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Sunday, 05 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Chrome OS Terminal App Gains New Features, Makes Working with Linux Easier Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 9:22pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 8:06pm
Story What is better than GNOME, in what ways Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 7:58pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 5:17pm
Story Looking At The LVI Mitigation Impact On Intel Cascade Lake Refresh Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 5:07pm
Story Best video editing software for linux/Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 5:01pm
Story Ubuntu 20.04 Beta is Now Available to Download Rianne Schestowitz 15 05/04/2020 - 4:53pm
Story How I manage my productive life in Linux Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 4:46pm
Story Fantastic Linux Games For 2020 : Linux Games Rianne Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 4:40pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/04/2020 - 4:15pm

Chrome OS Terminal App Gains New Features, Makes Working with Linux Easier

Filed under
OS
Linux

As spotted by the focally-blessed hawks at Android Police, Chrome OS 83 (currently on the developer channel) ships with an updated terminal app boasts a solid set of welcome new features.

If you’re unfamiliar with it, the Chrome OS terminal app is available to users of Chrome OS on compatible Chromebooks who opt-in to the Linux (beta) feature.

The feature (through the power of containers) provides a full Linux development environment in which they can apt install popular open software like GIMP, LibreOffice, and, yes, even Mozilla Firefox on a Chromebook and run them alongside other software, native software.

Read more

What is better than GNOME, in what ways

Filed under
GNOME

Gnome is a fantastic way to run your desktop but it is not right for everyone. Maybe, you may like to switch to another for specific tasks. For performance reasons, user and computer, you may want another desktop. This is particularly interesting for people who work with specific activities. A programmer becomes accustomed to using the keyboard and a graphic designer may need more power. In this post you will hear about some other desktop environments and their benefits and drawbacks.

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Looking At The LVI Mitigation Impact On Intel Cascade Lake Refresh

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

On Friday I posted some initial numbers looking at the LVI mitigation impact when using the LLVM Clang compiler with that open-source, multi-platform compiler having landed its mitigation this week for Intel's Load Value Injection (LVI) vulnerability that was disclosed in March. Through the weekend I have been running some additional tests of this compiler-based mitigation and in this article are some numbers off Cascade Lake Refresh, which while recently released is reported by Intel to still be vulnerable to this new disclosure.

Read more

Best video editing software for linux/Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

If you are looking for a good Linux video editing software to create home videos, then you’ve come to the right place. Ubuntu easily supports the multimedia world, not only playing audio and video but also helping create content. Currently users are able to create audio and video files easily and with professional results from Ubuntu.

Here is our list of the top best video editors for linux that can help you make custom movies and share them with your friends and family.

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How I manage my productive life in Linux

Filed under
Linux

Before I start to share my thoughts on the digital side of my productivity workflow, I want to mention that I am not an open source purist. First of all I use Linux because in my opinion it just works better and faster on my machines, because it is much more stable, because it is simpler (currently my main distros are Zorin OS and elementary OS, both distros that require virtually no tweaking to meet my personal requirements and preferences), and because it just helps me to focus on my productive tasks. But although I always start to look for open source software solutions first, in the end I don’t force myself to exclusively run open source applications on my machines. If there is a closed source solution, or even a web based only solution, that fits my needs best and it can be used in Linux, then I have no problem using that software.

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Fantastic Linux Games For 2020 : Linux Games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
HowTos

There are thousands of games available for Linux based operating systems. Those used to be the day when it was hard to find Linux games but these days there are many gaming marketplaces, gaming platforms, and games being developed for the Linux based operating systems.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • InTrain: University of Bologna Launches Open Source RSI Training Platform

    Long before the current coronavirus situation made remote work and education the new normal, Gabriele Carioli and Nicoletta Spinolo launched InTrain, a free, open-source, online training platform for remote simultaneous interpreters.

  • Add Authentication to Jitsi Meet

    By default Jitsi Meet is open for everyone. So everyone can just put in a name for a conference room and start a conference. As my Jitsi Meet instance is not running on a dedicated server but shares the server with other important functions like DNS, mail etc., I do not want that everyone is using Jitsi without my permission.

    So I needed to add some kind of authentication to Jitsi which means, that only certain authenticated users can start a conference. Once started everyone then can join the conference without further authentication just like before.

