Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 6 min 7 sec ago

Will your organization change itself to death?

1 hour 2 min ago

Open organizations are flexible and resilient organizations. This means they're able to change themselves as the world around them changes. It's a critical skill for remaining relevant over time, both for individuals and organizations.


read more

Fauxpen source is bad for business

1 hour 2 min ago

Open source software is amazing. This emergent phenomenon of human collaboration, enabled by the internet, makes it possible for organizations of every size—including for-profit businesses—to get more done, faster, with less friction and with more predictability. It's the foundation of our digital economy.

Proprietary software is fine. It is what it is. Sure, it lacks the collaborative advantages of open source software, but at least it does what it says on the tin. Pay me this, I'll give you that, and you can use it according to this specific license we negotiate.


read more

Graphically manage SSH keys with Seahorse

1 hour 4 min ago

If you're a Linux system administrator, you are probably familiar with using the Secure Shell (SSH) tool to securely connect to remote servers. You probably also know that SSH uses a public-private key pair to provide encryption. So, the first step in using SSH is to generate the key pair. You can also distribute your public key to remote servers so you can log into them without needing to type your password.


read more

Hydroelectricity and transmission planning in Chile use open source geospatial tools

1 hour 4 min ago

From 2014 and 2017, I had the good fortune of working with a multidisciplinary team in Chile, building decision support tools to facilitate the planning of hydroelectric capacity as an alternative to fossil-fuel based thermoelectric capacity. Our job was also to aid in the design of transmission line corridors. Transmission lines carry “bulk electricity” from where the electricity is generated to where it is consumed.


read more

9 ways to save the planet

Monday 22nd of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

What can be done to help save the planet? The question can seem depressing at a time when it feels like an individual's contribution isn't enough. But, who are we Earth dwellers if not for a collection of individuals? So, I asked our writer community to share ways that open source software or hardware can be used to make a difference. Here's what I heard back.

9 ways to save the planet with an open source twist

1. Disable the blinking cursor in your terminal.


read more

4 open source apps for plant-based diets

Monday 22nd of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Reducing your consumption of meat, dairy, and processed foods is better for the planet and better for your health. Changing your diet can be difficult, but several open source Android applications can help you switch to a more plant-based diet.


read more

8 environment-friendly open software projects you should know

Monday 22nd of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

For the last few years, I've been helping Greenpeace build its first fully open source software project, Planet 4. Planet 4 is a global engagement platform where Greenpeace supporters and activists can interact and engage with the organization. The goal is to drive people to action on behalf of our planet. We want to invite participation and use people power to battle global issues like climate change and plastic pollution.


read more

Tracking the weather with Python and Prometheus

Monday 22nd of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Open source monitoring system Prometheus has integrations to track many types of time-series data, but if you want an integration that doesn't yet exist, it's easy to build one. An often-used example is a custom integration with a cloud provider that uses the provider's APIs to grab specific metrics. In this example, though, we will integrate with the biggest cloud provider of all: Earth.


read more

Building scalable social media sentiment analysis services in Python

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

The first part of this series provided some background on how sentiment analysis works. Now let's investigate how to add these capabilities to your designs.


read more

Getting started with social media sentiment analysis in Python

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Natural language processing (NLP) is a type of machine learning that addresses the correlation between spoken/written languages and computer-aided analysis of those languages. We experience numerous innovations from NLP in our daily lives, from writing assistance and suggestions to real-time speech translation and interpretation.


read more

This is how System76 does open hardware

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Most people know very little about the hardware in their computers. As a long-time Linux user, I've had my share of frustration while getting my wireless cards, video cards, displays, and other hardware working with my chosen distribution. Proprietary hardware often makes it difficult to determine why an Ethernet controller, wireless controller, or mouse performs differently than we expect.


read more

How to organize with Calculist: Ideas, events, and more

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

Thoughts. Ideas. Plans. We all have a few of them. Often, more than a few. And all of us want to make some or all of them a reality.

Far too often, however, those thoughts and ideas and plans are a jumble inside our heads. They refuse to take a discernable shape, preferring instead to rattle around here, there, and everywhere in our brains.


read more

Electronics designed in 5 different countries with open hardware

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

The Open Source Hardware Association's Hardware Registry lists hardware from 29 different countries on five continents, demonstrating the broad, international footprint of certified open source hardware.


read more

Level up command-line playgrounds with WebAssembly

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

WebAssembly (Wasm) is a new low-level language designed with the web in mind. Its main goal is to enable developers to compile code written in other languages—such as C, C++, and Rust—into WebAssembly and run that code in the browser. In an environment where JavaScript has traditionally been the only option, WebAssembly is an appealing counterpart, and it enables portability along with the promise for near-native runtimes.


read more

Simplifying organizational change: A guide for the perplexed

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Most organizational leaders have encountered a certain paralysis around efforts to implement culture change—perhaps because of perceived difficulty or the time necessary for realizing our work. But change is only as difficult as we choose to make it. In order to lead successful change efforts, we must simplify our understanding and approach to change.


read more

6 alternatives to OpsGenie for managing monitoring alerts

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Note from the Editor: the following is the author's point of view related to the topic of managing monitoring systems.

