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Wednesday, 03 Mar 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/03/2021 - 12:24am
Story Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 3 04/03/2021 - 12:02am
Story Free Software Foundation awarded consulting project grant from Community Consulting Teams of Boston Roy Schestowitz 04/03/2021 - 12:01am
Story openSUSE Leap 15.3 Reaches Beta Build Phase Roy Schestowitz 4 03/03/2021 - 11:57pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2021 - 11:41pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2021 - 11:41pm
Story Free Software Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2021 - 11:36pm
Story Asymmetric Multi Processing with Linux & Zephyr on the STM32MP1 Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2021 - 11:31pm
Story Geniatech XPI-3288 Raspberry Pi lookalike features Rockchip RK3288 SoC Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2021 - 11:23pm
Story Canonical/Ubuntu Deal With ADLINK Roy Schestowitz 1 03/03/2021 - 11:01pm

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Learn How to Use Postman to Test APIs

    Anyone who creates APIs should also be testing APIs. One of the most popular ways to test APIs is to use Postman. Postman has over 10 million users worldwide.

    We've released a Postman crash course on the freeCodeCamp.org YouTube channel that will teach you everything you need to know to start easily testing your APIs.

    Valentin Despa created this course. Valentin is a developer educator who has been teaching software concepts for many years.

  • How to find NetworkManager version on Linux - nixCraft

    How do I check or find NetworkManager version on Linux distribution?

    We can use the nmcli command line for controlling NetworkManager and reporting network status. Another option is to use the NetworkManager to print the version on Linux.

  • [Older] Introduction to database normalization: the first three normal forms

    The table above, doesn’t satisfy the first normal form, why? For the first normal form to be satisfied, each column of a table must contain atomic (indivisible) data. In the second row of our table, which contains information about the “The Usual Suspects” movie, we can see that the genre column contains data which is not atomic. Two genres are actually listed: Thriller and Neo-noir. Let’s say in our representation we want to allow one movie to be associated with more than one genre; how do we solve the problem?

    The first thing that comes to mind may be to add a new row in the same table, repeating the information about the movie, and just specify one genre per raw. This idea is quite horrible, since we would have a lot of redundant data (we should repeat the same movie information each time we want to associate it with a new genre!).

    Another slightly better solution, would be to add a new column, so to have, for example, a genre1 and genre2 columns. This however would, among the other things, represent a limit: what if a movie should be listed under more than two genres?

  • How To Install Atom Text Editor on Manjaro 20 [Ed: The problem is that it's controlled by Microsoft]

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Atom Text Editor on Manjaro 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Atom is a free and open-source text and source code editor for OS X, Linux, and Windows with support for plug-ins written in Node.js, and embedded Git Control, developed by GitHub. It supports more than 35+ programming languages by default.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of Atom Text Editor on a Manjaro 20 (Nibia).

  • Learning through breaking | Bryan Quigley

    I run Steam in a flatpak for convenience and confinment reasons. One day my Steam install failed with

Free Software Foundation awarded consulting project grant from Community Consulting Teams of Boston

Filed under
GNU

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced the award of a pro bono management consulting project from Community Consulting Teams of Boston (CCT). The strategic need is an analysis and marketing plan focused on the FSF's diverse network of supporters worldwide. The project is anticipated to be completed this summer.

As one of eight pro bono consulting project grants awarded by CCT in 2021, the FSF was chosen among Boston-area nonprofits based on its demonstrated need, organizational stability, and readiness to plan and implement change. CCT has awarded over 200 consulting grants to Boston-area nonprofits since its inception in 1990, providing an estimated $20 million value.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Changing Of The Guard For HPC And Big Iron At HPE

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise has been building a mainstream and grassroots server business aimed at large enterprises, HPC centers, and academic and government institutions for two decades. HPE took a run at the hyperscalers and cloud builders and large service providers with its Cloudline minimalist machinery, but has largely backed away from that business because margins are thin to non-existent.

    The systems business that is left represents the core of HPE after it has largely divested its software and services business, which it spent tens of billions of dollars to acquire to try to create a clone of IBM, and split off its PC and printer business into an entirely different company.

    While the original Hewlett Packard has a long history in proprietary and Unix systems, it was the acquisition of Compaq way back in September 2001 for $25 billion that gave what is now HPE a volume server business aimed at small, medium, and large enterprises as well as the emerging webscale companies. The rivalry with Dell (and to a lesser extent with Lenovo, Inspur, and Sugon) and the rise of the original design manufacturers who work directly with the hyperscalers and large public cloud builders (Foxconn, Quanta, Inventec, WiWynn, and such) have put the hurt on this ProLiant server business. But that ProLiant business is still formidable, and has many millions of loyal customers.

  • SUSE: 7 Digital Transformation Questions IT Should Ask Their Business Managers

    During the journey of digital transformation, organizations have to master several things at the same time: adopting new innovations, increasing efficiency, and maintaining continuity. IT not only plays a crucial role in these improvements but in many cases also leads transformation projects that improve the business.