    The steps to provide that, are documented in this article under the subject “Secure domain”.

    I just followed the steps 1 to 4 and it worked fine afterwards.

  • Videoconferencing Options in the Age of Pandemic

    At first the IT dept. at university said no. But he protested. They looked at the code, (it is open source), and after a few hours of bit wrangling, decided it was ok.

    They walled off a server, locked it down, and installed “Jitsi”. The IT guys were impressed. It takes a small amount of resources. But is fairly light weight for a big university system.

  • Radeon Open Compute 3.3 Released But Still Without Official Navi Support

    This week marked the release of ROCm 3.3 as the newest version of the Radeon Open Compute stack.

    Radeon Open Compute 3.3 brings support for multi-version installations so multiple versions of ROCm can be installed on the same system albeit the same kernel driver will be at play. This allows for different versions of the ROCm user-space libraries like HCC, ROCm Math Libraries, MIOpen, and others to all be on the same platform as long as the Kernel Fusion Driver is compatible with all.

Microsoft Entrapment, Linux Foundation and Openwashing by DataStax

Filed under
Misc

Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Open Source AVs: The Story Of AV Development In Estonia

    TalTech is a leading polytechnic university in Estonia. In the world of technology, the area is best known for providing some of the key founders of Skype. Like many AV design teams, TalTech’s journey towards building an AV started with robotics competitions such as Robotex. In June 2017, an ambitious self-driving vehicle project was started with the goal to develop a low speed AV Shuttle for the university anniversary in September 2018.

  • The JavaScript Framework That Puts Web Pages on a Diet
  • Language Design: Stop Using <> for Generics

    TL;DR: Use [] instead of <> for generics. It will save you a lot of avoidable trouble down the road.

  • Pixar pioneers behind Toy Story animation win “Nobel Prize” of computing

    “The electronic revolution we have witnessed in all varieties of films, tv, video games – in all probability no a person made a lot more of the change to that then Ed and Pat,” claims David Value, creator of the ebook The Pixar Contact.

    To make Toy Story and other laptop-animated movies feasible, Dr Catmull, Dr Hanrahan and their teams experienced to build ways to get computers to visualize 3-dimensional objects.

    Throughout his postdoctoral reports, Dr Catmull produced a way to make a personal computer to realize a curved floor. As soon as builders experienced a mathematically defined curve area they could begin to add far more features to it – like texture and depth.

    “Step by stage you figure out what form of lights should really be applied. Then you get started to place in the physics of it due to the fact plastic demonstrates gentle one way and steel displays it in a extremely various way,” Dr Catmull describes.

  • Intel MKL-DNN / DNNL 1.3 Released With Cooper Lake Optimizations

    Intel on Thursday released version 1.3 of their Deep Neural Network Library (DNNL) formerly known as MKL-DNN in offering a open-source performance library for deep learning applications.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 54: k-th Permutation Sequence and the Collatz Conjecture

    These are some answers to the Week 54 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

    Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a couple of days (April 5, 2020). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • Skaffolder Has Published an Open-Source Tool to the Developer

    The specs-driven code age instrument includes an instinctive interface and simple to-utilize formats that help to set aside to 40% of improvement time. Additionally, combined with an open-source segment, Skaffolder permits designers to make web or versatile applications from the order line. Alongside the order line apparatus, the imaginative web application instrument offers a VSCode augmentation that empowers designers to utilize the order line device’s highlights from the VSCode interface. Consequently, designers can associate with Skaffolder without leaving their coordinated improvement condition, additionally, furnishing them with a visual interface locally to characterize APIs and databases.

  • Why Having A Full Post RSS Feed Is A Good Idea

    If you didn’t know already, I think everyone should have an RSS feed on their site. But it really frustrates me when I subscribe to a new feed, only to find that the owner has the post excerpt syndicated, and not a full post RSS feed.

    Now, having the excerpt is better than nothing, but having a full post feed is so much better for a number of reasons.

