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Monday, 20 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Bash if else statement johnwalsh 20/01/2020 - 6:21am
Story Programming Leftovers: Python, Perl, Rust and More Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 2:28am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 2:06am
Story Review: Zorin 15.1 "Lite" Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 2:04am
Story XFS - Online Filesystem Checking Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 1:59am
Story Linux 5.5 RC7 Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 1:54am
Story GNU Make 4.3 Released! Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 1:51am
Story MNT Reform 2 Open Source DIY Arm Linux Modular Laptop Coming Soon (Crowdfunding) Rianne Schestowitz 2 20/01/2020 - 1:49am
Story Kernel: Zhaoxin, Arch Linux's Zen and WireGuard in Linux 5.6 Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 1:43am
Story Update: State of CentOS Linux 8, and CentOS Stream Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2020 - 1:40am

Bash if else statement

Filed under
Linux

Bash if statement, if else statement, if elif else statement and nested if statement used to execute code based on a certain condition. Condition making statement is one of the most fundamental concepts of any computer programming. Moreover, the decision making statement is evaluating an expression and decide whether to perform an action or not.

Programming Leftovers: Python, Perl, Rust and More

Filed under
Development
  • Keep a journal of your activities with this Python program

    Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 43: Olympic Rings and Self-Descripting Numbers

    These are some answers to the Week 43 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

    Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a couple of days (January 19, 2020). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • SaltStack Introduces Plugin Oriented Programming with New Open-Source Innovation Modules to Power Scalable Automation and Artificial Intelligence
  • JFrog Launches Free ConanCenter to Improve C/C++ DevOps Package Search and Discovery English

    JFrog, the Universal DevOps technology leader known for enabling liquid software via continuous updates, announces today the launch of the free ConanCenter, enabling better search and discovery while streamlining C/C++ package management. Conan is an open-source, decentralized, and multi-platform package manager for developers to create and share native binaries.

  • Rav1e Kicks Off 2020 With Speed Improvements For Rust-Based AV1 Encoding

    Xiph.org's Rustlang-written "Rav1e" AV1 video encoder is back on track with delivering weekly pre-releases after missing them over the past month due to the holidays. With Rav1e p20200115 are not only performance improvements but also binary side and build speed enhancements.

    The new Rav1e pre-release should be roughly 30% faster while also delivering slight enhancements to the image quality at the highest speed (10). That's a winning combination with speed and image quality improvements together!

  • RPushbullet 0.3.3

    Release 0.3.3 of the RPushbullet package just got to CRAN. RPushbullet offers an interface to the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send (programmatic) alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once.

    This release further robustifies operations via two contributed PRs. The first by Chan-Yub ensures we set UTF-8 encoding on pushes. The second by Alexandre permits to downgrade from http/2 to http/1.1 which he needed for some operations with a particular backend. I made that PR a bit more general by turning the downgrade into one driven by a new options() toggle. Special thanks also to Jeroen in help debugging this issue. See below for more details.

Review: Zorin 15.1 "Lite"

Filed under
Reviews

Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based operating system that aims to make Linux easy for Windows and macOS users. In the words of Zorin, it is "the alternative to Windows and macOS designed to make your computer faster, more powerful, secure and privacy respecting". Zorin's main product is the paid-for "Ultimate" edition, which will set you back €39 and comes with macOS, Windows, Linux and "Touch" layouts (i.e. themes) as well as a relatively large collection of software and "installation support". Other editions of Zorin are free but come with less pre-installed software and fewer desktop layouts.

For this review I dusted off a MacBook that dates from late 2009 and installed the "Lite" edition which, as the name suggests, is designed to breathe new life into older hardware. The laptop is one of the plastic, white MacBooks. It has an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU and 4GB of RAM - I doubled the amount of RAM a few months ago. The laptop has mostly been running Fedora with the MATE desktop and the i3 window manager as an alternative environment, both of which ran fine. Zorin's Lite edition uses Xfce as the desktop environment.

First impressions and installation

Zorin's website is either modern and clean or yet another bootstrap site, depending on your view. There are just three links in the navigation menu: Download, Computers and Help (the Computers section links to vendors that sell laptops with Zorin pre-installed). The Download section lists Zorin's Ultimate edition first, followed by the Core, Lite and Education editions.

Clicking any of the Download links for the free versions triggers a "Sign up to our newsletter & Download" pop-up window featuring a huge "Sign up & Download" button and a very small "Skip to download" link. I am not a fan of this type of marketing. I don't mind that they ask if I maybe want to sign up to their mailing list, but I take issue with the fact that the dialogue window has been designed to make the "No thanks" option easy to miss. Such marketing techniques assume that users need to be tricked into signing up to receiving marketing materials, which reflects poorly on the project as a whole.