  • Freedom to map depends on WHO delivers it

    At the moment, I do not know enough about this reform and its general background, to have a definite opinion on who is wrong or right here. But that is not important. My only goal with this post is to remind everybody, in India and everywhere else, that “map or you will be mapped” is not just a fancy slogan.

    Whoever draws the maps, or controls the data needed to draw them, can concretely increase, or limit, your personal freedom and rights. This is the only thing that you surely want to learn from all the congratulations and concerns above. Take them as concrete examples of what could actually go wrong, or right, with mapping laws, whatever digital map you are already living in.

  • Microsoft Attacks The Open Web Because It's Jealous Of Google's Success

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • Rust Lang team March update

    Did you know that you can see the lang team's active projects on our project board? We're still experimenting and evolving the setup, but the goal is that it should give you a quick overview of what kinds of things the lang team is focused on, and what stage they are in their development. Our minutes contain a writeup for each active project, but let me call out a few highlights here...

  • DIY primary/foreign key relationships, again

    In a blog post in 2020 I described a problem I was finding in linked tables. One table had a primary key field and the other had a foreign key field that should have referred back to the first table. That wasn't always the case, because the tables didn't always come from a database with referential integrity. The tables were sometimes built in spreadsheets and the primary and foreign keys were entered by hand.

    The defective tables usually have formatting differences or orphaned foreign keys. The formatting issue is that the primary key is something like "Abc_def_236-ghi" and the foreign key is "Abc-def-236-ghi"; close, but no cigar. Orphaned foreign keys are correctly formatted entries with no match at all in the primary key set.

  • Flutter 2.0 reaches stable and adds support for foldable and dual-screen devices

    For a while now, Flutter for Desktop has been in an alpha stage, which meant changing APIs, bugs, and performance issues. With Flutter 2.0, Google has moved its status to somewhere between beta and stable. What does that mean? Well, it’s available in Flutter 2.0 Stable, but Google doesn’t think it’s fully complete yet. It should be fine for production use, but there may be a bug here and there.

  • How I Built a Web Scraper with Beautiful Soup and Used it to Land My First Job

    Landing any job, let alone a first job, can be a difficult process. Employers often tell you that you don't have enough experience for them to hire you. But that means you also won't get an opportunity to gain that experience (like a job).

    Landing a job in tech can feel even more challenging. On the one hand you have to answer interview questions well, like any other job. On the other you have to prove that your technical skills can do the job you're interviewing for.

    These hurdles can be difficult to overcome. In this article I'll share how I built a web scraper to help me land my first job in tech. I'll explain what exactly I built and the key lessons I learned. Most importantly, I'll share how I leveraged those lessons to ace my interviews and land a job offer.

  • We Sent 304,654 Coding Tests to Developers from 156 Countries – Here’s What We Learned

    At DevSkiller, we are known for our detailed industry reports that assist IT recruitment professionals with their hiring decisions. And this past year has been the most diverse and data-heavy set of information ever compiled by our team.

    Despite the circumstances that 2020 brought us, the show must go on. We have compiled 304,654 coding tests sent to developers in 156 countries to create the 2021 DevSkiller IT skills report.

    Whilst it’s easy to point to the big tech multinationals that will indeed profit from a crisis like we’ve had, many other small businesses will have a hard time adapting to the market’s fluctuating demands.

  • Qt 6.0.2 Released

    We have released Qt 6.0.2 today. As a patch release, the Qt 6.0.2 does not add any new functionality but provides bug fixes and other improvements.

  • The Month in WordPress: February 2021

    That was Josepha Haden Chomphosy on WordPress is Free(dom) episode of the WP Briefing Podcast, speaking about the four freedoms of open-source software. Those four freedoms are core to how WordPress is developed. A lot of the updates we bring you this month will resonate with those freedoms.

  • Toolbox your Debian

    Last week I needed a Debian system to test things, I had heard others were using toolbox with Debian images without much trouble so decided to give it a go instead of creating a VM.

    Toolbox only requires a handful utilities to work with any given docker image. After a quick search I stumbled upon Philippe’s post which in turn linked into this PR about an Ubuntu based toolbox image. Looks like the last major issues where worked out recently in toolbox and there isn’t anything extra needed apart the image.

  •   

  • February GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 23 new releases

    23 new GNU releases in the last month (as of February 25, 2021):
    artanis-0.5
    autoconf-archive-2021.02.19
    binutils-2.36.1
    freeipmi-1.6.7
    freeipmi-1.6.8
    glibc-2.33
    gnuhealth-3.8.0
    gwl-0.3.0
    help2man-1.48.1
    inetutils-2.0
    intlfonts-1.4.1
    libgcrypt-1.9.2
    libredwg-0.12.1
    libredwg-0.12.2
    linux-libre-5.11
    mailutils-3.12
    nano-5.6
    nettle-3.7.1
    octave-6.2.0
    parallel-20210222
    tar-1.34
    unifont-13.0.06
    xorriso-1.5.4.pl02

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
  • Zstd 1.4.9 Released With ~2x Faster Performance For Long Mode

    Zstd previously introduced the "--long" mode to analyze large quantities of data in a timely manner and suitable memory budget. The aim in this mode is to improve the compression ratio for files with long matches at a large distance. With Zstd 1.4.9 the long distance mode is much faster thanks to a number of optimizations that preserve the compression ratio while drastically speeding up the compression time. Test cases are showing this long distance mode being 114~154% faster than the prior point release of Zstd. These new algorithms for the long distance mode appear to be a big win based on all of the data published thus far.

