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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GNU World Order 336

    Listener feedback

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/03

    This has been a busy week when looking at the snapshots. Tumbleweed has received 6 fully tested snapshots that were published (0110, 0111, 0112, 0113, 0114 and 0115).

  • Open Mainframe Project Continues to Grow with Launch of Polycephaly and New Members

    The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, continues to see rapid growth with a new project , Polycephaly, and the addition of new members.

    The project  (formally zJenkins) is based on IBM IBM Dependency Based Build (DBB) using Groovy script to build z/OS applications with Jenkins and Git, and three academic institutions from China: Beijing Institute of Technology, South China University of Technology, and Xidian University.

  • The BSC coordinates the manufacture of the first open source chip developed in Spain

    In collaboration with the Centro de Investigación en Computación of the Mexican IPN, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica of the CSIC and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC).

    Lagarto, which is built with TSMC’s 65-nanometer transistors, is the first open source instruction set architecture (ISA) chip developed in Spain, coordinated by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC). The chip, which has performed better results than expected, is a key step in the center's strategy to become a benchmark in the open source hardware technologies’ field developed in Europe.

  • Next release will be LibreOffice 7

    Congratulations! Next release will be LibreOffice 7 instead LibreOffice 6.5. Look at that message in marketing mail list.

  • UVM Gets $1 Million From Google For Open Source Research

    Open source software can be shared and modified but UVM said the concept is about more than software. The school says the aim of the project is to broaden understanding of how people, teams and organizations thrive in technology-rich settings, particularly in open-source projects and communities.

  • UVM gets $1M from Google for open source research

    The unrestricted gift is to support open-source research. Open source is a type of computer software, where source code is released under a license, and the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.

  • Is open source culture the answer to our technology woes?

    For that, open source culture is likely to be the most effective, if not the only, therapy. Open source means to be open about the source of knowledge that enables anyone to make something. With regard to technology, one important element of that source, but certainly not the only one, is represented by the code used to generate a given piece of software, AKA the source code.

    But you would be mistaken to think that the ability to read and write code is a necessary requirement to access this alternative technological world. In fact, open source should be understood in its broader sense of open knowledge. Should one wish, everyone can contribute in many ways such as by sharing, translating and editing instructions, creating tutorials and engaging with the ethical issues at stake in our technological society. Contrary to how things were 30 years ago, open source software is today as user-friendly and good-looking as any other proprietary and close-source counterpart. The ability to read and write code is certainly useful, but not necessary when using open source alternatives.

  • Open source: Vatican wartime archives ready for new batch of scholars

    After decades of anticipation, the Vatican archives are ready to welcome, starting March 2, scores of scholars wishing to study documents related to the wartime pontificate of Pope Pius XII.

  • How open-source code could help us survive natural disasters

    In November 2019, while on a trip to Australia to discuss the power of technology to make a difference in the aftermath of natural disasters, I saw firsthand the devastation caused by historic bushfires raging throughout the country.

    Sadly, devastating bushfires are still burning on the continent, putting more and more lives at risk and destroying entire communities. As the fires persist, the smoke in Sydney and elsewhere has rendered the air quality “hazardous.” There’s been a national spike in hospital visits, many to treat breathing problems.

    Unfortunately, Australia is not alone in being ravaged by natural disaster.

  • Textbooks are pricey. So students are getting creative.
  • HP remotely disables customer’s printer until he joins monthly subscription

    Just because you buy a product doesn't mean you actually own it; that's the new normal that the advancement of technology has been slowly establishing over the past decades. Corporations look after themselves by using copyright protections such as digital rights management, DRM, but in this process, consumers' rights are often restricted to an absurd degree.

    For example – as Ryan Sullivan has discovered and then shared on Twitter – HP will disable ink cartridges in your (or, it would seem, their) printers if you stop paying a monthly subscription for a service that's known as HP Instant Ink.

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • [Ubuntu] Design and Web team summary – 17 January 2020

    The second iteration of this year is the last one before our mid-cycle sprint next week.

    Here’s a short summary of the work the squads in the Web & Design team completed in the last 2-week iteration.

  • 5 key steps to take your IoT device to market

    IoT businesses are notoriously difficult to get off the ground. No matter how good your product is or how good your team is, some of the biggest problems you will face are just in getting to market and maintaining your devices once they’re in the field. The webinar will take a look at how Canonical’s Brand Store product allows you to get to market while catering for long term problems and the need to keep your product up to date in the future.

    More specifically, this webinar will look at the common problems we see organisations facing on their way to getting an IoT device to market, and cover five key steps to solve these problems. Along the way we will dig a little into serval case studies Canonical has done with various customers and partners to show you what has already been achieved with these solutions.

  • Fake cases — make sure yours is the real deal

    We’ve had some reports of people finding cases that pretend to be official Raspberry Pi products online — these are fakes, they’re violating our trademark, they’re not made very well, and they’re costing you and us money that would otherwise go to fund the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable work. (Reminder, for those who are new to this stuff: we’re a not-for-profit, which means that every penny we makes goes to support our work in education, and that none of us gets to own a yacht.)

  • Let’s Talk With Neal Gompa of Fedora @ openSUSE Conference

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, we sat down with Neal Gompa of the Fedora community at openSUSE Conference

  • FOSSCOMM 2019 aftermath

    FOSSCOMM (Free and Open Source Software Communities Meeting) is a Greek conference aiming at free-software and open-source enthusiasts, developers, and communities. This year was held at Lamia from October 11 to October 13.

    It is a tradition for me to attend this conference. Usually, I have presentations and of course, booths to inform the attendees about the projects I represent.

    This year the structure of the conference was kind of different. Usually, the conference starts on Friday with a "beer event". Now it started with registration and a presentation. Personally, I made my plan to leave Thessaloniki by bus. It took me about 4 hours on the road. So when I arrived, I went to my hotel and then waited for Pantelis to go to University and set up our booths.

  • Fugue open sources Regula to evaluate Terraform for security misconfigurations and compliance violations

    Regula rules are written in Rego, the open source policy language employed by the Open Policy Agent project and can be integrated into CI/CD pipelines to prevent cloud infrastructure deployments that may violate security and compliance best practices.

    “Developers design, build, and modify their own cloud infrastructure environments, and they increasingly own the security and compliance of that infrastructure,” said Josh Stella, co-founder and CTO of Fugue.

    “Fugue builds solutions that empower engineers operating in secure and regulated cloud environments, and Regula quickly and easily checks that their Terraform scripts don’t violate policy—before they deploy infrastructure.”

  • Finance goes agile as open source checks the security box

    “At Northwestern Mutual, we’ve finally gotten past that curve,” said Sean Corkum (pictured, right), senior engineer at Northwestern Mutual. “Now we’re trying to make it even easier for our internal developers to participate in open source … and contribute more to the community.”

