23-inch Android display shows HD digital art

Filed under
Android

Electric Objects has achieved Kickstarter funding for its Android-based EO1, a wall-mounted, 23-inch HD signage computer for displaying digital art.

New York City based Electric Objects is one of several companies reinvigorating the wall-mounted digital picture frame form-factor with more affordable prices, smartphone access, and other modern amenities. Like Framed, which is based on Windows Embedded, Electric Objects’s EO1 picture frame has easily surpassed its Kickstarter funding goals. There are still 17 days left, however, to get in on discounted pricing, including $299 for a May 2015 release, or $499 (the eventual retail price) for a wooden-framed version, or a beta test model due in Jan. 2015.

Read more

Looking at the Zooniverse code

Filed under
Development
OSS

Recently I’ve been looking over the Zooniverse citizen science project and its source code on github, partly because it’s interesting as a user and partly because I thought writing an Android app for Galaxy Zoo would be a good learning exercise and something useful to open source.

Read more

U.K. Cabinet Office Adopts ODF as Exclusive Standard for Sharable Documents

Filed under
LibO
OSS
OOo

The U.K. Cabinet Office accomplished today what the Commonwealth of Massachusetts set out (unsuccessfully) to achieve ten years ago: it formally required compliance with the Open Document Format (ODF) by software to be purchased in the future across all government bodies. Compliance with any of the existing versions of OOXML, the competing document format championed by Microsoft, is neither required nor relevant. The announcement was made today by The Minister for the Cabinet Office, Francis Maude.

Read more

Nine Reasons Linux Rules the Supercomputing Space

Filed under
Linux

The latest TOP500 List of the fastest supercomputers in the world helped many in the technology community understand what open-source aficionados have known for years: Linux has quickly become the operating system of choice in the high-performance computing (HPC) market, growing from relative obscurity 15 years ago to powering 97 percent of the fastest computers in the world. But its appeal is found in more than cost or choice. Here are a few of the main reasons Linux has grown to own the lion's share of the fastest supercomputers in the world. Although the United States remains the top country in terms of overall systems, with 233, this is down from 265 on the November 2013 list. The number of Chinese systems on the list rose from 63 to 76, giving the Asian nation nearly as many supercomputers as the United Kingdom, with 30; France, with 27; and Germany, with 23—combined. Japan also increased its showing, up to 30 from 28 on the previous list. HP has the lead in systems and now has 182 systems (36 percent), compared to IBM, with 176 systems (35 percent). HP had 196 systems (39 percent) six months ago, and IBM had 164 systems (33 percent) six months ago. In the system category, Cray remains third with 10 percent (50 systems).

Read more

Zorin OS 9 - a step forward for Windows migrants

Filed under
Reviews

I think Zorin OS 9 Core is a decent system, and those who it is aimed for, literally Windows migrants, will find everything they want in this operating system.

As this is an LTS edition, it will be supported for a long time. It means you can install it on your computer and forget about upgrade problems, as well as forget about the Microsoft empire.

Read more

What are useful online tools for Linux

Filed under
HowTos

As you know, GNU Linux is much more than just an OS. There is literally a whole sphere on the Internet dedicated to the penguin OS. If you read this post, you are probably inclined towards reading about Linux online. Among all the pages that you can find on the subject, there are a couple of websites that every Linux adventurer should have in his bookmarks. These websites are more than just tutorials or reviews. They are real tools that you can access from anywhere and share with everyone. So today I shall propose you a non-exhaustive list of sixteen websites that should be in your bookmarks. Some of them can also be useful for Windows or Mac users: that's the extent of their reach.

Read more

The Linux Kernel Bang-Bang Thermal Governor Is Banging

Filed under
Development
Linux

The Bang-bang thermal governor remains under discussion on the kernel mailing list after patches for it originally appeared a few months back. Bang-bang will hopefully be ready for an upcoming kernel release (Linux 3.17?) and the latest technical discussion about it can be found via the LKML archives.

One Linux kernel driver already planning to utilize the Bang-bang thermal governor is the "Acerhdf" driver that serves as the fan driver for Acer's Aspire One and other Acer systems where it has a simple fan that only supports being on or off. Up to now the acerhdf driver has handled its own on-off controls by post-manipulating the kernel's thermal subsystem trip point handling but will now be able to utilize the unified Bang-bang governor.

Read more

Docker security with SELinux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Security

This article is based on a talk I gave at DockerCon this year. It will discuss Docker container security, where we are currently, and where we are headed.

Read more

Linux Foundation SysAdmin Clint Savage Reminisces on Weeklong Hackfest

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Clint Savage is a system administrator for the Linux Foundation's Collaborative Projects. Here he discusses the new technologies he's been digging into lately, his favorite part of the job, and fond memories of a weeklong hackfest with his coworkers.

