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Tuesday, 13 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.20 and Virtual Reality at Valve Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 2:39pm
Story Sourcegraph: An Open-Source Source Code Search Engine Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 2:34pm
Story KDE Usability & Productivity, Belated Writeup About Akademy 2018 by Sandro Knauß Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 2:25pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 2:02pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 11:06am
Story Servers: Red Hat and Kubernetes Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 11:05am
Story Arduino Gets a Command Line Interface Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 10:33am
Story The "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 10:04am
Story Programming: py3status, Debian LTS Work, RcppArmadillo and Programmers Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 10:01am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2018 - 9:58am

Got a Screwdriver? GalliumOS Can Turn Chromebooks Into Linux Boxes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

GalliumOS is a Chromebook-specific Linux variant. It lets you put a real Linux distro on a Chromebook.

My recent review of a new Chromebook feature -- the ability to run Linux apps on some Chromebook models -- sparked my interest in other technologies that run complete Linux distros on some Chromebooks without using ChromeOS.

GalliumOS is not a perfect solution. It requires making a physical adjustment inside the hardware and flashing new firmware before the GalliumOS installation ISO will boot. However, it can be a handy workaround if your Chromebook does not support Linux apps and/or Android apps.

If you follow directions explicitly and can wield a screwdriver to remove the bottom panel, GalliumOS is an ingenious Linux distro that can give you the best of two computing worlds. You can install it as a fully functional replacement for the ChromeOS on a compatible Chromebook. You can install it as a dual boot to give you both ChromeOS and a complete Linux distro on one lightweight portable computer.

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How To Install Kali Linux Tools In Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

Today I am going to do a quick demonstration of how to easily install a suite of security testing tools from Kali Linux onto a Ubuntu machine. For a bit of background information, Kali Linux is a distribution derived from Debian. Its sole purpose is to provide a suite of tools for penetration testing (pentesting) and forensics. It is provided by Offensive Security, an organization dedicated to providing security training. There is a very long list of tools available for Kali. Such tools include (but are not limited to) forensics, vulnerability checks, access checks, and stress testing.

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KDE Applications 18.08 Reaches End of Life, KDE Apps 18.12 Launches December 13

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KDE

KDE Applications 18.08.3 is now available as the third and last point release of the open-source and cross-platform KDE Applications 18.08 software suite, brining about 20 20 bugfixes and improvements to applications like Ark, Dolphin, Kate, KDE Games, Kontact, Okular, and Umbrello, as well as translation updates.

Highlights of this last point release include the ability for the KMail email client to remember the HTML viewing mode, as well as to load external images if allowed, support for the Kate text editor to remember meta information, including bookmarks, between sessions, and updated automatic scrolling in the Telepathy text UI.

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FFmpeg 4.1 "al-Khwarizmi" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Officially Released

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OSS

Dubbed "al-Khwarizmi", the FFMpeg 4.1 release comes six months after the April 2018 debut of the FFmpeg 4.0 "Wu" series. It's a major update that adds lots of new filters, decoders and encoders of all kinds, as well as some exciting new features and enhancements to make FFmpeg the best free multimedia backend on the market.

Highlights of the FFmpeg 4.1 "al-Khwarizmi" release include support for the highly efficient AV1 codec in the MP4 container, an AV1 parser for parsing AV1 encoded streams, Transport Layer Security (TLS)-based mbedTLS support, a SER demuxer, as well as a libtensorflow backend for DNN-based filters like srcnn.

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Desktop: System76 Sale and Vista 10 Breaking Itself Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • System76 laptops are on sale, plus they will donate to select open source projects from sales until Jan 3rd

    After recently releasing their own in-house designed Thelio desktop system, System76 have announced they're giving away some funding to open source projects from laptop sales.

    The projects include KiCad, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Free Software Foundation (FSF), and the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). "We picked these four projects to represent a wide array of efforts within open source initiatives." Says Louisa Bisio at System76.

  • A Bug In Windows 10 Pro Is Forcing Users Downgrade To Windows 10 Home

    A bug-free Windows 10 October Update still seems to be far away, and Windows users have already come up with another issue.

