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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Is Linus Trolling The Linux Community? - Invidious

    Linus and Luke (from Linus Tech Tips) recently published video number two of their "Linux gaming challenge". In this video, both men had some complaints about their Linux experience so far. Linus, in particular, had a lot of negative things to say. Here are some of my thoughts on their video.

  • Bullseye

    I just upgraded my Debian GNU/Linux server to Bullseye, 11. Except for a shortage of disc space everything went smoothly. It was my fault. I created a bit too small a / partition when I moved to a newer computer… I looked around and found gigabytes of cruft I could clear out to make things fit: obsolete compilers, files I was never likely to use and I deleted a few packages I was never likely to use. Did that from my smartphone while watching old news on CNN. Went to the console for the real work which took about ten minutes.

  • OpenBSD on the VIA Eden X2 powered HP t510 Thin Client

    Back in 2017, I bought two used HP thin clients on a local auction site, the t5570e and the t510, both of them powered by VIA x86-64 CPUs. In this article, I will focus on the t510, which is the more powerful of the two.

  • Open-Source Virtual Assistant Almond Renamed Genie

    Genie (and Almond) were designed as an alternative to Alexa, Google Assistant, and other common voice assistants. Stanford computer systems designer Dr. Monica Lam set up OVAL to create a decentralized virtual assistant that stored and shared information based on user preferences, without mandates from a company. Almond’s success led to discussions of a rebrand to go with making a commercial product out of the academic experiment. The group wanted to come up with a word that would be useful regardless of the language spoken, thus accommodating international users. The researchers considered other names, like Coco, Mario, and Nico, before settling on Genie as the best option, one unrelated to the Genie virtual assistant developed by Disney for its theme parks and resorts or Alibaba’s Tmall Genie voice assistant.

  • The fish shell is amazing

    I’ve been lurking the fish shell for a couple of years now (and the nushell but it is another story for another time). Not so long ago, I decided to try it, and it’s simply… amazing. If I had to state one feature that makes me like to use it, it’ll be the autocompletion, hands down. It’s the first time I just take a shell and without customization it’s pleasing to use.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Distro Rating Wallpapers = Distro Review | Sudo 25k Special - Invidious

    I recently heard about Ubuntu Unity and I was curious how usable Unity 7 would be like in 2021, if it's exciting I might make a followup video about my thoughts.

  • Linux overview | deepin 20.3 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of deepin 20.3 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Craft Parts – Reusable code, Snapcraft style | Ubuntu

    Throughout the ages, humans have always used simpler tools and materials to create more complex ones. Wood and stone for smelting bronze and iron; iron to create steel; vacuum tubes to create logical gates; logical gates to create advanced arithmetic engines, and so on. Modern software is no different.

    With Snapcraft in particular, the snap building process comprises a number of steps. Source artifacts are collected, there’s compilation and assembly of binary products, and then, these are packaged into a single final archive. This process is very similar to how various other Canonical solutions work, and applicable to many different use cases outside of the snap world. To that end, the Snapcraft team has created a portable, reusable mechanism called Craft Parts.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (October 2021)

    In October there were 303 alerts generated, resulting in 45 regression bugs being filed on average 5.2 days after the regressing change landed.

    Welcome to the October 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-47

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

    Fedora Linux 33 will reach end of life on Tuesday 30 November. The F35 retrospective survey is open through 4 December.

  • 4 unexpected ways to use Ansible | Enable Sysadmin

    Ansible is well-known for automating traditional IT tasks, like server administration, networking, application deployments, and more. But Ansible can do a whole lot more. In Jeff Geerling's AnsibleFest 2021 presentation, Automating the uncommon—Ansible automates everything, he shared some of the creative ways he uses Ansible.

  • #20 Colorful Characters · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from November 19 to November 26.

  • Intel Compute-Runtime Updated With DG2/Alchemist Support - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source engineers today released the Compute-Runtime 21.47.21710 as their latest update to this open-source compute stack for Linux systems enabling their graphics processors to enjoy performant OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero support.