  • How to accelerate development with well-maintained and secure open-source components

    To shift catching these problems left, Fischer said you can’t just rely on code-scanning tools. He advised creating a master catalog of open-source projects that developers can choose from at the outset of their work, and make sure they’re maintained. Tidelift, Fischer added, lets you start with a catalog of thousands of open-source projects that you can count on being good today and good tomorrow, based on hygiene and quality.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • HPE, Intel, Red Hat Team On 5G Open Source Initiative
  • IBM awards its second $50,000 Open Source Community Grant to internship and mentorship program Outreachy

    Last October, the open source community at IBM awarded a first-of-its-kind quarterly grant to promote nonprofits that are dedicated to education, inclusiveness, and skill-building for women, underrepresented minorities, and underserved communities in the open source world. Our Open Source Community Grant identifies and rewards future developers and open source leaders and creates new tech opportunities for underrepresented communities.

  • IBM selects Outreachy for second $50K open source community grant

    The award will help the organization provide paid remote work to underrepresented groups hit especially hard during the coronavirus pandemic, officials said.

  • Ankur Sinha "FranciscoD": 20200404: What I did this week

    The research group does a lot of experimental work, but it is also where the Open Source Brain project is based. Given my computing background, and experience with FOSS in Fedora, a large component of my role is to work on the development of the Open Source Brain platform, and liaise with MetaCell who do most of the core development. Along with that, I get to work on modelling and other research projects. I was looking to work in a group that included experimentalists. I think that it is important for me to develop as an independent researcher in neuroscience.

    [...]

    We're nearing the Fedora 32 release, so I worked on the bits remaining for the new CompNeuroFedora lab image. Based on the discussion at the NeuroFedora meeting, I passed all the information needed to set up a page for the lab to the Websites team.

    The general package updates continue. I just updated Brian2 to the new version this morning and pushed an update with a test case. The test case takes one through the tutorial, so if one is looking to learn how to use Brian2, this is a good way of doing it while contributing to NeuroFedora. Another few bugs were fixed and updates pushed too. I've got to work on packaging a few new tools that are on the list.

    On the Fedora-Join front, we've had a few more folks join the community to help out. It was lovely chatting with new folks and discussing where and how they'd like to work with the community. Needless to say, lots of cookie giving has occurred in the IRC channel.

    I've also been thinking about the lack of a process for Community Changes in Fedora. Why isn't there something similar to the Change process that we use for dev changes? I finally filed a ticket with the Council. It's being discussed on the council-discuss mailing list. I've also asked Mindshare and CommOps to weigh in this morning. Please feel free to jump in and discuss how we should go about this. A change process that focusses on community is important, in my book.

    The Git forge discussion continues on the -devel mailing list, so I've been keeping up with that. I would prefer Pagure myself, and I do understand the CPE team's view even if I don't necessarily agree with it.

  • Deploying Red Hat Enterprise Linux for telco edge computing use cases

    Amongst the common reasons why service providers are deploying mobile edge computing are to improve network security, increase scalability, lower costs and increase revenue with new services. Digital Service Providers and the associated telco partner ecosystem rely on Red Hat Enterprise Linux as a foundation for responding to customer requirements and seizing new opportunities, particularly as they deploy 5G and edge services.

    As Stefanie Chiras explains, the vendor sees its Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the innovation engine for edge, providing consistency from the data center all the way to the edge with tools like Image Builder. 5G is changing the world, and edge is changing 5G. It believes that RHEL is the intelligent OS service providers and telco ecosystem can count on to provide that consistent, scalable foundation for innovation where customers can develop once, deploy and deliver anywhere.

  • Linux Beat IBM, Will Open-Source Software Beat Waymo And Tesla? [Ed: "Linux Beat IBM"? Huh? I don't think they know what "Linux" is and what "IBM" does? Forbes is absolutely hilarious.]

    Open Source has disrupted many markets. Is the Autonomous Vehicle Market next ?

  • Will A Small Open-Source Effort From Japan Disrupt The Autonomous Space ? [Ed: Forbes... the Breitbart of tech. Very poor and shallow, weak and wrong on many facts]

    A small team in Finland built linux and changed the landscape of corporate computing. Will a small team in Japan do the same for the autonomous vehicle space ?

Sharing, Collaboration and 'Open Source' Tackling Covid-19

Filed under
Security
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute working on open-source ventilator designs

    Researchers at Worcester (Mass.) Polytechnic Institute (WPI) are touting a design for turning inexpensive bag valve mask (BVM) resuscitators into automated ventilators to aid the fight against the coronavirus outbreak.