    According to a trending Reddit thread, many Microsoft Windows users are complaining that their Windows Pro version is demoted to Windows Home version without any notification or prior warning.

LWN Kernel Articles: 4.20/5.0 Merge, Jiri Kosina, Arnd Bergmann and Greg Kroah-Hartman

Filed under
Linux
  • 4.20/5.0 Merge window part 1

    Linus Torvalds has returned as the keeper of the mainline kernel repository, and the merge window for the next release which, depending on his mood, could be called either 4.20 or 5.0, is well underway. As of this writing, 5,735 non-merge changesets have been pulled for this release; experience suggests that we are thus at roughly the halfway point.

  • Improving the handling of embargoed hardware-security bugs

    Jiri Kosina kicked off a session on hardware vulnerabilities at the 2018 Kernel Maintainers Summit by noting that there are few complaints about how the kernel community deals with security issues in general. That does not hold for Meltdown and Spectre which, he said, had been "completely mishandled". The subsequent handling of the L1TF vulnerability suggests that some lessons have been learned, but there is still plenty of room for improvement in how hardware vulnerabilities are handled in general.

    There are a number of reasons why the handling of Meltdown and Spectre went bad, he said, starting with the fact that the hardware vendors simply did not know how to do it right. They didn't think that the normal security contact (security@kernel.org) could be used, since there was no non-disclosure agreement (NDA) in place there. Perhaps what is needed is the creation of such an agreement or, as was discussed in September, a "gentleman's agreement" that would serve the same role.

  • Removing support for old hardware from the kernel

    The kernel supports a wide range of hardware. Or, at least, the kernel contains drivers for a lot of hardware, but the hardware for which many of those drivers was written is old and, perhaps, no longer in actual use. Some of those drivers would certainly no longer work even if the hardware could be found. These drivers provide no value, but they are still an ongoing maintenance burden; it would be better to simply remove them from the kernel. But identifying which drivers can go is not as easy as one might think. Arnd Bergmann led an inconclusive session on this topic at the 2018 Kernel Maintainers Summit.

    Bergmann started by noting (to applause) that he recently removed support for eight processor architectures from the kernel. It was, he said, a lot of work to track down the right people to talk to before removing that code. In almost every case, the outgoing architectures were replaced — by their creators — by Arm-based systems. There probably are not any more architectures that can go anytime soon; Thomas Gleixner's suggestion that x86 should be next failed to win the support of the group.

  • The proper use of EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL()

    The kernel, in theory, puts strict limits on which functions and data structures are available to loadable kernel modules; only those that have been explicitly exported with EXPORT_SYMBOL() or EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL() are accessible. In the case of EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(), only modules that declare a GPL-compatible license will be able to see the symbol. There have been questions about when EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL() should be used for almost as long as it has existed. The latest attempt to answer those questions was a session run by Greg Kroah-Hartman at the 2018 Kernel Maintainers Summit; that session offered little in the way of general guidance, but it did address one specific case.

Init system support in Debian

Filed under
Debian

The "systemd question" has roiled Debian multiple times over the years, but things had mostly been quiet on that front of late. The Devuan distribution is a Debian derivative that has removed systemd; many of the vocal anti-systemd Debian developers have switched, which helps reduce the friction on the Debian mailing lists. But that seems to have led to support for init system alternatives (and System V init in particular) to bitrot in Debian. There are signs that a bit of reconciliation between Debian and Devuan will help fix that problem.

The Devuan split was acrimonious, much like the systemd "debate" that preceded it. Many bits were expended in describing the new distribution as a waste of time (or worse), while the loudest Devuan proponents declared that systemd would cause the end of Debian and Linux as a whole. Over time, that acrimony has mostly been reduced to random potshots (on both sides); there is clearly no love lost between the pro and anti sides (whether those apply to systemd, Devuan, or both). Some recent developments have shown that perhaps a bit of thawing in relations is underway—that can only be a good thing for both sides and the community as a whole.

