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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Programming/Development: Math Libraries for Python, Compiler Fuzzing With Prog-Fuzz, Intel MKL and Flutter Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 6:32am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 6:29am
Story Security: Apple Lockdown, More Logo/Brands for Bugs, Other News Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 6:25am
Story It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 5:53am
Story Perl 5.28.0 released Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 5:50am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2018 - 5:05am
Story Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub? Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2018 - 11:12pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2018 - 9:50pm
Story Why Open Source Matters to Alibaba Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2018 - 9:39pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2018 - 4:29pm

Programming/Development: Math Libraries for Python, Compiler Fuzzing With Prog-Fuzz, Intel MKL and Flutter

Filed under
Development
  • 10 Best Math Libraries for Python

    Many times, when you write programs you need to use special functions that others have used before you. When this happens, open source comes to the rescue and gives you a library that covers that need. Python calls theirs modules, to use modules you need to import them.Modules for mathematics are especially useful when you have the theory ready but need to use standard math for your particular problem.  The Mathematics module in the Python standard library has many features. It is useful to check if you can solve your problem easily with these functions. If you need to know what functions exist you need to go through the list. However, first realize that the module implements all the C standard functions.

    The simplest use of Python for math is as a calculator. To do this, start Python on the terminal and use the print function.

  • Compiler Fuzzing With Prog-Fuzz Is Turning Up Bugs In GCC, Clang

    Vegard Nossum of Oracle has been working on fuzzing different open-source compilers for turning up bugs within these code compiler likes GCC and Clang.

    Vegard ended up writing a new compiler fuzzer from scratch making use of AFL instrumentation. This new fuzzer is dubbed simply Prog-Fuzz and is available on GitHub.

  • Intel MKL in Debian / Ubuntu follow-up

    About two months ago, in the most recent post in the series, #18, we provided a short tutorial about how to add the Intel Math Kernel Library to a Debian or Ubuntu system thanks to the wonderful apt tool -- and the prepackaged binaries by Intel. This made for a simple, reproducible, scriptable, and even reversible (!!) solution---which a few people seem to have appreciated. Good.

  • Fedora 28 : Starting develop with Flutter .

Security: Apple Lockdown, More Logo/Brands for Bugs, Other News

Filed under
Security

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

Filed under
Hardware

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER.

Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open.

Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Filed under
Development

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing.

Read more

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats.

In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts.

When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company.

The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services.

With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development.

Read more

Why Open Source Matters to Alibaba

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

At present, Alibaba has more than 150 open source projects. We work on the open source projects with the aim to contribute to the industry and solve real-life problems. We share our experiences with the rest of the open source enthusiasts.

As a long-time contributor to various other open source projects, Alibaba and Alibaba Cloud have fostered a culture that encourages our teams to voluntarily contribute to various open source projects, either by sharing experiences or helping others to solve problems. Sharing and contributing to the community altogether is in the DNA of Alibaba’s culture.

Read more

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository

    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post.
    I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.

  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18

    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24

    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

Filed under
Development
  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools

    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language.

    The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations.

    The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.

  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month

    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time.

    Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.18-rc2

    Another week, another -rc.

    I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday
    _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home
    and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the
    traditional schedule.

    Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal.
    About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's
    networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over).

    We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and
    lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other
    "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be
    less disruptive that way.

    Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for
    rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too.

    We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm
    going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have
    been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the
    "missing features" sense.

    So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be
    things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does,
    then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a
    security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix.

    But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some
    behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the
    merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it
    really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense.

    Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch
    updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking.

    Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that
    scary.

    Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed.

    Linus

  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes

    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

Filed under
GNOME
  • A GTK+ 3 update

    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while.

    I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.

  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4

    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released.

    While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

Filed under
KDE

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages.

After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release.

You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release.

Read more

Peppermint OS Version 9 Released With New Features

Filed under
News

Ubuntu-based lightweight distribution, Peppermint has just released its version 9. Here’s a quick look at the changes in the new release.
Read more

Ubuntu Data Collection Report is Out! Read the Interesting Facts

Filed under
News

Ubuntu started collecting some basic, not-personally-identifiable system data starting with Ubuntu 18.04. Two months after Ubuntu 18.04 release, Canonical has shared some interesting stats.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more