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Thursday, 23 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 2:33pm
Story AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT Linux Gaming Performance Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 2:17pm
Story Can the Linux Foundation Speak for Free Software? Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 2:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 2:06pm
Story bandwhich Shows What's Taking Up Your Network Bandwidth On Linux And macOS Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 12:52pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 12:23pm
Story Games: Steam Client, Slay the Spire and DASH (Danger Action Speed Heroes) Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 12:15pm
Story Need a distraction-free art application on Linux? Try out MyPaint Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 12:11pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 11:19am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 10:47am

The Performance Cost To SELinux On Fedora 31

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the recent AppArmor performance regression in Linux 5.5 (since resolved), some Phoronix readers had requested tests out of curiosity in looking at the performance impact of Fedora's decision to utilize SELinux by default. Here is how the Fedora Workstation 31 performance compares out-of-the-box with SELinux to disabling it.

By default Fedora runs with SELinux enabled in an enforcing and targeted mode. But by booting with selinux=0 as a kernel parameter or editing /etc/selinux/config it's possible to outright disable the Security Enhanced Linux functionality or change its operating mode.

Read more

Events: XDC2020, SUSECON and Xen Project Developer & Design Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • X.Org's XDC2020 May Abandon Poland Conference To Find More Welcoming European Location

    Hopefully you didn't yet book your tickets to XDC2020 as the annual X.Org conference as the venue -- and host country for that matter -- may change.

    The annual X.Org Developers' Conference flips each year between different venues in North American and Europe. Last year it was announced XDC2020 would be hosted in Gdansk, Poland by a local Polish crew at Intel. But now that decision is being reassessed over finding a more welcoming and inclusive country for the event.

  • Top 5 Reasons Why You CAN’T MISS SUSECON 2020

    A new year, a new decade, and a new SUSE (now fully independent), all coalesce to a new SUSECON—bigger, more inspiring, and more focused on the world we live in than ever before. Like a pot of gold, SUSECON 2020 will be full of life-enhancing moments to make your world better. Here are the top five riches you have to look forward to when the rainbow lands in Dublin, March 23 – 27, 2020.

  • Xen Project Design and Developer Summit: Registration and CFP Open Now!

    Starting today, registration and Call for Proposals officially opens for the Xen Project Developer & Design Summit. This year’s Summit, taking place from June 2nd through the 4th at the PRECIS Center in Bucharest, Romania, will bring together the Xen Project community of developers and power users to share ideas, latest developments, and experiences, as well as offer opportunities to plan and collaborate on all things Xen Project.

    If you’d like to present a talk at the Summit, the Call For Proposals is open now and will close Friday, March 6, 2020.

    The Xen Summit brings together key developers in this community and is an ideal sponsorship opportunity. If you are interested in sponsoring this year’s event, check out the Sponsorship Page. For information regarding registration, speaking opportunities and sponsorships, head over the event website and learn more!

This Cool Cyberpunk Desktop is Easy to Recreate on Kubuntu

Filed under
KDE

Arguably the most striking feature of this neo-noir desktop in the video above is the vivid live wallpaper. Atmospheric, this instantly instills an edgy, futuristic vibe reminiscent of films like Blade Runner, Dark City, and eXistenZ.

I am even more impressed by easy it is to recreate the whole look (assuming you’re running KDE Plasma desktop) for yourself.

On a regular Ubuntu desktop with GNOME Shell setting up a live wallpaper requires some a bit of effort (installing an unmaintained app from a random repo or getting tricksy with mpv, fining the numbers and deftly placing enough hyphens).

Read more

AMD: Ryzen, AMDGPU and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • ASUS TUF Laptops With Ryzen Are Now Patched To Stop Overheating On Linux

    The AMD Ryzen Linux laptop experience continues improving albeit quite tardy on some elements of the support. In addition to the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver finally being released and current/voltage reporting for Zen CPUs on Linux, another step forward in Ryzen mobile support is a fix for ASUS TUF laptops with these processors.

  • AMD Sends In A Bunch Of Fixes For Linux 5.6 Along With Pollock Support

    After already several rounds of feature work queued in DRM-Next for Linux 5.6, AMD has submitted a final batch of feature work for this next kernel as it concerns their AMDGPU graphics driver.

