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Tuesday, 14 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics Roy Schestowitz 1 15/08/2018 - 6:56am
Story Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 6:44am
Story New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 6:38am
Story 'Foreshadow' Coverage Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 6:31am
Story Flock 2018 Reports Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 6:28am
Story Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Vega 20 PowerPlay Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 5:39am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 4:16am
Story Security: Disclose.io, Adobe, Apple and Instagram Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 4:14am
Story 5 of the Best Linux Educational Software and Games for Kids Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 3:40am
Story Kernel: NSA Code/Algorithm in Linux, Performance Superiority Over Windows, and Linux Foundation News Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2018 - 2:53am

Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

Filed under
OS
Hardware
Gaming

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor.

Read more

New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power

    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”

  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4

    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion.

    Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

'Foreshadow' Coverage

Filed under
Security

Flock 2018 Reports

Filed under
Red Hat

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Vega 20 PowerPlay

Filed under
Linux
  • Power Management Updates Land In The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Intel's Rafael Wysocki has submitted the ACPI and power management updates today for the Linux 4.19 kernel which were subsequently merged by Linus Torvalds.

  • Linux 4.19 Git Contains a lot of Performance Impacting Spectre Mitigation Updates

    Another round of commits regarding anti-Spectre security have landed up in the Linux 4.19 kernel git tree, which may have possible performance impacts for the kernel.

    While Spectre is still only a somewhat theoretical threat, as its entirely too slow to be used in a serious attack, many folks are taking its future potential quite seriously and arming up against it.

  • Linux 4.19 Kernel to Receive a Ton of Audio Hardware Updates for Improved Linux Sound Capabilities

    Linux audiophiles may have something to rejoice about, as a recent pull request from SUSE’s Takashi Iwai focuses on a plethora of sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel, including a lot of latest hardware support and overall improvements for Linux’s audio capabilities.

  • Updated Vega 20 Open-Source Driver Patches Posted, Including PSP & PowerPlay Support

    Back in May AMD posted initial open-source "Vega 20" patches and support for that yet-to-launch graphics processor was subsequently merged for the Linux 4.18 kernel. More of the Vega 20 AMDGPU kernel driver enablement has now been posted.

    This latest 69,910 lines of code -- before fretting, most of that is auto-generated header files for the GPU -- notably adds PSP (Platform Security Processor) and SMU (System Management Unit) for Vega 20. With the SMU enablement code, it's also now wired in to enable Vega 20 PowerPlay support as well as related power/clocking-functionality like OverDrive overclocking is also available.

Security: Disclose.io, Adobe, Apple and Instagram

Filed under
Security

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5 of the Best Linux Educational Software and Games for Kids

Linux is a very powerful operating system, and that explains why it powers most of the servers on the Internet. Though it may not be the best OS in terms of user friendliness, its diversity is commendable. Everyone has their own need for Linux. Be it for coding, educational purposes or the internet of things (IoT), you’ll always find a suitable Linux distro for every use. To that end, many have dubbed Linux as the OS for future computing.

Because the future belongs to the kids of today, introducing them to Linux is the best way to prepare them for what the future holds. This OS may not have a reputation for popular games such as FIFA or PES; however, it offers the best educational software and games for kids. These are five of the best Linux educational software to keep your kids ahead of the game.

Read more

Kernel: NSA Code/Algorithm in Linux, Performance Superiority Over Windows, and Linux Foundation News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.18 brings support for Vega M, Volta GV100 and, er, SPECK

    AFTER A WEEK'S DELAY, Linux kernel 4.18 stable has arrived.

    Announcing the release on Sunday, head of Linuxing Linus Torvalds said: "One week late(r) and here we are - 4.18 is out there. It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates."

    One notable change is that there's been a lot of code ditched - around 100,000 lines of obsolete code has been slashed.

  • The AMD Threadripper 2990WX shows even higher numbers when benchmarked on Linux

    Phoronix has done a performance comparison of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in Windows 10 Pro and Linux and the results show Threadripper numbers significantly lower under Windows 10 Pro than in Linux. In some tests such as 7-Zip Compression, the Threadripper 2990WX posted almost 58% higher scores in Linux compared to Windows 10 Pro implying that Linux is a better OS of choice when testing high core count CPUs.

  • Diversity Empowerment Summit Highlights Importance of Allies

    Diversity and inclusion are hot topics as projects compete to attract more talent to power development efforts now as well as build their ranks to carry the projects into the future. The Diversity Empowerment Summit co-located with Open Source Summit coming up in Vancouver August 29-31, will offer key insights to help your project succeed in these endeavors.