As organizations move toward a new generation of distributed systems and microservice architecture, the DevOps world finds it increasingly difficult to keep up with the hybrid needs of today's application monitoring, and the alerts it generates. Managing this aspect of IT infrastructure has DevOps professionals turning to up-and-coming serverless methodologies for this purpose.


read more

How to use Ansible to document procedures

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

"Documentation is a love letter that you write to your future self." —Damian Conway

I use Ansible as my personal notebook for documenting coding procedures—both the ones I use often and the ones I rarely use. This process facilitates my work and reduces the time it takes to do repetitive tasks, the ones where specific commands in a certain sequence are executed to accomplish a specific result.


read more

Inter-process communication in Linux: Sockets and signals

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the third and final article in a series about interprocess communication (IPC) in Linux. The first article focused on IPC through shared storage (files and memory segments), and the second article does the same for basic channels: pipes (named and unnamed) and message queues.


read more

Building a DNS-as-a-service with OpenStack Designate

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

Designate is a multi-tenant DNS-as-a-service that includes a REST API for domain and record management, a framework for integration with Neutron, and integration support for Bind9.

You would want to consider a DNSaaS for the following:


read more

Detecting malaria with deep learning

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Artificial intelligence (AI) and open source tools, technologies, and frameworks are a powerful combination for improving society. "Health is wealth" is perhaps a cliche, yet it's very accurate! In this article, we will examine how AI can be leveraged for detecting the deadly disease malaria with a low-cost, effective, and accurate open source deep learning solution.


read more

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Radiant Software, ASRock and Microsoft

  • Radiant 1.1 Lattice FPGA Design Tools Release Accelerates Design Reuse
    In addition to supporting Windows, Radiant Software 1.1 adds support for the popular Ubuntu LTS 16.4 distribution of Linux. Radiant Software 1.1 is now available for download from Lattices website and currently can be used with a free license.
  • ASRock spins Whiskey Lake-U in thin Mini-ITX, 3.5-inch, and NUC formats
    ASRock announced four products based on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U: a thin Mini-ITX “IMB-1216” board, a 3.5-inch “SBC-350,” and a NUC 4×4 form-factor “iBox-8365U” mini-PC and NUC-8365U mainboard. ASRock Industrial has been busy lately tapping the latest embedded-oriented x86 chips in products such as the Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U based iBox-8265U mini-PC, as well as the iBox-R1000 industrial PC and NUC-R1000 mainboard built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000. Now it has announced four more Whiskey Lake-U products aimed at the embedded market.
  • Making Sense of Microsoft’s Acquisition of Express Logic [Ed: Windows is worthless, so Microsoft is buying the competition. Microsoft also bought Danger, Sidekick etc. and it never ended well. Anything Microsoft touches turns to dust. When it bought Skype it was (back then) near-monopoly, but not anymore. Microsoft sometimes announces financial losses.]
    Even the Linux Foundation, home of the Linux kernel, hosts a project called Zephyr, which is an RTOS designed for use-cases, beyond the reach of Linux.

Events: Richard Stallman in Zurich (Switzerland), OpenStack Summit, Linux Fest Northwest

  • Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • SUSE CaaS Platform at Open Infrastructure Summit
    If you’re attending Open Infrastructure Summit this year and have in previous years as well, you might be noticing something a bit different; this year it’s not called OpenStack Summit. While we expect much of the talk will still be about OpenStack, we thought it might be a good idea to include other related technologies as well, like SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Cloud Application Platform – the two offerings that combine to form SUSE’s Application Delivery solution – and SUSE Enterprise Storage
  • Gearing Up for Linux Fest Northwest 2019!
    This next weekend (April 26-28th, 2019) I will be in Bellingham at Bellingham Technical College for Linux Fest Northwest to help at the Ubuntu table! I will be demonstrating Ubuntu Studio and my au…
  • Ubuntu Studio at Linux Fest Northwest 2019
    Council Chair Erich Eickmeyer will be in Bellingham, WA, USA this weekend for Linux Fest Northwest 2019, and will be bringing his audio setup to demonstrate Ubuntu Studio at the Ubuntu table. Check out the post on his personal blog!

today's howtos

Put the internet back under your control with the FreedomBox

On today's internet, most of us find ourselves locked into one service provider or the other. We find ourselves tied down to Apple, Facebook, Google, or Microsoft for our e-mail, social networking, calendering -- you name it. It doesn't have to be that way. The FreedomBox Foundation has just released its first commercially available FreedomBox: The Pioneer Edition FreedomBox Home Server Kit. With it, you -- not some company -- control over your internet-based services. The Olimex Pioneer FreedomBox costs less than $100 and is powered by a single-board computer (SBC), the open source hardware-based Olimex A20-OLinuXino-LIME2 board. This SBC is powered by a 1GHz A20/T2 dual core Cortex-A7 processor and dual-core Mali 400 GPU. It also comes with a Gigabyte of RAM, a high-speed 32GB micro SD card for storage with the FreedomBox software pre-installed, two USB ports, SATA-drive support, a Gigabit Ethernet port, and a backup battery. Doesn't sounds like much does it? But, here's the thing: You don't need much to run a personal server. Sure, some of us have been running our own servers at home, the office, or at a hosting site for ages. I'm one of those people. But, it's hard to do. What the FreedomBox brings to the table is the power to let almost anyone run their own server without being a Linux expert. The supplied FreedomBox software is based on Debian Linux. It's designed from the ground-up to make it as hard as possible for anyone to exploit your data. It does this by putting you in control of your own corner of the internet at home. Its simple user interface lets you host your own internet services with little expertise. Read more