    While Linux 5.6's merge window isn't opening until around the start of February, with RC6 having come, it effectively marks an end to the feature window of DRM-Next for targeting the next kernel. AMD's final pull request is mostly centered on fixes plus a few other extras and also enabling AMD Pollock display/graphics support for that forthcoming hardware.

  • The AMD Ryzen Thermal / Power Linux Reporting Improvements Working Well - V2 Up For Testing

    A few days ago I reported on AMD's "k10temp" Linux kernel driver finally seeing the ability to report CCD temperatures and CPU current/voltage readings as a big improvement to this hardware monitoring driver. The work hasn't yet been queued for inclusion into the mainline kernel, but initial testing is working well and a second revision to the patches has been sent out.

    Linux HWMON maintainer Guenter Roeck who spearheaded this work independent of AMD sent out the "v2" k10temp driver improvements on Saturday. This allows core complex tie temperature reporting for Zen 2 CPUs and allows current and voltage reporting for Ryzen CPUs. While this information has long been available to Windows users, sadly it's not been the case for Linux at least as far as mainline drivers go -- the out-of-tree Zenpower driver and other third-party attempts have been available but nothing mainline.

Intel's OSPray 2.0 Ray-Tracing Engine Released

Filed under
Hardware
Software

An area where Intel continues striking with rhythm and near perfection is on the open-source software front with their countless speedy and useful open-source innovations that often go unmatched as well as timely hardware support. Out this weekend is their OSPray 2.0 release for this damn impressive ray-tracing engine.

OSPray 2.0 is out as their latest big upgrade to this open-source ray-tracing engine that supports photo-realistic global illumination, MPI for exploiting large system performance, volume rendering, and is all open-source software. OSPray 2.0 is another big advancement for this project that is part of Intel's growing oneAPI tool-kit.

Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • webcompat.com: Project belt-on.

    So last week, on Friday (Japanese time), I woke up with a website being half disabled and then completely disabled. We had been banned by GitHub because of illegal content we failed to flag early enough. And GitHub did what they should do.

    Oh… and last but not least… mike asked me what Belt-on meant. I guess so let's make it more explicit.

  • Units of Measure in Rust with Refinement Types

    Years ago, Andrew Kennedy published a foundational paper about a type checker for units of measure, and later implemented it for F#. To this day, F# is the only mainstream programming language which provides first class support to make sure that you will not accidentally confuse meters and feet, euros and dollars, but that you can still convert between watts·hours and joules.

  • This post focuses on the work I accomplished as part of the Treeherder team during the last half of last year.

    The Taskcluster team requested that we stop ingesting tasks from the taskcluster-treeherder service and instead use the official Taskcluster Pulse exchanges (see work in bug 1395254). This required rewriting their code from Javascript to Python and integrate it into the Treeherder project. This needed to be accomplished by July since the Taskcluster migration would leave the service in an old set up without much support. Integrating this service into Treeherder gives us more control over all Pulse messages getting into our ingestion pipeline without an intermediary service. The project was accomplished ahead of the timeline. The impact is that the Taskcluster team had one less system to worry about ahead of their GCP migration.

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The tiniest of Python templating engines

    In someone else's project (which they'll doubtless tell you about themselves when it?s done) I needed a tiny Python templating engine. That is: I wanted to be able to say, here is a template string, please substitute a bunch of variables into it. Now, Python already does this, in about thirty different ways, and str.format or string.Template do most of it as built-in.

  • How to set a variable in Django template
  • Why ASGI is Replacing WSGI in Django

    When I first learnt about how to deploy my Django website. I took the easy route which was deploying it on Heroku.

    There's literally tons of tutorial on how the process of deploying it work. Heck, there was even a book about the benefits of deploying Django using Heroku.

    Soon in my own work, I needed to deploy my own Django project. It was working well for a bundled development grade web server. I thought to myself, why not find a better way on a production-grade web server. Instead of just a miserable default web server that is not production-grade.

    My journey in searching on deploying Django started for me. Which if you look at multiple tutorial references they still suggest the use of Heroku or Digital Ocean.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxi) stackoverflow python report
  • Understand predicate pushdown on row group level in Parquet with pyarrow and python

    We are using the NY Taxi Dataset throughout this blog post because it is a real world dataset, has a reasonable size and some nice properties like different datatypes and includes some messy data (like all real world data engineering problems).