  • Conditions and Implied Licenses: Bitmanagement v. United States

    An interesting case was handed down by the Federal Circuit on February 25, 2021, discussing some software licensing issues seldom mentioned in case law. Bitmanagement Software GMBH v. United States was a dispute that involved the use of certain proprietary software, BS Contract Geo, a 3D visualization product.

    The facts surrounding the license of the software are complex, but laid out in detail in the opinion. The owner of the software, Bitmanagement, and the user of the software, the US Navy, never entered into a direct or express software license. The contracting process, which took place via a reseller called Planet 9, stalled, when it was determined that the Navy’s system needs were incompatible with Bitmanagement’s software management keys. In the end, the Navy paid for some copies, but engaged in “massive free copying” (see concurring opinion, p.27) of the software with no express license to do so.

    Central to the court’s finding, the parties had agreed that as a condition to the license, the Navy would use Flexera’s license-tracking software FlexWrap to monitor the number of simultaneous users of the software. It noted that the Claims Court found that Bitmanagement agreed to the licensing scheme “because Flexera would limit the number of simultaneous users of BS Contact Geo, regardless of how many copies were installed on Navy computers.” (p. 20) But the Navy did not use the FlexWrap tool as agreed. The court held that use of this management software was a condition of the license, even though the license was not in writing. The court said, “This is one of those rare circumstances where the record as a whole reflects that the only feasible explanation for Bitmanagement allowing mass copying of its software, free of charge, was the use of Flexera at the time of copying.” (p.21)

  • Sustainability for Open Source Projects: 4 Big Questions [Ed: VM (Vicky) Brasseur, who promotes proprietary software in some contexts, wants to FUD Free software as having that mythical "sustainability" woe (as if it's all about money). GNU developed for 37 years (soon 38) in spite of that "sustainability" nonsense. People can get paid for things other than their per Free software project.]

    What does sustainability look like for open source projects? VM (Vicky) Brasseur considers four key questions to help determine the answer for your project.

    These days the word "sustainability" gets thrown around a lot with respect to free and open source software (FOSS). What is sustainability, and what does it mean for your project?

    The concept of sustainability didn't originate in the 1980s, but it gained a lot of mindshare at that time thanks to the Brundtland Report, which was released by the United Nations in 1987 after three years of research by a cross-functional team of scientists, policy makers, and business people. The report defines sustainability as "…development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs."

  • Samuel Iglesias: Igalia is hiring! [Ed: Case of point; you can get paid to do Free software]

    One of the best decisions I did in my life was when I joined Igalia in 2012. Inside Igalia, I have been working in different open-source projects, most of the time related to graphics technologies, interacting with different communities, giving talks, organizing conferences and, more importantly, contributing to free software as my daily job.

    [...]

    What we offer is to work in an open-source consultancy in which you can participate equally in the management and decision-making process of the company via our democratic, consensus-based assembly structure. As all of our positions are remote-friendly, we welcome submissions from any part of the world.

Asymmetric Multi Processing with Linux & Zephyr on the STM32MP1

Filed under
Hardware

In the embedded world, more and more vendors offer Arm-based System-on-Chips (SoC) including both powerful Cortex-A CPU cores, designed to run a full-featured OS such as Linux, and one or more low-power Cortex-M cores, usually found in microcontrollers, designed to execute bare-metal or RTOS-based applications.

[...]

While the Linux kernel can run on a wide range of devices, it requires a decent amount of memory (> 4MB), and therefore cannot be used on memory-constrained microcontrollers.

Enters Zephyr, a project initiated by Wind River, now developed as a Linux Foundation project.

Read more

Geniatech XPI-3288 Raspberry Pi lookalike features Rockchip RK3288 SoC

Filed under
Hardware

Geniatech XPI is a family of single board computers following Raspberry Pi 3 form factor. We first covered XPI-S905X SBC in 2018, which was followed by XPI 3128 board last year.

The company has now launched another model with Geniatech XPI-3288 SBC powered by Rockchip RK3288 32-bit quad-core Cortex-A17 processor coupled with 2G RAM and 16GB eMMC flash.

Read more

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Font Preview Ueberzug: A Better Font Previewer

    A while back I looked at a font preview script but it was kind of annoying to use, but it turns out there's a much better version of that script called font preview ueberzug which is what we're checking out today.

  • Ubuntu Voltage

    For a few years we’ve been performing a live version of an Ubuntu Podcast at FOSS Talk Live. This is a lively, nerdy, in-person Linux Podcast event at the Harrison Pub in London. A few shows are performed in front of a live slightly drunk studio pub audience. We are but one troup of performers though, over the course of the evening.