    Notable with today's Compute Runtime update is that v21.47.21710 is the first having DG2 "Alchemist" graphics card support in place. This goes along with other DG2/Alchemist enablement going on in the Linux kernel and Mesa, etc. When pairing the latest kernel now with Intel Compute-Runtime should yield preliminary support for OpenCL and oneAPI L0 on Alchemist but expect more refinements and optimizations to come over the months ahead.

  • Several Older NVIDIA Tegra Powered Tablets To Be Supported By Linux 5.17 - Phoronix

    For those that happen to have older ASUS Transformer tablets powered by a NVIDIA Tegra SoC, the Linux 5.17 kernel cycle early next year is enabling a number of them to work off the mainline kernel.

    A batch of patches were sent out this week intended for the Linux 5.17 cycle for improving the older NVIDIA Tegra support with the mainline kernel.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • mintCast 374.5 – “Smart” Phones

    1:46 Linux Innards
    42:07 Vibrations from the Ether
    51:07 Check This Out
    54:28 Announcements & Outro

  • Kubernetes Blog: Quality-of-Service for Memory Resources

    Kubernetes v1.22, released in August 2021, introduced a new alpha feature that improves how Linux nodes implement memory resource requests and limits.

  • Ken Shirriff Breaks Open The Yamaha DX7 | Hackaday

    For better or worse, this synthesizer was king in the 1980s music scene. Sure, there had been synthesizers before, but none acheived the sudden popularity of Yamaha’s DX7. “Take on Me?” “Highway to the Dangerzone”? That harmonica solo in “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” All DX7. This synth was everywhere in pop music at the time, and now we can all get some insight from taking a look at this de-capped chip from [Ken Shirriff].

    To be clear, by “look” that’s exactly what we mean in this case, as [Ken] is reverse-engineering the YM21280 — the waveform generator of the DX7 — from photos. He took around 100 photos of the de-capped chip with a microscope, composited them, and then analyzed them painstakingly. The detail in his report is remarkable as he is able to show individual logic gates thanks to his powerful microscope. From there he can show exactly how the chip works down to each individual adder and array of memory.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Archinstall 2.3 Released For Easily Installing Arch Linux - Phoronix

    Added to the Arch Linux install media back in April was Archinstall for easy and quick installations. It's worked very well for basic Arch Linux installs in a matter of minutes while with Archinstall 2.3 now available it has even more features.

  • When the IoT vendor goes bust

    Over recent years, legislation has started to emerge to protect consumers from unethical behaviour from IoT vendors. Far too many smart devices didn’t charge for a subscription to the online platform that made the device ‘smart’. As a result, manufacturers had a perverse incentive to end-of-life product in order to sell you their next great smart thing.

    A good example of this was the Revolv home hub: Google’s Nest division acquired the firm behind the $300 hub. Two years later, they shut the platform down, leaving consumers with a pile of useless electronics, orphaned from the platform. Uproar ensued, resulting in the US FTC investigating. Fortunately for Revolv owners, the FTC ruled in their favour and made Google compensate hub owners.

    Sonos owners will recall a similar kerfuffle around their ‘recycle mode’ that killed the device when one traded up for a newer product, among many negative press stories around the length of product support.

    Existing and planned regulation for IoT is increasingly having manufacturers state up front how long they will support the product for. Whilst some legislation is focussed on the longevity of product security updates, others focus on length of platform support.

    This is good: it will allow consumers to make informed decisions about the smart products they buy. I, for one, don’t expect to be replacing a smart door lock after a couple of years simply because the manufacturer wanted to sell me a newer version.

  • KDE Floating Panels: PULL REQUEST DONE! And Next Projects! - Kockatoo Tube
  • Bad Voltage 3×40: The House on the Hill

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia hold these rights to be self-evident...

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Controlling PWM fans with the Raspberry Pi CM4 IO Board's EMC2301

    The better option is to use the built-in PWM fan controller on the IO Board (pictured above). And to do that, we're going to need to use the Raspberry Pi's I2C bus!