MNT Reform 2 Open Source DIY Arm Linux Modular Laptop Coming Soon (Crowdfunding)

Filed under
Linux
OSS

We first covered MNT Reform in fall of 2017, when it was a prototype for a DIY and modular laptop powered by NXP i.MX 6QuadPlus processor, and with plans to eventually use i.MX 8 hexa-core processor.

Last year they designed several beta units of Reform to get feedback for a dozen users, and have now fully redesigned the laptop based on an NXP i.MX 8M system-on-module with the crowdfunding campaign expected to go live in February on Crowd Supply.

The goals of the project are to provide an open-source hardware laptop that avoids binary blobs as much as possible and is environmentally friendly. These goals guided many of the technical decisions.

For example, there are many NXP i.MX 8M SoM’s, but MNT selected Nitrogen8M as the schematics are available after registration on Boundary Devices website, and that means people wanting to create their own module compatible with Reform 2 could do so.

Read more

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • [Ubuntu] Design and Web team summary – 17 January 2020

    The second iteration of this year is the last one before our mid-cycle sprint next week.

    Here’s a short summary of the work the squads in the Web & Design team completed in the last 2-week iteration.

  • 5 key steps to take your IoT device to market

    IoT businesses are notoriously difficult to get off the ground. No matter how good your product is or how good your team is, some of the biggest problems you will face are just in getting to market and maintaining your devices once they’re in the field. The webinar will take a look at how Canonical’s Brand Store product allows you to get to market while catering for long term problems and the need to keep your product up to date in the future.

    More specifically, this webinar will look at the common problems we see organisations facing on their way to getting an IoT device to market, and cover five key steps to solve these problems. Along the way we will dig a little into serval case studies Canonical has done with various customers and partners to show you what has already been achieved with these solutions.

  • Fake cases — make sure yours is the real deal

    We’ve had some reports of people finding cases that pretend to be official Raspberry Pi products online — these are fakes, they’re violating our trademark, they’re not made very well, and they’re costing you and us money that would otherwise go to fund the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable work. (Reminder, for those who are new to this stuff: we’re a not-for-profit, which means that every penny we makes goes to support our work in education, and that none of us gets to own a yacht.)

  • Let’s Talk With Neal Gompa of Fedora @ openSUSE Conference

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, we sat down with Neal Gompa of the Fedora community at openSUSE Conference

  • FOSSCOMM 2019 aftermath

    FOSSCOMM (Free and Open Source Software Communities Meeting) is a Greek conference aiming at free-software and open-source enthusiasts, developers, and communities. This year was held at Lamia from October 11 to October 13.

    It is a tradition for me to attend this conference. Usually, I have presentations and of course, booths to inform the attendees about the projects I represent.

    This year the structure of the conference was kind of different. Usually, the conference starts on Friday with a "beer event". Now it started with registration and a presentation. Personally, I made my plan to leave Thessaloniki by bus. It took me about 4 hours on the road. So when I arrived, I went to my hotel and then waited for Pantelis to go to University and set up our booths.

  • Fugue open sources Regula to evaluate Terraform for security misconfigurations and compliance violations

    Regula rules are written in Rego, the open source policy language employed by the Open Policy Agent project and can be integrated into CI/CD pipelines to prevent cloud infrastructure deployments that may violate security and compliance best practices.

    “Developers design, build, and modify their own cloud infrastructure environments, and they increasingly own the security and compliance of that infrastructure,” said Josh Stella, co-founder and CTO of Fugue.

    “Fugue builds solutions that empower engineers operating in secure and regulated cloud environments, and Regula quickly and easily checks that their Terraform scripts don’t violate policy—before they deploy infrastructure.”

  • Finance goes agile as open source checks the security box

    “At Northwestern Mutual, we’ve finally gotten past that curve,” said Sean Corkum (pictured, right), senior engineer at Northwestern Mutual. “Now we’re trying to make it even easier for our internal developers to participate in open source … and contribute more to the community.”

  • Top NLP Open Source Projects For Developers In 2020
  • Kiwi TCMS: Project roadmap 2020

    Hello testers, the Kiwi TCMS team sat down together last week and talked about what we feel is important for us during the upcoming year. This blog post outlines our roadmap for 2020!