    The whole thing is organised by Joe Ressington and attended by our friends and/or/xor listeners. Joe has just announced over on episode 114 of Late Night Linux that we’re all doing it again! Go and listen to that show for a small amount of detail.

  • FLOSS Weekly 619: Notetaking With Dendron - Kevin Lin and Dendron [Ed: FLOSS Weekly jumping the shark by pushing Microsoft proprietary software instead of actual FLOSS]

    Kevin Lin and Dendron.

    Kevin Lin joins Jonathan Bennett and Katherine Druckman to talk about Dendron, a note-taking application built on top of VSCode. After many years of taking notes, Kevin found himself with a massive, unmanageable personal knowledge store. None of the existing note-taking applications quite solved his problem, so Kevin did the only reasonable thing, and wrote his own. On this episode of FLOSS Weekly, Lin covers some of his design decisions, including building Dendron on VSCode and Javascript, and helps us understand how Dendron can help tame the jungle of personal knowledge.

Kernel: Intel SGX, Swapfile Problem, and Security Fixes

Filed under
Linux

     

  • Intel Sends Out KVM SGX Virtualization Patches For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel SGX support finally landed in Linux 5.11 after going through 40+ rounds of review that took years for bringing up Software Guard Extensions in the mainline kernel. But that trek isn't yet over as Intel is now working on KVM SGX virtualization support to be upstreamed. 

    Intel earlier sent out a "request for comments" on KVM SGX virtualization support while on Monday they sent out the first formal (non-RFC) patch series with this support for handling Software Guard Extensions in the context of KVM virtualization. Basically this allows for a portion of the system memory to be encrypted with an SGX enclave exclusively for a KVM guest virtual machine that can't be accessed outside of the secure enclave. Separate from SGX enclaves, Intel also has coming out with future CPUs the Total Memory Encryption (TME) feature. AMD meanwhile has been working on Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) with Secure Memory Encryption (SME) as their EPYC approach for securing guest VM memory from other VMs or the host. 

  •   

  • Linux 5.12 Lands Fix For File-System Corruption Caused By Swapfile Issue - Phoronix

    For those wanting to help in testing out the Linux 5.12 kernel, at least it should no longer eat your data now if you rely on a swapfile. 

    The file-system corruption issue on Linux 5.12 Git noted last week and then followed up on yesterday when the corruption hit Intel's graphics CI systems and narrowed down to a set of swap-related changes, has now been resolved with today's latest Git code. 

    [...]

    With that fix now in, we can get back to looking at Linux 5.12 performance changes and other more interesting testing than worrying about data loss.

  • High severity Linux network security holes found, fixed | ZDNet

    Young and rising Linux security developer Alexander Popov of Russia's Positive Technologies discovered and fixed a set of five security holes in the Linux kernel's virtual socket implementation. An attacker could use these vulnerabilities (CVE-2021-26708) to gain root access and knock out servers in a Denial of Service (DoS) attack.

Games: Drova - Forsaken Kin, Core Defense, and Proton Stuff

Filed under
Gaming
  • Drova - Forsaken Kin is an upcoming pixel-art RPG with 'high player agency'

    Ready to try another demo of a promising upcoming game? The developer of Drova - Forsaken Kin emailed in about their pixel-art RPG and it sounds pretty promising.

    They mention that it's a pixel art RPG that "focuses on investigative exploration and combat with high player agency", with you choosing a side in a changing world "devoured by Ether, the essence of creation itself getting out of control when an ancient threat returns". So what they're saying is the world is dynamic, it changes and you have an effect on things - something like that.

    [...]

    The developer, Just2D, mentioned how they've put "a lot of effort into Linux compatibility" so hopefully that works out well for them.

  • Top 6 New Games You Can Play With Proton Since Feb. 2021

    Valheim is a bit of a different beast in that list. It has a Linux client in the first place, but there’s apparently enough people who had trouble with it not working properly that they ended up falling back on Proton (and it looks like it works perfectly under Proton). So, do not take this as a recommendation to play the game on Proton, but simply as an alternative in case you have issues.

  • Tower Defense with deck-building 'Core Defense' set to get an expansion

    Core Defense, a positively rated tower defense game by users (and one we enjoyed) from developer ehmprah that sprinkles in a little deck-building is getting an expansion with a Beta you can try.

    Quite different to most tower defense games, as the placement of almost everything is down to you. You're building up a maze for enemy units to travel through, and then each round you pick from a set of cards that can give you new towers, abilities and more. It was a success too, earning the developer over $20K in the first week on Steam, clearly hit a mark.

  • Another Proton Experimental update is out improving VR and controllers

    Proton Experimental is the extra special testing area where new fixes and features enter the Steam Play Proton compatibility layer before going out to everyone and there's a new update out. If you're not clear on what Proton and Steam Play are, be sure to check out our constantly updated dedicated page. It's a special compatibility layer for running Windows games and apps from Steam on Linux.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Kali Linux 2021.1

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Kali Linux 2021.1.

  • Arch Linux: Full Installation Guide - A complete tutorial/walkthrough in one video!