    The WPI team is designing the ventilators from readily available, manual BVM resuscitators so that they can fill the gap between the number of ventilators available and the number needed when COVID-19 is expected to peak, according to a news release.

    Anyone with a 3D printer and a background in electronics and mechanical engineering may be able to produce the ventilators for a local hospital, as the researchers intend to make designs of multiple devices and components publicly available. The researchers also believe a manufacturing company can use the designs to make the ventilators quickly and at scale.

  • Will EEs Be the Heroes of the Global Ventilator Shortage?

    As the coronavirus continues to spread, hospitals around the world face a severe shortage of ventilators that alleviate respiratory distress. New York could be short by about 15,000 ventilators to treat the most severe cases, according to The New York Times. In these uncertain times, even carmakers are starting to make ventilators and face masks to help out during the crisis.

    A quick search of ventilators shows that there are many makers around the world who try to build a basic ventilator using readily available materials or 3D-printed parts. Some of these projects are open source to solicit help from experts and enthusiasts all over the world.

    In this article, we’ll briefly look at some of these open-source projects. Some of the projects we assessed in this article include OpenLung BVM Ventilator, the Low-Cost Open Source Ventilator or PAPR, the Rice OEDK Design (or ApolloBVM), and OxyGEN, among others.

    We’ll also take a look at the general challenges that a low-budget open-source ventilator project might face.

  • UF researchers develop low-cost, open-source ventilator

    As the need for ventilators grows as hundreds of thousands of patients are expected to need treatment for COVID-19, a University of Florida professor is working to help meet the demand.

    UF Professor of Anesthesiology Dr. Samsun Lampotang and a team of UF researchers have developed a ventilator that can be made using items from the hardware store.

    As a UF mechanical engineering student decades ago, Lampotang helped respiratory therapist colleagues build a minimal-transport ventilator that became a commercial success. So, when the coronavirus pandemic hit and he heard the desperate international plea for thousands of more ventilators, he set out to build a prototype using plentiful, cheap components that could be copied from an online diagram and a software repository.

  • Triple Eight develops open-source ventilator prototype

    After nearly two weeks of around-the-clock development, Triple Eight Race Engineering has revealed a low-cost ventilator prototype in an effort to help fight the global coronavirus pandemic.

    Following the ill-fated Australian Grand Prix, the Brisbane-based racing team led by Roland Dane suspended its racing operations after government guidelines on social distancing were introduced.

    With the Supercars season on hold, Dane challenged a group of six engineers to conceptualise and develop a ‘worst-case scenario’ ventilator in the event of the virus worsening.

    It took the group of engineers just four days to design and produce the first proof of concept, slowed only by a lack of readily available electrical componentry.

  • Council on Foreign Relations: Time to Open-Source Ventilators
  • Rice University's open-source emergency ventilator design plans freely available

    The plans for Rice University's ApolloBVM, an open-source emergency ventilator design that could help patients in treatment for COVID-19, are now online and freely available to everyone in the world.

    The project first developed by students as a senior design project in 2019 has been brought up to medical grade by Rice engineers and one student, with the help of Texas Medical Center doctors. The device costs less than $300 in parts and can squeeze a common bag valve mask for hours on end.

  • WPI Researchers Developing Open-Source Designs to Speed Creation of Low-Cost Ventilators

    A team of researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is creating designs to turn inexpensive and readily available manual, hand-held, bag valve mask (BVM) resuscitators into automated ventilators that could be used to fill the deep gap between the number of life-saving ventilators available and the much larger number that will be needed when COVID-19 is expected to peak.

    The WPI researchers are going to make designs of multiple devices and their components publicly available so anyone with a 3D printer and a background in electronics and mechanical engineering could use them to produce ventilators for their local hospitals. A manufacturing company also could use the designs to produce ventilators quickly and at scale.

