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Updated: 1 hour 45 min ago

Are you a Python coder?

8 hours 41 min ago

It seems like every day I'm coming across a new project written in Python.


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3 mistakes to avoid when learning to code in Python

8 hours 42 min ago

It's never easy to admit when you do things wrong, but making errors is part of any learning process, from learning to walk to learning a new programming language, such as Python.

Here's a list of three things I got wrong when I was learning Python, presented so that newer Python programmers can avoid making the same mistakes. These are errors that either I got away with for a long time or that that created big problems that took hours to solve.

Take heed young coders, some of these mistakes are afternoon wasters!


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A introduction to creating documents in LaTeX

8 hours 43 min ago

LaTeX (pronounced lay-tech) is a method of creating documents using plain text, stylized using markup tags, similar to HTML/CSS or Markdown. LaTeX is most commonly used to create documents for academia, such as academic journals. In LaTeX, the author doesn't stylize the document directly, like in a word processor such as Microsoft Word, LibreOffice Writer, or Apple Pages; instead they write code in plain text that must be compiled to produce a PDF document.


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A user's guide to links in the Linux filesystem

Thursday 22nd of June 2017 07:02:00 AM

In articles I have written about various aspects of Linux filesystems for Opensource.com, including An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystemManaging devices in LinuxAn introduction to Linux filesystems; and A Linux user's guide to Logical Vol


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8 ways to contribute to open source when you have no time

Thursday 22nd of June 2017 07:01:00 AM

One of the most common reasons people give for not contributing (or not contributing more) to open source is a lack of time. I get it; life is challenging, and there are so many priorities vying for your limited attention. So how can you find the time in your busy life to contribute to the open source projects you care about?


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To compete or to collaborate? 4 criteria for making the call

Thursday 22nd of June 2017 07:00:00 AM

In my series on becoming more open, I've written about selecting teammates for an open project, working with people that have different personalities, and encouraging front-line decision-making.


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Using Kdump for examining Linux Kernel crashes

Wednesday 21st of June 2017 07:03:00 AM

Kdump is a way to acquire a crashed Linux kernel dump, but finding documents that explain its usage and internals can be challenging. In this article, I'll examine the basics of kdump usage and look at the internals of kdump/kexec kernel implementation.


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Revisit Colossal Cave with Open Adventure

Wednesday 21st of June 2017 07:02:00 AM

In the history of computer games, very few are as influential as Colossal Cave Adventure. Initially developed in 1976 by Will Crowther and expanded by Don Woods in 1977, Adventure was the first interactive fiction game and inspired countless other computer games. Adventure directly or indirectly led to the entire corpus of text-based adventure games, and by extension, graphical adventure games.


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Why aren't more researchers using open source?

Wednesday 21st of June 2017 07:01:00 AM

Academic researchers depend on a variety of highly specialized software to power their studies. The commercial software options in common use are expensive; either investigators must purchase a large number of licenses for common applications like data analysis tools, or they have to buy costly single licenses for specialized software, such as an application for a specific laboratory device.


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What to know before you open source your project

Wednesday 21st of June 2017 07:00:00 AM

Your company is going to release an internal project as open source. Congratulations! You know your code is ready, but are you ready for all your new responsibilities?

Once a project has been released as open source, your company is not only responsible for the project, but also for the community that will form around it. This often requires changes to the development/build/release workflow. This is not about the code per se; it's about all the processes and infrastructure that surround the code that make the open source project successful.


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A beginner's guide to collecting and mapping Twitter data using R

Tuesday 20th of June 2017 10:36:00 AM

When I started learning R, I also needed to learn how to collect Twitter data and map it for research purposes. Despite the wealth of information on the internet about this topic, I found it difficult to understand what was involved in collecting and mapping Twitter data. Not only was I was a novice to R, but I was also unfamiliar with the technical terms in the various tutorials. Despite these barriers, I was successful! In this tutorial, I will break down how to collect Twitter data and display it on a map in a way that even novice coders can understand.