    "I run Arch!" You hear everyone else saying it, now you can say it too! In this video, we'll go through the process of setting up Arch Linux from scratch. It'll start at the command-line, and we'll build the installation all the way up to a full desktop environment!

  • How To Set Up Redis as a Cache for MySQL with PHP on Ubuntu 20.04

    Redis is an open-source and in-memory data structure store that can be used for caching, real-time analytics, searching, and machine learning. Integrate Redis with PHP and MySQL will improve your application performance because Redis stores data in RAM.

    You can use it with databases like MySQL or MariaDB. Redis provides a mechanism to cache your queries. For example, when a user requests your application page the first time, a MySQL query is performed on the server, and Redis caches this query to RAM. When another user requests the same page, you don’t need to query the database again.

  • 7 Ways to Customize Cinnamon Desktop in Linux

    Linux Mint is one the best Linux distributions for beginners. Especially Windows users that want to switch to Linux, will find its flagship Cinnamon desktop environment very familiar.

    Cinnamon gives a traditional desktop experience and many users like it as it is. It doesn’t mean you have to content with what it provides. Cinnamon provides several ways for customizing the desktop.

  • How to install Toontown Rewritten on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Toontown Rewritten on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install the Brave Beta Browser on Linux Mint 20.1 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install the Brave Beta Browser on Linux Mint 20.1.

Security Patches and Bugs

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (bind), Debian (adminer, grub2, spip, and wpa), Mageia (openjpeg2, wpa_supplicant, and xterm), openSUSE (avahi, bind, firefox, ImageMagick, java-1_8_0-openjdk, nodejs10, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (container-tools:1.0, container-tools:2.0, grub2, and virt:rhel and virt-devel:rhel), SUSE (bind, gnome-autoar, grub2, and nodejs8), and Ubuntu (python2.7 and wpa).

  • Now-fixed Linux kernel vulnerabilities enabled local privilege escalation (CVE-2021-26708)

    The vulnerabilities could be exploited for local privilege escalation, as confirmed in experiments on Fedora 33 Server. The vulnerabilities, known together as CVE-2021-26708, have received a CVSS v3 base score of 7.0 (high severity).

    These vulnerabilities result from race conditions that were implicitly added with virtual socket multi-transport support. They appeared in Linux kernel version 5.5 in November 2019. The vulnerable kernel drivers (CONFIG_VSOCKETS and CONFIG_VIRTIO_VSOCKETS) are shipped as kernel modules in all major GNU/Linux distributions. The vulnerable modules are automatically loaded when an AF_VSOCK socket is created. This ability is available to unprivileged users.

  • Researchers discover and patch Linux kernel vulnerabilities | 2021-03-03

GNU Denemo 2.5

Filed under
GNU
  • denemo @ Savannah: Release 2.5 out now.
    New Features 
    
        MusicXML export 
            Supports export of multi-movement scores 
        Support for Musical Sketches 
            Cut selection as sketch 
        Support for LilyPond 2.20.0 
        Menu Navigation from Keyboard enabled 
        Comments in Lyric verses 
    
    Bug Fixes 
        Various fixes in MusicXML import 
        Various fixes in LilyPond import 
        Wrong Keyboard Shortcuts on MacOS
    
  • GNU Denemo 2.5 Is Released

    GNU Denemo version 2.4.0. This is not the new version, this is the previous version. The graphical is basically identical to the new version.

    GNU Denemo is a very specialized program for music notation. It has most of the bases in that area covered, thought he user-interface is a bit clunky to work with.

    The latest 2.5.0 release brings support for cutting selections as sketches, support exporting multi-movement scores to the MusicXML format, support for comments in lyric verses and, after all these years, support for menu navigation using the keyboard.

    There's also improvements to MusicXML import, LilyPond import and a fix for keyboard shortcuts on macOS.

Canonical/Ubuntu Deal With ADLINK

Filed under
Ubuntu

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why it's time to stop setting SELinux to Permissive or Disabled

    Given the kerfuffle that has been CentOS lately, and the number of inevitable forks that will rise out of the ashes, there will probably be a large percentage of admins migrating to, or finally deploying, a Linux distribution based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in some form or fashion. It may be Rocky Linux or AlmaLinux. It may be that you stick with CentOS Stream, or even purchase a license for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. If you're a non-profit or another eligible organization, you might qualify for RHEL for Open Source Infrastructure.

    No matter which route you take, you'll be using a solid Linux distribution with serious security systems in place.

    However... It's such a powerful word, "however." It stops all natural flow of the narrative to make you wonder just what comes next.

    You wait, and you wait, and you wait.

    Until the inevitable: SELinux.

  • 13 challenges creating an open, scalable, and secure serverless platform

    Serverless is the natural evolution of cloud computing. In essence, serverless comes down to two main features: (1) you “pay by the drink” for all computing resources and (2) you get more fine-grained scaling than you would from larger workloads. However, taking full advantage of this extended computing model requires developers to restructure apps and services into components that can scale down to zero when not needed.

