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Updated: 1 hour 53 min ago

How to use Email Encryption in Ubuntu

3 hours 4 min ago
In this article, we are going to learn how to use email encryption with Thunderbird, OpenPGP, and Enigmail in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

How to Manage ConfigServer Security and Firewall (CSF) From Linux Command Line?

5 hours 15 min ago
2DayGeek: csf firewall prevents Linux server from unnecessary attack.

Modifying Windows local accounts with Fedora and chntpw

7 hours 27 min ago
I recently encountered a problem at work where a client’s Windows 10 PC lost trust to the domain. The user is an executive and the hindrance of his computer can affect real-time mission-critical tasks. He gave me 30 minutes to resolve the issue while he attended a meeting. Needless to say, I’ve encountered this issue […]

FLOSS Weekly 538: Leo Laporte

9 hours 38 min ago
Randal Schwartz and Jonathan Bennett talk to Leo Laporte about FLOSS's history and the TWiT Network.

Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

11 hours 50 min ago
I have spent the first three parts of this series describing the evolution and current state of Flash storage. I also described how to configure an NVMe over Fabric (NVMeoF) storage network to export NVMe volumes across RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) and again over native TCP. But what does the future of memory technologies look like? As memory technologies continue to evolve, the method in which you plug that technology into your computers will evolve with it.

Buying a Linux-ready laptop

Saturday 20th of July 2019 04:49:15 AM
Recently, I bought and started using a Tuxedo Book BC1507, a Linux laptop computer. Ten years ago, if someone had told me that, by the end of the decade, I could buy top-quality, "penguin-ready" laptops from companies such as System76, Slimbook, and Tuxedo, I probably would have laughed. Well, now I[he]#039[/he]m laughing, but with joy!

How To Set Timezone And Enable Network Time Sync (NTP) From The Command Line

Saturday 20th of July 2019 02:37:43 AM
This article explains how to use timedatectl to change the timezone and enable automatic synchronization of the system clock with a remote server using the NTP (Network Time Synchronization) protocol on Linux.

Powered by Plasma: ALBA Synchrotron in Barcelona, Spain

Saturday 20th of July 2019 12:26:12 AM
We’re always looking for interesting stories from people who use KDE software at their workplace, in school, or in government institutions. You can imagine our delight, then, when we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at this year’s FOSDEM. Sergi is a Controls Software Engineer at ALBA, a KDE user, and a Free software advocate and contributor. Not only was he willing to tell us about his favorite KDE apps, but he also works at one of the most amazing places on Earth! In this interview, he tells us what it’s like to work at ALBA, and answers the burning question: “what even is a synchrotron?”.

Use HackMD to collaborate on open source projects

Friday 19th of July 2019 10:14:41 PM
HackMD.io is an open source, collaborative Markdown editor. It allows people to share, comment, and collaborate on documents. As open source software, users can choose between using the online platform or installing it as a local service using the upstream project CodiMD.

Installing Microsoft's fonts on Solus

Friday 19th of July 2019 08:03:10 PM
Times New Roman, Arial, are one of the most popular fonts that are created by Microsoft.Solus, by default, does not include the major Microsoft fontsSo in this tutorial i will show you how to install MS Fonts pack on Solus.

Maestral Is A New Open Source Dropbox Client For Linux And macOS

Friday 19th of July 2019 03:40:08 PM
Maestral is a new open source Dropbox client for macOS and Linux, that's currently in beta. Its porpose is to have a Dropbox client that supports syncing to drives which use Btrfs, Ext3, ZFS, XFS or encrypted filesystems. It's also a lot lighter than the official Dropbox client.

Shrinking Linux Attack Surfaces

Friday 19th of July 2019 02:25:48 PM
Often, a kernel developer will try to reduce the size of an attack surface against Linux, even if it can't be closed entirely. It's generally a toss-up whether such a patch makes it into the kernel. Linus Torvalds always prefers security patches thatreally close a hole, rather than just give attackers a slightly harder time of it.

No love lost between security specialists and developers

Friday 19th of July 2019 01:11:28 PM
GitLab finds 68% of security professionals feel that less than half of developers can spot security vulnerabilities, but most people feel it[he]#039[/he]s a programmer[he]#039[/he]s job to write secure code.