  • Top NLP Open Source Projects For Developers In 2020
  • Kiwi TCMS: Project roadmap 2020

    Hello testers, the Kiwi TCMS team sat down together last week and talked about what we feel is important for us during the upcoming year. This blog post outlines our roadmap for 2020!

  • Shift on Stack: api_port failure
  • How To Git Commit With Message

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • When Kickstarter goes wrong for indie games: Drift Stage

    A lot of the time Kickstarter (and other crowdfunding services) for indie games goes well, in fact the vast majority of the time all is fine. Sometimes though, everything breaks down as is the case with Drift Stage.

    Drift Stage was successfully funded on Kickstarter back in February of 2015, with a reasonable sum (compared with other projects) of $57,720 to make their modern take on retro racing a reality. Over the years, they released multiple demo versions and showed it off at Minecon (the Minecraft convention) in 2016 which you can still find a demo of here on itch.io and all seemed well on the surface.

    Time went on, backers noticed a lack of new details and progress on it with many trying to find out what was actually going on. In December of 2018, the Artist on the project Charles "DelkoDuck" Blanchard posted on Steam to finally clear it up and it wasn't good. The programmer and co-creator, Chase Pettit, apparently did a bit of a disappearing act, becoming hard to get in contact with and claimed they were just too busy for it.

  • Open-world puzzler 'Bonfire Peaks' has you climb mysterious ruins and set fire to your belongings

    Arriving with Linux support on May 5, from the developer of Pipe Push Paradise and Hiding Spot is the open-world puzzle game Bonfire Peaks.

    Not much info on it yet, with it only just being announced. From what the developer said it's a "difficult open world puzzle game about climbing mysterious ruins and setting fire to your belongings" that's being made in Unity. They do at least have a trailer up you can see below:

  • Running for the openSUSE Board again or: reelect (Sarah);

    I was in the openSUSE Board for 2 years in the past and I have enjoyed this time to bring along the openSUSE project.

    I want to run for the openSUSE Board again after a short break about 1 year. I am happy that the existing openSUSE Board has proceeded my idea with the foundation so successfully. But I would be happy about being allowed to finalize this/ my topic together with the other Board Members as my old idea.
    Additionally, I have watched the decreasing reputation. Public representations of openSUSE have been missing by the openSUSE Board in the last year. I would increase that on the same way I have done that at our university.

  • Top Open Source Machine Learning Tools

    Google, Facebook, IBM, Microsoft and other tech giants including renowned developers have already taken a nimble step towards the Machine learning and Artificial intelligence to make the dream of human beings of creating a highly intelligent machine. And to armed others to partake in this journey of building a conscious machine for the future, there are quite a good number of open source tools avail by tech giants to integrate artificial intelligence into applications.

    Yet, the artificial intelligence and machine learning are at very early stage, so don?t expect something like some sci-fi movie, however developers those are into AI and ML can use the open-source software we are going to discuss for writing apps for better speech recognition, Image recognization, Voice assistance, developing a neural network and more? Take a look at some of the most popular open-source solutions.

  • A day in the life at SUSECON 2020. Here’s what to expect!

    We are roughly about 9 weeks out from SUSECON 2020 taking place in Dublin, Ireland! Wondering what you can expect from this years event? I’ve got you covered!

    Plan to be inspired by keynotes, 150+ breakout sessions and more certification opportunities than ever before! Expect the latest innovations in Linux, Ceph, Cloud Foundry, and a host of other great open source technologies now available from SUSE and from our technology partners. You can also plan to network with open source technologists and experts in their field, gain new skills in our deep dive hands-on technical sessions and gain insight through talking with peers. Your SUSECON pass brings you the best content and value of any conference in the industry, from hands-on training to complimentary certifications to meeting with experts — it’s all here!

  • Daniel Stenberg: You’re invited to curl up 2020: Berlin

    curl up is the main (and only?) event of the year where curl developers and enthusiasts get together physically in a room for a full weekend of presentations and discussions on topics that are centered around curl and its related technologies.

    We move the event around to different countries every year to accommodate different crowds better and worse every year – and this time we’re back again in Germany – where we once started the curl up series back in 2017.

    The events are typically small with a very friendly spirit. 20-30 persons

  • Kiwi TCMS 7.3

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 7.3!

    IMPORTANT: this is a critical security update for CVE-2019-19844: Potential account hijack via password reset form!

    Also migrates to Django 3.0 and includes several other improvement and bug-fixes!

  •  

  • WordPress Leaders Nominated for CMX Awards

    Two members of the WordPress leadership team were nominated for excellent work in their field in the first ever Community Industry Awards. Andrea Middleton is nominated for Executive Leader of a Community Team and Josepha Haden Chomphosy is nominated for Community Professional of the Year.

    [...]

    Andrea has been a vital community strategist for the WordPress project since 2011. Her work to build and support a vibrant community has played a part in the success around the popular open source CMS. Her work is sponsored by Automattic, where she leads a team that focuses on educational efforts, funding, and in-person community-driven events that serve a global base.

    Josepha has been the Executive Director of the WordPress project since 2019. Her work to coordinate and guide volunteer efforts spans 20 teams and involves thousands of volunteers. Her work is also sponsored by Automattic, where she leads the open source division that focuses on all aspects of open source contribution including design, development, volunteer engagement, and the health of the overall WordPress ecosystem.

  • Schneier: "It's really too late to secure 5G networks"

    Schneier points to a variety of factors contributing to 5G's intrinsic, irreparable unsuitability: first, the US government pushed for weaker security in order to ensure that it could conduct domestic surveillance; the standards themselves are so complex as to be impossible to implement securely; and the system calls for software running on dynamically configurable hardware, which "dramatically increases the points vulnerable to attack."

    Moreover, 5G is backwards compatible with earlier protocols, inheriting all their insecurities, and generating new ones where these protocols' weak spots can be chained together to create attacks that each protocol was, in and of itself immune to, but which the system remains vulnerable to.

  • The trouble with IPv6 extension headers

    It has taken longer than anybody might have liked, but the IPv6 protocol is slowly displacing IPv4 across the Internet. A quick, highly scientific "grep the access logs" test shows that about 16% of the traffic to LWN.net is currently using IPv6, and many large corporate networks are using IPv6 exclusively internally. This version of the IP protocol was designed to be more flexible than IPv4 in a number of ways; the "extension header" mechanism is one way in which that flexibility is achieved. A proposal to formalize extension-header processing in the kernel's networking stack has led to some concerns, though, about how this feature will be used and what role Linux should play in its development.
    In both versions of the IP protocol, the header of each packet contains a collection of information about how the packet is to be handled; at a minimum, it contains source and destination addresses and a higher-level protocol number. In IPv4, the contents of the header are rigidly specified; it is difficult to add new types of information to the header. When IPv6 was designed, extension headers were added as a way to (relatively) easily add new information in the future.