    Microservices architectures are a step in the correct direction. And Kubernetes (K8s) as a platform for running microservices is a promising and popular concrete implementation of a core infrastructure for managing containers, which are used to run microservices. However, Kubernetes by itself is not sufficient to meet the needs of serverless workloads, and the layers on top of the base platform do not need to be reinvented by all. Enter Knative in 2019 as a common serverless layer on top of K8s.

  • Why developers should centralize their security

    Current security challenges are forcing developers to implement increasing amounts of security measures to provide safe environments for customers on online sites. Adding security measures such as MFA, 2FA, and even reCAPTCHA to increase security can have a negative impact on customer loyalty. How do you ensure fraud is not committed while also making it easy for the customer to use the site or buy a product?

  • Red Hat Adds Common Criteria Certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8
  • rpminspect-1.3.1 released

    rpminspect 1.3.1 is now available. I was actually preparing to release rpminspect 1.3, which I did, but a bug was found by Fedora QA in the 1.3 release after I already made it. So I just did a 1.3.1 followup to fix that issue. You will 1.3.1 in the Fedora and EPEL repos, but 1.3 is posted as a release on the GitHub project page.

    In addition to the usual collection of bug fixes and enhancements, this release also expands the GitHub Actions CI coverage. It builds and runs the test suite on the latest Fedora stable release, Debian testing, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE Leap, CentOS 8, CentOS 7, and Gentoo. Gentoo is the newest one. I have had to disable OpenSUSE Tumbleweed and Arch Linux. I also disabled Fedora rawhide for the moment because I could not get anything to pass there. I plan to check these out again and enable the ones that work. If there are other platforms you would like to see in the CI workflow, let me know.

  • Red Hat Introduces Latest Update to Red Hat Process Automation

    The goal of Red Hat Process Automation has always been to empower enterprise business and IT users to collaborate, successfully document, simulate, manage, automate, and monitor business processes and decisions. We are excited to announce the latest release of Red Hat Process Automation, which delivers new developer tooling, extended support for eventing and streaming for event-driven architectures (EDA) through integration with Apache Kafka, and new monitoring capabilities through heatmap dashboards.

    Red Hat Process Automation is an open source business automation platform that combines business process management (BPM), case management, business rules management, and resource planning. It enables IT organizations to better create, manage, validate, and deploy business processes, cases, and business rules. Red Hat Process Automation also uses a centralized repository where all resources are stored. This allows for consistency, transparency, and the ability to audit across the business. The latest release of the platform introduces and expands on a number of key capabilities.

  • SAP HANA 2.0 Certified on RHEL 8.2 and 7.9: Top 5 reasons why you should care

    The shift to using SAP S/4HANA drives standardization towards SAP’s in-memory database (SAP HANA) on Linux. With SAP HANA, both transactional and analytical data workloads are served from the same in-memory database, eliminating the need for separate data systems. However, to deliver the horsepower needed to serve these demanding data workloads, picking the right operating system that can best utilize the underlying hardware resources is essential.

    When deploying mission-critical enterprise workloads on SAP HANA, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is the de-facto standard for many customers. We are excited to announce that SAP HANA 2.0 is certified on RHEL 8.2 and 7.9. Customers may find further details at SAP Note 2235581.

  • IBM's Arranged OpenShift-Power Marriage Eyes Hybrid Cloud Crown | Data Center Knowledge

    New Power-based hardware appliance for IBM cloud on-prem ships with Red Hat's container orchestration platform. Power Systems, IaaS expand OpenShift support.

  • Red Hat's survey results on the state of enterprise open-source software | ZDNet

    After all, as Red Hat president and CEO Paul Cormier, pointed out, "Open source has solidified itself as an innovation engine for the software industry. The technology trends that you see changing how we work and do business were born in open source -- enterprise Linux, cloud computing, edge and Internet of Things (IoT), containers, artificial intelligence, and machine learning, and DevOps." It's all open source, all the time.

    It's not just what we think of as IT. Thanks to the power of open source, which combines collaboration, transparency, and the belief that the best idea can come from anywhere, we've been able to come up with COVID-19 vaccines in mere months instead of years.

    But where exactly is open-source software being used? Infrastructure modernization, which is a fancy way of saying replacing the last proprietary operating systems in servers and data centers, remains at 64%, open-source software's top use.

Review: The New weLees Visual LVM, a new style of LVM management, has been released

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Reviews

Maintenance of the storage system is a daily job for system administrators. Linux provides users with a wealth of storage capabilities, and powerful built-in maintenance tools. However, these tools are hardly friendly to system administrators while generally considerable effort is required for mastery.

As a Linux built-in storage model, LVM provides users with plenty flexible management modes to fit various needs. For users who can fully utilize its functions, LVM could meet almost all needs. But the premise is thorough understanding of the LVM model, dozens of commands as well as accompanying parameters.

Read more

Linux for Beginners: Should You Make the Switch?

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OS
GNU
Linux

When it comes to operating systems, most people tend to go for the most popular options. If you’re buying a Mac computer, you probably won’t use Windows. PC owners typically choose it without giving this decision a second thought. Still, there is a low-key third option used to power many machines but is rarely used by your average PC owner.

