetworkManager then the installer configuration was lost and the network of the final system had to be be configured again using NetworkManager this time. Not anymore! That’s not the only installer behavior we have refined based on feedback from our users. In some scenarios, the logic used to decide whether an existing EFI System Partition (ESP) could be reused was getting in the way of those aiming for a fine-grained control of their partitions. That should now be fixed by the changes described in this pull request, that have been already submitted to Tumbleweed and will be part of the upcoming releases (15.3) of both openSUSE Leap and SLE.

  • Session One Meetup Generates Enhancements, Actions

    The first session of the openSUSE Project’s meetup regarding the End of the Year Survey Results on Jan. 23 is already starting produce some actionable items from contributors. The session on openSUSE’s Jitsi instance had engagement from about 20 people from around the globe. Topics discussed in the two-hour session focused on addressing pain points, transferring knowledge and promoting openSUSE projects. Members of the “let’s improve the openSUSE learning experience” shared statics and analysis from the survey and attendees engaged in generating ideas and actions to enhance and improve the above mentioned items.

The 10 Best Linux Server Distributions [2021 Edition]

One of the best things about Linux is the various types of distributions it has to offer. No matter how you plan to use your Linux PC, there’s a Linux distro optimized with all the necessary tools and functionalities to meet your needs. And this brings us to Linux server distributions – Linux distros optimized to be used on servers. These are lightweight Linux distros, sometimes even stripped of a desktop environment, and packed with tools to improve speed, stability, and security – the traits of a good server OS. But with that being said, there are literally hundreds of Linux server distros circulating the internet. So which one should you choose for your home server or even for professional use? Well, to answer your question, we have put together a comprehensive list of the 10 best Linux Server Distributions for 2021. [...] So this brings us to the end of our list of the 10 best Linux server distributions of 2021. We hope this was useful and helped you find the right Linux server distro for your specific needs and requirements. All the server distros come with their own unique advantages and disadvantages, as you can see. If you are completely new, we recommend starting with a Ubuntu server. With time, you’ll understand what features you need and then migrate to a distro that delivers those functionalities. But that being said, this is by no means a comprehensive list of all the best Linux server distros out there. So if your favorite distro didn’t make it up on this list, then feel free to mention it down in the comments along with why you prefer it over the options discussed here. We would surely like to know. Read more

openSUSE "Leap" 15.2 - Any Good?

This is a review I've been wanting to write since forever. Having tried many iterations of SUSE Linux over its long life before, during and after the Novell era, it always left me feeling ambivalent. And I really wanted to like it. The last time I set out to write a review but then canned the idea was for 12.3, when images would work in VMware Player but did not boot on my real hardware. Now THAT is a long time ago and it also means a lot may have changed, hopefully for the better. SUSE is known and often praised for their offering of a highly polished KDE desktop. This is what I will go for in this little experiment. On the download page we can choose between a netinstall image for openSUSE "Leap" approx. 125 MB in size for x86_64 and the full DVD image of 4.3 GB. This is the equivalent of the box set of olden days. Live images are available with the KDE Plasma and Gnome desktops as well as a Rescue Live CD which are all staying under 1 GB in size, but only the rescue image is small enough to burn to CD. All images can be written to USB and DVD. Community maintained ports are also available for ARM, the Raspberry Pi and PPC architectures. Instructions to install or change to "Leap" as well as minimum system requirements are further down the page. Quite a traditional selection really. The web page layout is simple and clear and conveys the most pertinent information right away. Years ago installing from live image was not recommended so the choice here is basically between downloading the entire library or the netinstall image. I decided to go for the netinstall. Not having an installable live image obviously robs us of the test run people have become accustomed to unless we down yet another image just for testing. I decided against that as we can see from the netinstall image whether openSUSE will boot up or not. The rest is just desktop showcasing. I downloaded images for the x86_64 architecture. Read more

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Two Powerful SSD Benchmark Utilities for Linux

    The 21st century has seen unprecedented growth in the technological sector, and many upgrades have been made in the past several years. The evolution of phones from landlines to smartphones is a clear indicator of this technological phenomenon. The latter has become a key part of our lives, providing us a means to connect with the world around us. The desktops and laptops that we use today have also seen major progression, and this can be observed in the improvement in the quality of tools and games in the world of computers. One such sector in the computer world is that of memory storage, which has quickly moved on from traditional hard disks to a newer, faster type of storage called a solid-state drive, or SSD for short. SSDs are extremely fast, require less power, and are more shock-resistant than HDDs. You can see this for yourself by benchmarking your SSDs. Benchmarking is the process of measuring the performance of any tool, which can be done using a benchmarking utility. This article looks at two of the best utilities available for SSD benchmarking in the Linux operating system, Disks and hdparm.

  • Radeon ROCm 4.0.1 Released For AMD Open-Source GPU Compute

    Last month marked the release of the big Radeon Open eCosystem 4.0 update (ROCm 4.0) while today that has been replaced by a v4.0.1 point release. ROCm 4.0 brought CDNA / MI100 (Arcturus) compute support and other "Exascale Era" preparations in making this open-source GPU compute stack competitor more competitive with NVIDIA's CUDA. For now though it's still been leaving out the Navi GPU support.

  • Linux Foundation Public Health Joins The Fight Against COVID-19 Pandemic

    Brian Behlendorf is one of the most respected luminaries of the open-source world. He has been heading the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project since its inception and recently took over additional responsibilities of the Linux Foundation Public Health.