Read more

Samsung and Google provide more details on Knox contribution to Android L

Filed under
Android
Google

As businesses look beyond BlackBerry for smartphone security, Samsung and Google step up to the plate. Knox integration is coming in Android L.

Read more

Over 170 Primary Schools In Geneva Switched To Ubuntu For Classroom Teaching

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over 170 primary schools and secondary schools in Geneva are switching to Ubuntu for PCs used by teachers and students, which were earlier using a proprietary software. The move has been successfully completed for all the primary schools. For the rest 20 secondary schools, the migration is expected to be completed by the next academic year.

Read more

Canonical Community Team Changes Announced For Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

With Jono Bacon having recently left Canonical where he served as the Ubuntu Community Manager, Canonical has made some changes to its community team.

Canonical's Rick Spencer, the VP of Engineering, has done away with the "Community Manager" role in favor of a new "Community Team Manager" position that's now filled by Canonical's David Planella. Additionally, the rest of the community team (Michael Hall, Daniel Holback, and Nicholas Skaggs) now all carry the title as community managers.

Those interested in more information on Ubuntu's Community Team changes can be found from Rick's blog post.

Read more

Mozilla Unleashes Firefox 31 Web Browser

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox 31 web-browser is out this morning with new features.

New to Firefox 31 is improved download security by trying to block known malware (based upon Google's functionality in Chrome), a search box has been added to the new tab page, a new certificate verification library, HTML5 WebVTT support for video playback with subtitles, and various developer-focused improvements.

Users can download the Firefox 31 update from Mozilla.org

Read more

Files (Nautilus) 3.13.2 Has Been Improved for Adwaita Theme

Filed under
Software
GNOME


The GNOME developers behind the Nautilus project (now known as Files) have announced that version 3.13.2 is now available for download and testing.
Read more

Raspberry Pi B+ ARM Debian Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Those wishing to see the Raspberry Pi B+ performance benchmarks with a Debian Linux host, the results are available from 1407220-BY-1407183GL47. To see how the results compare against your own Linux systems, with the Phoronix Test Suite you simply need to run phoronix-test-suite benchmark 1407220-BY-1407183GL47 to conduct a quick, fully-automated, side-by-side performance comparison.

Read more

The new Android Wear smartwatches already have their first game (exclusive)

Filed under
Android

Smartwatches are still a fairly new category. Google revealed its big Android Wear initiative at its I/O developer conference in June. The company is hoping to do for smartwatches what Android proper did for smartphones. Rumors suggest Apple is also working on a smartwatch of its own, but the company hasn’t announced anything yet.

With games dominating the app market on both iOS and Android, it isn’t a surprise that a developer is already coming to the scene with a game for smartwatches. Now we can find out if anyone cares about gaming on a watch or whether most will just stick to playing Candy Crush Saga on their smartphone.

Read more

Mozilla Thunderbird 31.0 Officially Released with Lots of Fixes and Important Changes

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has officially released Thunderbird 31.0, an email and RSS client, for all the available platforms, and the developers have actually made a number of improvements to the application.

The first version has been released in the Thunderbird 31.x branch, but unlike some of the previous updates, this one actually brings something interesting. It's been a while since Thunderbird received any real improvements, but that's not exactly Mozilla's fault.

Read more

NVIDIA Releases K1-Powered Shield Tablet & Controller

Filed under
Android
Gaming

NVIDIA announced this morning their new Shield Tablet and Shield Controller. The new Shield Tablet is a $299 Android tablet that's great for gaming and is mighty powerful with using the Tegra K1 SoC.

With being powered by the Tegra K1, the CPU and graphics performance is mighty powerful for the tablet with its Kepler-based GPU and four Cortex-A15 processor cores. The Shield Tablet has an 8-inch, 1920 x 1200 display and the WiFi version with 16GB of storage is going to sell for $299 USD.

Read more

New Duke Beta, Debian 6 Update, and Geary Still Coming

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news, Geary 0.7.0 was recently released despite the programmers' troubles with the IRS. Debian released an update the 6.0 branch of their old stable Linux distribution. A new Duke Nukem enhanced compilation game has hit beta. "GCC 5.0 is expected next year" and Linus is getting grumpy! And finally today, two new Mint 17 reviews round out the Linux news on this Monday July 21.

Read more

Deepin 2014 review

Filed under
Reviews

it’s no secret that I like Deepin 2014. But what’s not to like about something that’s good and has the potential to be even better. There are features (on the installer) that need to be implemented and several rough edges on the desktop that calls for more polishing, but in general, this is one desktop distribution that I think you should, at least, take for a test drive.

Read more

Syndicate content