  • Email Netiquette

    We needed email but people got stressed out and they started flocking to these silo sites like Facebook and Twitter which have a more codified interaction pattern that enforces or rewards brevity, picture tagging, and event scheduling.

    If we wanna get people back into email then we can’t be all shamey and gatekeepy about it.

  • Why it matters to us if exploits are available for security issues

    In general, the more that plug and play exploits exist for something, the more chances are that low-skill people can use the exploit against you casually. They might be running an exploit they found on the web, or it might be part of a broadly available canned toolkit they're using. But either way, the easier it is to get the exploit in some usable form, the more you're exposed to casual people who would never write their own exploit but who are perfectly happy to run someone else's to break into your system (or just to break it).

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Use symbolic constants instead of magic numerical constants – EasyHack

    There are many situations that you need to use numerical constants in your code. If you use numerical literal values directly instead of symbolic constants, it can cause problems. For example, consider this piece of code that calculate area of a circle:

    double area = 3.14 * r * r;

    This is not OK, because:

    1. The value of π is not 3.14 nor 3.141592. π is an irrational number, and the suitable value depends on the number of decimal places that you can/want to use among unlimited decimals of π.

    2. Suppose that you want to change the numerical literal to increase the number of decimals that you use. You should search for 3.14, and check one by one to see if it is actually π, or it is another 3.14 unrelated to the well-known mathematical constant.

  • WhiteSource Adds SBOM Tool That Lists Vulnerabilities [Ed: WhiteSource is almost a de facto Microsoft proxy [1, 2, 3]]

    WhiteSource has added a software bill of materials (SBOM) tool to its portfolio that, in addition to capturing the components of an application, also surfaces vulnerabilities that should be addressed.

  • Entire Rust moderation team resigns • The Register

    The Rust language community is in disarray following the resignation of the entire moderation team, citing the "structural unaccountability" of the core development team.

    The moderation team, represented by Andrew Gallant, posted its resignation to GitHub yesterday, stating that it was "done in protest of the Core Team placing themselves unaccountable to anyone but themselves."

    Therefore, the post goes on to explain, "we have been unable to enforce the Rust Code of Conduct [CoC] to the standards the community expects of us."

  • FSFE Calls for 'Device Neutrality' in EU's Proposed 'Digital Markets Act' - FOSS Force

    In a press release issued Monday ahead of a planned preliminary vote on the EU’s proposed Digital Markets act by the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee, the Free Software Foundation Europe called for device neutrality to be included in the proposed law.

    The German-based FSFE is a sister organization to the Free Software Foundation, although the two are legally and financially separate entities

    “On the imminent voting of the Digital Markets Act – the latest EU proposal on internet platform regulation – the FSFE demands device neutrality as a fundamental element for safeguarding consumer protection in open, fair, and contestable digital markets,” the FSFE said in its statement.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy donors challenged with largest match yet - Software Freedom Conservancy

    Donations will be matched (up to $159,191) thanks almost entirely to contributions by a few very generous anonymous donors. Contributions by individuals keep Software Freedom Conservancy afloat, and it's with your help that we are empowered to do the vital and sometimes overlooked work in software freedom. We also have some gracious donors who brought the amount up a little more to the prime number you see above: Chris Neugebauer and Josh Simmons, Mark Galassi, Stephen Paul Weber, Tony Sebro, and VM Brasseur are contributing to our match fund and encourage others to give as well.

  • Deepin 20.3 Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at Deepin 20.3. Enjoy!

  • Deepin 20.3

    Today we are looking at Deepin 20.3. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.10 and uses about 1.5 - 1.9GB of ram when idling.

  • Crusader Kings III: Royal Court releases February 8, 2022 | GamingOnLinux

    With the Crusader Kings III: Royal Court expansion, would-be monarchs will have new ways to manage courts, build nations, and display the prestige of their dynasty for everyone in the realm to see. It's now set to release on February 8, 2022.