    Although adoption of diversity and inclusion policies is generally seen as simply the right thing to do, finding good paths to building and implementing such policies within existing community cultures continues to be challenging. The Diversity Empowerment Summit, however, provides hard insights, new ideas, and proven examples to help open source professionals navigate this journey.

  • Hollywood rolls out red carpet for open source developers

    The launch of the ASWF is almost like creating a GitHub for the developers behind motion pictures, but open source is nothing new to the film industry. It dates back about 20 years, Andy Maltz, managing director of the Science and Technology Council at the Academy, told CIO Dive.

    Film "is the only art form that has a fundamental reliance on technology," he said. The film industry's use of tech dates back to photochemical technologies and proceeds to today's digital image capture.

Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Debian GNU/Linux project to mark 25th birthday on Thursday

Filed under
Debian

The Debian GNU/Linux project will turn 25 on Thursday, with the Linux distribution having made its debut on 16 August in 1993 under the leadership of the late Ian Murdock.

In its original manifesto, Murdock stated: "Many distributions have started out as fairly good systems, but as time passes attention to maintaining the distribution becomes a secondary concern."

Maintaining a Debian system was made simple after some developers created a package management system known as apt.

Apt — and its derivatives like aptitude and synaptic — have served to make the task of updating a Debian system simple. With apt, the secondary concern that Murdock referred to was effectively taken care of. Incidentally, there are now about 29,000 packages available in Debian.

Read more

Also new (Debian-related news):

  • DebConf 18
  • Google Summer of Code 2018- Final Report

    This project aims at developing tools and packages which would simplify the process for new applicants in the open source community to get the required setup. It would consist of a GUI/Wizard with integrated scripts to setup various communication and development tools like PGP and SSH key, DNS, IRC, XMPP, mail filters along with Jekyll blog creation, mailing lists subscription, project planner, searching for developer meet-ups, source code scanner and much more! The project would be free and open source hosted on Salsa (Debian based Gitlab)

    I created various scripts and packages for automating tasks and helping a user get started by managing contacts, emails, subscribe to developer’s lists, getting started with Github, IRC and more.

Graphics: Libinput 1.12 RC2, xf86-video-v4l v0.3.0, Intel DRM Driver and RADV Vulkan Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • [ANNOUNCE] libinput 1.11.902

    The second RC for libinput 1.12 is now available.

    First a heads-up, this is probably going to be a longer RC cycle than usual,
    just look at the commit count for rc1..rc2 below. I don't have any
    additional large features planned for 1.12, so the rest should just be
    bugfixing and polishing now.

  • Libinput 1.12 RC2 Continues Working On Improving Linux Touchpad Behavior

    We've known libinput 1.12 is going to be a significant release and that's still holding true in looking at the second release candidate for this Wayland/X.Org input handling library.

    Libinput 1.12 RC1 was working on replacing its udev "hwdb" hardware database with its own quirk handling system, migrating documentation from Sphinx to ReadTheDocs, FreeBSD support, improved trackpoint code, various touchpad fixes and improvements, and other input handling tweaks.

  • xf86-video-v4l X.Org Driver Sees First New Release In A Decade

    The xf86-video-v4l v0.3.0 driver was announced today as the first new release for this DDX driver in ten years.

    In case you don't have any recollection of this DDX driver, this "Video 4 Linux adapter driver" is used for registering generic X-Video (Xv) adapters that can be used in turn by any graphics driver.

  • Intel Publishes New DRM Driver For Their Arria 10 FPGA System

    An Intel engineer has published the "Intel FPGA Video and Image Processing Suite" DRM driver today for Linux. This Direct Rendering Manager is intended for use with their Arria 10 FPGA system when combined with Intel DisplayPort IP.

  • RADV Now Supports On-Demand Compilation Of Built-In Shaders

    For helping out the RADV Vulkan driver in cases where no shader cache is available, this open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver now supports the on-demand compilation of built-in shaders.

    On cases like Android, ChromeOS, or sandboxes where no on-disk shader cache is available due to write/security permissions, RADV can take a while to start-up for some programs due to having to compile all of the built-in pipelines at start. RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen says this process can take one to four seconds for the creation of a device.

Mozilla: Rustfmt 1.0, Amy Keating Joins as General Counsel, Extension APIs and L10N Report

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Rustfmt 1.0 release candidate

    The current version of Rustfmt, 0.99.2, is the first 1.0 release candidate. It is available on nightly and beta (technically 0.99.1 there) channels, and from the 13th September will be available with stable Rust.