    “I just wanted to do something to help,” said Gregory Fischer, professor of robotics engineering and mechanical engineering, and director of the PracticePoint Medical Cyber-Physcial Systems R&D Center, who spearheaded the idea. “A lot of people are trying to contribute, and this is an area where we can make an impact. We’re taking things that are used every day in emergency medicine and finding a way to turn them into safe, reliable, and readily replicable ventilators that can save patients’ lives. And we’re sharing those designs with the world.”

  • For Open-Source Ventilators, Making Them Is the Easy Part

    Last week, when Eric Humphreys heard about the impending need for ventilators to treat the huge influx of Covid-19 patients, he sprang to action. Humphreys used to be an EMT, and he remembered the bag valve mask resuscitators used in ambulances—called by the trademarked name of the leading provider, “Ambu bag”—and thought maybe he could create something like it. He didn’t have much else to do during the shutdown.

    Humpreys is a lifelong maker, working as the director of creative design technology at a production company called Standard Transmission. The company is best known for concocting the intricate Christmas window displays at Macy’s. Working in the now depopulated 20,000-square-foot headquarters in Red Hook, Brooklyn, he began building a DIY breathing machine. “I literally used Christmas parts,” he says.

    The point of a ventilator is to pump air into the lungs of patients who can’t breathe for themselves. The Ambu bag requires an EMT to manually press down on the plastic bladder, forcing the air into the patient. Humpreys rigged a machine to do the pumping. It took him only a couple of days to produce something that mimicked the action of an EMT on an Ambu bag.

  • Globally Scalable Open Source Ventilator Initiative
  • Indian engineers at MIT to develop open-source, low-cost ventilator for US

    One of the most pressing shortages facing hospitals during the COVID-19 emergency is a lack of ventilators. These machines can keep patients breathing when they no longer can on their own, and they can cost around $30,000 each. Now, a rapidly assembled volunteer team of engineers, physicians, computer scientists, and others, centered at MIT, is working to implement a safe, inexpensive alternative for emergency use, which could be built quickly around the world.

  • Hyderabadi in global open source ventilator project

    Amateur radio operators are once again playing a crucial role in times of despair, with some of them, including Hyderabad’s Ashhar Farhan, now in the process of developing an electronic control system for an open-source low-cost ventilator.

    The device was designed by researcher Sem Lampotang and his team at University of Florida using components like PVC pipes and lawn-sprinkler valves. The idea is to create a bare-bones ventilator that could serve in the event of a ventilator shortage anywhere in the world during the Covid-19 pandemic.

  • Medtronic Makes Plans for a Ventilator Open-Source - Nasdaq [Ed: openwashing lies]
  • Professional Ventilator Design Open Sourced Today By Medtronic [Ed: This is a lie and Bob Baddeley helps Medtronic spread false claims from its openwashing press release (above)]
  • Runaway Soldering Irons, Open Source Ventilators, 3D Printed Solder Stencils, And Radar Motion | Hackaday

    Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams sort through the hardware hacking gems of the week. There was a kerfuffle about whether a ventilator data dump from Medtronics was open source or not, and cool hacks from machine-learning soldering iron controllers to 3D-printing your own solder paste stencils. A motion light teardown shows it’s not being done with passive-infrared, we ask what’s the deal with Tim Berners-Lee’s decentralized internet, and we geek out about keyboards that aren’t QWERTY.

  • Nonprofit releases open source tool for making 3D print reusable protective masks

    A nonprofit initiative aims to put an end to the protective mask shortage that both healthcare workers and the public are facing during the coronavirus pandemic by providing them with tools to make the gear at home.

    Mask Maker released the first medically-approved design for 3D printed protective masks in an open source program that is available online.

    The masks can be created using commonly available materials and hobbyist grade 3D printers for a cost of about $2.00 to $3.00 per unit for materials – and they can be manufactured in just a few hours.

    The finished product is reusable and is equivalent of 300 disposable masks over a two month period.

  • American architects mobilise to make coronavirus face shields for hospital workers
  • How Coronavirus can make open-source movements flourish and fix our healthcare systems

    Birds can be heard chirping loud, as Mark Turrell (CEO at Orcasci, Founder of unDavos) talks to the Data Natives online community from his garden. A squirrel might even jump on his head at any moment, he warns. In this idyllic scene from his home quarantine it might not seem so at first sight, but the entrepreneur, author and contagion expert is worried. And that says a lot, coming from a man who also used to be a spy in Libya and Syria. “We are living in a very unusual time”, he says.