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Using open source tools to play Dungeons and Dragons

Tuesday 20th of June 2017 07:01:00 AM

I have two active role-playing gaming (RPG) sessions going all the time. One is a traditional face-to-face game, and we play at my kitchen table. The other is played online via Google Hangouts and a website, Roll20.net.


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Leaders are more powerful than they think

Tuesday 20th of June 2017 07:00:00 AM

I've noticed something interesting about the people whose names appear at the top of reporting structures in open organizations:

They tend to underestimate their influence.

Exhibit A: I was sitting across from the director of my department, asking for his thoughts on a new quarterly recognition program I was hoping we'd implement as a way of enhancing associate engagement. "And the prize could be lunch with you!" I exclaimed.

My director met me with silence and a skeptical look before stating bluntly, "That is not a prize."


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How to use Ansible to manage PostgreSQL

Monday 19th of June 2017 07:02:00 AM

Working with a database in a pressure-cooker production environment using an agile approach with tight deadlines can be a contradictory experience. As this article demonstrates, you can operationalize those many steps and prepare Postgres for any range of service. The key is Ansible, an open source automation engine for software provisioning, configuration management, and application deployment.


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Resources for getting started with Python and machine learning

Monday 19th of June 2017 07:01:00 AM

Are you interested in machine learning and want to learn how to program? That's why I started learning to code. In this article, I'll share a few of the best resources that helped me advance from building my first program to building my first neural network.


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3 great reasons to embrace rejection

Monday 19th of June 2017 07:00:00 AM

I worked professionally as a software developer for nine years before I committed any code to open source. It wasn't that I didn't want to participate. Rather, my self-doubt and fear of rejection stopped me from contributing.


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Top 5: Five incorrect ways to exit Vim, Getting started with Go, and more

Friday 16th of June 2017 02:00:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we're learning to talk, learning new languages, and learning to quit.

Top 5 articles of the week

5. How open source is advancing the Semantic Web


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3 security tips for software developers

Friday 16th of June 2017 07:02:00 AM

Every developer knows the importance of following best security practices. But too often we cut corners, maybe because we have to work hard until those security practices sink in. Unfortunately, that usually takes something like seeing a security malpractice that's so bad it gets marked in indelible ink in our brains.


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Ura Design donates great UX to open source projects

Friday 16th of June 2017 07:01:00 AM

Open source software is nothing new in an age where even big tech giants are exploring and using it. More and more companies allow—if not outright encourage—employees to contribute to open source software on company hours. What's missing in open source, however, is high-quality, effective design.


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How containers and DevOps transformed Duke University's IT department

Friday 16th of June 2017 07:00:00 AM

It's difficult, even in retrospect, to know which came first for us: containers or a shift towards DevOps culture.


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More in Tux Machines

University of Missouri Adopts Open Access

Ubuntu Development Updates: GDM, Kernel, and Ubuntu Phone

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Proceeding With Transition From LightDM To GDM
    As part of the switch over to the GNOME Shell desktop environment by default for Ubuntu 17.10, they are also abandoning the LightDM display/log-in manager in favor of GNOME's GDM.
  • [Ubuntu] Kernel Team Summary: June 22, 2017
    We intend to target a 4.13 kernel for the Ubuntu 17.10 release. The Ubuntu 17.10 Kernel Freeze is Thurs Oct 5, 2017.
  • Ubuntu Phone project failed because it was a mess: claim
    A developer who worked with the Ubuntu Phone project has outlined the reasons for its failure, painting a picture of confusion, poor communication and lack of technical and marketing foresight. Simon Raffeiner stopped working with the project in mid-2016, about 10 months before Canonical owner Mark Shuttleworth announced that development of the phone and the tablet were being stopped.