Holger Levsen alerted the debian-devel mailing list that the Debian "Buster" (i.e. Debian 10) release was in danger of shipping with only partial support for running without systemd. The problem is that two packages needed for running with System V init (sysvinit-core and systemd-shim) are not really being maintained. The shim is completely unmaintained and sysvinit-core has been languishing even though it has two maintainers listed.

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Compartmentalized computing with CLIP OS

Filed under
OS
Gentoo

The design of CLIP OS 5 includes three elements: a bootloader, a core system, and the cages. The system uses secure boot with signed binaries. Only the x86 architecture was supported in the previous versions, and there are no other architectures in the plan for now. The core system is based on Hardened Gentoo. Finally, the cages provide user sessions, with applications and documents.

Processes running in separate cages cannot communicate directly. Instead, they must pass messages using special services on the core system; these services are unprivileged and confined on the cage system, but privileged on the core. These communication paths are shown in this architecture diagram from the documentation. Cages are also isolated from the core system itself — all interactions (system calls, for example) are checked and go through mediation services. The isolation between applications will be using containers, and the team plans to use the Flatpak format. The details of the CLIP OS 5 implementation are not available yet, as this feature is planned for the stable release.

A specific Linux security module (LSM) inspired from Linux-VServer will be used to add additional isolation between the cages, and between the cages and the core system. Linux-VServer is a virtual private server implementation designed for web hosting. It implements partitioning of a computer system in terms of CPU time, memory, the filesystem, and network addressing into security contexts. Starting and stopping a new virtual server corresponds to setting up and tearing down a security context.

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Debian Developers

Filed under
Debian
  • Neil McGovern: GNOME ED update – October

    As per usual, our main focus has been on the hiring of new staff members for the Foundation. We’ve completed a few second interviews and a couple of first interviews. We’re aiming to start making offers around the end of November. If you have put in an application, and haven’t heard back in a while, please don’t worry! It’s simply due to a large number of people who’ve applied and the very manual way we’ve had to process these. Everyone should hear back.

    We’ve also had some interesting times with our banking. The short version is, we’ve moved banks to another provider. This has taken quite a bit of work, but hopefully, this should be settling down now.

  • New and improved Frikanalen Kodi addon version 0.0.3

    If you read my blog regularly, you probably know I am involved in running and developing the Norwegian TV channel Frikanalen. It is an open channel, allowing everyone in Norway to publish videos on a TV channel with national coverage. You can think of it as Youtube for national television. In addition to distribution on RiksTV and Uninett, Frikanalen is also available as a Kodi addon. The last few days I have updated the code to add more features. A new and improved version 0.0.3 Frikanalen addon was just made available via the Kodi repositories. This new version include a option to browse videos by category, as well as free text search in the video archive. It will now also show the video duration in the video lists, which were missing earlier. A new and experimental link to the HD video stream currently being worked on is provided, for those that want to see what the CasparCG output look like. The alternative is the SD video stream, generated using MLT. CasparCG is controlled by our mltplayout server which instead of talking to mlt is giving PLAY instructions to the CasparCG server when it is time to start a new program.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (September and October 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Joseph Herlant (aerostitch)
    Aurélien Couderc (coucouf)
    Dylan Aïssi (daissi)
    Kunal Mehta (legoktm)
    Ming-ting Yao Wei (mwei)
    Nicolas Braud-Santoni (nicoo)
    Pierre-Elliott Bécue (peb)
    Stephen Gelman (ssgelm)
    Daniel Echeverry (epsilon)
    Dmitry Bogatov (kaction)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Sagar Ippalpalli
    Kurt Kremitzki
    Michal Arbet
    Daniel Pocock
    Peter Wienemann
    Alexis Bienvenüe
    Gard Spreemann

    Congratulations!

Linux Foundation: Blockchain as a Catalyst for Good, B.C. Ministry of Citizens’ Services joins the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Blockchain as a Catalyst for Good

    Blockchain and its ability to “embed trust” can help elevate trust, which right now, is low, according to Sally Eaves, a chief technology officer and strategic advisor to the Forbes Technology Council, speaking at The Linux Foundation’s Open FinTech Forum in New York City.

    People’s trust in business, media, government and non-government organizations (NGOs) is at a 17-year low, and businesses are suffering as a result, Eaves said.

