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Monday, 21 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 10:30am
Story GNU Parallel and FreeDink Releases Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:39am
Story Programming: POCL, Pelican and Python Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:37am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:35am
Story Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:30am
Story Review: Sculpt OS 18.09 Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:18am
Story This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 9:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 8:53am
Story Linux 5.0-rc3 Kernel Released With Plenty Of Fixes Plus Nouveau RTX 2080 Ti Support Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 8:46am
Story Security: ThreadX, Kali Linux, Rocke and Data Loss Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2019 - 8:44am

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Startup 101: Here’s How Open Sourcing Can Be Beneficial For You

    In this week's Startup 101, Upekkha founder Prasanna Krishnamoorthy tells how to make the right decision in open sourcing.

  • Is Bettering Threat Intelligence And Cyber Security the New Role For the Blockchain?

    Blockchains are typically epitomized by security and safety for storing data on its FL. They traditionally use depend on the trustless model to be completely trustworthy. On the principle of protection, it will make sense to begin applying the Blockchain initiative to a newly emerging movement in the cybersecurity space.

  • Crypto Pundit: Ethereum (ETH) Is “Doomed To Be Centralized”

    On January 14th, Preston Byrne, an attorney at Bryne & Storm that is enamored with blockchain technology, took to Twitter to mention his thoughts on Ethereum (ETH), likely in the context of the then-impending Constantinople hard fork, which was recently delayed due to security qualms. Byrne joked that the popular blockchain is more centralized than “the core of a neutron store falling into the event horizon of a black hole,” accentuating his true thoughts on Ethereum.

  • New Open Source Cryptocurrency Grin Has Deep-Pocketed Donors

    New cryptocurrency Grin launched its mainnet on January 15th. Grin is a volunteer-run project that says it’s only interested in getting the MimbleWimble technology — on which it is based — into public usage. But with major funding from multiple crypto investment firms and businesses, it’s unclear what safeguards Grin has in place to ensure the project remains independent.

  • Hell freezes over as Windows Core OS to include Open Source components [Ed: Microsoft propaganda site MSPoweruser is openwashing proprietary malware with NSA back doors, marketed to the public as "OS". It could be similarly argued that all versions of Windows "include Open Source components" because Microsoft had nicked TCP/IP code from BSD.]
  • How this woman went from a $20,000 a year Trader Joe's job to a well-paid programmer at a San Francisco startup

    But she was intrigued with the idea that she could have a fantastic career in tech by learning to code and wanted to try. She took a basic HTML course on Code Academy, a site that hosts free learn-to-code courses and it made sense.

    [...]

    You can even "fork" a project, she says: meaning make a copy of it that you can alter as you wish, sharing it with others.

GNU Parallel and FreeDink Releases

Filed under
Development
GNU
Gaming

Programming: POCL, Pelican and Python

Filed under
Development

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #266: #$%&! Net Neutrality

    Welcome to the first episode of Linux in the Ham Shack for 2019. In this episode, the hosts discuss topics including the 2018 RTTY Roundup using FT-8, Cubesats and wideband receivers in space, the ORI at Hamcation, Wekcan, Raspberry Pi-based VPN servers, the LHS Linux distributions, CW trainers and much more.

  • LHS Episode #267: The Weekender XXII

    Welcome to the 22nd edition of the LHS Weekender. In this episode, the hosts discuss upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, Open Source events in the next fortnight, Linux distributions of interest, news about science, technology and related endeavors as well is dive into food, drink and other hedonistic topics.

  • Linux Action News 89

    Another troubling week for MongoDB, ZFS On Linux lands a kernel workaround, and 600 days of postmarketOS.

    Plus our thoughts on the new Project Trident release, and Mozilla ending the Test Pilot program.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 130 - Chat with Snyk co-founder Danny Grander
  • The ACME Era | TechSNAP 395

    We welcome Jim to the show, and he and Wes dive deep into all things Let’s Encrypt.

Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

Filed under
OS
Reviews

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku.

With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful.

Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time.

Read more

This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

Filed under
OS
Linux
Microsoft
  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!

  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag

    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.

  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020

    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform.

    The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process.

    "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.

Linux 5.0-rc3 Kernel Released With Plenty Of Fixes Plus Nouveau RTX 2080 Ti Support

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds has released the third weekly release candidate for the upcoming Linux 5.0 kernel release.