Tumbleweed Development and Laptop Experience

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, Linux Kernel 4.11.6, and MP3 Out-Of-The-Box
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system are getting a lot of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software applications lately as a total of seven snapshots were released this week. openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio is back to report that openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by the latest Linux 4.11.6 kernel, and the GStreamer multimedia framework was updated to the major 1.12 series, adding out-of-the-box MP3 decoding support in the distribution.
  • Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, mp3 Out-Of-The Box
    A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots featuring new software were released this week along with an upgrade to GStreamer that allows for mp3 decoding to work out-of-the box. The newest stable Linux Kernel 4.11.6 is also available in the latest Tumbleweed snapshot 20170620. Updates in the repositories from the 20170620 snapshot brought both the 52.2 versions of Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird, which fixed some critical vulnerabilities. Systemd 233 provided a package for a new systemd-umount binary and, with the update of dracut 044.1, supports the new compatibility rule. Fontconfig’s 2.12.3 version fixed the build issues with gperf 3.1 and on GNU Hurd. The Beta 2 version of LibreOffice 5.4 cleaned up the license string and got rid of the Oxygen theme. A removal of support for old, non-systemd distros was made available in the snapshot with libvirt 3.4.0.
  • Dell Latitude D630 Tumbleweed Refresh
    I am not quick to buy new things, though I did replace my Dell Latitude D630 about three months ago with a newer Dell latitude E6440. My plan was to deprecate the machine and put it on a "reserve only" status. In my process of setting up the E6440, I found that I used my D630 still but quite differently, it became my home station machine and my E6440 would be my mobile machine that would return back to "base" where I would have it connect as a client to the D630 for keyboard and mouse. It was a rather nice arrangement. Unfortunately, the hard drive died on the D630 and I needed to install openSUSE once again on it in order to continue to use my workspace as I have been. What is $50 on a new hard drive to restore my SuperCubicle, right? [...] I run KDE Plasma for my desktop. I've tried others but the customization options in KDE Plasma just fits my personal tastes best. I have also been real happy with the speed improvements of KDE Plasma in the last couple years and especially those of KDE Plasma 5.10 on Tumbleweed as of late.

GNOME/GSOC Development and Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell

  • Code Search for GNOME Builder : GSOC 2017
    I am very happy to be part of GNOME and Google Summer of Code 2017. First of all, thank you for all GNOME members for giving me this opportunity and Christian Hergert for mentoring and helping me in this project. In this post I will introduce my project and approach for doing this project. Goal of the project is to enhance Go to Definition and Global Search in GNOME Builder for C/C++ projects. Currently in GNOME Builder, using Go to Definition one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition if definition is there in current file or included in current file. In this project, Go to Definition will be enhanced and using that one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition which can be present in any file in the project. Global Search will also be enhanced by allowing to search all symbols in the project fuzzily right from search bar.
  • [Older] GSOC 2017: And so it begins
    But let’s start from the beginning. Only 4 months ago, I was making my first steps as a contributor in the open-source world. One of the first things I discovered is how amazing and helpful the GNOME community is. I started by trying out a lot of GNOME apps and looking through the code behind them and that’s how I discovered Pitivi, a really great video editing solution. After my first patch on Pitivi got accepted, I was really hooked up. Fast forward a couple of patches and now I have the opportunity and great pleasure to work on my own project: UI for the Ken Burns effect, after being accepted for Google Summer of Code 2017. In this amazing journey, I’ve had some great mentoring: special thanks to Thibault Saunier (thiblahute), who is also my current mentor for GSOC 2017, and Alexandru Balut (aleb), who helped me along the way.
  • Pitivi: UI for the Ken-Burns effect
    It’s been three weeks since the coding period for GSOC 2017 started, so it’s time to show the world the progress I made. A short recap: I’ve been working on building a user interface which allows simulating the Ken-Burns effect and other similar effects in Pitivi. The idea is to allow adding keyframes on x, y, width, height properties of a clip, much like we are doing with other effects.
  • I Finally Found a Way to Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell [Ed: If your workflow involves "Cascade" like in Windows 3.1x, then you make poor use of virtual desktops, activities, etc.]