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Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS Out Now for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 with MATE 1.16.1 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 4:06pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 4:05pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 3:13pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 3:11pm
Story Ubuntu Leftovers and Devices/PCs With Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 2:04pm
Story Linux Lite Among The Best Lightweight Linux Distributions Mohd Sohail 17/02/2017 - 2:01pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 1:59pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 12:46pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 12:27pm

Stay with Free Software, City of Munich!

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
Microsoft

The city of Munich is currently considering a move away from Free Software back to Microsoft products. We consider this to be a mistake and urge the decision makers to reconsider.

For many years now the City of Munich has been using a mix of software by KDE, LibreOffice and Ubuntu, among others. Mayor Dieter Reiter (a self-proclaimed Microsoft-fan who helped Microsoft move offices to Munich) asked Accenture (a Microsoft partner) to produce a report about the situation of the City of Munich's IT infrastructure. That resulted in a 450-page document. This report is now being misused to push for a move away from Free Software. However the main issues listed in the report were identified to be organizational ones and not related to Free Software operating systems and applications.

[...]

The City of Munich has always been a poster child of Free Software in public administrations. It is a showcase of what can be done with Free Software in this setting. The step back by the City of Munich from Free Software would therefore not just be a blow for this particular deployment but also have more far-reaching effects into other similar deployments.

Read more

CloudLinux 7 Gets New Linux Kernel Update to Fix Memory Leak, XFS Issue, More

Filed under
Linux
Security

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today the availability of a new kernel update for CloudLinux 7 operating system series, urging users to update their machines immediately.

CloudLinux 7's kernel packages have been updated to version 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.37, which has been marked as ready for production and is available from the stable repositories of the operating system.

Today's kernel replaces version 3.10.0-427.18.2.lve1.4.27 that most CloudLinux 7 users might have installed on their machines, and it fixes a memory leak related to LVE Lightweight Virtual Environment) deletion.

Read more

Also (direct): CloudLinux 7 kernel updated

GNOME News: Nautilus 3.24, Calendar, GParted, and GNOME 3.24

Filed under
GNOME
  • Nautilus 3.24 File Manager Enters Beta, Adds New Keyboard Shortcuts and Features

    We already told you the other day when we reported the availability of new development releases of GNOME Software and GTK+ that the GNOME developers are currently preparing to unleash the first Beta version of the GNOME 3.24 desktop.

    Since yesterday, a lot more apps and core components from the GNOME Stack have appeared on the project's FTP servers, including the Nautilus file manager, which is used by default in numerous Linux-based operating systems that use the GNOME Stack, including Ubuntu, Fedora Workstation, Solus, and many others.

  • GNOME Calendar App to Finally Add a Week View in GNOME 3.24, Flatpak Support

    As part of the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.24 Beta version, due later today or by the end of the week, the GNOME Calendar applications received its first development release.

    We've already told you that the GNOME developers are working hard these days to give us the first Beta preview of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, due for release on March 22, and we recommend reading our in-depth stories about what's coming new in Nautilus (Files), GTK+ 4, and GNOME Software components.

  • GParted 0.28 Begins Read-Write LUKS Encrypted File-System Support

    For those using GParted as a way to visually manage your Linux disk partitions/file-systems, GParted 0.28 was released as a Valentine's Day present for Linux users.

    The primary change with GParted 0.28 is that it adds partial read-write support for LUKS-encrypted file-systems. GParted 0.28 is now able to copy/resize/manipulate file-systems within LUKS volumes as well as moving closed LUKS sub-volumes. However, this GNOME Partition Editor isn't yet able to create, open, or close LUKS encryption volumes.

  • GParted 0.28.0 Adds Partial Read/Write Support for LUKS Encrypted Filesystems

    Curtis Gedak announced today the general availability of GParted 0.28.0, a new stable update of the widely-used open-source partition editor for Linux-based operating systems.

    GParted 0.28.0 comes approximately four months after the release of GParted 0.27.0, and the most important feature it introduces is partial read/write support for LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) encrypted filesystems, allowing users to resize or copy a file system enclosed in a LUKS volume. Additionally, it allows the move of closed LUKS volumes.