  • Homeless in Vancouver: B.C. Ministry of Citizens’ Services joins the Linux Foundation

    A funny thing happened on my way to writing about IBM buying the open-source company Red Hat: I noticed that a ministry of the B.C. government is listed as a member of the Linux Foundation.

    According to a B.C. government spokesperson, the Ministry of Citizens' Services of British Columbia joined the Linux Foundation as an associate member on September 4, 2018, as part of becoming an associate member of the Foundation’s Hyperledger project.

Red Hat and Fedora: Infrastructure Migration, PHP Updates, Fedora Women’s Day and Fedora's 15th Birthday

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Infrastructure Migration Solution, an open source technical tale

    Red Hat announced its infrastructure migration solution in late August, with information about what it is and the value it can offer. What I’d like to talk about is how it came to be, and some of the behind-the-scenes work to make it happen.

  • PHP version 7.1.24 and 7.2.12

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.12 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28-29 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 26-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.1.24 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Fedora Women’s Day 2018 – Trieste

    On September 29, the hackerspace Mittelab of Trieste had the honor to host the first edition of the Fedora Women’s Day event. Organized by the Fedora Diversity and Inclusion team, the event aims to break down gender walls to allow all women passionate about IT and technology in general to approach the Fedora operating system. During the day there were a series of conferences whose purpose was to show this distribution and define the main features of Linux.

  • FAW 2018 Day 4: “You know you can do it”

Mozilla: Rust, WebRender, AV1

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Splash 2018 Mid-Week Report

    I really enjoyed this talk by Felienne Hermans entitled “Explicit Direct Instruction in Programming Education”. The basic gist of the talk was that, when we teach programming, we often phrase it in terms of “exploration” and “self-expression”, but that this winds up leaving a lot of folks in the cold and may be at least partly responsible for the lack of diversity in computer science today. She argued that this is like telling kids that they should just be able to play a guitar and create awesome songs without first practicing their chords1 – it kind of sets them up to fail.

    The thing that really got me excited about this was that it seemed very connected to mentoring and open source. If you watched the Rust Conf keynote this year, you’ll remember Aaron talking about “OSS by Serendipity” – this idea that we should just expect people to come and produce PRs. This is in contrast to the “OSS by Design” that we’ve been trying to practice and preach, where there are explicit in-roads for people to get involved in the project through mentoring, as well as explicit priorities and goals (created, of course, through open processes like the roadmap and so forth). It seems to me that the things like working groups, intro bugs, quest issues, etc, are all ways for people to “practice the basics” of a project before they dive into creating major new features.

  • WebRender newsletter #29

    To introduce this week’s newsletter I’ll write about culling. Culling refers to discarding invisible content and is performed at several stages of the rendering pipeline. During frame building on the CPU we go through all primitives and discard the ones that are off-screen by computing simple rectangle intersections. As a result we avoid transferring a lot of data to the GPU and we can skip processing them as well.

    Unfortunately this isn’t enough. Web page are typically built upon layers and layers of elements stacked on top of one another. The traditional way to render web pages is to draw each element in back-to-front order, which means that for a given pixel on the screen we may have rendered many primitives. This is frustrating because there are a lot of opaque primitives that completely cover the work we did on that pixel for element beneath it, so there is a lot of shading work and memory bandwidth that goes to waste, and memory bandwidth is a very common bottleneck, even on high end hardware.

    Drawing on the same pixels multiple times is called overdraw, and overdraw is not our friend, so a lot effort goes into reducing it.
    In its early days, to mitigate overdraw WebRender divided the screen in tiles and all primitives were assigned to the tiles they covered (primitives that overlap several tiles would be split into a primitive for each tile), and when an opaque primitive covered an entire tile we could simply discard everything that was below it. This tiling approach was good at reducing overdraw with large occluders and also made the batching blended primitives easier (I’ll talk about batching in another episode). It worked quite well for axis-aligned rectangles which is the vast majority of what web pages are made of, but it was hard to split transformed primitives.

