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Updated: 3 hours 18 min ago

Zowe 1.0 released, Microsoft joins OpenChain, new Raspberry Pi store, and more news

9 hours 11 min ago

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the first physical Raspberry Pi store, NVIDIA's hyper-realistic face generator, Microsoft joining the OpenChain project, and more.


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Make websites more readable with a shell script

Friday 15th of February 2019 08:02:00 AM

If you want people to find your website useful, they need to be able to read it. The colors you choose for your text can affect the readability of your site. Unfortunately, a popular trend in web design is to use low-contrast colors when printing text, such as gray text on a white background. Maybe that looks really cool to the web designer, but it is really hard for many of us to read.


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Why should you use Rust in WebAssembly?

Friday 15th of February 2019 08:01:00 AM

WebAssembly (Wasm) is a technology that has the chance to reshape how we build apps for the browser. Not only will it allow us to build whole new classes of web applications, but it will also allow us to make existing apps written in JavaScript even more performant. 

In this article about the state of the Rust and Wasm ecosystem, I'll try to explain why Rust is the language that can unlock the true potential of WebAssembly.


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Ansible for the Windows admin

Friday 15th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

We are searching for a champion, a Windows administrator willing to venture out into the world of Ansible automation. No, you will not need to know Bash scripting or how to navigate your way around a Linux terminal. All you need is the desire all admins share: to complete mundane tasks as quickly as possible.


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Why I love free software

Thursday 14th of February 2019 08:02:00 AM

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is a charity that supports and promote the use of free software. Their latest income and expense report for 2017, shows that much of their efforts focus on, beyond basic infrastructure costs, public awareness, legal work, and policy work.


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Drinking coffee with AWK

Thursday 14th of February 2019 08:01:00 AM

The following is based on a true story, although some names and details have been changed.

A long time ago, in a place far away, there was an office. The office did not, for various reasons, buy instant coffee. Some workers in that office got together and decided to institute the "Coffee Corner."


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Top 5 podcasts for Linux news and tips

Thursday 14th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

Like many Linux enthusiasts, I listen to a lot of podcasts. I find my daily commute is the best time to get some time to myself and catch up on the latest tech news. Over the years, I have subscribed and unsubscribed to more show feeds than I care to think about and have distilled them down to the best of the best.

Here are my top five Linux podcasts I think you should be listening to in 2019, plus a couple of bonus picks.


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Getting started with the Linux cat command

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 08:02:00 AM

Cat is a fairly simple tool designed to concatenate and write file(s) to your screen, which is known as standard output (stdout). It is part of the GNU Core Utils released under the GPLv3+ license. You can expect to find it in just about any Linux distribution or other Unix operating environment, such as FreeBSD or Solaris. The simplest use of cat is to show the contents of a file. Here is an example with a file named hello.world:


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How to build a WiFi picture frame with a Raspberry Pi

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 08:01:00 AM

Digital picture frames are really nice because they let you enjoy your photos without having to print them out. Plus, adding and removing digital files is a lot easier than opening a traditional frame and swapping the picture inside when you want to display a new photo. Even so, it's still a bit of overhead to remove your SD card, USB stick, or other storage from a digital picture frame, plug it into your computer, and copy new pictures onto it.

An easier option is a digital picture frame that gets its pictures over WiFi, for example from a cloud service. Here's how to make one.


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3 new ways to contribute code to Ansible

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

Ansible is the most active community in the configuration management space; according to GitHub's State of the Octoverse report, it was the seventh most contributed project of 2018.


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Introducing the Small Scale Scrum framework

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

Scrum is a leading candidate for the implementation of Small Scale Agile for many reasons, including its popularity, developers’ preferences, high success rates for scrum adoption and project deliveries, and strong principles and values including focus, courage, openness, commitment, and respect.


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January top 10: Why data scientists love Kubernetes, CNC milling, Linux kernel, Vim plugins, and more

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 06:30:00 PM

Opensource.com brought in 1,163,531 unique visitors who generated 1,810,561 page views in January, a new record for both metrics. This represents an almost 15% increase in page views over our previous record set in October 2018.

We published 106 articles last month, and welcomed 24 new writers. 

Our 2019 linux.conf.au series was a big hit with readers:


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6 lessons we learned building Measure, a contributor relationship management system

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 08:03:00 AM

At its core, Measure is, for lack of a better term, a contributor relationship management system. Measure consists of easy-to-understand widgets that can be arbitrarily displayed to build dashboards. It allows you to visualize and understand how people, both as individuals and as organizations, are interacting with open source projects on GitHub. It produces metrics that focus not only on code but also on contributors.


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Two graphical tools for manipulating PDFs on the Linux desktop

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 08:02:00 AM

With the way I talk and write about PDFs and tools for working with them, some people think I'm in love with the format. I'm not, for a variety of reasons I won't go into here.

I won't go so far as saying PDFs are a necessary evil in my personal and professional life—rather they're a necessary not-so-good. Often I have to use PDFs, even though there are better alternatives for delivering documents.


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Announcing the 2018 Open Source Yearbook: Download now

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 08:01:00 AM

Get your free PDF download of the 2018 Open Source Yearbook


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What Return of the Jedi taught me about open leadership

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

No matter where you are in an organization, you can benefit from observing others and learning from them. We can all learn lessons from someone else.

I like to look for leadership lessons wherever I go. Sometimes I learn a few tips on public speaking by watching a skilled presenter. Or I'll learn how to improve my meeting management style by reflecting on meetings that go well.