Read more

XFS - Online Filesystem Checking

Filed under
Linux

Since Linux 4.17, I have been working on an online filesystem checking feature for XFS. As I mentioned in the previous update, the online fsck tool (named xfs_scrub) walks all internal filesystem metadata records. Each record is checked for obvious corruptions before being cross-referenced with all other metadata in the filesystem. If problems are found, they are reported to the system administrator through both xfs_scrub and the health reporting system.

As of Linux 5.3 and xfsprogs 5.3, online checking is feature complete and has entered the stabilization and performance optimization stage. For the moment it remains tagged experimental, though it should be stable. We seek early adopters to try out this new functionality and give us feedback.

Read more

Linux 5.5 RC7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.5-rc7
    Well, things picked up at the end of the week, with half of my merges
    happening in the last two days.
    
    Whether that is the usual "send the weeks work to Linus on Friday", or
    a sign that things are just picking up in general after the holidays,
    I don't know.  If the former, I'll probably just release the final 5.5
    next week. But if it looks like there's pent-up fixes pending next
    week, I'll make another rc.
    
    Nothing in here looks particularly odd. Drivers is about half of the
    patch (networking, sound, gpio, gpu, scsi, usb, you name it), with the
    rest being the usual mix - arch, networking, filesystems, core
    kernel..  The diffstat looks mostly fairly nice and flat, with a
    couple of exceptions that look harmless (a few device tree file
    updates, some pure code movemment, and a couple of driver fixes that
    ended up changing calling conventions to get done and as a result got
    to be more lines than the bug otherwise would have merited).
    
    Please do test, there should be nothing scary going on.
    
                  Linus
    
  • Kernel prepatch 5.5-rc7

    The 5.5-rc7 kernel prepatch is out. Linus is still unsure whether the final 5.5 release will come out next week or not: "if it looks like there's pent-up fixes pending next week, I'll make another rc".

  • Linux 5.5-rc7 Kernel Released

    The seventh weekly release candidate to Linux 5.5 is now available for testing.

    Linus noted with Linux 5.5-rc7 there was a large uptick in patch volume at week's end. "Well, things picked up at the end of the week, with half of my merges happening in the last two days."

    Due to the recent holidays in large part, it's possible an eighth release candidate may be needed for Linux 5.5 before then releasing the kernel as stable on 2 February. However, in today's 5.5-rc7 announcement, Torvalds noted he may just end up releasing 5.5 stable next week. In any case, the release of Linux 5.5 is right on the horizon and this should be the kernel powering Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and other upcoming distribution releases.

GNU Make 4.3 Released!

Filed under
Development
GNU

The next stable version of GNU make, version 4.3, has been released and is available for download from https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/make/

Please see the NEWS file that comes with the GNU make distribution for details on user-visible changes.

Read more

Also: GNU Make 4.3 Released With Performance Improvements, Newer GNU libc + Musl Support

Kernel: Zhaoxin, Arch Linux's Zen and WireGuard in Linux 5.6

Filed under
Linux
  • Zhaoxin 7-Series x86 CPUs Mitigated For Spectre V2 + SWAPGS

    When it comes to the Zhaoxin x86-compatible processors coming out of VIA's joint venture in Shanghai, their forthcoming 7-series (KX-7000) has hardware mitigations in place for some CPU vulnerabilities.

    We haven't heard much about these Chinese x86 CPUs with regards to speculative execution vulnerabilities but it appears the pre-7-Series is vulnerable to Spectre Variant Two and at least SWAPGS. But with their 7-series, hardware mitigations appear to be in place.

  • Benchmarks Of Arch Linux's Zen Kernel Flavor

    Following the recent Linux kernel tests of Liquorix and other scheduler discussions (and more), some requests from premium supporters rolled in for seeing the performance of Arch Linux's Zen kernel package against the generic kernel. Here are those benchmark results.

    These are some benchmarks I recently did on the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X while running EndeavourOS. Tests were done with its default Linux 5.4.8-arch1 kernel compared to the same kernel revision but using Arch's Zen kernel flavor. That is Arch's spin of the Zen-kernel patches (not to be confused with AMD Zen).

  • Intel's ConnMan Is Ready With WireGuard Support

    In addition to NetworkManager having good WireGuard support in advance of this secure VPN tunnel tech landing with the Linux 5.6 kernel, Intel's ConnMan software is also ready with supporting WireGuard.