Enable bootsplash on Manjaro

Friday 19th of July 2019 11:57:08 AM
If you use Manjaro and you like to have a harmonic and beautiful Linux system from boot to desktop, follow me as i will show you in this tutorial how to enable and configure the bootsplash screen on Manjaro. Let's go

Episode 23: Advertisers: Don't Be Creepy

Friday 19th of July 2019 09:28:27 AM
Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Linux Journal's Danna Vedder about the current state of advertising.

IBM / Red Hat, Ubuntu & Nvidia, Firefox, Kdenlive, Syncthing, Huawei, Valve | This Week in Linux 74

Friday 19th of July 2019 08:14:07 AM
On this episode of This Week in Linux, AMD releases BIOS fix for the Linux booting issue, IBM closes on the landmark acquisition of Red Hat,and Ubuntu announces that Ubuntu LTS users will be getting the latest nvidia drivers much more easily.......................

Setup Zsh + Powerline on Solus

Friday 19th of July 2019 06:59:47 AM
Have you asked yourself ? What is Zsh ? And why should I use it ? If yes, I will answer you briefly.The Z shell (Zsh) is a Unix shell that can be used as an interactive login shell and as a command interpreter for shell scripting. Zsh is an extended Bourne shell with a large number of improvements, including some features of Bash, ksh, and tcsh.If you are using Solus and you decided to switch your shell from bash to Zsh, I will show you how to Setup Zsh + Powerline on Solus.

Public Statement on Neutrality of Free Software

Friday 19th of July 2019 05:45:27 AM
F-Droid abandons neutrality to censor Gab oriented apps.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Hideki Yamane: Debian 10 "buster" release party @Tokyo (7/7)

    We ate a delicious cake to celebrate Debian 10 "buster" release, at party in Tokyo (my employer provided the venue, cake and wine. Thanks to SIOS Technology, Inc.! :)

  • First Global Students Open Source Conference to Bring Together Next-Generation Tech Community

    Open-source software is a piece of software whose source code is distributed, modified and reused by the public with a few restrictions. The emphasis of open-source development on freedom, collaboration and community appeals to Silicon Valley companies and student organizations alike.

  • Zstd 1.4.1 Further Improves Decode Speed, Other Optimizations

    Zstd 1.4.1 is out today as a maintenance release to Facebook's Zstandard compression algorithm but with this update comes even more performance optimizations.  [...] This Zstd release also has several bug fixes including for niche use-cases where it could hit a rare data corruption bug. There are also build system updates and documentation improvements. 

  • Kubernetes As A Service On Bare Metal | Boris Renski

    Mirantis is one of those companies that continues to evolve with change times. Mirantis is now upping its Kubernetes game by offering Kubernetes as a service that supports bare metal. Mirantis CMO and co-founder Boris Renski explains the service in this interview.

  • YugaByte Commits to 100 Percent Open Source with Apache 2.0 License

    Version 2.0 Release Candidate of YugaByte Distributed SQL DB Available; First Product Available Under License Created by the Polyform Project.

  • Databases adopt open licenses, JavaScript gets faster on Android, governments use more OSS, and more news

    In the last year, a handful of major open source database vendors have tightened their grip on their code to try to remain competitive. Two vendors have bucked that trend and have gone all in on open source. The first of those is Cloudera, which announced that it's making "closed license components of its products open source" under the AGPL and Apache 2.0 license. While Cloudera's executives said they "had been mulling a modified open source license" like the one adopted by some of their competitors, they decided to go open and to adopt a "licensing/subscription approach" that closely mirrors that of Red Hat. Distributed database vendor YugaByte also adopted an Apache 2.0 license, making its wares fully open source. That move brings "previously commercial-only, closed-source features such as Distributed Backups, Data Encryption, and Read Replicas into the open source core project." That code is available in the project's GitHub repository.