    A few extension header types are defined in RFC8200 (which describes IPv6). Two of particular interest are the "Hop-by-Hop" and "Destination" headers; the former is meant to be acted upon by every system that handles the packet, while the latter is only for the destination node's attention. These headers may contain one or more options, each encoded in a type-length-value (TLV) format. RFC8200 only defines a couple of options that insert padding into the header, but there is interest in adding a number of others.

    For example, In-situ Operations, Administration, and Maintenance options are meant to allow providers to collect telemetry information on packets passing through their networks. The Path MTU mechanism uses a Hop-by-Hop option to discover the maximum packet size a path can handle. Firewall and Service Tickets (FAST) are a Hop-by-Hop option that documents a packet's right to traverse a network or pass through a firewall. The Segment Routing options allows a packet to contain the path it should take through a network. And so on.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tesla Is Making Use Of The Open-Source Coreboot Within Their Electric Vehicles

    Not only is Linux increasingly used within automobiles but it turns out at least one automobile manufacturer is even using Coreboot within their vehicles.

    Tesla turns out to be utilizing Coreboot as part of their electric vehicle computer systems. Tesla Motors' open-source portal on GitHub is hosting a Coreboot repository with a big code drop having happened at the start of the new year.

    The new code added on top of the Coreboot source tree is from Tesla Motors and Samsung. Samsung manufacturers the company's current full self-driving (FSD) chip.

  • Boostnote – A Note Taking and Markdown Editor Made for Coders

    Boostnote is a 100% open-source, multi-platform Markdown editor and note-taking application designed for developers. Of course, non-programmers can use it without any technical requirements in order to take advantage of all its modern features which include full Markdown editing (with live preview) and Latex support.

    [...]

    Apart from the above-listed features, you can use hotkeys to quickly navigate through the app and search for notes among other quick actions. The tab or spacebars can be customized to your taste and you can export notes as either plain text (.txt) or markdown (.md).

    [...]

    Boostnote is open-source but that doesn’t stop it from having a paid version. The Basic version is free with 100MB cloud storage space while the Premium version features 2GB of cloud storage space for a fee of $3/month and $5 for every extra 5GB.

  • Oracle Groundbreakers Podcast: #374: Kubernetes and Beyond: An Interview with Kelsey Hightower

    Kelsey Hightower is a developer advocate, an open source aficionado, and a widely recognized expert on Kubernetes. He is the creator of the open source tutorial Kubernetes The Hard Way, available on Github, and he is a co-author of Kubernetes: Up and Running: Dive Into the Future of Infrastructure, the second edition of which is now available from O’Reilly Media. In this program his conversation with Oracle's Karthik Gaekwad encompasses Kubernetes, Open Source, cloud computing, developer advocacy and a lot more. Listen!

  • Unboxing of the Kubuntu Focus Laptop

    I got a chance to review the Kubuntu Focus laptop and this is the Unboxing and First Impressions video for it.

  • Kaby Lake edge AI system features Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080

    Ibase’s Ubuntu-ready “EC-7100” edge AI computer combines a 7th Gen Intel Core i7 with Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics. The system offers 2x M.2, mini-PCIe, 2x SATA 3.0, 4x DP, 4x USB 3.0, and up to 3x GbE ports.

    The EC-7100 is another example of the trend of adding discrete graphics cards to embedded systems to enable edge AI or high-end graphics applications. Ibase previously combined an Intel 7th Gen Kaby Laky CPU with an Nvidia MXM NV1050 graphics card in its SI-614 signage player to enable up to 4x 4K DisplayPort displays. With the EC-7100, Ibase has paired Kaby Lake with a much more powerful Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 card for AI applications. One similar system that supports the GTX 1080 is Neousys’ Intel Coffee Lake based Nuvo-8208GC.

  • Can algorithms be unethical?

    At Raspberry Pi, we’re interested in all things to do with technology, from building new tools and helping people teach computing, to researching how young people learn to create with technology and thinking about the role tech plays in our lives and society. One of the aspects of technology I myself have been thinking about recently is algorithms.

  • Best WordPress Search Plugins to Improve Your Site Search

    Are you running a multilingual WordPress website? we published an article on the best translation plugins for multilingual websites and you can improve the user experience of your site visitors who contact you using the world’s best WordPress contact form plugin. Evidently, we’re interested in boosting your WordPress experience and today we’re back with another set of plugin recommendations.

    WordPress installs with the basic setup required to run your business nicely but as you must know by now, there are 3rd party plugins that can boost its effectiveness and this is no different for the content management system’s default search.

    Yes, it works to return a result of selected text in posts and pages but the WordPress search function can do a lot more complex things than that e.g. you can search for strings of texts in PDFs, you can filter search results for specific custom post types, etc.

    If you’re interested in boosting your WordPress search functionality then today’s your lucky day because here are the best WordPress search plugins for your website listed in alphabetic order.

  • Strategic approaches to the development of digital literacies

    I’m in Kuwait City today, leading a pre-conference workshop for the AMICAL consortium of American international liberal arts institutions, who work together on common goals for libraries, technology and learning.

    This isn’t a ‘tools’ session but rather, as the title would suggest, a strategic look at developing digital literacies strategically across institutions.

  • Why everyone is talking about WebAssembly

    If you haven’t heard of WebAssembly yet, then you will soon. It’s one of the industry’s best-kept secrets, but it’s everywhere. It’s supported by all the major browsers, and it’s coming to the server-side, too. It’s fast. It’s being used for gaming. It’s an open World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the main international standards organization for the web, standard. It’s platform-neutral and can run on Linux, Macs, and Windows.

    "Wow," you may be saying, "this sounds like something I should learn to code in!" You’d be right, but you’d be wrong too; you don’t code in WebAssembly. Let’s take some time to learn about the technology that’s often fondly abbreviated to "Wasm."

  • Apple App Review: resistance is futile!

    Apple: “Computer says… blub-blub-blub’”

  • Apple App Review says “maybe”: the whims of trillion-dollar gatekeepers

    Yesterday, I wrote about how Apple’s refusal to update a couple of fields in their database has impacted the future of Better Blocker, the tracker blocker that Laura and I build at our tiny two-person not-for-profit, Small Technology Foundation.

    I also shared our plan for dealing with this situation.

    Yesterday, we were at Step 3 of our plan. We’d submitted the version 2020.1 updates to Better for macOS and iOS from our old developer account and we were waiting for Apple to approve them.

    Today, we are half-at step 4 because Apple has approved the macOS app and rejected the iOS app.

  • Linux Bonus Pack Makes SAP Hana Movers Happy

    More and more SAP customers are opting for Hana (and consequently Linux) and ERP successor S/4. According to a new forecast by German-speaking SAP user group DSAG, the percentage of existing customers using S/4 will continue to increase in the next three years – from currently 8 percent to then 50 percent.