    This is the first major expansion for the game, that has gone on to receive a very warm reception from players both new and old with it seeing now over 42,000 user reviews on Steam with a Very Positive rating. We enjoyed it a lot here too, so we're also very much looking forward to this!

  • Vulkan 1.2.200 Released With Two New Extensions - Phoronix

    Out today is Vulkan 1.2.200 as the newest spec revision to the Vulkan graphics/compute API.

    With Vulkan 1.2.200 is the usual assortment of clarifications and corrections to this leading cross-platform graphics API. But besides that usual documentation churn, there are also two new extensions: VK_ARM_rasterization_order_attachment_access and VK_EXT_depth_clip_control.

  • Linux Prepares For Next-Gen AMD CPUs With Up To 12 CCDs - Phoronix

    The latest Linux kernel patches confirm that next-gen AMD Zen processors are capable of featuring up to twelve CCDs.

    Currently the k10temp Linux driver for temperature monitoring of AMD processors can handle up to eight core-complex dies (CCDs) while next-gen AMD Zen processors will have configurations up to 12 CCDs to accommodate higher core counts.

    The latest Linux patches explicitly say, "The newer AMD Family 19h Models 10h-1Fh and A0h-AFh can support up to 12 CCDs. Update the driver to read up to 12 CCDs."

Free Software Leftovers

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Misc
  • The Apache Weekly News Round-up: week ending 19 November 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week. Let's review what we've been up to...

  • Take action to protect Open Source today [Ed: When you take money from Microsoft, which attacks "Open Source", and then urge others to "protect" Open Source... by giving you more money]

    Or renew your membership during our 2021 Membership Drive. Being an OSI member is a great way to directly support the mission of OSI while becoming more involved in open source community development and advocacy. You aren’t just helping one open source project—you’re helping all open source projects!

  • Community Member Monday: Bayram Çiçek

    I think contributing to LibreOffice is both fun and sometimes challenging. When ‘fun’ and ‘challenge’ come together, it creates a great community, as LibreOffice does; and being a part of this community makes you more passionate and stronger. And that’s why I wanted to become a TDF member.

  • Five Lessons from 'All Things Open' on Hosting In-Person Events During COVID - FOSS Force

    All Things Open 2021 wrapped up about a month ago, and as I look back two things stand out.

    First, overall things went well and the outcome was a good one.

    I have a tendency to initially focus only on what didn’t go as planned, but I often look back later and realize that the imperfections were far more insignificant than I originally thought, and the outcome far better.

    With 30 days now to review the 2021 event, the same pattern holds true this year. Yes, not everything went as planned, but it never does. On the whole, attendees, speakers, and partners genuinely seemed to enjoy themselves and get value from the experience in a variety of ways. I’d call that a success.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • This Is What's Wrong With The Linux Community

    Why do so many folk in the Linux community default to overly complex solutions when it comes to solving problems?

    Jim Salter is an extremely technical guy, I get that. Running a LAMP/LEMP stack with RoundCube for him, would be as trivial as my mum starting up MS Word.

    But Jim positioned this solution as the best solution for managing email on Linux. At one point Will somewhat flippantly asked so you’re saying that in order to manage email people should spin up an Nginx server?” Jim replied with a definitive “yes”.

    That simply isn’t the case.

  • mcabber with OTR on FreeBSD

    mcabber is a great XMPP (Jabber) console client. It has all the important features and is easy use.

    XMPP is an open standard for messaging and presence. XMPP is the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol that is developed in 1999 by Jeremie Miller. He called it jabber.

  • A Conversation with Margo Seltzer and Mike Olson: The history of Berkeley DB

    Kirk McKusick sat down with Margo Seltzer and Mike Olson to discuss the history of Berkeley DB, for which they won the ACM Software System Award in 2021. Kirk McKusick has spent his career as a BSD and FreeBSD developer. Margo Seltzer has spent her career as a professor of computer science and as an entrepreneur of database software companies. Mike Olson started his career as a software developer and later started and managed several open-source software companies. Berkeley DB is a production-quality, scalable, NoSQL, Open Source platform for embedded transactional data management.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LLVM Is Still Working On Relicensing, Needs Help Locating Some Past Contributors - Phoronix

    For years LLVM has been working on a massive relicensing of its code-base but that effort is still ongoing as they are still trying to track down some past contributors to collect their sign-offs on the change.