  • Why Carl Malamud's Latest Brilliant Project, To Mine The World's Research Papers, Is Based In India

    Carl Malamud is one of Techdirt's heroes. We've been writing about his campaign to liberate US government documents and information for over ten years now. The journal Nature has a report on a new project of his, which is in quite a different field: academic knowledge. The idea will be familiar to readers of this site: to carry out text and data mining (TDM) on millions of academic articles, in order to discover new knowledge. It's a proven technique with huge potential to produce important discoveries. That raises the obvious question: if large-scale TDM of academic papers is so powerful, why hasn't it been done before? The answer, as is so often the case, is that copyright gets in the way. 

Security Leftovers

  • Researchers Build App That Kills To Highlight Insulin Pump Exploit

    By now the half-baked security in most internet of things (IOT) devices has become a bit of a running joke, leading to amusing Twitter accounts like Internet of Shit that highlight the sordid depth of this particular apathy rabbit hole. And while refrigerators leaking your gmail credentials and tea kettles that expose your home networks are entertaining in their own way, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that the same half-assed security in the IOT space also exists on most home routers, your car, your pacemaker, and countless other essential devices and services your life may depend on. Case in point: just about two years ago, security researchers discovered some major vulnerabilities Medtronic's popular MiniMed and MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps. At a talk last year, they highlighted how a hacker could trigger the pumps to either withhold insulin doses, or deliver a lethal dose of insulin remotely. But while Medtronic and the FDA warned customers about the vulnerability and issued a recall over time, security researchers Billy Rios and Jonathan Butts found that initially, nobody was doing much to actually fix or replace the existing devices. [...] And of course that's not just a problem in the medical sector, but most internet-connected tech sectors. As security researcher Bruce Schneier often points out, it's part of a cycle of dysfunction where the consumer and the manufacturer of a flawed product have already moved on to the next big purchase, often leaving compromised products, and users, in a lurch. And more often than not, when researchers are forced to get creative to highlight the importance of a particular flaw, the companies in question enjoy shooting the messenger.

  • Desktop Operating Systems: Which is the safest? [Ed: This shallow article does not discuss NSA back doors and blames on "Linux" devices with open ports and laughable passwords -- based on narrative often pushed by corporate media to give illusion of parity. Also pushes the lie of Linux having minuscule usage.]
  • How Open Source Data Can Protect Consumer Credit Card Information
  • Open Source Hacking Tool Grows Up

    An open source white-hat hacking tool that nation-state hacking teams out of China, Iran, and Russia have at times employed to avoid detection....

Games: Dota Underlords and Stadia

  • Dota Underlords has another update out, this one changes the game quite a lot

    Valve continue to tweak Dota Underlords in the hopes of keeping players happy, this mid-Season gameplay update flips quite a few things on their head. I like their sense of humour, with a note about them removing "code that caused crashes and kept code that doesn't cause crashes". There's a few smaller changes like the addition of Loot Round tips to the Season Info tab, the ability to change equipped items from the Battle Pass and some buffs to the amount XP awarded for your placement in matches and for doing the quests. Meaning you will level up the Battle Pass faster.

  • Interested in Google's Stadia game streaming service? We have a few more details now

    With Google's game streaming service Stadia inching closer, we have some more information to share about it. Part of this, is thanks to a recent AMA (Ask Me Anything) they did on Reddit. I've gone over what questions they answered, to give you a little overview. Firstly, a few points about the Stadia Pro subscription: The Pro subscription is not meant to be like a "Netflix for Games", something people seem to think Stadia will end up as. Google said to think of it more like Xbox Live Gold or Playstation Plus. They're aiming to give Pro subscribers one free game a month "give or take". If you cancel Stadia Pro, you will lose access to free games claimed. However, you will get the previously claimed games back when you re-subscribe but not any you missed while not subscribed. As for Stadia Base, as expected there will be no free games included. As already confirmed, both will let you buy games as normal.

LabPlot has got some beautifying and lots of datasets

Hello everyone! The second part of this year's GSoC is almost over, so I was due to let you know the progress made in the last 3 weeks. I can assure you we haven't lazed since then. I think I managed to make quite good progress, so everything is going as planned, or I could say that even better. If you haven't read about this year's project or you just want to go through what has already been accomplished you can check out my previous post. So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots. The first step was to improve the welcome screen and make it easily usable, dynamic, clean and intuitive for users. This step was very important since the welcome screen is what the users will first get in contact with when they start using LabPlot. Read more