  • Watch: the New, Revamped Users Panel of the GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment

    As we reported last year, the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will come with a revamped GNOME Control Center component, and GNOME developer Felipe Borges now gives us a sneak peek into the new Users panel.

    GNOME Control Center's Users panel got a new design recently, which represents the developers' first attempt to move away from the old two-column panel and implement a single page concept, as you can see in the video attached below.

  • GTK+ 3.89.4 Released With More Vulkan Work, Wayland Fixes

    Matthias Clasen has issued the newest GTK4 development release with more feature work.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Tool Now Works Out of the Box with OpenGL Drivers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Alex Larsson announced earlier the availability of a new stable update to the Flatpak 0.8 series of the open-source application sandboxing and distribution framework for Linux-based operating systems.

Flatpak 0.8.3 is here about 19 days after the release of the second maintenance update to the series, and adds a small number of improvements, including better handling of extra-data errors, improvements to buildsystem=cmake builds, as well as the implementation of updated OpenGL support that would enable Flatpak to work with OpenGL drivers out of the box.

Read more

Also: KDE Discover Making Progress With Flatpak Support

Linux Graphics: NVIDIA, Games, AMD, and Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Statement by The Document Foundation about the upcoming discussion at the City of Munich to step back to Windows and MS Office

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
  • Statement by The Document Foundation about the upcoming discussion at the City of Munich to step back to Windows and MS Office

    The Document Foundation is an independent, charitable entity and the home of LibreOffice. We have followed the developments in Munich with great concerns and like to express our disappointment to see a minority of politicians apparently ignoring the expert advice for which they’ve sought.

    Rumours of the City of Munich returning to Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office have been regularly leaking since the election of Mayor Dieter Reiter, who was described as a “Microsoft fan” when interviewed by StadtBild magazine in 2014.

    [...]

    In spite of the suggestions, on Wednesday, February 15, Munich City Council will discuss a proposal – filed by a minority of city councillors – to install Windows 10 and MS Office 2016 on all workstations by 2020. This would cost taxpayers close to 90 million euro over the next six years, with a 35% aggravation over the 66 million euro figure suggested by Accenture.

    [...]

    Based on the above considerations, The Document Foundation thinks that the proposal to be discussed on Wednesday, February 15, represents a significant step backwards for the City of Munich, with a substantial increase in expenditure, an unknown amount of hidden cost related to interoperability, and a questionable usage of taxpayers money.

  • TDF On Munich

    Beware politicians promising solutions to nonexistent problems. Read TDF’s post. Read the report from Accenture, M$’s “partner”. Even Accenture doesn’t believe the politicians’ solution. Monopoly is never the solution to diverse problems. Accenture advocates using web-applications. That provides independence from the OS and GNU/Linux would work for them. Sigh. Politics, the game that never ends.

Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx

Filed under
MDV

  • A Glimpse of Mageia 6: Mageia 6 Sta2

    I noticed that the icons were new and the DE is more responsive that the beta that I had installed previously. I particularly loved the new icon for the Mageia Control Center (it reminded me of the nazar in Pisi Linux).

    I used the system a bit to see if I could detect certain glitches even though I know this is not a final version. My intention is not to write a review, but to assess potential problems and, most importantly, to get more familiar with Mageia running Plasma 5.

  • Upgrade to OpenMandriva Lx 3

    My HP Pavilion has been running OpenMandriva 2014 exclusively, but I decided to upgrade it to OpenMandriva Lx 3 last week.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • CTU Training Solutions joins Red Hat Academy

    CTU Training Solutions announced it has collaborated with Red Hat to create the CTU Training Solutions Red Hat Academy. Red Hat Academy is an open source, Web-deployed and Web-managed education programme that is designed to provide turnkey curriculum materials to academic institutions to start and sustain an open source and Linux curriculum programme.