Being well past the winter holidays, Linux 5.0-rc3 saw a ton of commit activity this week with a lot of bug/regression fixing. Though one "feature" worth pointing out that was merged this week was Nouveau now supporting the NVIDIA TU102, a.k.a. the RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX granted in its mode-setting-only limited form. That complements the other NVIDIA Turing GPU support added to the Nouveau DRM driver back during the Linux 5.0 merge window to round-out the current latest-generation GeForce RTX 2000 series graphics cards.

Read more

Security: ThreadX, Kali Linux, Rocke and Data Loss

Filed under
Security
  • Vulnerabilities Found in Highly Popular Firmware for WiFi Chips

    WiFi chip firmware in a variety of devices used mainly for gaming, personal computing, and communication comes with multiple issues. At least some of them could be exploited to run arbitrary code remotely without requiring user interaction.

    The security flaws were discovered in ThreadX, a real-time operating system (RTOS) developed by Express Logic. The vendor claims on their website that ThreadX has over 6.2 billion deployments, being one of the most popular software powering Wi-Fi chips.

    The firmware is also powering the Avastar 88W8897 SoC (Wi-Fi + Bluetooth + NFC) from Marvell, present in Sony PlayStation 4 (and its Pro variant), Microsoft Surface (+Pro) tablet and laptop, Xbox One, Samsung Chromebook and smartphones (Galaxy J1), and Valve SteamLink.

  • Wolf Halton on what’s changed in tech and where we are headed

    The tech industry is changing at a massive rate especially after the storage options moved to the cloud. However, this has also given rise to questions on security, data management, change in the work structure within an organization, and much more. Wolf Halton, an expert in Kali Linux, tells us about the security element in the cloud. He also touches upon the skills and knowledge that should be inculcated in your software development cycle in order to adjust to the dynamic tech changes at present and in the future. Following this, he juxtaposes the current software development landscape with the ideal one.

  • Rocke coinminer disables cloud protection agents

    A group of hackers that specializes in infecting servers with cryptocurrency mining software has started disabling security software agents used in cloud environments to evade detection. Known as Rocke in the security industry, the group has been active since at least April 2018 and is known for exploiting critical vulnerabilities in web application frameworks and servers like Apache Struts, Oracle WebLogic and Adobe ColdFusion.

  • Malware used by “Rocke” group evolves to evade detection by cloud security products
  • Malware uninstalls cloud security products from Linux machines

    After removing the cloud security, the malware then proceeded to mine the monero cryptocurrency on its hosts.

  • I Nearly Lost All Of My Data!

    At this point I’m really worried. You see, I cancelled my off-site Amazon Glacier backups around 6 months ago. What are the chances of both a 4 disk RAID failing AND a USB drive at the same time? Not likely, I thought. Boy was I wrong

Solving the Year 2038 problem in the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

Because of the way time is represented in Linux, a signed 32-bit number can't support times beyond January 19, 2038 after 3:14:07 UTC. This Year 2038 (Y2038 or Y2K38) problem is about the time data type representation. The solution is to use 64-bit timestamps.

I started working on the problem while working as an Outreachy intern for kernel developer Arnd Bergmann. Outreachy is a benevolent program that helps new programmers get into kernel development. The mentors for the kernel projects are usually experienced kernel developers like Arnd.

Read more

Booting Linux faster

Filed under
Linux

Of all the computers I've ever owned or used, the one that booted the quickest was from the 1980s; by the time your hand moved from the power switch to the keyboard, the BASIC interpreter was ready for your commands. Modern computers take anywhere from 15 seconds for a laptop to minutes for a small home server to boot. Why is there such a difference in boot times?

A microcomputer from the 1980s that booted straight to a BASIC prompt had a very simple CPU that started fetching and executing instructions from a memory address immediately upon getting power. Since these systems had BASIC in ROM, there was no loading time—you got to the BASIC prompt really quickly. More complex systems of that same era, such as the IBM PC or Macintosh, took a significant time to boot (~30 seconds), although this was mostly due to having to read the operating system (OS) off a floppy disk. Only a handful of seconds were spent in firmware before being able to load an OS.

Read more

Akira: The Linux Design Tool we’ve always wanted?