    Turrell was in Davos this year when the coronavirus crisis broke loose in Wuhan. He became alarmed when he learned that the Chinese government had closed Wuhan. “A city of 16 million people, to just shut it down, that is weird”, he tells. “And then I saw, this virus has properties that will make it extremely hard to suppress and extremely hard to defeat.”

  • bjarke ingels group and more architects 3D print face shields for coronavirus medical staff

    showing the power of collaboration, a number of well-known architects have come together to help produce protective visors for hospital workers on the frontline of coronavirus (COVID-19). what began as an initiative by cornell university, led by jenny sabin, has now reached architecture studios across the US in a matter of days. the likes of BIG and KPF are now utilizing their firm’s 3D printers to mass-produce face shields and combat the shortage faced by medical staff.

  • Why isn't the government publishing more data about coronavirus deaths?

    Studying the past is futile in an unprecedented crisis. Science is the answer – and open-source information is paramount

  • [Repeat] Lesson of the Day: ‘D.I.Y. Coronavirus Solutions Are Gaining Steam’

    As the number of cases of Covid-19 grow across the globe, health care workers are facing a serious shortage of critical equipment and supplies needed to treat the coronavirus — from exam gloves to ventilators.

    From Ireland to Seattle, makers and engineers are creating open-source versions of much-needed medical equipment.

    In this lesson, you will learn about do-it-yourself makers who are collaborating to fight the gravest public-health threat of our time. In a Going Further activity, you will consider how you might contribute to the D.I.Y. movement.

  • Three state prison staff test positive; KU partners on open-source plastic mask design
  • Bangladesh's Daffodil University using open-source AI for COVID-19 test with x-ray images

    Researchers at Daffodil International University in Bangladesh are using an open-source Artificial Intelligence technology that can diagnose COVID-19 by using chest x-ray images.

    The university’s Department of Public Health, AI Unit, and Daffodil Group’s Cardio-Care Specialized and General Hospital have jointly launched the system with a 96 percent success rate, according to the researchers.

    The Directorate General of Health Services has cautiously welcomed the initiative saying that more analysis is needed before the technology can be put to use.

    The researchers started working on the technology two and a half months ago after the novel coronavirus emerged in China and a lack of testing kits began straining the public heathcare system the world over, Assistant Professor Sheikh Muhammad Allayar, head of the university’s Department of Multimedia and Creative Technology, told bdnews24.com.

  • Color is launching a high-capacity COVID-19 testing lab and will open-source its design and protocols

    Genomics health technology startup Color is doing its part to address the global COVID-19 pandemic, and has detailed the steps it’s taking to support expansion of testing efforts in a new blog post and letter from CEO Othman Laraki on Tuesday. The efforts include development of a high-throughput lab that can process as many as 10,000 tests per day, with a turnaround time of within 24 hours for reporting results to physicians. In order to provide the most benefit possible from the effort of standing this lab up, Color will also make the design, protocols and specifics of this lab available open-source to anyone else looking to establish high-capacity lab testing.

    [...]

    Color has also made efforts to address COVID-19 response in two other key areas: testing for front-line and essential workers, and post-test follow-up and processing. To address the need for testing for those workers who continue to operate in public-facing roles despite the risks, Color has redirected its enterprise employee base to providing, in tandem with governments and employers, onsite clinical test administration, lab transportation and results reporting with patient physicians.

  • Color to launch COVID-19 testing lab, open-source infrastructure to bolster national response to pandemic

    Color today announced it is launching a high-throughput CLIA-certified COVID-19 testing laboratory integrated with public health tools. The testing facility, based in Burlingame, CA, will begin processing clinical samples to support public health efforts over the coming week, with a near-term goal of performing 10,000 tests per day and a lab turnaround time of 24 hours.

    Color's lab is operating at cost as a public good. The lab's initial testing is backed by philanthropic support from industry leaders and private donors. In addition to increasing capacity for patients, Color is also supporting access to testing for public sector essential personnel and healthcare workers on the front lines of the crisis.