  • Shift on Stack: api_port failure
  • How To Git Commit With Message

Proprietary Software and Openwashing

Filed under
Software
Security
  • Boeing discovers new software problem in 737 Max

    The news comes following the release of internal documents showing employees knew about problems with pilot training for the 737 MAX and tried to conceal them from regulators. In the documents released by US lawmakers, Boeing employees said the aircraft was "designed by clowns, who in turn are supervised by monkeys," in an apparent reference to regulators.

  • A Georgia election server was vulnerable to Shellshock and may have been hacked

    Forensic evidence shows signs that a Georgia election server may have been hacked ahead of the 2016 and 2018 elections by someone who exploited Shellshock, a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over vulnerable systems, a computer security expert said in a court filing on Thursday.

    Shellshock came to light in September 2014 and was immediately identified as one of the most severe vulnerabilities to be disclosed in years. The reasons: it (a) was easy to exploit, (Cool gave attackers the ability to remotely run commands and code of their choice, and (c) opened most Linux and Unix systems to attack. As a result, the flaw received widespread news coverage for months.

  • Micro Focus AD Bridge 2.0: Extending security policies and access controls to cloud-based Linux

    With AD Bridge 2.0, organizations can leverage existing infrastructure authentication, security as well as policy, in order to simplify the migration of on-premises Linux Active Directory to the cloud, resulting in fully secured and managed Linux virtual machines in the cloud.

  • [Attacker] stole [sic] over 10,000 hospital files

    Jason Corden-Bowen, of the CPS, said: “Moonie had no right to access confidential patient and staff records. He admitted his earlier wrongdoing and accepted a police caution yet he went ahead to reoffend knowing fully well it was not just against hospital procedures but it was wrong and illegal.

  • Facebook Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Platform

    Facebook has announced that it will be making its wav2letter@anywhere online speech recognition framework more readily available as an open source platform. The framework was developed by Facebook AI Research (FAIR), which claims that it has created the fastest open source automatic speech recognition (ASR) platform currently on the market.

  • Microsoft opens up Rust-inspired Project Verona programming language on GitHub

What's your favorite Linux terminal trick?

Filed under
Linux

The beginning of a new year is always a great time to evaluate new ways to become more efficient. Many people try out new productivity tools or figure out how to optimize their most mundane processes. One area to assess is the terminal. Especially in the world of open source, there are tons of ways to make life at the terminal more efficient (and fun!) with shortcuts and commands.

We asked our writers about their favorite terminal trick. They shared their time-saving tips and even a fun terminal Easter egg. Will you adopt one of these keyboard shortcuts or command line hacks? Do you have a favorite you'd like to share? Tell us about it by taking our poll or leaving a comment.

Read more

One open source chat tool to rule them all

Filed under
OSS

Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using.

Instant messaging and chat have become a staple of the online world. And if you are like me, you probably have about five or six different apps running to talk to your friends, co-workers, and others. It really is a pain to keep up with it all. Thankfully, you can use one app (OK, two apps) to consolidate a lot of those chats into a single point.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Programming: GNU, Git, Perl, Python and Django

Filed under
Development
  • Experimental Support For C++20 Coroutines Has Landed In GCC 10

    As of this morning experimental support for C++20 coroutines has been merged into the GCC 10 compiler!

    Coroutines allow a function to have its execution stopped/suspended and then to be resumed later. Coroutines is one of the big features of C++20. Sample syntax and more details on C++ coroutines can be found at cppreference.com.

    Coroutines support for GCC has been under development for months and now as a late addition to GCC 10 is the experimental implementation.

  • GNU Binutils 2.34 Branched - Bringing With It "debuginfod" HTTP Server Support

    With GNU Binutils 2.34 comes debuginfod support, which is the HTTP server catching our eye while the debuginfod server is distributed as part of the latest elfutils package. This isn't for a general purpose web server thankfully but is an HTTP server for distributing ELF/DWARF debugging information and source code. With debuginfod enabled, Binutils' readelf and objdump utilities can query the HTTP server(s) for debug files that cannot otherwise be found. Enabling this option requires building Binutils using --with-debuginfod.

