Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSource.com

Syndicate content
Updated: 5 hours 48 min ago

New releases from Facebook and Google, CPTPP's potential open source impact, and more news

Saturday 23rd of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look new open source from Facebook and Google, the CPTPP's potential to harm open source, open source traffic management, and more.

Facebook and Google release more open source

Internet juggernauts Facebook and Google built their services with a lot of open source software. And while both companies are jealously guard their core code, they do release quite a bit of open source software.


read more

Take your computer on the go with Portable Apps

Friday 22nd of June 2018 07:02:00 AM

Portable Apps lets you access all your go-to apps anywhere, anytime—regardless of whether you are using your own computer or not.

With more than 400 apps, 980 million downloads, and available in 55 languages, Portable Apps allows you to access your favorites via a USB flash drive, a cloud folder, or just about any portable storage device. Portable Apps is like having your computer without having your computer.


read more

Cheaper textbooks and better access for higher ed students

Friday 22nd of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

Recently at the Texas Linux Fest, Ross Reedstrom introduced me to OpenStax. I've heard of a lot of open educational resources (OER) but not this particular one. It's certainly a project I'm going to follow now.


read more

7 tips for promoting your project and community on Twitter

Friday 22nd of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

Communicating in open source is about sharing information, engaging, and building community. Here I'll share techniques and best practices for using Twitter to reach your target audience. Whether you are just starting to use Twitter or have been playing around with it and need some new ideas, this article's got you covered.


read more

Troubleshooting a Buildah script

Thursday 21st of June 2018 07:03:00 AM

As both a father of teenagers and a software engineer, I spend most of my time dealing with problems. Whether the problem is large or small, many times you can't find the cause of an issue by looking directly at it. Instead, you need to step back and investigate the environment where the situation exists.


read more

How to connect to a remote desktop from Linux

Thursday 21st of June 2018 07:02:00 AM

A remote desktop, according to Wikipedia, is "a software or operating system feature that allows a personal computer's desktop environment to be run remotely on one system (usually a PC, but the concept applies equally to a server), while being displayed on a separate client device."


read more

Balancing transparency and privacy as big data meets HR

Thursday 21st of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

This is an exciting time for HR—the use of analytics is predictably changing the conversations and the perception around HR as a function. Most organizations are convinced of the role people analytics can play in making HR a strategic partner to the C-suite, thus firmly involved in the agenda of business transformation. While people analytics has been one of the most crucial tools to usher in this change, the unintended effect is that is has opened up a big debate about transparency vs. privacy in the workplace.


read more

16 blogs and newsletters to follow for DevOps practitioners

Thursday 21st of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

Keeping up with trends in the fast-paced world of technology is challenging. I might be dating myself, but I remember a time before there was a difference between front-end and back-end coders. Now, there is so much technology it makes little sense to try to keep up with everything.


read more

Anatomy of a perfect pull request

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 07:02:00 AM

Writing clean code is just one of many factors you should care about when creating a pull request.

Large pull requests cause a big overhead during the code review and can facilitate bugs in the codebase.

That's why you need to care about the pull request itself. It should be short, have a clear title and description, and do only one thing.


read more

Getting started with React Native animations

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

React Native animation is a popular topic for workshops and classes, perhaps because many developers find it challenging to work with. While many online blogs and resources focus on the performance aspects of React Native, few take you through the basics. In this article, I will discuss the fundamentals of how to implement React Native animations.

First, let's review some background and history.


read more

3 reasons cost isn't the best motivator for moving to the cloud

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

This article was co-written with Roel Hodzelmans.

Cloud hype is all around you—you're told it's critical to ensuring a digital future for your business. Whether you choose cloud, hybrid cloud, or hybrid multi-cloud, you have numerous decisions to make, even as you continue the daily work of enhancing your customers' experience and agile delivery of your applications (including legacy applications)—likely some of your business' most important resources.


read more

Where in the DevOps cycle do you do security?

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

Sometimes the title just gives away the answer. I’m a security guy, so this one is easy for me: the answer to "Where in the DevOps cycle do you do security?" is "everywhere". However, a couple of sentences doesn’t make a very compelling article, so I’ll go into a bit more detail.


read more

Try this vi setup to keep and organize your notes

Tuesday 19th of June 2018 07:03:00 AM

The idea of using vi to manage a wiki for your notes may seem unconventional, but when you're using vi in your daily work, it makes a lot of sense.


read more

A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts

Tuesday 19th of June 2018 07:02:00 AM

The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

These nine books—each one a recommendation from a member of our community—represent merely the beginning of an important journey toward greater and better openness.

But they sure are a great place to start.


read more

Getting started with Open edX to host your course

Tuesday 19th of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

Now in its seventh major release, the Open edX platform is a free and open source course management system that is used all over the world to host Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as well as smaller classes and training modules. To date, Open edX software has powered more than 8,000 original courses and 50 million course enrollments.


read more

How to reset, revert, and return to previous states in Git

Tuesday 19th of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

One of the lesser understood (and appreciated) aspects of working with Git is how easy it is to get back to where you were before—that is, how easy it is to undo even major changes in a repository. In this article, we'll take a quick look at how to reset, revert, and completely return to previous states, all with the simplicity and elegance of individual Git commands.


read more

Why agile teams fail, Bash tips, Emacs vs. Vim, 12 fiction reads for Linux fans, and other greatest hits

Monday 18th of June 2018 06:13:00 PM

Let's look back at the most popular reads from the week of June 11-17:


read more

5 open source alternatives to Dropbox

Monday 18th of June 2018 07:02:00 AM

Dropbox is the 800-pound gorilla of filesharing applications. Even though it's a massively popular tool, you may choose to use an alternative.

Maybe that's because you're dedicated to the open source way for all the good reasons, including security and freedom, or possibly you've been spooked by data breaches. Or perhaps the pricing plan doesn't work out in your favor for the amount of storage you actually need.


read more

Write fast apps with Pronghorn, a Java framework

Monday 18th of June 2018 07:01:00 AM

In 1973, Carl Hewitt had an idea inspired by quantum mechanics. He wanted to develop computing machines that were capable of parallel execution of tasks, communicating with each other seamlessly while containing their own local memory and processors.


read more

Support the uncommon women in your life

Monday 18th of June 2018 07:00:00 AM

One of Kelsey Merkley's goals is raising awareness and support for women, like her, who are involved in the open software and hardware movement. She is a leader in the Creative Commons, the founder of the UnCommon Women organization, and last year published the UnCommon Women Coloring Book with illustrations of 15 women leaders in the open movement.


read more

More in Tux Machines

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.