    These numbers are impressive, and they are not even taking new customers into account. Numerous companies of all sizes and industries will also switch to SAP and S/4 in the next couple of years.

    [...]

    This company is a supplier operating in the construction industry. On the road to S/4, this company migrated its SAP systems (ECC, APO, TM and PI) to Hana with Suse Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications from its existing infrastructure with DB2, Power hardware and Power VM and AIX.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • [OpenMandriva] Additional desktop environments updated once again!

    I am pleased to announce that all currently the most popular desktops are available in the OpenMandriva repository and have been updated to the latest releases.

    So, if you don’t like the default Plasma 5, then you have option to use a different environment like Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, IceWM or i3. In addition @fedya has prepared Sway, and in the repository we can also find under the tutelage of @bero the LXQT and Lumina - both QT based environments. All desktop you can find in Cooker, Rolling* and in upcoming stable release Rock 4.1.

    [...]

    GNOME environment was updated to latest stable 3.34.3 along with most components that fall into this gtk stack.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 613

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 613 for the week of January 5 – 11, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • UVM gets $1 million from Google for open source research

    The school says the aim of the project is to broaden understanding of how people, teams and organizations thrive in technology-rich settings, particularly in open-source projects and communities.

  • Creative Commons and USAID Collaborate on Guide to Open Licensing

    Over the past two years, we’ve been working with USAID, the Global Book Alliance, the Global Digital Library, and the Global Reading Network on early childhood reading programs, with a focus on helping these programs to recognize the potential of open licensing to increase the reach and efficacy of resources that promote youth literacy. In the course of doing that work, we all realized that additional materials needed to be created for grantees of the programs to not only understand the open license grant requirements, but to undertake the practical steps of implementing open licenses. To respond to that need, we collaborated with USAID and the Global Reading Network to write and co-publish Open Licensing of Primary Grade Reading Materials: Considerations and Recommendations, a guide to open licenses that includes an introduction to the basics of copyright, an overview of the benefits of open licensing, and suggestions for choosing and implementing open licenses.

  • German Lawyer Niklas Plutte shares OSS tips

    Under the title « Open Source Software Recht: Große FAQ mit vielen Praxistipps” (in German language) the German lawyer Niklas Plutte (Rechtsanwalt) summarises the main questions related to open source licensing.

    In particular, the paper analyse how far open licences will produce a reciprocal (or copyleft) effect, meaning that in case or re-distribution of the program (as is, modified or in combination with other software) the copy, the modified or derivative work must be provided under the same licence and made available to the public in source code form, which could be shared and reused by anyone.

  • Cryptic Rumblings Ahead of First 2020 Patch Tuesday [iophk: why is Canonical not utilizing this already? Do they have too many microsofters inside the perimeter now?]

    According to sources, the vulnerability in question resides in a Windows component known as crypt32.dll, a Windows module that Microsoft says handles “certificate and cryptographic messaging functions in the CryptoAPI.” The Microsoft CryptoAPI provides services that enable developers to secure Windows-based applications using cryptography, and includes functionality for encrypting and decrypting data using digital certificates.

    A critical vulnerability in this Windows component could have wide-ranging security implications for a number of important Windows functions, including authentication on Windows desktops and servers, the protection of sensitive data handled by Microsoft’s Internet Explorer/Edge browsers, as well as a number of third-party applications and tools.

    Equally concerning, a flaw in crypt32.dll might also be abused to spoof the digital signature tied to a specific piece of software. Such a weakness could be exploited by attackers to make malware appear to be a benign program that was produced and signed by a legitimate software company.

  • Facebook Shares Its 2019 Year in Review for Open Source

    Facebook said it released 170 new open-source projects in 2019, bringing its total portfolio to 579 active repositories.

    Open-source developer advocate Dmitry Vinnik said in a blog post that the social network’s internal engineers contributed more than 82,000 commits in 2019, while some 2,500 external contributors committed over 32,000 changes.

    He added that almost 93,000 new people starred Facebook’s open-source projects last year.

  • Amazon accused of 'strip mining' open source software

    ust before the start of the festive season shut-down in mid-December, the New York Times published a long article accusing one of the world’s largest technology companies – Amazon – of nefarious business practices.

    Amazon reacted strongly, with Andi Gutmans, VP of Analytics and ElastiCache at Amazon Web Services (AWS) calling the NY Times article “skewed and misleading” as well as “silly and off-base”.

    Referring to open source companies that it said had complained about Amazon’s business practices, which included benefiting by integrating open source software pioneered by others into its own products, the NYTimes wrote: “Some of the companies have a phrase for what Amazon is doing: strip-mining software. By lifting other people’s innovations, trying to poach their engineers and profiting off what they made, Amazon is choking off the growth of would-be competitors and forcing them to reorient how they do business.”

  • Financial Services Firms Must Contribute More Software Repos, to Retain Staff and Stay Relevant [Ed: This article promotes the fiction that only code Microsoft controls counts as FOSS. It is a hostile and malicious takeover.]

    Does this tell us anything ? Overall, I was quite encouraged, but felt financial services firms in particular have more to do.

    My first observation regards firms not featuring on the list. Many Financial Services companies - banks, asset managers and other open source-consuming tier 1 hedge funds - are notable by their absence on Github, though in fairness some host repos elsewhere. While Goldman Sachs, for a long time active with Java, and JP Morgan are readily findable, many of their rivals sadly barely register. Kudos to those that have contributed, particularly the likes of Two Sigma and Man AHL, who have truly put money, time and effort where their mouths are.

    Vendors like Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters have found repos to be useful for promoting APIs to their databases, not unlike some internet services firm submissions represented in the list. They're doing well.

    Particularly pleasing for me were two "proprietary" software firms active in Financial Services, MathWorks and SAS, both releasing significant numbers of high calibre code repos, not least because I worked many years for one of them. Predictably, most repos from my former company are in their own proprietary though openly-viewable and editable language, MATLAB. For SAS, somewhat less predictably to my mind at least, more code submissions were in Python and JavaScript than SAS code itself. Kudos therefore to my former competitors at SAS ! It seems they understand the programming languages preferred by their staff's children and grandchildren, a bit like my using DuckDuckGo, chatting with gamers on Discord and shouting "boomer" at anyone over the age of 33.

  • Spotify Accidentally Leaks Details on Its Home Thing Smart Speaker

    A leak may have revealed Spotify’s upcoming foray into smart home speakers. New setup images for something called ‘Spotify Home Thing’ have appeared online.

  • Bay Staters Continue to Lead in Right to Repair, and EFF Is There to Help

    Massachusetts has long been a leader in the Right to Repair movement, thanks to a combination of principled lawmakers and a motivated citizenry that refuses to back down when well-heeled lobbyists subvert the legislative process.

