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Updated: 4 hours 44 min ago

The Linux terminal is no one-trick pony

15 hours 39 min ago

Welcome to another day of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.


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Tips for using Flood Element for performance testing

15 hours 41 min ago

In case you missed it, there’s a new performance test tool on the block: Flood Element. It’s a scalable, browser-based tool that allows you to write scripts in JavaScript that interact with web pages like a real user would.

Browser Level Users is a newer approach to load testing that overcomes many of the common challenges we hear about traditional methods of testing. It offers:


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Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science

15 hours 42 min ago

For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming.

So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices.


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Relax by the fire at your Linux terminal

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Welcome back. Here we are, just past the halfway mark at day 13 of our 24 days of Linux command-line toys. If this is your first visit to the series, see the link to the previous article at the bottom of this one, and take a look back to learn what it's all about. In short, our command-line toys are anything that's a fun diversion at the terminal.

Maybe some are familiar, and some aren't. Either way, we hope you have fun.


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One developer's road: Programming and mental illness

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

In early 1997, my dad bought a desktop PC pre-installed with Microsoft Windows 98. An 11-year-old elementary school student at the time, I started learning the applications. Six months later, we got internet access using a dial-up modem, and I learned the basics of accessing the World Wide Web and discovered Netscape Navigator.


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Podman and user namespaces: A marriage made in heaven

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Podman, part of the libpod library, enables users to manage pods, containers, and container images. In my last article, I wrote about Podman as a more secure way to run containers. Here, I'll explain how to use Podman to run containers in separate user namespaces.


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Preventing "Revenge of the Ancillaries" in DevOps

Thursday 13th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

In "Why Doctors Hate Their Computers," Atul Gawande describes the frustration medical professionals experience when the requirements imposed by the electronic health records (EHR) system they must use to annotate their patient interactions get in the way of those same patient interactions. Sumit Rana, a senior vice president of EHR company Epic, called one of the more frustrating problems "the Revenge of the Ancillaries." Gawande wrote:


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Patch into The Matrix at the Linux command line

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

You've found your way to today's entry from the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be wondering what a command-line toy even is? It's anything that's an entertaining diversion at the terminal, be it a game, a fun utility, or a simple distraction.

Some of these are classics, and some are completely new (at least to me), but I hope all of you find something you enjoy in this series.


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Top 5 configuration management tools

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

DevOps is evolving and gaining traction as organizations discover how it enables them to produce better applications and reduce their software products' time to market.

DevOps' core values are Culture, Automation, Measurement, and Sharing (CAMS), and an organization's adherence to them influences how successful it is.


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Taking notes with Standard Notes

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Online note-taking tools seem to have bloomed like 100 flowers. The tallest ones in that garden are usually proprietary, closed source applications like Evernote, Zoho Notebook, Google Keep, and Notion.


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5 resolutions for open source project maintainers

Wednesday 12th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

I'm generally not big on New Year's resolutions. I have no problem with self-improvement, of course, but I tend to anchor around other parts of the calendar. Even so, there's something about taking down this year's free calendar and replacing it with next year's that inspires some introspection.

In 2017, I resolved to not share articles on social media until I'd read them. I've kept to that pretty well, and I'd like to think it has made me a better citizen of the internet. For 2019, I'm thinking about resolutions to make me a better open source software maintainer.


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Winterize your Bash prompt in Linux

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:03:00 AM

Hello once again for another installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is? Really, we're keeping it pretty open-ended: It's anything that's a fun diversion at the terminal, and we're giving bonus points for anything holiday-themed.

Maybe you've seen some of these before, maybe you haven't. Either way, we hope you have fun.


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40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year.


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An introduction to Kubeflow

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Model construction and training are just a small part of supporting machine learning (ML) workflows. Other things you need to address include porting your data to an accessible format and location; data cleaning and feature engineering; analyzing your trained models; managing model versioning; scalably serving your trained models; and avoiding training/serving skew. This is particularly the case when the workflows need to be portable and consistently repeatable and have many moving parts that need to be integrated.


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Companies behind on digital transformation get ahead with open leaders

Tuesday 11th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

(Editor's note: The newest volume in the Open Organization book series, The Open Organization Leaders Manual, Second Edition, debuts today at Opensource.com. This is the book's introduction.)


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Fun on the Linux command-line, Ansible, DevOps, best books, and more

Monday 10th of December 2018 06:25:00 PM

The first few installments in our 24 days of fun Linux command-line tricks dominated our top 10 list last week. 

Do you have a suggestion for the list? Leave a comment on one of the articles or shoot us a note: open@opensource.com.

Stay up on what's going on with Opensource.com by subscribing to our highlights newsletter.


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When Linux required installation parties

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:02:00 AM

I studied math in college. Back then, ordinarily, math students didn't have access to the computer lab; pen and paper were all we needed to do our work. But for my one required programming class, I got access to the college computer lab.

It was running SunOS with remote X terminals (this was circa 1996). I immediately fell in love with Unix. I fell in love with the command line, X Windows, the utilities—all of it.