  • Into the Depths: The Technical Details Behind AV1

    Since AOMedia officially cemented the AV1 v1.0.0 specification earlier this year, we’ve seen increasing interest from the broadcasting industry. Starting with the NAB Show (National Association of Broadcasters) in Las Vegas earlier this year, and gaining momentum through IBC (International Broadcasting Convention) in Amsterdam, and more recently the NAB East Show in New York, AV1 keeps picking up steam. Each of these industry events attract over 100,000 media professionals. Mozilla attended these shows to demonstrate AV1 playback in Firefox, and showed that AV1 is well on its way to being broadly adopted in web browsers.

Graphics: Radeon, AMD, NVIDIA and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The Anticipated Linux Driver Requirements For The Radeon Instinct MI50 / MI60 (Vega 20)

    With this week's announcement of the Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 as what we previously knew as Vega 20, here's a look at what is likely required from the Linux software side for making use of these professional GPUs that will begin shipping in early 2019.

  • AMD Lands Big Batch Of AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Changes To Start November

    As it had been two weeks since AMD developers last pushed out new source updates to their AMDVLK Vulkan Linux driver, rather than their normal weekly release cadence, today's driver updates are a bit on the heavier side than some of their past light updates.

  • NVIDIA 415.13 Beta Linux Graphics Driver Released With Assorted Improvements

    NVIDIA today released their first beta release for Linux/Solaris/BSD users in the 415 release stream.

    NVIDIA 415.13 is now the first post-410 series driver for Linux users. That 410 driver series was big for introducing NVIDIA RTX "Turing" graphics card support and initial Vulkan ray-tracing support. The NVIDIA 415 driver isn't as significant but has various fixes and improvements throughout its large driver stack.

  • More AMD Zen Microarchitecture Tuning For Mesa Is Likely Ahead

    Published back in September was some Mesa RadeonSI tuning for AMD Zen CPUs. That tuning to pin the application thread and driver execution thread to the same L3 cache benefits the Zen micro-architecture with its multiple core complexes (CCX). That code was merged a short time later unconditionally but it looks like that behavior needs to be refined for delivering maximum performance.

Oracle Updates Its Linux Distro with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Compatibility

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Derived from the sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6, the Oracle Enterprise Linux 7 Update 6 release ships with Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 5 version 4.14.35-1818.3.3 for both 64-bit (x86_64) and ARM architectures, and the Red Hat Compatible Kernel 3.10.0-957, which is only available for 64-bit systems.

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KDE Plasma 5.14.3 Desktop Further Improves Firmware Updates, Flatpak Support

Filed under
KDE

Coming about two weeks after the October 23rd release of the KDE Plasma 5.14.2 point release, the KDE Plasma 5.14.3 point release continues to improve the new firmware update functionality implemented in the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, as well as support for the Flatpak and Snap universal binary formats.

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PostgreSQL 11.1, 10.6, 9.6.11, 9.5.15, 9.4.20, and 9.3.25 released

Filed under
OSS

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group has released an update to all
supported versions of our database system, including 11.1, 10.6, 9.6.11,
9.5.15, 9.4.20, and 9.3.25. This release fixes one security issue as
well as bugs reported over the last three months.

All users using the affected versions of PostgreSQL should update as
soon as possible. Please see the notes on "Updating" below for any
post-update steps that may be required if you are using
`pg_stat_statements` in your installation.

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Also: PostgreSQL 11.1 Released To Address The Latest Open-Source Security Vulnerability

openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

Filed under
SUSE

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

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More in Tux Machines

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler. Read more

This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a “C-SKY Linux Development Board” for $5.60 and up, featuring a RISC-V derived, 574MHz C-SKY GX6605S CK610M SoC, 64MB DDR2, an HDMI port, and 2x USB 2.0 ports. Last month, Hangzhou C-SKY Microsystems Co. announced Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel support for its new RISC-V based C-SKY CK810 SoC design. Now, Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a development board that runs Linux on a similar CK610M SoC. The C-SKY Linux Development Board sells for 39-40 Yuan ($5.60 to $7.05) on Taobao and $19.50 to $21.50 on AliExpress. Read more