  • What Analysts are Predicting For AMETEK, Inc. (AME), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
  • A discussion of Fedora's Legal state

    Tom Callaway, the Fedora Legal chair, will talk about the past, present, and future of licensing and legal issues in the Fedora community. Tom is not a lawyer, nor does he play one on TV, but he does consult with lawyers, and occasionally, go drinking with them. Bring your questions, and he'll do his best to answer them. I am not a lawyer, so nothing in my presentation should be (or could be) construed as legal advice.

    Fedora, as the evolution of Red Hat Linux, is one of the oldest and most well known Linux distributions in existence today. For more than 10 years, I have been the Fedora Legal representative who investigates licenses, negotiates with lawyers, advises our community, and does everything in my power to not have to tell people "no" without a very good reasoning.

  • Trying to get an idea about what packages are used
  • F25-20170210 Updated Lives released

    I am happy to announce new F25-20170210 Updated Lives.

  • Packaging Ampache in Fedora

    Hello Fedora Hackers! I've been working together with Remi Collet and Shawn Iwinski to package Ampache and its list of dependencies for Fedora. Ampache is a music server that allows you to listen to your music catalog in your web browser. There are even a variety of mobile applications that allow you to listen to your music on the go, such as DSub.

KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.9.2 Desktop Rolls Out on Valentine's Day with Multiple Bug Fixes

    It's Valentine's Day, and to celebrate this important event, the KDE developers demonstrate their love for KDE Plasma users by bringing them a new maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment.

    Yes, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.9.2, the second point release to the latest KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop, which launched just two weeks ago for various GNU/Linux distributions, including KDE Neon and Arch Linux. Because of the new, fast release cycle, you see this new version just one week after the first update, namely KDE Plasma 5.9.1.

  • An Early Qt 5.9 Alpha Snapshot: Qt 5.9 Packing A Ton Of Features

    While Qt 5.8 was released less than one month ago, the Qt 5.9 Alpha release is on approach for landing.

    Jani Heikkinen today announced the first Qt 5.9 Alpha snapshot. This isn't the formal Qt 5.9 Alpha release, but will become the official Alpha source package if there isn't anything important that's missing. Hit up that mailing list link if you are interested in testing.

  • First Qt 5.9 alpha snapshot available
  • KDE's Plasma Discover Package Manager to Support Flatpak Packages and Repos

    It looks to us like Flatpak, the open-source application sandboxing and distribution framework for GNU/Linux systems is on its way to becoming the norm on most distributions.

    Not only that GNOME Software offers support for Flatpak runtimes, but it appears that KDE's Plasma Discover graphical package manager will do too, as KDE developer Jan Grulich reports today on the upcoming availability of a Flatpak backend to implement support for handling Flatpak packages and repositories in the app.

  • KDE Discover flatpak backend

    As some of you might already know, I’ve been focusing lately on Flatpak and its integration into KDE. You can check my work on Flatpak KDE portals, which are being currently included in our KDE runtimes and repositories were migrated to KDE git so there has been made some progress since last time I talked about them. Recently I started looking into adding Flatpak support to KDE Discover, to have same support for Flatpak as Gnome has with gnome-software. From the begining it was a nightmare for me as I have never used any glib based library so that slowed me down little bit. I also went through gnome-software code to understand how flatpak integration is done there to get some inspiration. Things went well since then and I have already quite nice stuff to share with you. We currently support most common functionality, like listing available/installed flatpak applications in Discover with possibilities to install/remove/update and of course launch them. We also support flatpak bundles and flatpakref files already.

Linux Foundation Teaches GNU and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Foundation is offering training and certification discounts for Valentine's Day

    Happy Valentine's Day, dear BetaNews readers! Please know that I love you all very much. On this day of romance, restaurants will be crowded with couples celebrating the holiday. If you have a significant other, I hope you have already purchased a gift or at least a greeting card by now. If not, you might be fighting over slim-pickings at the store this evening!

  • The Linux Foundation Releases Free Open Source Software Basics Publication

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today released a free electronic publication, Open Source Software Basics, providing an overview of open source management principles based on The Linux Foundation's work with more than 300 companies, from startups to the world's largest corporations.

Lumina Adds Luster to Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The Lumina Desktop Environment desktop is a standout in the crowded field of Linux graphical user interface choices.