    In 2012, Massachusetts became the first US state to enact Right to Repair legislation, with an automotive law that protected the right of drivers to get their cars repaired by independent mechanics if they preferred them to the manufacturers' service depots. Though wildly popular, it took the threat of a ballot initiative to get the legislature to act, an initiative that ultimately garnered 86% of the vote. The initiative led to strong protections for independent repair in Massachusetts and set the stage for a compromise agreement leading to better access to repair information for most of the country.

  • Enjoy this peaceful 4 hour long trailer for THE LONGING, a game that takes 400 days to beat

    A curious one this, a game that has a clock that counts down from 400 days as soon as you start it and you don't even need to play it to get to the ending, as time continues when you're not playing. I've played some slow games before but this is an all new kind of sloth.

    It's called THE LONGING and you play as Shade, the last lonely servant of a King who once ruled an underground kingdom. The King's powers have faded and he sleeps for 400 days to regain strength and you're supposed to stick around until he awakens. Announced today, Studio Seufz have now given it a release date of March 5 and you can see the wonderful four hour long trailer below. The trailer is obviously a joke, at how you can just sit around and do nothing.

  • Feral Interactive are asking what you want ported to Linux again

    Feral Interactive, the porting studio behind a lot of great games available on Linux are asking for some feedback again on where they should go next.

    In the past, they've teased how they feed port requests into "THE REQUESTINATOR". Looks like my number three from when they asked in November 2018 turned out okay with Shadow of the Tomb Raider. As always though, we want additional ports to buy and more varied titles to play through.

  • OpenStack’s Complicated Kubernetes Relationship

    2020 may be the year the OpenStack community comes to terms with Kubernetes

    As the open source community heads into 2020, loyalties between OpenStack and Kubernetes are likely to become increasingly divided. Contributors to open source projects are trying to determine where to prioritize their efforts, while IT organizations are wondering to what degree they will need a framework such as OpenStack to deploy Kubernetes.

    Most Kubernetes deployments thus far have been on top of open source virtual machines or commercial platforms from VMware. Most of those decisions have been driven by the need to isolate Kubernetes environments sharing the same infrastructure. In addition, many IT organizations lacked the tools or expertise required to manage Kubernetes natively, so it became easier to simply extend existing tools to manage Kubernetes as an extension of a virtual machine-based platform.

    The debate now is to what degree that approach will continue as organizations become first more familiar with native Kubernetes toolsets and alternative approaches to isolating workloads using lighter-weight virtual machines emerge.

    Lighter-weight alternatives to OpenStack and VMware for deploying Kubernetes clusters already exist, notes Rob Hirschfeld, CEO of RackN, a provider of an infrastructure automation platform based on open source Digital Rebar software.

    At the same time, managed service providers such as Mirantis have begun rolling out highly distributed services based on Kubernetes that make no use of OpenStack at all.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Avoid Unnecessary Reboots: Set up the Livepatch Service on Ubuntu

    Rebooting should only be done if absolutely necessary, especially on servers. In this video, I show the process of enabling Canonical's Livepatch service, which will patch the Linux kernel automatically and allow you to avoid (most) reboots when the kernel updates.

  • Linux Action News 140

    Are we overloaded with open source licenses? We consider a simpler future. Results from the Debian init vote are in, and why Amazon’s new open source project might be worth checking out.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.4 Milestone 1 Released

    The first development release of Phoronix Test Suite 9.4-Vestby is now available for evaluation.

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.4-Vestby is the Q1'2020 feature update due out in about one month's time. With today's Milestone 1 release is the first batch of improvements arriving while more work should be landing over the next few weeks.

    With Phoronix Test Suite 9.4 Milestone 1 are a variety of low-level improvements, external dependency updates, various new helper string options for test profiles, pass/fail graph formatting improvements, Phodevi software/hardware detection improvements, support for the forthcoming Linux "drivetemp" ATA temperature driver as another fallback in monitoring drive temperatures, and other refinements and fixes.

  • Benchmarks Of LLVM Clang 6.0 Through Clang 10.0 Compilers

    At the end of 2019 I ran some GCC 5 through GCC 10 compiler benchmarks while here are the similar tests conducted on the LLVM side for seeing how the Clang C/C++ compiler performance has evolved over the past few years.

    This round of testing was done on LLVM Clang 6.0 through LLVM Clang 9.0 while building in the release modes and also testing with LLVM Clang 10.0 as the development code as of December. All the CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS remained the same throughout testing.

  • The next generation of low-cost, open-source oceanographic instruments is here! Meet the OpenCTD rev 2!

    In 2013, Kersey Sturdivant and I embarked upon a quixotic quest to create an open-source CTD — the core tool of all oceanographic research that measures the baseline parameters of salinity, temperature, and depth. We weren’t engineers; neither of us had any formal training in electronics or sensing. And, full confession, we weren’t (and still aren’t) even oceanographers! What we were were post-doc marine ecologists working with tight budgets who saw a desperate need among our peers and colleagues for low-cost alternatives to insurmountably expensive equipment. And we had ties to the growing Maker and DIY electronics movements: Kersey through his work developing Wormcam and me through my involvement with OpenROV.

  • Wi-Fi 6 is finally here

    The biggest leap forward for Wi-Fi 6 at this year’s conference came from affordable Wi-Fi routers. Last year, we saw lots of promises of routers coming soon, but when those routers showed up in stores, they tended to arrive at the highest of price points. This makes sense — Wi-Fi 6 is new tech, so of course it ended up in the highest end routers first. But widespread adoption depends on Wi-Fi 6 making it into the lower priced routers the majority of people actually buy. These new routers aren’t necessarily better than last year’s, but they offer a meaningful improvement upon the cheaper models they’re replacing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Physics-based platformer LAZR has a very impressive new demo out

    Currently in development by Garrick Campsey, LAZR has to be one of the most unique platformers I've seen in some time with some very fun cloth simulation going on and a big new demo is out.

    Campsey calls their game a "Clothformer" due to the special mechanics it uses. You can climb across all sort of cloth-based objects, set them on fire, even some enemies are made of cloth for you to have some fun destroying them. The previous tech demo was already impressive and this new demo is much bigger featuring 5 mission levels, 5 challenge levels, 2 training levels and more to give a proper look at it.

  • FC Is Yet Another LLVM Fortran Compiler, Now Targeting The New MLIR IR

    While the Flang/f18 compiler is expected to land in the LLVM 10.0 source tree on Monday, another Fortran LLVM front-end continues in development.

    FC is another Fortran compiler for LLVM that is completely separate from the likes of Flang and f18 compilers. FC was announced last year as a new Fortran compiler being developed by little-known compiler consulting firm CompilerTree. At the time they said their Fortran compiler was delivering comparable performance to Flang and GCC's Fortran (Gfortran).