  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.3

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • Steve Kemp: Announce: github2mr

    myrepos is an excellent tool for applying git operations to multiple repositories, and I use it extensively.

    I've written several scripts to dump remote repository-lists into a suitable configuration format, and hopefully I've done that for the last time.

  • Term::ANSIColor 5.01

    This is the module included in Perl core that provides support for ANSI color escape sequences.

    This release adds support for the NO_COLOR environment variable (thanks, Andrea Telatin) and fixes an error in the example of uncolor() in the documentation (thanks, Joe Smith). It also documents that color aliases are expanded during alias definition, so while you can define an alias in terms of another alias, they don't remain linked during future changes.

  • Python 3.7.5 : Django security issues - part 001.

    Django like any website development and framework implementation requires security settings and configurations.
    Today I will present some aspects of this topic and then I will come back with other information.

  • How to display flash messages in Django templates

    Sometimes we need to show the one-time notification, also known as the flash messages in our Django application. For this Django provides the messages framework. We are going to use the same here.

    To show flash messages in the Django application, we will extend our previous project Hello World in Django 2.2. Clone the git repository, check out the master branch and set up the project on your local machine by following the instructions in the README file.

KDE: Videos, Plasma and Itinerary

Filed under
KDE
  • So you want to make a KDE video...

    KDE is running a competition in search of the next great promotional video for KDE's Plasma desktop and KDE's applications.

    The prizes are two fantastic TUXEDO computers, one per category, which will undoubtedly boost your film rendering capacity. There are also 12 goodie packages for runner-ups, and who doesn't need more Linux shirts, caps and stickers?

    Although we have already received some interesting entries, we feel it may be time to help video artists out there with ideas from the judges themselves.

    Below, Julian Schraner, Ivana Isadora Devčić, and Paul Brown from the Promo team and Farid Abdelnour from the Kdenlive team give their views on what a KDE promotional video should look like, where to find resources, and which pitfalls may hurt your film if you fall for them.

  • Learning about our users

    In a product like Plasma, knowing the kind of things our existing users care about and use sheds light on what needs polishing or improving. At the moment, the input we have is either the one from the loudest most involved people or outright bug reports, which lead to a confirmation bias.

    What do our users like about Plasma? On which hardware do people use Plasma? Are we testing Plasma on the same kind of hardware Plasma is being used for?

    Some time ago, Volker Krause started up the KUserFeedback framework with two main features. First, allowing to send information about application’s usage depending on certain users’ preferences and include mechanisms to ask users for feedback explicitly. This has been deployed into several products already, like GammaRay and Qt Creator, but we never adopted it in KDE software.

    The first step has been to allow our users to tune how much information Plasma products should be telling KDE about the systems they run on.

  • [KDE] Itinerary extraction in Nextcloud Hub

    Nextcloud announced their latest release and among the many new features is itinerary extraction from emails. That’s using KDE’s extraction engine, the same that powers similar features in KMail as well.

Windows 7 Support Ended. Here’s You Should Do.

Filed under
Linux

After a decade of service, Windows 7 finally retired, leaving millions of PC worldwide exposed to security vulnerabilities and hackers.
Read more

Debian: Stremio in Sparky Linux, Looking at Debian 10, and Package Usage Stats

Filed under
Debian
  • Stremio

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: Stremio

    What is Stremio?

    Stremio is a one-stop hub for video content aggregation. Discover, organize and watch video from all kind of sources on any device that you own.
    Movies, TV shows, series, live television or web channels like YouTube and Twitch.tv – you can find all this on Stremio.

  • Debian 10, the clean install

    Events have ended my upgrade procrastination. Last week my hard drive started having many errors. Fortunately it lasted long enough for me to copy all of its contents to my USB backup drive. (My /home/brad directory is automatically backed up daily, but I also have separate partitions for downloaded files, PDFs, Linux CD images, and archived photos from my digital camera...and those only get backed up now and then.) Then a quick trip to the store for a new SATA hard drive.

    I suppose I could have copied my old root partition over to the new drive. But I've been running 32-bit Debian 8 ("Jessie"), which is now two versions behind. And I've been noticing more and more applications that I want to run are only being distributed for 64-bit Linux. So I decided to do a clean install of 64-bit Debian 10 ("Buster"), with my preferred MATE desktop (now a standard option with Debian).