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Programming languages to learn now, network monitoring tools, backup solutions, and more must-reads

Monday 11th of February 2019 04:16:00 PM

Unsurprisingly readers had great interest in—and strong opinions on—which programming languages you should learn, which brought in almost 15,000 page views to Marty Kalin's article recent article.


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What's the right amount of swap space for a modern Linux system?

Monday 11th of February 2019 08:01:00 AM

Swap space is one of those things that everyone seems to have an idea about, and I am no exception. All my sysadmin friends have their opinions, and most distributions make recommendations too.

Many years ago, the rule of thumb for the amount of swap space that should be allocated was 2X the amount of RAM installed in the computer. Of course that was when a typical computer's RAM was measured in KB or MB. So if a computer had 64KB of RAM, a swap partition of 128KB would be an optimum size.


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Introducing kids to computational thinking with Python

Monday 11th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

When the Parkman Branch of the Detroit Public Library was flooded with bored children taking up all the computers during summer break, the library saw it not as a problem, rather an opportunity.


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How does rootless Podman work?

Monday 11th of February 2019 08:00:00 AM

In my previous article on user namespace and Podman, I discussed how you can use Podman commands to launch different containers with different user namespaces giving you better separation between containers. Podman also takes advantage of user namespaces to be able to run in rootless mode. Basically, when a non-privileged user runs Podman, the tool sets up and joins a user namespace.


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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!
    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and B), as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture). [...] As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific). Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

OSS: SVT-AV1, LibreOffice, FSF and Software Freedom Conservancy

  • SVT-AV1 Already Seeing Nice Performance Improvements Since Open-Sourcing
    It was just a few weeks ago that Intel open-sourced the SVT-AV1 project as a CPU-based AV1 video encoder. In the short time since publishing it, there's already been some significant performance improvements.  Since the start of the month, SVT-AV1 has added multi-threaded CDEF search, more AVX optimizations, and other improvements to this fast evolving AV1 encoder. With having updated the test profile against the latest state as of today, here's a quick look at the performance of this Intel open-source AV1 video encoder.
  • Find a LibreOffice community member near you!
    Hundreds of people around the world contribute to each new version of LibreOffice, and we’ve interviewed many of them on this blog. Now we’ve collected them together on a map (thanks to OpenStreetMap), so you can see who’s near you, and find out more!
  • What I learned during my internship with the FSF tech team
    Hello everyone, I am Hrishikesh, and this is my follow-up blog post concluding my experiences and the work I did during my 3.5 month remote internship with the FSF. During my internship, I worked with the tech team to research and propose replacements for their network monitoring infrastructure. A few things did not go quite as planned, but a lot of good things that I did not plan happened along the way. For example, I planned to work on GNU LibreJS, but never could find enough time for it. On the other hand, I gained a lot of system administration experience by reading IRC conversations, and by working on my project. I even got to have a brief conversation with RMS! My mentors, Ian, Andrew, and Ruben, were extremely helpful and understanding throughout my internship. As someone who previously had not worked with a team, I learned a lot about teamwork. Aside from IRC, we interacted weekly in a conference call via phone, and used the FSF's Etherpad instance for live collaborative editing, to take notes. The first two months were mostly spent studying the FSF's existing Nagios- and Munin-based monitoring and alert system, to understand how it works. The tech team provided two VMs for experimenting with Prometheus and Nagios, which I used throughout the internship. During this time, I also spent a lot of time reading about licenses, and other posts about free software published by the FSF.
  • We're Hiring: Techie Bookkeeper
    Software Freedom Conservancy is looking for a new employee to help us with important work that supports our basic operations. Conservancy is a nonprofit charity that promotes and improves free and open source software projects. We are home to almost 50 projects, including Git, Inkscape, Etherpad, phpMyAdmin, and Selenium (to name a few). Conservancy is the home of Outreachy, an award winning diversity intiative, and we also work hard to improve software freedom generally. We are a small but dedicated staff, handling a very large number of financial transactions per year for us and our member projects.

Security: Back Doors Running Amok, Container Runtime Flaw Patched, Cisco Ships Exploit Inside Products

  • Here We Go Again: 127 Million Accounts Stolen From 8 More Websites
    Several days ago, a hacker put 617 million accounts from 16 different websites for sale on the dark web. Now, the same hacker is offering 127 million more records from another eight websites.
  • Hacker who stole 620 million records strikes again, stealing 127 million more
    A hacker who stole close to 620 million user records from 16 websites has stolen another 127 million records from eight more websites, TechCrunch has learned. The hacker, whose listing was the previously disclosed data for about $20,000 in bitcoin on a dark web marketplace, stole the data last year from several major sites — some that had already been disclosed, like more than 151 million records from MyFitnessPal and 25 million records from Animoto. But several other hacked sites on the marketplace listing didn’t know or hadn’t disclosed yet — such as 500px and Coffee Meets Bagel. The Register, which first reported the story, said the data included names, email addresses and scrambled passwords, and in some cases other login and account data — though no financial data was included.
  • Vendors Issue Patches for Linux Container Runtime Flaw Enabling Host Attacks
  • How did the Dirty COW exploit get shipped in software?
    An exploit code for Dirty COW was accidentally shipped by Cisco with product software. Learn how this code ended up in a software release and what this vulnerability can do.

10 Cool Software to Try from CORP Repo in Fedora

In this article, we will share 10 cool software projects to try in Fedora distribution. All the apps or tools covered here can be found in COPR repository. However, before we move any further, let’s briefly explain COPR. Read more