  • Library of Congress Storage Architecture Meeting

    The Library of Congress has finally posted the presentations from the 2019 Designing Storage Architectures for Digital Collections workshop that took place in early September, I've greatly enjoyed the earlier editions of this meeting, so I was sorry I couldn't make it this time. Below the fold, I look at some of the presentations.

  • Ring Throws A Moist Towelette On Its Dumpster Fire With A Couple Of Minimal Security Tweaks

    Things have gotten worse and worse for Amazon's Ring over the past several months. Once just the pusher of a snitch app that allowed city residents to engage in racial profiling from the comfort of their homes, Ring is now synonymous with poor security practices and questionable "partnerships" with hundreds of law enforcement agencies around the nation.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Make Linux Login Look Better than Windows

    In this video, I am going over how to make Linux login look better than Windows by modifying the config of LightDM.

  • Self-Hosted: Fixing Brent's WiFi | Jupiter Extras 45

    Join Alex and Brent for a chat about upgrading your home network with an eye towards stability, simplicity, and hosting things yourself.

  • Xiaomi Redmi AC2100 Router Sells for $35 and Up

    Xiaomi has launched several affordable WiFi routers over the years.

  • SimplePnP is a Low-Cost, Open Source Hardware Pick-and-Place Machine (Crowdfunding)
  • Seeeduino XIAO is the smallest Arduino compatible board from SeeedStudio’s Seeduino family.

    Seeeduino XIAO is the smallest Arduino compatible board from SeeedStudio’s Seeduino family.

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: December 2019

    LibreOffice 6.4.0 RC1 was released on December 23 and a Bug Hunting Session took place the same day

  • Meet Guix at FOSDEM

    As usual, GNU Guix will be present at FOSDEM on February 1st and 2nd. This year, we're happy to say that there will be quite a few talks about Guix and related projects!

  • AWS announces AutoGluon, an open-source library for writing AI models

    Amazon Web Services Inc. today launched a new open-source library to help developers write, with just a few lines of code, machine learning-based applications that use image, text or tabular data sets.

    Building machine learning apps that rely on such data isn’t an easy task. For example, developers need to know how to tune the “hyperparameters” that represent the choices made when constructing an AI model. They also need to grapple with issues such as neural architecture search, which enables them to find the best architecture design for their machine learning models.

  • The ethical side of open source [Ed: Deeply unethical corporations trying to lecture us about ethics; this is all about control, in the name of 'safety'...]

    Over the summer, Facebook’s open-source JavaScript library React was under fire after racism and harassment were discovered within its community. The incident is known as #Reactgate and it ended with the designer Tatiana Mac, who raised awareness of some of the issues, resigning from the industry, and React software engineer Dan Abramov and library author Ken Wheeler deactivating their Twitter accounts temporarily.

  • Copyright Notices in Open Source Software Projects

    When source code, documentation and other content is contributed to an OSS project, the copyrights in those contributions typically remain owned by the original copyright holders.

    What follows is a discussion of the typical OSS project where each contributing organization and individual retains ownership of their copyrights that they make available under the project’s open source software license. In this case, the copyrights are licensed for distribution as part of the project. Whether a project uses the Developer Certificate of Origin (“DCO”) and/or a Contributor License Agreement (“CLA”), the original copyright holders retain their copyrights.

    [...]

    If a file only contains code that originates from a third party source who didn’t contribute it themselves, then you would not want to add the notices above. (In a similar vein, you wouldn’t add a notice identifying you as the copyright holder either, if you didn’t own it.) Just preserve the existing copyright and license notices as they are.

    If, however, you add copyrightable content to a pre-existing file from another project, then at that point you could add a copyright notice similar to the one above.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ldm and sa-exim), Mageia (firefox), openSUSE (chromium, firefox, and thunderbird), SUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, golang-github-docker-libnetwork, firefox, log4j, nodejs10, nodejs12, and openssl-1_0_0), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • Some NYC subway riders are accidentally getting double-charged because of Apple Pay

    Dozens of subway riders in New York City are being charged extra for their transit rides, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority suspects that Apple may be partly to blame.

    The MTA is not explicitly pointing the finger at Apple, but it appears that some riders may be unwittingly putting their iPhones too close to the system’s new tap-to-pay OMNY readers while simultaneously swiping their MetroCards at the turnstile.

today's howtos and leftovers

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • My favorite Bash hacks
  • 5 ways to do serverless on Kubernetes
  • AMDGPU Linux 5.5 Fixes 8K / 4K120 Output, Hits Sync Object Timeline Support For Vulkan

    While on the back-half of the Linux 5.5 kernel cycle, sent in on Wednesday were an interesting batch of AMDGPU driver fixes that are quite notable.

    First up, the reverting of the retry faults behavior is part of this pull request. This code revert is about helping the stability of recent AMD APUs that for some Linux users has meant frequent hangs unless this functionality was disabled. The alternative to try this workaround is booting the kernel with amdgpu.noretry=0 to achieve the same effect on existing kernel releases.

  • flexiWAN Open Source SD-WAN Platform Hits GA

    flexiWAN launched the first stable release of its open-source SD-WAN platform, which is available through one of the company’s hardware partners: Advantech, Lanner, and Silicom.

    “This release is a major milestone for flexiWAN and our community as it is the world’s first production-ready open and community-driven SD-WAN solution,” said Amir Zmora, CEO and co-founder of flexiWAN, in a statement. “Our innovation and openness doesn’t stop at the technical level. By offering our services as a freemium business model, along with publicly sharing our pricing and source code with the community, we strive to lead the industry to more openness.”

  • 11 top open-source API testing tools: What your team needs to know

    How do you find the right open-source API testing tool for your needs? Since my last roundup of the best candidates, a few more tools have appeared that warrant consideration—and there's a new technique that's all the buzz in AI automation circles that you need to know about.

    While most vendors are talking up the benefits of AI- and UI-based testing tools in general, AI- and machine learning-based applications that help with API testing have arrived.

    Before you begin API testing, however, make sure you understand test automation basics and know how to avoid the most common test automation mistakes.

  • Enterprise Networking Planet Predictions for 2020

    With 2020 now ramping up there's a lot to look forward to in the networking space this new year. Some of the trends have been going on for years, some are newer, but these are the areas where we expect to see big things in 2020

    [...]

    Simply put, all major networking efforts in 2020 will have some form of open source component. Whether its via code, participation in an Linux Foundation collaboration project or otherwise, the reach of open source is inescapable.

  • Odoo Raises $90M To Advance Open Source ERP

    Odoo brings in new funds as it aims to further expand its enterprise resource planning platform.

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software has long been dominated by established proprietary vendors, but that's not to say there isn't open source competition in the market.

