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Updated: 40 min 12 sec ago

5 reasons to run Kubernetes on your Raspberry Pi homelab

2 hours 36 min ago

There's a saying about the cloud, and it goes something like this: The cloud is just somebody else's computer. While the cloud is actually more complex than that (it's a lot of computers), there's a lot of truth to the sentiment. When you move to the cloud, you're moving data and services and computing power to an entity you don't own or fully control. On the one hand, this frees you from having to perform administrative tasks you don't want to do, but, on the other hand, it could mean you no longer control your own computer.


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5 tips for making documentation a priority in open source projects

2 hours 37 min ago

Open source software is now mainstream; long gone are the days when open source projects attracted developers alone. Nowadays, users across numerous industries are active consumers of open source software, and you can't expect everyone to know how to use the software just by reading the code.


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You don't need a computer science degree to work with open source software

2 hours 38 min ago

I am mostly a self-taught programmer. When I was growing up in the late 1970s, our elementary school had a small resource room with an Apple II computer. My brother and I fell into a group of friends that liked computers, and we all helped each other learn the system.


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Modernize network function development with this Rust-based framework

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

The world of networking has undergone monumental shifts over the past decade, particularly in the ongoing move from specialized hardware into software defined network functions (NFV) for data plane1 and packet processing.


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What I learned while teaching C programming on YouTube

Wednesday 5th of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

The act of breaking something down in order to teach it to others can be a great way to reacquaint yourself with some old concepts and, in many cases, gain new insights.


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Creating and debugging Linux dump files

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:02:00 AM

Crash dump, memory dump, core dump, system dump … all produce the same outcome: a file containing the state of an application's memory at a specific time—usually when the application crashes.

Knowing how to deal with these files can help you find the root cause(s) of a failure. Even if you are not a developer, dump files created on your system can be very helpful (as well as approachable) in understanding software.

This is a hands-on article, and can you follow along with the example by cloning the sample application repository with:


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Use your favorite programming language to provision Infrastructure as Code

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

As you navigate the world of IT and technology, there are some terms you come across repeatedly. Some of them are hard to quantify and may take on different meanings as time goes on. "DevOps" is an example of a word that seems (to me) to change depending on the person using it; the original DevOps pioneers might not even recognize what we call DevOps today.


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An open source solution for continuous testing at scale

Tuesday 4th of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

In Sogeti's most recent World Quality Report, software testing ranked No. 1 in terms of its contributions to business objectives and growth, making it a key enabler for business digitalization. Despite this, the software testing industry still reports major pain points related to test maintenance, automation, tooling, and skills. Most of the tooling in common use lacks capabilities, is too complex to integrate, provides insufficient intelligence, or is too difficult to use.


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Do math in the Linux shell with GNU bc

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:02:00 AM

Most POSIX systems come with GNU bc, an arbitrary precision numeric processing language. Its syntax is similar to C, but it also supports interactive execution of statements and processing data from standard in (stdin). For that reason, it's often the answer to the question, "How do I do math in the Linux shell?" This style of response is common online:


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Practice parsing text in NLP with Python

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:01:00 AM

Natural language processing (NLP) is a specialized field for analysis and generation of human languages. Human languages, rightly called natural language, are highly context-sensitive and often ambiguous in order to produce a distinct meaning. (Remember the joke where the wife asks the husband to "get a carton of milk and if they have eggs, get six," so he gets six cartons of milk because they had eggs.) NLP provides the ability to comprehend natural language input and produce natural language output appropriately.


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Why I use Ingress Controllers to expose Kubernetes services

Monday 3rd of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

The meteoric rise of containerization and microservices has been necessary to meet the growing demand for applications, but getting it right means overcoming some critical network orchestration challenges. Out of the complexities that developers of cloud-native applications face, strategically utilizing Kubernetes ingress controllers is among the most difficult components to understand—and among the most important.


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Why making mistakes makes me a better sysadmin

Sunday 2nd of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

I've been a Fedora Linux contributor for a little over a decade now. Fedora has a large community of developers and users, each with a unique set of skills ranging from being a particularly discerning user to being an amazing programmer. I like this because it inspires and motivates me to develop new skills of my own.


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8 tips for running a virtual hackathon

Saturday 1st of August 2020 07:00:00 AM

Hackathons are events where developers, product managers, designers, and others come together to tackle problems over a short time period. They have become increasingly popular over the last 15 years after OpenBSD ran the first hackathon in June 1999.

These events provide several benefits—greater engagement across the community, innovation and new ideas, awareness for the organizers, and networking opportunities for participants.