    Intel's ConnMan hasn't seen a new tagged release in nearly one year but over the past two months in the Git development code WireGuard support has materialized. ConnMan, as a reminder, is the Intel-led effort for providing an Internet connection manager on Linux designed for embedded/mobile use-cases that dates back to their Moblin days.

Update: State of CentOS Linux 8, and CentOS Stream

Filed under
Red Hat

We wanted to update you on what is happening, largely out of sight to most of the community, on the CentOS Linux 8 front. We have appreciated the patience of the community, but we understand that your patience won’t last forever.

A lot of the work in rebuilding RHEL sources into CentOS Linux is handled by automation scripts. Due to the changes between RHEL 7 and RHEL 8, many of these scripts no longer work, and had to be fixed to reflect the new layout of the buildroot. This work has been largely completed, allowing us to pull the source from Red Hat without a lot of manual work. This, in turn, should make the process of rebuilding RHEL 8.2 go much more smoothly than RHEL 8.0 and 8.1 have done.

Read more

Also: Retooled CentOS Build Scripts To Help Spin New Releases Quicker, More Automation

The Performance Cost To SELinux On Fedora 31

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the recent AppArmor performance regression in Linux 5.5 (since resolved), some Phoronix readers had requested tests out of curiosity in looking at the performance impact of Fedora's decision to utilize SELinux by default. Here is how the Fedora Workstation 31 performance compares out-of-the-box with SELinux to disabling it.

By default Fedora runs with SELinux enabled in an enforcing and targeted mode. But by booting with selinux=0 as a kernel parameter or editing /etc/selinux/config it's possible to outright disable the Security Enhanced Linux functionality or change its operating mode.

Read more

Events: XDC2020, SUSECON and Xen Project Developer & Design Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • X.Org's XDC2020 May Abandon Poland Conference To Find More Welcoming European Location

    Hopefully you didn't yet book your tickets to XDC2020 as the annual X.Org conference as the venue -- and host country for that matter -- may change.

    The annual X.Org Developers' Conference flips each year between different venues in North American and Europe. Last year it was announced XDC2020 would be hosted in Gdansk, Poland by a local Polish crew at Intel. But now that decision is being reassessed over finding a more welcoming and inclusive country for the event.

  • Top 5 Reasons Why You CAN’T MISS SUSECON 2020

    A new year, a new decade, and a new SUSE (now fully independent), all coalesce to a new SUSECON—bigger, more inspiring, and more focused on the world we live in than ever before. Like a pot of gold, SUSECON 2020 will be full of life-enhancing moments to make your world better. Here are the top five riches you have to look forward to when the rainbow lands in Dublin, March 23 – 27, 2020.

  • Xen Project Design and Developer Summit: Registration and CFP Open Now!

    Starting today, registration and Call for Proposals officially opens for the Xen Project Developer & Design Summit. This year’s Summit, taking place from June 2nd through the 4th at the PRECIS Center in Bucharest, Romania, will bring together the Xen Project community of developers and power users to share ideas, latest developments, and experiences, as well as offer opportunities to plan and collaborate on all things Xen Project.

    If you’d like to present a talk at the Summit, the Call For Proposals is open now and will close Friday, March 6, 2020.

    The Xen Summit brings together key developers in this community and is an ideal sponsorship opportunity. If you are interested in sponsoring this year’s event, check out the Sponsorship Page. For information regarding registration, speaking opportunities and sponsorships, head over the event website and learn more!

This Cool Cyberpunk Desktop is Easy to Recreate on Kubuntu

Filed under
KDE

Arguably the most striking feature of this neo-noir desktop in the video above is the vivid live wallpaper. Atmospheric, this instantly instills an edgy, futuristic vibe reminiscent of films like Blade Runner, Dark City, and eXistenZ.

I am even more impressed by easy it is to recreate the whole look (assuming you’re running KDE Plasma desktop) for yourself.

On a regular Ubuntu desktop with GNOME Shell setting up a live wallpaper requires some a bit of effort (installing an unmaintained app from a random repo or getting tricksy with mpv, fining the numbers and deftly placing enough hyphens).

Read more

AMD: Ryzen, AMDGPU and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • ASUS TUF Laptops With Ryzen Are Now Patched To Stop Overheating On Linux

    The AMD Ryzen Linux laptop experience continues improving albeit quite tardy on some elements of the support. In addition to the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver finally being released and current/voltage reporting for Zen CPUs on Linux, another step forward in Ryzen mobile support is a fix for ASUS TUF laptops with these processors.