    Odoo, a company formerly known as OpenERP, develops a suite of open source ERP tools and built a solid user base of over 4.5 million users. The core open source Odoo community version is complemented with the Odoo enterprise edition that adds proprietary features that can be useful for larger organizations.

    In December 2019, Odoo got a strong vote of confidence, with an investment of $90 million, led by Summit Partners, with the participation of existing investor SRIW and its affiliate Noshaq. Total funding to date for Odoo is approximately $104 million.

  • Daniel Stenberg: webinar: Why everyone is using curl and you should too

    I’m please to invite you to our live webinar, “Why everyone is using curl and you should too!”, hosted by wolfSSL. Daniel Stenberg (me!), founder and Chief Architect of curl, will be live and talking about why everyone is using curl and you should too!

    This is planned to last roughly 20-30 minutes with a following 10 minutes Q&A.

  • Bring the planet to LibrePlanet by sponsoring an attendee

    LibrePlanet 2020: Free the Future is only ten weeks away! On March 14 and 15, we will welcome free software enthusiasts and experts to Boston for the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) annual conference on technology and social justice.

    We're hard at work creating an event with engaging talks with speakers from all over the world, and without spoiling any future announcements, we're very excited about the program we have so far. It is promising to be a year filled with talks about interesting and successful projects. Anticipated talks will expose the fascinating parallels between social movements in free software, dig into community-related subjects, and as always, explore the latest issues in licensing, security, education, and government adoption of free software with experts from these fields.

    The FSF is proud of the fact that the LibrePlanet audience and speakers come from a diverse range of backgrounds, countries, and cultures. We believe that anyone who wants to attend or speak at the conference should not be held back by financial burdens, so if you have a few dollars to spare, why not make a donation in support of the LibrePlanet Scholarship Fund? You'll be supporting a robust, diverse free software community by helping to reduce the financial barrier for those who need the help.

    [...]

    On top of all the free software work we fund and do year-round, with your financial support, we can invite speakers who can enlighten us with their knowledge and experience. Your donations will also help free software enthusiasts attend who otherwise would not have the means to do so. Your contribution, even if it's only a couple dollars, can be the difference between someone attending or not.

  • The open source licence debate: dead project walking & incentive models

    Open source grew, it proliferated… and it became something that many previously proprietary-only software vendors embraced as a key means of development.

    If you don’t accept the options offered by the community contribution model of development, then you risk becoming a Proprietary 2.0 behemoth… or so the T-shirt slogan might go.

    But the issue of how open source software is licenced is still the stuff of some debate.

  • Uber open-sources Manifold, a visual tool for debugging AI models

    Debugging machine learning (ML) models isn’t a walk in the woods. Just ask the data scientists and engineers at Uber, some of whom have the unenviable task of digging into algorithms to diagnose the causes of their performance issues.

    To lighten the workload, Uber internally developed Manifold, a model-agnostic visual tool that surfaces the differences in distributions of features (i.e., the measurable properties of the phenomena being observed). It’s a part of the ride-hailing company’s Michelangelo ML platform, where it’s helped various product teams analyze countless AI models. And as of today, it’s available in open source on GitHub.

  • Y2K20 - The Infamous Millennium Bug Strikes Back 20 Years Later

    The new millennium presented the coders of the 90s with a unique problem know as the Y2K bug. Many computers of the time counted years by the last two digits, and they were about to roll back to 00. Come January 1st, a lot of systems were going to jump back to 1900, instead of 2000.

    Y2K was a coding complication that added to the plethora of scares surrounding the mysterious year 2000. Some people feared supernatural entities or extraterrestrial creatures would roam the earth. Others worried that every nuclear weapon in the world would misfire all at once as a result of the bug. In actuality, banking errors were among the worst things to come out of it.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GL.iNet Slate OpenWrt Travel Router Supports Tor, Wireguard VPN, and Cloudflare DNS over HTTPS/TLS

    A couple of months ago, we wrote about GL.iNet Mudi portable WiFi router with built-in 4G LTE connectivity and supporting features such as the Tor Project...

  • $4 Orange Pi 4/4B PCIe Expansion Board Includes an mPCIe socket, and a SIM card Slot

    Rockchip RK3399 based Orange Pi 4 & 4B boards launched last year with a PCIe connector.

  • Will Kahn-Greene: Socorro Engineering: Year in Review 2019

    Last year at about this time, I wrote a year in review blog post. Since I only worked on Socorro at the time, it was all about Socorro. In 2019, that changed, so this blog post covers the efforts of two people across a bunch of projects.

    2019 was pretty crazy. We accomplished a lot, but picking up a bunch of new projects really threw a wrench in the wheel of ongoing work.

    [...]

    I redid how Socorro handles queueing crash reports for processing. Previously, it used RabbitMQ. I switched it to Google Pub/Sub. In doing this, I removed one of the components between the collector and the processor which was sometimes flakey, so that was good. This was the first step in moving all of Socorro to Google Cloud Platform.

    [...]

    During the Buildhub and Buildhub2 audits, I decided that while Buildhub2 has a different set of issues with its data, it was better than maintaining two indexes. I wrote up a plan to shut down Buildhub, identified and fixed blocking issues in Buildhub2, and migrated projects from Buildhub to Buildhub2.

    Then we shut down and dismantled Buildhub.

    [...]

    Mozilla Location Services had been dormant for years. It was running Python 2.6 on Scientific Linux. It had a deploy pipeline that was several generations old. It was in an unmaintainable state.

    We overhauled it, finished up the Docker-ization of the services, finished the mostly-done migration from Python 2.6 to Python 3, updated dependencies, reduced a bunch of complexity, wrote a lot of documentation, fixed a ton of issues, pushed out a new deploy pipeline and Docker-based infrastructure, and did a series of stop-gap fixes for processing.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Mozilla Announces Deal to Bring Firefox Reality to Pico Devices

    For more than a year, we at Mozilla have been working to build a browser that was made to showcase the best of what you love about browsing, but tailor made for Virtual Reality.

    Now we are teaming up with Pico Interactive to bring Firefox Reality to its latest VR headset, the Neo 2 – an all-in-one (AIO) device with 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) head and controller tracking that delivers key VR solutions to businesses. Pico’s Neo 2 line includes two headsets: the Neo 2 Standard and the Neo 2 Eye featuring eye tracking and foveated rendering. Firefox Reality will also be released and shipped with previous Pico headset models.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (chromium, cyrus-imapd, drupal7-l10n_update, drupal7-webform, htmldoc, nethack, php, and singularity), Mageia (advancecomp, apache-commons-compress-, cyrus-imapd, cyrus-sasl, dia, freeimage, freeradius, igraph, jhead, jss, libdwarf, libextractor, libxml2, mediawiki, memcached, mozjs60, openconnect, openssl, putty, python-ecdsa, python-werkzeug, shadowsocks-libev, and upx), Oracle (container-tools:1.0 and container-tools:ol8), and Red Hat (kpatch-patch).