We’re talking about Linux OS, of course. In its many variations, Linux is used as a software basis for many servers, IoT appliances, and many other devices but rarely do we see regular users opt for it. Why is that? Well, let’s take a closer look at this subject and see if this is a good OS choice for you.

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Why it's a good thing that the Linux desktop is boring again

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Linux

Hopefully the title has piqued your interest, as that was the intent. With the upcoming release of GNOME 40, I've found myself in a rather contemplative and nostalgic mood lately. I remember, back in the early 2000s, I'd read about a new desktop in development called GNOME. Curiosity got the best of me and installed the beta version of the environment.

If I'm being honest, I wasn't impressed. My formative years with the Linux desktop were spent using the likes of AfterStep and Enlightenment E16. If you know either of those desktops (or Window Managers) you get it. Both of them were exceptionally configurable and could be made to look absolutely gorgeous. At one point, I had AfterStep tricked out to the point where everything was varying degrees of transparency and the window decorations were as much sculpture as they were code. When people saw my desktop, they were astonished. It was a work of art.

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NomadBSD 1.4 is now available!

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BSD

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 1.4.

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Programming Leftovers

  • Rust Lang team March update

    Did you know that you can see the lang team's active projects on our project board? We're still experimenting and evolving the setup, but the goal is that it should give you a quick overview of what kinds of things the lang team is focused on, and what stage they are in their development. Our minutes contain a writeup for each active project, but let me call out a few highlights here...

  • DIY primary/foreign key relationships, again

    In a blog post in 2020 I described a problem I was finding in linked tables. One table had a primary key field and the other had a foreign key field that should have referred back to the first table. That wasn't always the case, because the tables didn't always come from a database with referential integrity. The tables were sometimes built in spreadsheets and the primary and foreign keys were entered by hand. The defective tables usually have formatting differences or orphaned foreign keys. The formatting issue is that the primary key is something like "Abc_def_236-ghi" and the foreign key is "Abc-def-236-ghi"; close, but no cigar. Orphaned foreign keys are correctly formatted entries with no match at all in the primary key set.

  • Flutter 2.0 reaches stable and adds support for foldable and dual-screen devices

    For a while now, Flutter for Desktop has been in an alpha stage, which meant changing APIs, bugs, and performance issues. With Flutter 2.0, Google has moved its status to somewhere between beta and stable. What does that mean? Well, it’s available in Flutter 2.0 Stable, but Google doesn’t think it’s fully complete yet. It should be fine for production use, but there may be a bug here and there.

  • How I Built a Web Scraper with Beautiful Soup and Used it to Land My First Job

    Landing any job, let alone a first job, can be a difficult process. Employers often tell you that you don't have enough experience for them to hire you. But that means you also won't get an opportunity to gain that experience (like a job). Landing a job in tech can feel even more challenging. On the one hand you have to answer interview questions well, like any other job. On the other you have to prove that your technical skills can do the job you're interviewing for. These hurdles can be difficult to overcome. In this article I'll share how I built a web scraper to help me land my first job in tech. I'll explain what exactly I built and the key lessons I learned. Most importantly, I'll share how I leveraged those lessons to ace my interviews and land a job offer.

  • We Sent 304,654 Coding Tests to Developers from 156 Countries – Here’s What We Learned

    At DevSkiller, we are known for our detailed industry reports that assist IT recruitment professionals with their hiring decisions. And this past year has been the most diverse and data-heavy set of information ever compiled by our team. Despite the circumstances that 2020 brought us, the show must go on. We have compiled 304,654 coding tests sent to developers in 156 countries to create the 2021 DevSkiller IT skills report. Whilst it’s easy to point to the big tech multinationals that will indeed profit from a crisis like we’ve had, many other small businesses will have a hard time adapting to the market’s fluctuating demands.

  • Qt 6.0.2 Released

    We have released Qt 6.0.2 today. As a patch release, the Qt 6.0.2 does not add any new functionality but provides bug fixes and other improvements.

  • The Month in WordPress: February 2021

    That was Josepha Haden Chomphosy on WordPress is Free(dom) episode of the WP Briefing Podcast, speaking about the four freedoms of open-source software. Those four freedoms are core to how WordPress is developed. A lot of the updates we bring you this month will resonate with those freedoms.

  • Toolbox your Debian

    Last week I needed a Debian system to test things, I had heard others were using toolbox with Debian images without much trouble so decided to give it a go instead of creating a VM. Toolbox only requires a handful utilities to work with any given docker image. After a quick search I stumbled upon Philippe’s post which in turn linked into this PR about an Ubuntu based toolbox image. Looks like the last major issues where worked out recently in toolbox and there isn’t anything extra needed apart the image.