  • gnu Linux Debian – top 1000 packages by install – popularity contest

    remember: only the installs are counted where the user said yes during setup to: „do you want to participate in popularity contest?“ (guess that many Linux users are privacy sensitive and a lot of them probably say „no“)

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More in Tux Machines

Lakka 2.3.2 with RetroArch 1.8.4

The Lakka team wishes everyone a happy new year and welcomes 2020 with a new update and a new tier-based releases system! This new Lakka update, 2.3.2, contains RetroArch 1.8.4 (was 1.7.2), some new cores and a handful of core updates. Read more

It is time to end the DMCA anti-circumvention exemptions process and put a stop to DRM

Although it is accurate, there's one aspect of the process that is missing from that description: the length. While the process kicks off every three years, the work that goes into fighting exemptions, whether previously granted or newly requested, has a much shorter interval. As you can see from the timeline of events from the 2018 round of the exemptions process, the process stretches on for months and months. For each exemption we have to prepare research, documents, and our comments through wave after wave of submission periods. For the 2018 exemptions round, the first announcements from the United States Copyright Office were in July of 2017, on a process that concluded in October of 2018. Fifteen months, every three years. If you do the math, that means we're fighting about 40% of the time just to ensure that exemptions we already won continue, and that new exemptions will be granted. If the timeline from the last round holds up, then we're only a few short months away from starting this whole circus back up again. Describing it as a circus seems an appropriate label for the purpose of this whole process. It's not meant to be an effective mechanism for protecting the rights of users: it's a method for eating up the time and resources of those who are fighting for justice. If we don't step up, users could lose the ability to control their own computing and software. It's like pushing a rock up a mile-long hill only to have it pushed back down again when we've barely had a chance to catch our breath. Read more

Programming With Python: PyQt5, “Effective Python” and Wing Python IDE

  • PyQt5 plotting with matplotlib, embed plots in your GUI applications

    In the previous part we covered plotting in PyQt5 using PyQtGraph. That library uses the Qt vector-based QGraphicsScene to draw plots and provides a great interface for interactive and high performance plotting. However, there is another plotting library for Python which is used far more widely, and which offers a richer assortment of plots — Matplotlib. If you're migrating an existing data analysis tool to a PyQt GUI, or if you simply want to have access to the array of plot abilities that Matplotlib offers, then you'll want to know how to include Matplotlib plots within your application. In this tutorial we'll cover how to embed Matplotlib plots in your PyQt applications Many other Python libraries — such as seaborn and pandas— make use of the Matplotlib backend for plotting. These plots can be embedded in PyQt5 in the same way shown here, and the reference to the axes passed when plotting. There is a pandas example at the end of this tutorial.

  • “Effective Python” by Brett Slatkin book review

    Let’s start with the target audience for this book. I’d recommend it to the people who are using Python at least several months and are feeling good with the basics. If you need more practical advice you are definitely welcome.

  • Wing Tips: Using Black and YAPF Code Reformatting in Wing Python IDE

    ing version 7.2 has been released, so in the next couple Wing Tips we'll take a look at some of its new features. Wing 7.2 expands the options for automatic code reformatting to include also Black and YAPF, in addition to the previously supported autopep8. Using one of these allows you to develop nicely formatted uniform-looking code without spending time manually adjusting the layout of code.

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: System76 Serval WS, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly and LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux

  • System76 Serval WS Workstation Laptop Full Review

    The System76 Serval WS laptop is crazy powerful, with a desktop CPU and a powerful Nvidia video card. In this review, I show off the hardware, weigh the pros and cons, and give my overall thoughts.

  • 2020-01-22 | Linux Headlines

    Major improvements come to Wine, Debian makes a significant change post systemd debate, and the world’s most popular open source API gateway gets an update.

  • FLOSS Weekly 563: Apprentice Program

    The Apprentice Program is an initiative to train and mentor female junior developers in open source, creating a pipeline of talent and changing the ratio in tech.

  • LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux | Install and Service Creation

    This video goes over the infamous LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux. You have seen it in my background and now I show how to use an old 90s screensaver scr file on Linux. I then show how to make a systemd service to activate the screensaver when you are idle for a set amount of time.