Filed under
News

Akira wants to create an awesome design tool for Linux that could compete with the likes of Figma, Sketch and Adobe XD. They need your help to achieve this goal.
Read more

Complete Guide on How to Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows

Filed under
Linux

Installing Ubuntu and other Linux OS as dual boot is difficult in pre-installed Windows Laptops due to certain features and restrictions. Secure boot, fast boot, SATA AHCI modes – all these options makes it bit complicated to make a system dual boot with Windows 10 and Ubuntu, specially for the general users.

This guide will help you to install Windows 10 and Ubuntu as a dualboot in a system.

Read more

Kernel: Klibc, TEO, Z-Wave

Filed under
Linux
  • Klibc Sees Its First New Release In Five Years

    Klibc has seen some new activity recently and that has resulted in the first new release to this minimal standard C library subset in a half-decade.

    Klibc 2.0.5 was released this week by Ben Hutchings following a number of commits. The previous Klibc 2.0.4 version was released in July of 2014 and since then has only been sporadic work to this library. The Klibc C library subset is principally used for early in the Linux kernel boot process / initramfs.

  • The New "TEO" CPU Idle Governor For Tickless Systems Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.1

    The new "Timer Events Oriented" (TEO) governor in development over recent months by Intel developer Rafael Wysocki is poised to land with the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle.

    The TEO governor for the CPUIdle framework is designed to be more ideal for tickless systems in more appropriately picking the best C-state for the processor/system. TEO tries to pick the deepest idle state for the system's expected conditions.

  • There's Early Stage Work Exploring Z-Wave Linux Kernel Drivers

    Z-Wave is the incredibly common wireless communication protocol at the backbone of many home automation systems. To date there hasn't been any in-kernel Z-Wave Linux kernel drivers for this low-energy mesh network standard, but a SUSE developer has prototyped an initial driver and currently exploring the in-kernel possibilities, including what could end up being a Z-Wave subsystem.

Radio Telescopes Horn In With GNU Radio

Filed under
GNU
Hardware

Who doesn’t like to look up at the night sky? But if you are into radio, there’s a whole different way to look using radio telescopes. [John Makous] spoke at the GNU Radio Conference about how he’s worked to make a radio telescope that is practical for even younger students to build and operate.

The only real high tech part of this build is the low noise amplifier (LNA) and the project is in reach of a typical teacher who might not be an expert on electronics. It uses things like paint thinner cans and lumber. [John] also built some blocks in GNU Radio that made it easy for other teachers to process the data from a telescope. As he put it, “This is the kind of nerdy stuff I like to do.” We can relate.

Read more

New Releases: Kodachi 5.8, Tails RC, HardenedBSD Stable, KookBook 0.2.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Kodachi 5.8 The Secure OS

    Linux Kodachi operating system is based on Debian 9.5 / Ubuntu 18.04 it will provide you with a secure, anti-forensic, and anonymous operating system considering all features that a person who is concerned about privacy would need to have in order to be secure.
    Kodachi is very easy to use all you have to do is boot it up on your PC via USB drive then you should have a fully running operating system with established VPN connection + Connection established + service running. No setup or knowledge is required from your side we do it all for you. The entire OS is functional from your temporary memory RAM so once you shut it down no trace is left behind all your activities are wiped out.
    Kodachi is a live operating system that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to:

  • Call for testing: [Tails] 3.12~rc1

    You can help Tails! The first release candidate for the upcoming version 3.12 is out. We are very excited and cannot wait to hear what you think about it, especially the new simplified USB installation method (see below). Smile

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200058.2
  • KookBook 0.2.0 available – now manage your cooking recipes better

    Some people have started talking about maybe translation of the interface. I might look into that in the future.

    And I wouldn’t be sad if some icon artists provided me with a icon slightly better than the knife I drew. Feel free to contact me if that’s the case.

    Happy kooking!

Programming: Conway’s Game of Life, py3status and Teaching Python at Apple

Filed under
Development
  • Optimizating Conway

    Conway’s Game of Life seems to be a common programming exercise. I had to program it in Pascal when in High School and in C in an intro college programming course. I remember in college, since I had already programmed it before, that I wanted to optimize the algorithm. However, a combination of writing in C and having only a week to work on it didn’t leave me with enough time to implement anything fancy.

    A couple years later, I hiked the Appalachian Trail. Seven months away from computers, just hiking day in and day out. One of the things I found myself contemplating when walking up and down hills all day was that pesky Game of Life algorithm and ways that I could improve it.