  • COVID-19: Creatives Join Forces to Make Open-source Garments to Fight Disease

    Creatives in the fields of design, fashion and communication of Antwerp have formed a collaboration to fight against the coronavirus. They’re tackling the urgent demand from healthcare workers for protective isolation gowns and coveralls. Are you interested in producing protective garments with these patterns? Are you a virologist or medical protective wear specialist and willing to help them refine requirements?
    Belgium—Creatives tegen Corona, CtC for short, a temporary collaboration between various Antwerp-based creatives, have united their skills and network in support of the healthcare workers in the battle against the worldwide COVID-19 epidemic.
    The collaboration began after members began hearing about the urgent demand from healthcare workers in their own circles. They got together to test and prototype various models of protective isolation gowns and overalls.

  • Don Bosco Tech engineers developing open-source ventilators to help COVID-19 patients
  • Mozilla will fund open source COVID-19-related technology projects

    Have you come up with hardware or software that can help solve a problem that arose from COVID-19 and its worldwide spread? Mozilla is offering up to $50,000 to open source technology projects that are responding to the pandemic in some way.

  • Open-source program to assess and map COVID-19 hazard risk

    Most of the COVID-19 maps that I see are usually into choropleth maps at the country scale, which means that they assume a uniform distribution in each geographical unit. There are some other maps using a point symbology. However, the problem is that usually those points overlap each other. The approach adopted on the other hand, increases the spatial resolution and granularity of information that is conveyed to the people.

    Most of the other COVID-19 maps/applications usually focus purely on confirmed cases/ deaths, while not paying much attention to the quantification of potential risks. For example, if you look at some of the most current maps, you will see that populous countries like India and Nigeria do not yet have a big problem, while their large populations alone increase their risk.

  • Tencent Open-sources Another AI-powered Tool to Help Conduct Preliminary Self-evaluation Regarding COVID-19 Infection

    Tencent Holdings Limited ("Tencent", 00700.HK), announced today to deepen collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO). As part of the agreement, Tencent will provide technology support to combat the pandemic and open-sources another AI-powered tool today to assist the global fight against the coronavirus outbreak. The COVID-19 self-triage assistant, which is now available on Github for developers around the world, enables preliminary self-evaluation regarding infection of the disease and provides tips on its prevention. Prior to this tool, Tencent open-sourced a COVID-19 live updates module last Friday that has answered six billion pandemic-related queries in China over the past two months.

  • The open source response to Covid-19

    The coronavirus pandemic has exposed shortcomings and fragility in many of our largest and most important institutions. Some leaders have been slow to grasp the nature and severity of the threat, citizens in many countries feel that some aspects of their government’s response or preparedness have been lacking. Faced with untracked spread in the population, generalized lockdowns aiming to suppress the spread of the virus are exacting heavy economic tolls. Companies in many sectors are warning of imminent bankruptcy, seeking bailouts, and many have already embarked on large scale layoffs, resulting in a rise in unemployment unprecedented in its sharpness. Central banks are warming up the printing presses, stepping in with all manner of bailouts, designed to avert specific outcomes that they see as being particularly damaging and therefore worth the cost of avoiding.

Meet LBRY, A Blockchain-based Decentralized Alternative to YouTube

Filed under
News

LBRY is a new Blockchain-based, open source platform for sharing digital content. It is gaining popularity as a decentralized alternative to YouTube but LBRY is more than just a video sharing service.
Read more

Top 10 Circuit design tools for Linux

Filed under
Linux

So, you are planning a new electronics project and wonder what tools are the best? You may also be learning to design your own circuits and your favourite platform is Linux. Where are the Linux specific, or cross-platform tools, and which one suits my needs the best? Today, you will learn what you need to get started with your new project. This list goes through the tools available and discusses the pros and cons of each. You will also hear about how they specialise.

Before you start, you may want to consider what your current goals are. Are you learning to create hobby projects or are you already bringing your game to a higher level? You may also want to consider if your favourite electronics supplier already supports the tool you are going to make. Many of these tools import catalogues to the application so you can browse while designing, making it very convenient to order boards or components.