  • Reproducible Builds in December 2019

    In these reports we outline the most important things that we have been up to over the past month. As a quick recap, whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, almost all software is distributed to end users as pre-compiled binaries.

    The motivation behind the reproducible builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

  • Open Source Supply Chain: A Matter Of Trust [Ed: Linux Foundation still does openwashing puff pieces for proprietary software giant VMware; more of the same]

    Open source software is often considered safer and more secure than proprietary software because users can, if they want, compile the software from the source code. They know the source of the code running in their environment.  Every component that they are running in their environment can be audited and the developer held accountable.  

  • How I went nomad

    In 2016, I discovered this concept of digital nomadism, the idea that for knowledge workers who only need a laptop and an internet connection, you don’t really need to work in an office anymore. You can simply work remotely for companies that will allow it, or as a freelancer for clients who don’t really care where you are so long as the job is done. Many people were already doing it, and even though it had started off as a very difficult lifestyle, in the tracks of the 4-hour work week and other inspiring lifehackers, it had become easier and easier over the years with coworking spaces, AirBnB and even coliving spaces (coworking spaces combined with accomodations, NDLR). The only thing you needed was a knowledge job that could sustain your travels, making it possible for you to pay for temporary accomodation and flights. Some were doing it with dropshipping, others with ad-monetized niche websites, but one of the holy grails gigs seemed to be software development. How fortunate for me!

    [...]

    But at this point in my life, experience had already taught me that I shouldn’t jump into this sort of transition without a little bit of cautious preparation and experimentation.

    First things first, let’s expose the fears, since none of them is irrelevant, none of them should be kept under the rugs. All our fears exist to tell us something, and ignoring them is never the answer.

    The one fear I had heard of the most throughout forums and Slack groups about nomadism, and that I could relate to, was loneliness. When you move regularly and on your own, it can be really hard to create connections with other human beings, whether they live in the places where you live for a while, or they are other travellers like you. Bonding takes time, especially for an introvert with trust issues like myself, so I could see myself suffering from that. Thankfully, since it is such a widespread concern, some services had already started to appear to address that. Coliving spaces were a first answer, as they let travellers share accommodations with other travellers, or locals for that matter, creating a de facto sense of community, even for just a few weeks. On the other hand, except if you made a really good friend in that amount of time, you also had to start over almost from scratch in every space. Another answer that looked way more promising to me was travel groups. In addition to helping you with other issues we will talk about later, they also formed those groups of travellers who could follow each other from places to places, and also curated those communities around common sets of values and lifestyles.

    But then there was another fear, the extreme opposite one in fact. If it’s not a good idea to hide your fears under the rug, it’s also rarely a good one to forget who you are or try to disguise as someone else to fit into a new lifestyle. I had done that before, but no more. And for better or worse I am an introvert. I am not shy, but energy tends to flow outwards from myself to other people, which means I need some me time every once in a while to recharge. And I wanted to honor and respect that. Which meant I can support more lonely time than extroverts, but I also need to be able to take a step back from time to time. And some of those travel groups I just mentioned looked like a giant frat party, attracting a lot of twenty-something party-goers with their bad habits of peer-pressuring anyone who doesn’t follow along.

  • Matrix In, Telegram Out

    We would like to thank those of you who have participated in the Ubuntu Studio Telegram Groups over the past year. While it has been productive, we decided that it would be best to sunset our Telegram bridge to our IRC channels, thereby dropping Telegram from our official support and community channels.

  • 16 Best Platforms for Selling Digital Products 2020

    If you are considering starting an online business using the WordPress website then it is important for you to read our article on the Best WordPress Invoice Plugins in 2019. If what you want to do is sell digital/downloadable content without necessarily creating a website from scratch then read on.

  • Apple targets jailbreaking in lawsuit against iOS virtualization company

    Apple has expanded a lawsuit against an iOS virtualization company, claiming that its actions facilitate jailbreaking and violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) prohibition on circumvention of copyright-protection systems.

    Apple sued Corellium, a company that sells access to virtual machines that run copies of the operating system used in iPhones and iPads, in August 2019. We detailed the initial allegations in a previous article; Apple said that Corellium sells "perfect replicas" of iOS without a license from Apple and markets its software as "a research tool for those trying to discover security vulnerabilities and other flaws in Apple's software." But instead of aiding good-faith security research, Corellium "encourages its users to sell any discovered information on the open market to the highest bidder," Apple alleged.

    [...]

    Jailbreaking of smartphones and tablets such as iPhones and iPads is allowed in the US due to a DMCA exemption granted by the US Copyright Office (a division of the Library of Congress).

    The Copyright Office says the DMCA exemption for jailbreaking phones and tablets is intended "to allow the device to interoperate with or to remove software applications." There's also a DMCA exemption for security research on all types of devices. But to qualify for the security exemption, it must be "good-faith security research" that is "carried out in an environment designed to avoid any harm to individuals or the public."

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation describes DMCA exemptions in general as "too narrow and too complex for most technology users."

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

User Guide to Pantheon Desktop of elementary OS

Unlike Windows, user interface in elementary OS has a name, and it is Pantheon Desktop. It is a beautifully designed and easy to use desktop environment. This article wants to be a user guide to Pantheon Desktop that is simple to read and practice. You will learn about basic concepts of Pantheon and then practice to use it for daily tasks. You will see here how to use Wingpanel (top panel), Slingshot (start menu), Plank (taskbar), Switchboard (system settings), plus understand Headerbars and Multitasking mode. Of course I also include frequently used Keyboard Shortcuts so you can work more quickly. For your information, I use elementary OS 5.0 Juno as basis of this tutorial. I hope everybody could take benefit from this article and next time I could refer here if I write again about elementary. Enjoy! Read more

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (git, java-11-openjdk, and thunderbird), Debian (cacti, chromium, gpac, kernel, openjdk-11, ruby-excon, and thunderbird), Fedora (chromium and rubygem-rack), Mageia (suricata, tigervnc, and wireshark), openSUSE (glusterfs, libredwg, and uftpd), and Ubuntu (linux-hwe and sysstat).

  • Amazon’s Ring blamed hacks on consumers reusing their passwords. A lawsuit says that’s not true.

    After a series of high-profile incidents in which hackers gained access to live footage of Ring security cameras inside people?s homes, the company blamed consumers for reusing old passwords. Two plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit accusing the company of negligence and invasion of privacy say that?s not the issue ? instead, they say their passwords were unique and that the company didn?t implement basic security measures to protect users. A security expert enlisted by Recode found that Ring?s devices lack widely adopted safety precautions.

  • KeePassXC 2.5.3 Released with Microsoft Edge Integration

    KeePassXC password manager 2.5.3 was released today with stability improvements and new feature: browser extension for Chromium-based Edge browser.