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How to build deep learning inference through Knative serverless framework

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:01:00 AM

Deep learning is gaining tremendous momentum in certain academic and industry circles. Inference—the capability to retrieve information from real-world data based on pre-trained models—is at the core of deep learning applications.


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How to get started in AI

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

I've both asked and been asked about the best way to learn more about artificial intelligence (AI). What should I read? What should I watch? I'll get to that. But, first, it's useful to break down this question, given that AI covers a lot of territory.

One important distinction to draw is between the research side of AI and the applied side. Cassie Kozyrkov of Google drew this distinction in a talk at the recent O'Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference in London, and it's a good one.


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Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Monday 10th of December 2018 08:00:00 AM

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal.

We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake!


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More in Tux Machines

Games: Metropolisim, Monster Prom, Kingdom Two Crowns and Lots More

  • Metropolisim aims to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever, will have Linux support
    Metropolisim from developer Halfway Decent Games is releasing next year, with a pretty bold aim to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever.
  • Monster Prom, the dating sim that won me over is now available on GOG
    Visual novels and dating sims aren't something I'm usually into, however Monster Prom is actually funny and worth playing and it's now available on GOG. I know we have a number of GOG fans here, so hopefully this will be interesting for you. As always, we try to treat all stores equally with release info.
  • Kingdom Two Crowns will be coming to Linux after all with the Quality of Life update
    Kingdom Two Crowns, the third in the Kingdom series released recently for Windows and Mac. It looked like we weren't getting it, but it's now confirmed to be coming. In their new roadmap post on Reddit and Steam, under the "QoL #01 Update" (Quality of Life Update) they noted that they will add "Add SteamOS (Linux) Support". This update is due out sometime early next year. This is really nice news, it's good to know they didn't give up on supporting Linux after all.
  • Steam Link for the Raspberry Pi is now officially available
    After a rather short beta period, the Steam Link application for the Raspberry Pi is now officially out.
  • Valve in it for the 'long haul' with Artifact, first update out and a progression system due soon
    Artifact, the big new card game from Valve isn't doing so well but Valve won't be giving up any time soon. The first major update is out, with a progression system due soon. At release, it had around sixty thousand people playing and that very quickly dropped down hard. Harder than I expected, a lot worse than Valve probably thought it would too.
  • Bearded Giant Games open their own store with a 'Linux First Initiative'
    Bearded Giant Games, developer of Ebony Spire Heresy have announced their new online store along with a 'Linux First Initiative'. I know what you're thinking already "not another store", but fear not. For now, it's mainly going to be a place for them to sell their games directly. Speaking about it in a blog post, they mentioned how they hate having to check over multiple forums, channels, emails and so on to stay up to date and they wish "to spend more time giving love to my projects instead of updating 4 different distribution channels, translating pages, writing different press releases and making separate builds"—can't argue against that.
  • The Forgotten Sanctum, the final DLC for Pillars of Eternity II is out along with a patch
    Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire expansions come to a close with the release of The Forgotten Sanctum along with a major update now out.
  • Pre-order Meeple Station for instant beta access, what the developers say is like Rimworld in space
    Meeple Station, the space station building sim that the developers say is like Rimworld in space can now be pre-ordered with instant beta access. While we don't like the idea of pre-orders, getting access to the beta right away is a decent way to do it. Sadly, their Kickstarter campaign actually failed which I didn't notice. Making sure that wasn't the end of it, the developer Vox Games decided to go the Early Access route. They weren't left out in the cold of space though, as they also recently announced that Indie DB will be publishing their game. Under the label of Modularity, this will be the first title published by Indie DB.
  • Heroes of Newerth drops support for Linux and Mac
    Heroes of Newerth, the MOBA originally from S2 Games which is now handled by Frostburn Studios has dropped Linux and Mac support. [...] I'll be honest here, I couldn't care less about it personally. The last time i tried it, it was the single most toxic experience I've ever had in an online game. I've played a lot of online games and even so it was still at a level I had not seen before. I tried to go back to it a few times, never with a happy ending. Still, sad for any remaining Linux (and Mac) fans of the game. Looking over some statistics, it's not popular with viewers either. Around 180 on Twitch compared with nearly 100K for League of Legends and over 50K for Dota 2.
  • Unity 2018.3 With HDR Render Pipeline Preview, Updated PhysX & More
    Unity Tech is ending out the year with their Unity 2018.3 game engine update that brings a number of new features and improvements to its many supported platforms.

Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
  • Just when you think you can stop drinking, Wine 4.0 has another release candidate available
    Just before the weekend hits you in the face like a bad hangover when you realise it's Monday already, there's another bottle of Wine ready for you. Of course, we're not talking about the tasty liquid! Put down the glass, it's the other kind of Wine. The one used to run your fancy Windows programs and games on Linux. Doing their usual thing, developer Alexandre Julliard announced that the Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2 is officially out the door today. While this release is nothing spectacular it is an important one, the more bugs they're able to tick off the list the better the 4.0 release will be for more people to use it.

Android Leftovers

A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it's time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year. For getting a look at the performance, on four different systems (two Xeon boxes, a Core i5, and Core i7 systems), the performance was compared from Clear Linux at the end of 2017 to the current rolling-release state as of this week. Read more