  •   
  • February GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 23 new releases

    23 new GNU releases in the last month (as of February 25, 2021): artanis-0.5 autoconf-archive-2021.02.19 binutils-2.36.1 freeipmi-1.6.7 freeipmi-1.6.8 glibc-2.33 gnuhealth-3.8.0 gwl-0.3.0 help2man-1.48.1 inetutils-2.0 intlfonts-1.4.1 libgcrypt-1.9.2 libredwg-0.12.1 libredwg-0.12.2 linux-libre-5.11 mailutils-3.12 nano-5.6 nettle-3.7.1 octave-6.2.0 parallel-20210222 tar-1.34 unifont-13.0.06 xorriso-1.5.4.pl02

Free Software Leftovers

  • Zstd 1.4.9 Released With ~2x Faster Performance For Long Mode

    Zstd previously introduced the "--long" mode to analyze large quantities of data in a timely manner and suitable memory budget. The aim in this mode is to improve the compression ratio for files with long matches at a large distance. With Zstd 1.4.9 the long distance mode is much faster thanks to a number of optimizations that preserve the compression ratio while drastically speeding up the compression time. Test cases are showing this long distance mode being 114~154% faster than the prior point release of Zstd. These new algorithms for the long distance mode appear to be a big win based on all of the data published thus far.

  • Conditions and Implied Licenses: Bitmanagement v. United States

    An interesting case was handed down by the Federal Circuit on February 25, 2021, discussing some software licensing issues seldom mentioned in case law. Bitmanagement Software GMBH v. United States was a dispute that involved the use of certain proprietary software, BS Contract Geo, a 3D visualization product. The facts surrounding the license of the software are complex, but laid out in detail in the opinion. The owner of the software, Bitmanagement, and the user of the software, the US Navy, never entered into a direct or express software license. The contracting process, which took place via a reseller called Planet 9, stalled, when it was determined that the Navy’s system needs were incompatible with Bitmanagement’s software management keys. In the end, the Navy paid for some copies, but engaged in “massive free copying” (see concurring opinion, p.27) of the software with no express license to do so. Central to the court’s finding, the parties had agreed that as a condition to the license, the Navy would use Flexera’s license-tracking software FlexWrap to monitor the number of simultaneous users of the software. It noted that the Claims Court found that Bitmanagement agreed to the licensing scheme “because Flexera would limit the number of simultaneous users of BS Contact Geo, regardless of how many copies were installed on Navy computers.” (p. 20) But the Navy did not use the FlexWrap tool as agreed. The court held that use of this management software was a condition of the license, even though the license was not in writing. The court said, “This is one of those rare circumstances where the record as a whole reflects that the only feasible explanation for Bitmanagement allowing mass copying of its software, free of charge, was the use of Flexera at the time of copying.” (p.21)

  • Sustainability for Open Source Projects: 4 Big Questions [Ed: VM (Vicky) Brasseur, who promotes proprietary software in some contexts, wants to FUD Free software as having that mythical "sustainability" woe (as if it's all about money). GNU developed for 37 years (soon 38) in spite of that "sustainability" nonsense. People can get paid for things other than their per Free software project.]

    What does sustainability look like for open source projects? VM (Vicky) Brasseur considers four key questions to help determine the answer for your project. These days the word "sustainability" gets thrown around a lot with respect to free and open source software (FOSS). What is sustainability, and what does it mean for your project? The concept of sustainability didn't originate in the 1980s, but it gained a lot of mindshare at that time thanks to the Brundtland Report, which was released by the United Nations in 1987 after three years of research by a cross-functional team of scientists, policy makers, and business people. The report defines sustainability as "…development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs."

  • Samuel Iglesias: Igalia is hiring! [Ed: Case of point; you can get paid to do Free software]

    One of the best decisions I did in my life was when I joined Igalia in 2012. Inside Igalia, I have been working in different open-source projects, most of the time related to graphics technologies, interacting with different communities, giving talks, organizing conferences and, more importantly, contributing to free software as my daily job. [...] What we offer is to work in an open-source consultancy in which you can participate equally in the management and decision-making process of the company via our democratic, consensus-based assembly structure. As all of our positions are remote-friendly, we welcome submissions from any part of the world.

Asymmetric Multi Processing with Linux & Zephyr on the STM32MP1

In the embedded world, more and more vendors offer Arm-based System-on-Chips (SoC) including both powerful Cortex-A CPU cores, designed to run a full-featured OS such as Linux, and one or more low-power Cortex-M cores, usually found in microcontrollers, designed to execute bare-metal or RTOS-based applications. [...] While the Linux kernel can run on a wide range of devices, it requires a decent amount of memory (> 4MB), and therefore cannot be used on memory-constrained microcontrollers. Enters Zephyr, a project initiated by Wind River, now developed as a Linux Foundation project. Read more

Geniatech XPI-3288 Raspberry Pi lookalike features Rockchip RK3288 SoC

Geniatech XPI is a family of single board computers following Raspberry Pi 3 form factor. We first covered XPI-S905X SBC in 2018, which was followed by XPI 3128 board last year. The company has now launched another model with Geniatech XPI-3288 SBC powered by Rockchip RK3288 32-bit quad-core Cortex-A17 processor coupled with 2G RAM and 16GB eMMC flash. Read more