    LLVM is seeking help in trying to track down some past individual contributors and organizations so they can proceed with their relicensing of the massive code-base. As a reminder, they are working to move from the University of Illinois / NCSA Open-Source Library (similar to the MIT/X11 and 3-clause BSD) and over to Apache 2.0 license with an LLVM Exception. The "LLVM Exception" to Apache 2.0 is for code compiled by LLVM to not impose the same redistribution conditions and when pairing LLVM code with GPLv2 code the user can opt for the indemnity provision.

  • It Takes a Community

    Of the many challenges faced by open-source developers, among the most daunting are some that other programmers scarcely ever think about. And that's because most programmers work in settings where "other people" attend to such matters—people who work in the legal department or human resources, for example. But when there aren't any people like that to turn to, what then?

  • Setting up a motion activated light with Sonoff Zigbee sensor and T2 WiFi switch - CNX Software

    Earlier this month, I received a Sonoff ZBBridge Zigbee gateway, a motion sensor, and a Sonoff T2 wireless switch in order to set up everything to work as a motion activated light using Zigbee and WiFi through the eWelink Android app and cloud service. You can check out the first post to have a closer look at the hardware and accessories.

    We’ve now had time to configure everything and will report the results of the project in this post. The idea is basically to detect motion with the Zigbee sensor, which then transmits the info through the gateway, and the T2 switch is controlled by the eWelink cloud.

    Last time around, I thought I had a switch with a neutral wire at home, but I did not check in detail enough, and I’ve been unable to use it.

  • T700 Crowdfunding

    The T700 project is a drop-in replacement motherboard for the TP T60 and T61 series of laptops. This consists of an aftermarket motherboard not produced by L that fits in the chassis with little to no modifications necessary.

    The goal is to recreate the TP experience as much as possible, while incorporating the latest CPUs and technology. As the motherboard is not from L, it will require quite a bit of hands-on from the user to get the best experience out of the machine. It will be as stable as any other computer motherboard but will not have original TP software support and features.

  • 7-Zip 21.05

    7-Zip is a open source file archiver with a high compression ratio. The program supports 7z, XZ, BZIP2, GZIP, TAR, ZIP, WIM, ARJ, CAB, CHM, CPIO, CramFS, DEB, DMG, FAT, HFS, ISO, LZH, LZMA, MBR, MSI, NSIS, NTFS, RAR, RPM, SquashFS, UDF, VHD, WIM, XAR, Z. Most of the source code is under the GNU LGPL license. The unRAR code is under a mixed license: GNU LGPL + unRAR restrictions. Check license information here: 7-Zip license.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

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Misc
  • Apple just provided the perfect example of why you can’t trust App Store review scores

    But intentional or not, standard or not, the problem with star scores is there’s no way to tell whether they’re legitimate. We don’t know if someone pressed a five-star button because they loved the app, or thought they were rating the podcast itself, or just wanted to close the prompt as quickly as possible. We don’t know if Apple is prompting everyone, or just its most dedicated fans, or some other algorithmic subset that just happened to give it an advantage. Some bad actors reportedly even buy star scores for their egregious App Store scams, and it’s impossible for most App Store shoppers to tell. We’ve even seen an iOS app that refuses to open unless you give it a good score.

  • More than $500M for cybersecurity included in sweeping House-passed package

    The package gives $100 million to CISA for cybersecurity risk mitigation issues, $100 million for cybersecurity workforce and training, $50 million for moving to a secure cloud architecture, and a further $50 million to research and develop strategies to secure industrial control systems.

    The bill also designates $35 million for CISA to provide funding to the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC), $15 million for an effort to train teachers on cybersecurity, and $50 million for CISA’s CyberSentry program, which monitors the networks of critical infrastructure groups for threats.