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Bring your Mycroft AI voice assistant skill to life with Python

Friday 31st of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

In the first two articles of this series on Mycroft, an open source, privacy-focused digital voice assistant, I covered the background behind voice assistants and some of Mycroft's core tenets.


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Why we open sourced our Python platform

Friday 31st of July 2020 07:00:00 AM

The team at Anvil recently open sourced the Anvil App Server, a runtime engine for hosting web apps built entirely in Python.

The community reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and we, at Anvil, have already incorporated lots of that feedback into our next release. But one of the questions we keep getting asked is, "Why did you choose to open source such a core part of your product?"


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Defining cloud native, expanding the ecosystem, and more industry trends

Thursday 30th of July 2020 01:30:00 PM

As part of my role as a principal communication strategist at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are three of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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Monitor systemd journals via email

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:02:00 AM

Modern Linux systems often use systemd as their init system and manager for jobs and many other functions. Services managed by systemd generally send their output (of all forms: warnings, errors, informational messages, and more) to the systemd journal, not to traditional logging systems like syslog.


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10 cheat sheets for Linux sysadmins

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

When you're a systems administrator, you don't just have one job; you have ALL the jobs, and often each one is on-demand with little to no warning. Unless you do a task every day, you may not always have all the commands and options you need in mind when you need them. And that's why I love cheat sheets.

Cheat sheets help you avoid silly mistakes, they keep you from having to look through pages of documentation, and they keep you moving efficiently through your tasks. I've selected my favorite 10 cheat sheets for any sysadmin, regardless of experience level.


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4 ways I contribute to open source as a Linux systems administrator

Thursday 30th of July 2020 07:00:00 AM

I recently participated in The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit North America, held virtually June 29-July 2, 2020. In the course of that event, I had the opportunity to speak with a fellow attendee about my career in Linux systems administration and how it had led me to a career focused on open source. Specifically, he asked, how does a systems administrator who doesn't do a lot of coding participate in open source projects?

That's a great question!


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Bypass your Linux firewall with SSH over HTTP

Wednesday 29th of July 2020 07:01:00 AM

With the growth of connectivity and remote jobs, accessing remote computing resources becomes more important every day. But the requirements for providing external access to devices and hardware make this task complex and risky. Aiming to reduce this friction, ShellHub is a cloud server that allows universal access to those devices, from any external network.


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More in Tux Machines

5 reasons to run Kubernetes on your Raspberry Pi homelab

There's a saying about the cloud, and it goes something like this: The cloud is just somebody else's computer. While the cloud is actually more complex than that (it's a lot of computers), there's a lot of truth to the sentiment. When you move to the cloud, you're moving data and services and computing power to an entity you don't own or fully control. On the one hand, this frees you from having to perform administrative tasks you don't want to do, but, on the other hand, it could mean you no longer control your own computer. This is why the open source world likes to talk about an open hybrid cloud, a model that allows you to choose your own infrastructure, select your own OS, and orchestrate your workloads as you see fit. However, if you don't happen to have an open hybrid cloud available to you, you can create your own—either to help you learn how the cloud works or to serve your local network. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

  • Linux commands for user management
  • CONSOOM All Your PODCASTS From Your Terminal With Castero
  • Install Blender 3D on Debian 10 (Buster)
  • Things To Do After Installing openSUSE Leap 15.2
  • GSoC Reports: Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls, Part 2

    I have been working on Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls. This blogpost details the work I have done during my second coding period.

  • Holger Levsen: DebConf7

    DebConf7 was also special because it had a very special night venue, which was in an ex-church in a rather normal building, operated as sort of community center or some such, while the old church interior was still very much visible as in everything new was build around the old stuff. And while the night venue was cool, it also ment we (video team) had no access to our machines over night (or for much of the evening), because we had to leave the university over night and the networking situation didn't allow remote access with the bandwidth needed to do anything video. The night venue had some very simple house rules, like don't rearrange stuff, don't break stuff, don't fix stuff and just a few little more and of course we broke them in the best possible way: Toresbe with the help of people I don't remember fixed the organ, which was broken for decades. And so the house sounded in some very nice new old tune and I think everybody was happy we broke that rule.

Programming Leftovers

  • Podcast: COBOL development on the mainframe

    Nic reached out when COBOL hit the news this spring to get some background on what COBOL is good for historically, and where it lives in the modern infrastructure stack. I was able to talk about the basics of COBOL and the COBOL standard, strengths today in concert with the latest mainframes, and how COBOL back-end code is now being integrated into front ends via intermediary databases and data-interchange formats like JSON, which COBOL natively supports.