    Fast forward through twenty intervening years of life and experience with a few other programming languages to last weekend. I needed a fun programming exercise to raise my spirits so I looked up the rules to Conway’s Game of Life, sat down with vim and python, and implemented a few versions to test out some of the ideas I’d had kicking around in my head for a quarter century.

  • py3status v3.16

    Two py3status versions in less than a month? That’s the holidays effect but not only!

    Our community has been busy discussing our way forward to 4.0 (see below) and organization so it was time I wrote a bit about that.

  • #195 Teaching Python at Apple

Games: Protontricks, vkQuake2, System Shock, Dead Ascend, Lord of Dwarves and Panda3D

Filed under
Gaming
  • Protontricks, a handy tool for doing various tweaks with Steam Play has been forked

    For those brave enough to attempt to get more Windows games to run through Steam Play, Protontricks is a handy solution and it's been forked.

  • vkQuake2, the project adding Vulkan support to Quake 2 now supports Linux

    At the start of this year, I gave a little mention to vkQuake2, a project which has updated the classic Quake 2 with various improvements including Vulkan support.

    Other improvements as part of vkQuake2 include support for higher resolution displays, it's DPI aware, HUD scales with resolution and so on.

    Initially, the project didn't support Linux which has now changed. Over the last few days they've committed a bunch of new code which fully enables 64bit Linux support with Vulkan.

  • The new System Shock is looking quite impressive with the latest artwork

    System Shock, the remake coming eventually from Nightdive Studios continues along in development and it's looking impressive.

    In their latest Kickstarter update, they showed off what they say is the "final art" after they previously showed the game using "temporary art". I have to admit, while this is only a small slice of what's to come, from the footage it certainly seems like it will have a decent atmosphere to it.

  • Dead Ascend, an open source point and click 2D adventure gameDead Ascend, an open source point and click 2D adventure game

    For those wanting to check out another open source game or perhaps see how they're made, Dead Ascend might be a fun choice for a little adventure.

    Developed by Lars from Black Grain Games, Dead Ascend features hand-drawn artwork with gameplay much like classic point and click adventures.

  • Lord of Dwarves will have you build large structures and defend them, developed on Linux

    Here's a fun one, Lord of Dwarves from developer Stellar Sage Games is a game about helping a kingdom of dwarves survive, build, and prosper. It's made on Linux too and releasing in Early Access in March.

    The developer emailed in about it and to let everyone know that it was "developed in Linux using only open source software". You can actually see them showing it off on Ubuntu in a recent video.

    While it's going to be in Early Access, they told me it's "feature complete with a full campaign and sandbox mode" with the extra time being used for feedback and to polish it as much as possible.

  • A Journey of the Panda3D

    I don’t know why am I still working on Panda 3D despite the failure to export the Blender mesh to the Panda 3D engine but anyway here is a quick update for the development of the Panda3D’s game. Yesterday after the Panda 3D engine had failed again to render the blender 3D mesh together with its texture on the game scene, I had made another search for the solution on Google but again...

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt

  • LHS Episode #266: #$%&! Net Neutrality
    Welcome to the first episode of Linux in the Ham Shack for 2019. In this episode, the hosts discuss topics including the 2018 RTTY Roundup using FT-8, Cubesats and wideband receivers in space, the ORI at Hamcation, Wekcan, Raspberry Pi-based VPN servers, the LHS Linux distributions, CW trainers and much more.
  • LHS Episode #267: The Weekender XXII
    Welcome to the 22nd edition of the LHS Weekender. In this episode, the hosts discuss upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, Open Source events in the next fortnight, Linux distributions of interest, news about science, technology and related endeavors as well is dive into food, drink and other hedonistic topics.
  • Linux Action News 89
    Another troubling week for MongoDB, ZFS On Linux lands a kernel workaround, and 600 days of postmarketOS. Plus our thoughts on the new Project Trident release, and Mozilla ending the Test Pilot program.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 130 - Chat with Snyk co-founder Danny Grander
  • The ACME Era | TechSNAP 395
    We welcome Jim to the show, and he and Wes dive deep into all things Let’s Encrypt.

Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku. With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful. Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time. Read more

This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!
  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag
    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.
  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020
    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform. The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process. "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.