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MindSpore Source Code

Filed under
OSS
  • Huawei open sources MindSpore: claims to provide 'all-scenario AI computing framework'

    Huawei made a series of important announcements at the Huawei Developer Conference 2020 (Cloud) – HDC.Cloud, on March 28, notably that MindSpore, the all-scenario AI computing framework, goes open source on Gitee, and that ModelArts Pro, the first-ever AI app development suite for enterprises, goes live on HUAWEI CLOUD. Huawei also showcased some of the significant applications for Huawei's Atlas AI computing platform, on the cloud, edge, and devices. In doing so, Huawei has delivered the full-stack, all-scenario AI solutions for developers that it had first unveiled at HUAWEI CONNECT 2018.

  • Huawei open-sources AI framework MindSpore to rival Google’s TensorFlow

    China’s Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. today said it has open-sourced a framework for artificial intelligence-based application development called MindSpore.

    First revealed last year, MindSpore is an alternative to well known AI frameworks such as Google LLC’s TensorFlow and Facebook Inc.’s PyTorch. It can scale across devices, cloud and edge environments, Huawei said in a statement. The code is now available to download on GitHub and Gitee.

  • Huawei open-sources TensorFlow competitor MindSpore
  • Huawei Makes TensorFlow Competitor MindSpore Open Source

    Huawei has made its MindSpore AI framework open source. The Chinese tech giant is competing with the well-known AI frameworks from Google and Facebook, with a large number of advantages that ‘Ai algorithms as-a-code’ can provide.

    In a statement, the Chinese tech giant states that its MindSpore AI framework is suitable for developing AI applications. The AI ​​framework – co-developed with universities in Beijing and the United Kingdom and with a Turkish start-up – can easily be rolled out in various environments, such as on devices, within (multi) cloud and edge environments.

    Huawei launched the new AI framework last year in conjunction with the Ascend 910 processor. The AI ​​chip provides 256 teraflops of computing power on FP16, and that at a power consumption of 350 watts. With MindSpore and the Ascend 910 in addition to that new chip, the company has the most important components in the hands of a full AI stack.

Debian: RcppSimdJson, Opinionated IkiWiki and More

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.0.4: Even Faster Upstream!

    A new (upstream) simdjson release was announced by Daniel Lemire earlier this week, and my Twitter mentions have been running red-hot ever since as he was kind enough to tag me. Do look at that blog post, there is some impressive work in there. We wrapped up the (still very simple) rcppsimdjson around it last night and shipped it this morning.

    RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire. Via some very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. For illustration, I highly recommend the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Opinionated IkiWiki

    For various personal projects and things, past and present (including my personal site) I use IkiWiki, which (by modern standards) is a bit of a pain to set up and maintain. For that reason I find it hard to recommend to people. It would be nice to fire up a snapshot of an existing IkiWiki instance to test what the outcome of some changes might be. That's cumbersome enough at the moment that I haven't bothered to do it more than once. Separately, some months ago I did a routine upgrade of Debian for the web server running this site, and my IkiWiki installation broke for the first time in ten years. I've never had issues like this before.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in March 2020

    This month I accepted 156 packages and rejected 26. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 203.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python 2.7.8 : Using python scripts with Revit Dynamo.

    Dynamo is a visual programming tool that extends the power of the Revit by providing access to Revit API (Application Programming Interface.
    Dynamo works with node, each node have inputs and outputs and performs a specific task.
    This is a short tutorial about how you can use your python skills with Revit and Dynamo software.

  • Getting started with Django middleware

    Django comes with a lot of useful features. One of them is middleware. In this post I'll give a short explanation how middleware works and how to start writing your own.

  • Talk Python to Me: #258 Thriving in a remote developer environment

    If you are listening to this episode when it came out, April 4th, 2020, there's a good chance you are listening at home, or on a walk. But it's probably not while commuting to an office as much of the world is practicing social distancing and working from home. Maybe this is a new experience, brought upon quickly by the global lockdowns, or maybe it's something you've been doing for awhile.

    Either way, being effective while working remotely, away from the office, is an increasingly valuable skill that most of us in the tech industry have to quickly embrace.

    On this episode, I'll exchange stories about working from home with Jayson Phillips. He's been writing code and managing a team from his home office for years and has brought a ton of great tips to share with us all.

  • How TO GET STARTED WITH Machine Learning
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxii) stackoverflow python report
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