Lumina is a compact, lightweight, XDG-compliant graphical desktop environment developed from scratch. Its focus is on giving users a streamlined, efficient work environment with minimal system overhead.

Lumina was first developed for the BSD family of operating systems (such as FreeBSD and TrueOS). It is gaining interest among Linux users, having been introduced for a growing number of Linux distros.

Read more

CentOS Vs. Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Linux options available are almost “limitless” because, everyone can build it, either by changing an already existing distro or a new Linux From Scratch (LFS).

Read<br />
more

Vala Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Vala is not a Programming Language

    Vala provides you a way to write C/GObject/GInterface code using a different syntax. Vala doesn’t require to develop a “core library” in order to provide its features. Its “compiler” is not a compiler, is a C code generator.

    Vala can’t be compared with Rust, Go, Python, Java or C#, all of them provide their own “core library” in order to provide most of their features, allows you to create modules (like a library) to extend the language for their users consume. Their core generally is written in C, for very basic features, but almost in the language itself.

  • Vala 1.0?

    Yes is time to consider a Vala 1.0 release. Vala 0.34 code generator and bindings support LTS versions of GTK+ 3.22 and GLib 2.50. Next stable version of GTK+ will be 4.0 and GLib 2.x, but they have to traverse through 3.9x versions and any GLib 2.x on the way. Reaching that point we can consider Vala 2.0 release.

Why Munich should stick with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Once more, the drums are beating for Munich to turn its back on Linux and return to Windows. Oh please! Get a grip!

A Munich administrative and personnel committee recommended an immediate start to the creation of a uniform, Windows 10-based client architecture that can be deployed across the council by the end of 2020.

Read more

OpenWrt-driven LoRa gateways feature indoor and outdoor models

Filed under
Linux

Dragino’s LoRa Gateways run OpenWrt on an Atheros AR9331 — and Arduino on an ATMega328P — and bridge LoRA wireless with IP using WiFi, Ethernet, or 3G/4G.

Shenzhen based Dragino Technology has launched a weatherproof Outdoor OLG01 LoRa Gateway to go along with its two indoor LG01-P and LG01-S LoRa Gateway models for LoRa wireless IoT applications. Here, we’ll cover all three models, as well as a relatively new Lora IoT Kit, which combines the LG01-P with LoRa and GPS shields, a pair of Arduino Uno boards, and sensors (see farther below).

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VC Investor Martin Casado on the Future of Software-Defined Networking

    Software-defined networking’s biggest accomplishment last year was achieving market traction and validation, says Martin Casado, a general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. But there are still many challenges ahead for the industry at large and the organizations that aim to drive SDN forward.

  • What is the best Linux distro for beginners?

    Abundance of choice is one of the biggest challenges faced by all Linux users, particularly those dipping their toe in the water for the first time. Choosing your first Linux distro can be incredibly daunting, especially when you don't even know what you're looking for.

    In Linux's early days, choosing a distro was simple: you went with the one you had heard about, or the one that someone you knew had experience with, or the one with some degree of documentation. Naturally, then, you were limited in choice to the likes of RedHat, Debian, or Slackware.

  • DEFT “Zero” Linux 2017.1 Lightweight Hacker Distro Available For Download
  • No, OpenSUSE and SUSE Downloads Haven’t Been Hacked

    Some inconsequential remnants of SUSE’s old relationship with Novell remain, however; both the domain names and the IP addresses used by SUSE/openSUSE are still listed as being owned by Novell. If I were SUSE, I think I’d take care of that and have both transferred to my name. There’s no need to remind people of a history that’s better left forgotten.

    All indications are that the defacer of the openSUSE News site, which operates as a subdomain of openSUSE.org, leveraged a widely reported vulnerability in WordPress that has recently been responsible for more than 2 million WordPress sites being hacked. The vulnerability was fixed in late January with the WordPress 4.7.2 update.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2017

    In January, about 159 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

Microsoft-Friendly Media Prematurely Announces Death of GNU/Linux (Old Tactics) to Market Vista 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.