    1.0 will be a huge milestone for Rustfmt. As part of it's stability guarantees, it's formatting will be frozen (at least until 2.0). That means any sub-optimal formatting still around will be around for a while. So please help test Rustfmt and report any bugs or sub-optimal formatting.

  • Welcome Amy Keating, our incoming General Counsel

    Amy joins Mozilla from Twitter, Inc. where she has been Vice President, Legal and Deputy General Counsel. When she joined Twitter in 2012, she was the first lawyer focused on litigation, building out the functions and supporting the company as both the platform and the employee base grew in the U.S. and internationally. Her role expanded over time to include oversight of Twitter’s product counseling, regulatory, privacy, employment legal, global litigation, and law enforcement legal response functions. Prior to Twitter, Amy was part of Google, Inc.’s legal team and began her legal career as an associate at Bingham McCutchen LLP.

  • Building Extension APIs with Friend of Add-ons Oriol Brufau

    Please meet Oriol Brufau, our newest Friend of Add-ons! Oriol is one of 23 volunteer community members who have landed code for the WebExtensions API in Firefox since the technology was first introduced in 2015. You may be familiar with his numerous contributions if you have set a specific badge text color for your browserAction, highlighted multiple tabs with the tabs.query API, or have seen your extension’s icon display correctly in about:addons.

    While our small engineering team doesn’t always have the resources to implement every approved request for new or enhanced WebExtensions APIs, the involvement of community members like Oriol adds considerable depth and breadth to technology that affects millions of users. However, the Firefox code base is large, complex, and full of dependencies. Contributing code to the browser can be difficult even for experienced developers.

    As part of celebrating Oriol’s achievements, we asked him to share his experience contributing to the WebExtensions API with the hope that it will be helpful for other developers interested in landing more APIs in Firefox.

  • L10N Report: August Edition

    After a quick pause in July, your primary source of localization information at Mozilla is back!

Latest Speculative Execution 'Bug' (Chip Defect)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security
  • L1 Terminal Fault - The Latest Speculative Execution Side Channel Attack

    Details are still light but a new vulnerability is coming out called the L1 Terminal Fault. It's been described as a "train-wreck" and is another big deal in the security space as the latest speculative side-channel attack vector.

    The CVEs are CVE-2018-3615, CVE-2018-3620, and CVE-2018-3646 but as of writing they have not been made public yet. I just noticed the code hitting the mainline Linux kernel to this "L1TF - L1 Terminal Fault" vulnerability.

  • Ubuntu updates for L1 Terminal Fault vulnerabilities

    Today Intel announced a new side channel vulnerability known as L1 Terminal Fault. Raoul Strackx, Jo Van Bulck, Marina Minkin, Ofir Weisse, Daniel Genkin, Baris Kasikci, Frank Piessens, Mark Silberstein, Thomas F. Wenisch, Yuval Yarom, and researchers from Intel discovered that memory present in the L1 data cache of an Intel CPU core may be exposed to a malicious process that’s executing on the CPU core. Processors from other vendors are not known to be affected by L1TF.

  • Microsoft Patch Tuesday 17134.228 Enhances Battery Performance and Mitigates L1TF Vulnerability

Linux 4.19 (Next Release) Developments

Filed under
Linux
  • Big CIFS/SMB3 Improvements Head To Linux 4.19

    Linus Torvalds has merged a rather significant set of patches for improving the CIFS/SMB3 support in the mainline kernel.

    The SMB3/CIFS advanced network file-system support provides the VFS module supporting the SMB3 family of NAS protocols for dealing with Samba/Azure/etc. With Linux 4.19 a lot of new feature code has been merged.

  • New Sound Hardware Support & Other Improvements Playing In Linux 4.19

    SUSE's Takashi Iwai sent in the pull request this morning of the sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel and it includes a lot of new hardware support and other improvements for Linux's audio capabilities.

  • A Lot Of Spectre Changes Land In The Linux 4.19 Git Tree, Possible Performance Impact

    "The Speck [Spectre slang, not to be confused with the controversial NSA algo] brigade sadly provides yet another large set of patches destroying the perfomance which we carefully built and preserved," began the latest x86/pti pull request by kernel maintainer Thomas Gleixner.

Games: Banner Saga, Reynard, Ellen, TANGLEWOOD, Moonlighter and Steam

Filed under
Gaming

Git Basics - Git Series Part 1

Filed under
Linux

This series will explain the purpose of git, how to clone GitHub repository, GitLab repository, or otherwise. How to view the changelog and how to revert to an older version of the repository, add and remove files, commit changes, update remote repositories, fetch most recent versions of a repo, and more. GUI front-ends will also be covered, as well as troubleshooting and how typical IDEs will handle source code files belonging to a git repo.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

    Linux users are calling on Dropbox to reverse a decision to trim its filesystem support to unencrypted EXT4 only.