  • Malware alert: Dozen plus Joker trojan-laced Android apps detected on Play Store

    Despite the efforts put by Google to block malware-laced Android apps entering the Play Store, bad actors are still managing to slip through the security screening to prey on naive users. Tatyana Shishkova, Android Malware expert at Kaspersky has detected more than a dozen malicious Android apps with Joker trojan on Play Store. She has been sharing the links of the apps on Twitter and most of them have been taken down from Play Store.

    Joker malware-based apps are notorious for spying on victims. Once installed on the phone, they are capable of tracking apps such as the default Messages app on the phone. They can read text messages and steal contact lists, personal photos, financial details, or trade secrets and send them to hackers in remote locations. All that while, victims never know what is happening on their devices.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: RenderDoc, Mesa, and Vulkan

  • RenderDoc 1.17 Released For This Leading Open-Source Graphics Debugging Tool - Phoronix

    RenderDoc 1.17 released this week as the newest version of this leading cross-platform, cross-API graphics debugging utility. RendertDoc 1.17 continues to be a gem for developers working with Vulkan and OpenGL along with Direct3D 11/12. RenderDoc as the MIT-licensed frame-capture-based graphics debugger works extremely well for game/engine developers as well as GPU driver developers in working through different issues.

  • DMA-BUF Feedback Support For Wayland Lands In Mesa 22.0's EGL Code - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa on Black Friday was DMA-BUF Feedback support within the EGL code as another important step forward for Wayland. Introduced earlier this week was Wayland Protocols 1.24 and the primary addition to that collection of protocols is DMA-BUF feedback support. The DMA-BUF "feedback" support is important for Wayland multi-GPU systems where needing to know more information about the GPU device used by the compositor and for being able to efficiently exchange buffers between the secondary and primary GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Finally Adds VK_KHR_synchronization2 Support - Phoronix

    The Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has added support for the prominent VK_KHR_synchronization2 extension introduced earlier this year. Added back in February with Vulkan 1.2.170 was VK_KHR_synchronization2 for simplifying the core synchronization APIs of this industry-standard graphics API. VK_KHR_synchronization2 makes Vulkan synchronization handling easier to deal with Those interested in the changes with the "synchronization2" revision can see this Khronos blog post going over the Vulkan synchronization handling in detail along with the changes from this extension.

Kernel: Futex2, Fixes, and Other New Features for Linux 5.16

  • Futex2 Brings Linux Gaming To The Next Level - Invidious

    Futex2 has been a work in progress by Valve and collabora for a very long time and it seems like it's finally going to make it's way into the kernel.

  • Patch out for Alder Lake Linux bug that reminds of the Windows 11 Ryzen CPPC issue - Neowin

    Linux boss Linus Torvalds merged earlier today several important patches for Intel CPU generally related to performance states (P-states) on Linux.

  • Linux 5.16 Merges Fix For One Of The Intel Alder Lake Issues - Phoronix

    Merged this Friday afternoon into the Linux 5.16 development kernel is fixing a performance issue affecting some Intel Alder Lake motherboards. The fix merged a short time ago is the item previously covered within Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems. As explained in that prior article, TurboBoost Max 3.0 / ITMT (Turbo Boost Max Technology) code within the kernel isn't being enabled for some systems, particularly if overclocking or even any memory XMP / optimal settings. The ASUS Z690 board I've been primarily using for the i9-12900K was affected as are numerous other boards. I've also heard reports of some motherboards running purely stock are even having this issue.

  • Intel Preparing USI Stylus Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel open-source driver engineers have been working on USI stylus support for the Linux kernel. The Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) aims to offer interoperability of active styluses across touchscreen devices. The Universal Stylus Initiative has a goal of allowing all styluses that comply with USI to work across devices. USI is backed by the likes of Google who wants to see USI working uniformally across Chromebooks, Dell and other hardware vendors, Intel is also involved and leading the upstream Linux support patches, and peripheral vendors like Logitech are also supporting the standard. Other big names like Wacom, Samsung, and many other players from desktop to laptops to mobile.

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more