  • What I learned while teaching C programming on YouTube

    The act of breaking something down in order to teach it to others can be a great way to reacquaint yourself with some old concepts and, in many cases, gain new insights. I have a YouTube channel where I demonstrate FreeDOS programs and show off classic DOS applications and games. The channel has a small following, so I tend to explore the topics directly suggested by my audience. When several subscribers asked if I could do more videos about programming, I decided to launch a new video series to teach C programming. I learned a lot from teaching C, and in the process, I came across some meaningful takeaways I think others will appreciate. Make a plan For my day job, I lead training and workshops to help new and emerging IT leaders develop new skills. Outside of regular work, I also enjoy teaching as an adjunct professor. So I'm very comfortable constructing a course outline and designing a curriculum. That's where I started. If you want to teach a subject effectively, you can't just wing it. Start by writing an outline of what topics you want to cover and figure out how each new topic will build on the previous ones. The "building block" method of adding new knowledge is key to an effective training program.

  • Google's Flutter 1.20 framework is out: VS Code extension and mobile autofill support
  • Google Engineers Propose "Machine Function Splitter" For Faster Performance

    Google engineers have been working on the Machine Function Splitter as their means of making binaries up to a few percent faster thanks to this compiler-based approach. They are now seeking to upstream the Machine Function Splitter into LLVM. The Machine Function Splitter is a code generation optimization pass for splitting code functions into hot and cold parts. They are doing this stemming from research that in roughly half of code functions that more than 50% of the code bytes are never executed but generally loaded into the CPU's data cache.

  • Modernize network function development with this Rust-based framework

    The world of networking has undergone monumental shifts over the past decade, particularly in the ongoing move from specialized hardware into software defined network functions (NFV) for data plane1 and packet processing. While the transition to software has fashioned the rise of SDN (Software-defined networking) and programmable networks, new challenges have arisen in making these functions flexible, efficient, easier to use, and fast (i.e. little to no performance overhead). Our team at Comcast wanted to both leverage what the network does best, especially with regards to its transport capacity and routing mechanisms, while also being able to develop network programs through a modern software lens—stressing testing, swift iteration, and deployment. So, with these goals in mind, we developed Capsule, a new framework for network function development, written in Rust, inspired by Berkeley's NetBricks research, and built-on Intel's Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK).

  • This Week in Rust 350
  • Firefox extended tracking protection

    This Mozilla Security Blog entry describes the new redirect-tracking protections soon to be provided by the Firefox browser.

  • Karl Dubost: Browser developer tools timeline

    I was reading In a Land Before Dev Tools by Amber, and I thought, Oh here missing in the history the beautifully chiseled Opera Dragonfly and F12 for Internet Explorer. So let's see what are all the things I myself didn't know.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Upcoming Webinar: curl: How to Make Your First Code Contribution

    Abstract: curl is a wildly popular and well-used open source tool and library, and is the result of more than 2,200 named contributors helping out. Over 800 individuals wrote at least one commit so far. In this presentation, curl’s lead developer Daniel Stenberg talks about how any developer can proceed in order to get their first code contribution submitted and ultimately landed in the curl git repository. Approach to code and commits, style, editing, pull-requests, using github etc. After you’ve seen this, you’ll know how to easily submit your improvement to curl and potentially end up running in ten billion installations world-wide.

Security: Zoom Holes, New Patches and etcd Project Security Committee

  • Zoombomber crashes court hearing on Twitter hack with Pornhub video
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (net-snmp), Fedora (mingw-curl), openSUSE (firefox, ghostscript, and opera), Oracle (libvncserver and postgresql-jdbc), Scientific Linux (postgresql-jdbc), SUSE (firefox, kernel, libX11, xen, and xorg-x11-libX11), and Ubuntu (apport, grub2, grub2-signed, libssh, libvirt, mysql-8.0, ppp, tomcat8, and whoopsie).

  • The CNCF etcd project reaches a significant milestone with completion of security audit

    This week, a third-party security audit was published on etcd, the open source distributed key-value store that plays a crucial role in scaling Kubernetes in the cloud. For etcd, this audit was important in multiple ways. The audit validates the project’s maturity and sheds light on some areas where the project can improve. This sort of audit is required criteria for any project in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to qualify for graduation from the CNCF. Read the CNCF blog post that I co-authored to learn more about the audit and what it uncovered. As one of the project maintainers and one of two members of the etcd Project Security Committee, I’d love to share a few reasons I’m hopeful for etcd’s future and why now is a great time to contribute to etcd’s open source community.