    The company's supported file system list, here, is missing some formats – including various encrypted Linux filesystems.

    Until that list was revised, Dropbox said it supported NTFS, HFS, EXT4, and APFS on Linux; as the new requirements makes clear, Linux users will only be able to run unencrypted EXT4.

  • MacBuntu 18.04 Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Mojave/High Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack is ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, we were constantly asked for this pack to be available on our site, so here it is for you guys. In this transformation pack we are featuring many themes for almost every desktop, so you don't have to worry about the desktop you are using whether it is Gnome Shell, Mate, Xfce, Cinnamon or any other desktop. You can simply install it in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu based distribution and make your desktop look like Mac OS X. The Unity desktop is still supported in case you are using unofficial version of Unity desktop. In this pack you will find plenty of light variants as well as dark versions, which is managed by different creators and I would like to thank all of them for contributing these themes (McOS-themes, macOS High Sierra, macOS 11, macOS High Sierra - ELBULLAZUL).  There are two themes for cursors, for dock we recommend you to install Plank dock and we are providing themes for it as well (credits: KenHarkey and erikdubois. Also we are including themes for Gnome Shell, for Cinnamon, and three icon packs in this transformation pack.

  •  

  • TensorFlow Pi port is latest salvo in battle for edge analytics

    The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.

    Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

  • 9 Android Pie Hidden Features: Best Android 9 Tricks You Might Have Missed
  • TicWatch Pro: Reviewing the 30-Day Battery Smartwatch

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Why critics who bash Musk's open source Tesla security project are wrong

    While some have characterized this move as self-serving, a way to make Tesla "look good from a marketing standpoint," this completely misses the point. While some have used open source as a vapid marketing gesture, Musk's move here would have far deeper significance for the industry and, of course, for Tesla.

  • Tesla Plan To Release Source Code For Their In-Car Security Technology

    Elon Musk posted on Twitter that he is planning to open-source Tesla vehicle security software so other car makers can take advantage of their code and potentially collaborate when improving security features.

  • Talend Heads to Open Source Summit to Speak on Apache Beam and Apache Spark

    Talend (NASDAQ: TLND), a global leader in cloud integration solutions, announced today that two of its technology experts, Mark Balkenende and Alexey Romanenko, will be speaking at the Open Source Summit held in the Vancouver Convention Centre from August 29-31. The summit brings together developers, architects and others open source and industry leaders to cover cornerstones in open source technologies, help navigate open source transformation, track business and compliance needs, and delve into the newest technologies and latest trends touching open source.

  •  

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More in Tux Machines

Flock 2018 Reports

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Vega 20 PowerPlay

  • Power Management Updates Land In The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Intel's Rafael Wysocki has submitted the ACPI and power management updates today for the Linux 4.19 kernel which were subsequently merged by Linus Torvalds.
  • Linux 4.19 Git Contains a lot of Performance Impacting Spectre Mitigation Updates
    Another round of commits regarding anti-Spectre security have landed up in the Linux 4.19 kernel git tree, which may have possible performance impacts for the kernel. While Spectre is still only a somewhat theoretical threat, as its entirely too slow to be used in a serious attack, many folks are taking its future potential quite seriously and arming up against it.
  • Linux 4.19 Kernel to Receive a Ton of Audio Hardware Updates for Improved Linux Sound Capabilities
    Linux audiophiles may have something to rejoice about, as a recent pull request from SUSE’s Takashi Iwai focuses on a plethora of sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel, including a lot of latest hardware support and overall improvements for Linux’s audio capabilities.
  • Updated Vega 20 Open-Source Driver Patches Posted, Including PSP & PowerPlay Support
    Back in May AMD posted initial open-source "Vega 20" patches and support for that yet-to-launch graphics processor was subsequently merged for the Linux 4.18 kernel. More of the Vega 20 AMDGPU kernel driver enablement has now been posted. This latest 69,910 lines of code -- before fretting, most of that is auto-generated header files for the GPU -- notably adds PSP (Platform Security Processor) and SMU (System Management Unit) for Vega 20. With the SMU enablement code, it's also now wired in to enable Vega 20 PowerPlay support as well as related power/clocking-functionality like OverDrive overclocking is also available.

today's howtos

Security: Disclose.io, Adobe, Apple and Instagram

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