  • AMD Sends In A Bunch Of Fixes For Linux 5.6 Along With Pollock Support

    After already several rounds of feature work queued in DRM-Next for Linux 5.6, AMD has submitted a final batch of feature work for this next kernel as it concerns their AMDGPU graphics driver.

    While Linux 5.6's merge window isn't opening until around the start of February, with RC6 having come, it effectively marks an end to the feature window of DRM-Next for targeting the next kernel. AMD's final pull request is mostly centered on fixes plus a few other extras and also enabling AMD Pollock display/graphics support for that forthcoming hardware.

  • The AMD Ryzen Thermal / Power Linux Reporting Improvements Working Well - V2 Up For Testing

    A few days ago I reported on AMD's "k10temp" Linux kernel driver finally seeing the ability to report CCD temperatures and CPU current/voltage readings as a big improvement to this hardware monitoring driver. The work hasn't yet been queued for inclusion into the mainline kernel, but initial testing is working well and a second revision to the patches has been sent out.

    Linux HWMON maintainer Guenter Roeck who spearheaded this work independent of AMD sent out the "v2" k10temp driver improvements on Saturday. This allows core complex tie temperature reporting for Zen 2 CPUs and allows current and voltage reporting for Ryzen CPUs. While this information has long been available to Windows users, sadly it's not been the case for Linux at least as far as mainline drivers go -- the out-of-tree Zenpower driver and other third-party attempts have been available but nothing mainline.

Intel's OSPray 2.0 Ray-Tracing Engine Released

Filed under
Hardware
Software

An area where Intel continues striking with rhythm and near perfection is on the open-source software front with their countless speedy and useful open-source innovations that often go unmatched as well as timely hardware support. Out this weekend is their OSPray 2.0 release for this damn impressive ray-tracing engine.

OSPray 2.0 is out as their latest big upgrade to this open-source ray-tracing engine that supports photo-realistic global illumination, MPI for exploiting large system performance, volume rendering, and is all open-source software. OSPray 2.0 is another big advancement for this project that is part of Intel's growing oneAPI tool-kit.

Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • webcompat.com: Project belt-on.

    So last week, on Friday (Japanese time), I woke up with a website being half disabled and then completely disabled. We had been banned by GitHub because of illegal content we failed to flag early enough. And GitHub did what they should do.

    Oh… and last but not least… mike asked me what Belt-on meant. I guess so let's make it more explicit.

  • Units of Measure in Rust with Refinement Types

    Years ago, Andrew Kennedy published a foundational paper about a type checker for units of measure, and later implemented it for F#. To this day, F# is the only mainstream programming language which provides first class support to make sure that you will not accidentally confuse meters and feet, euros and dollars, but that you can still convert between watts·hours and joules.

  • This post focuses on the work I accomplished as part of the Treeherder team during the last half of last year.

    The Taskcluster team requested that we stop ingesting tasks from the taskcluster-treeherder service and instead use the official Taskcluster Pulse exchanges (see work in bug 1395254). This required rewriting their code from Javascript to Python and integrate it into the Treeherder project. This needed to be accomplished by July since the Taskcluster migration would leave the service in an old set up without much support. Integrating this service into Treeherder gives us more control over all Pulse messages getting into our ingestion pipeline without an intermediary service. The project was accomplished ahead of the timeline. The impact is that the Taskcluster team had one less system to worry about ahead of their GCP migration.

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The tiniest of Python templating engines

    In someone else's project (which they'll doubtless tell you about themselves when it?s done) I needed a tiny Python templating engine. That is: I wanted to be able to say, here is a template string, please substitute a bunch of variables into it. Now, Python already does this, in about thirty different ways, and str.format or string.Template do most of it as built-in.

  • How to set a variable in Django template
  • Why ASGI is Replacing WSGI in Django

    When I first learnt about how to deploy my Django website. I took the easy route which was deploying it on Heroku.

    There's literally tons of tutorial on how the process of deploying it work. Heck, there was even a book about the benefits of deploying Django using Heroku.

    Soon in my own work, I needed to deploy my own Django project. It was working well for a bundled development grade web server. I thought to myself, why not find a better way on a production-grade web server. Instead of just a miserable default web server that is not production-grade.

    My journey in searching on deploying Django started for me. Which if you look at multiple tutorial references they still suggest the use of Heroku or Digital Ocean.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxi) stackoverflow python report
  • Understand predicate pushdown on row group level in Parquet with pyarrow and python

    We are using the NY Taxi Dataset throughout this blog post because it is a real world dataset, has a reasonable size and some nice properties like different datatypes and includes some messy data (like all real world data engineering problems).

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More in Tux Machines

Review: Zorin 15.1 "Lite"

Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based operating system that aims to make Linux easy for Windows and macOS users. In the words of Zorin, it is "the alternative to Windows and macOS designed to make your computer faster, more powerful, secure and privacy respecting". Zorin's main product is the paid-for "Ultimate" edition, which will set you back €39 and comes with macOS, Windows, Linux and "Touch" layouts (i.e. themes) as well as a relatively large collection of software and "installation support". Other editions of Zorin are free but come with less pre-installed software and fewer desktop layouts. For this review I dusted off a MacBook that dates from late 2009 and installed the "Lite" edition which, as the name suggests, is designed to breathe new life into older hardware. The laptop is one of the plastic, white MacBooks. It has an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU and 4GB of RAM - I doubled the amount of RAM a few months ago. The laptop has mostly been running Fedora with the MATE desktop and the i3 window manager as an alternative environment, both of which ran fine. Zorin's Lite edition uses Xfce as the desktop environment. First impressions and installation Zorin's website is either modern and clean or yet another bootstrap site, depending on your view. There are just three links in the navigation menu: Download, Computers and Help (the Computers section links to vendors that sell laptops with Zorin pre-installed). The Download section lists Zorin's Ultimate edition first, followed by the Core, Lite and Education editions. Clicking any of the Download links for the free versions triggers a "Sign up to our newsletter & Download" pop-up window featuring a huge "Sign up & Download" button and a very small "Skip to download" link. I am not a fan of this type of marketing. I don't mind that they ask if I maybe want to sign up to their mailing list, but I take issue with the fact that the dialogue window has been designed to make the "No thanks" option easy to miss. Such marketing techniques assume that users need to be tricked into signing up to receiving marketing materials, which reflects poorly on the project as a whole. Read more

XFS - Online Filesystem Checking

Since Linux 4.17, I have been working on an online filesystem checking feature for XFS. As I mentioned in the previous update, the online fsck tool (named xfs_scrub) walks all internal filesystem metadata records. Each record is checked for obvious corruptions before being cross-referenced with all other metadata in the filesystem. If problems are found, they are reported to the system administrator through both xfs_scrub and the health reporting system. As of Linux 5.3 and xfsprogs 5.3, online checking is feature complete and has entered the stabilization and performance optimization stage. For the moment it remains tagged experimental, though it should be stable. We seek early adopters to try out this new functionality and give us feedback. Read more

Linux 5.5 RC7

  • Linux 5.5-rc7
    Well, things picked up at the end of the week, with half of my merges
    happening in the last two days.
    
    Whether that is the usual "send the weeks work to Linus on Friday", or
    a sign that things are just picking up in general after the holidays,
    I don't know.  If the former, I'll probably just release the final 5.5
    next week. But if it looks like there's pent-up fixes pending next
    week, I'll make another rc.
    
    Nothing in here looks particularly odd. Drivers is about half of the
    patch (networking, sound, gpio, gpu, scsi, usb, you name it), with the
    rest being the usual mix - arch, networking, filesystems, core
    kernel..  The diffstat looks mostly fairly nice and flat, with a
    couple of exceptions that look harmless (a few device tree file
    updates, some pure code movemment, and a couple of driver fixes that
    ended up changing calling conventions to get done and as a result got
    to be more lines than the bug otherwise would have merited).
    
    Please do test, there should be nothing scary going on.
    
                  Linus
    
  • Kernel prepatch 5.5-rc7

    The 5.5-rc7 kernel prepatch is out. Linus is still unsure whether the final 5.5 release will come out next week or not: "if it looks like there's pent-up fixes pending next week, I'll make another rc".

  • Linux 5.5-rc7 Kernel Released

    The seventh weekly release candidate to Linux 5.5 is now available for testing. Linus noted with Linux 5.5-rc7 there was a large uptick in patch volume at week's end. "Well, things picked up at the end of the week, with half of my merges happening in the last two days." Due to the recent holidays in large part, it's possible an eighth release candidate may be needed for Linux 5.5 before then releasing the kernel as stable on 2 February. However, in today's 5.5-rc7 announcement, Torvalds noted he may just end up releasing 5.5 stable next week. In any case, the release of Linux 5.5 is right on the horizon and this should be the kernel powering Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and other upcoming distribution releases.

GNU Make 4.3 Released!

The next stable version of GNU make, version 4.3, has been released and is available for download from https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/make/ Please see the NEWS file that comes with the GNU make distribution for details on user-visible changes. Read more Also: GNU Make 4.3 Released With Performance Improvements, Newer GNU libc + Musl Support