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today's leftovers

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  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds

    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008.

    Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.

  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells

    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it.
    We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42

    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday).

    But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

today's leftovers

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  • Docker: Making the Internet Programmable

    Docker, and containers in general, are hot technologies that have been getting quite a bit of attention over the past few years. Even Solomon Hykes, Founder, CTO, and Chief Product Officer at Docker started his keynote with the assumption that people attending LinuxCon Europe know that Docker does containers, so instead of focusing on what Docker does, Hykes used his time to talk about Docker’s purpose saying, “It really boils down to one small sentence. We're trying to make the Internet programmable.”

    Hykes described this idea of making the Internet programmable with three key points. First, they are focused on building “tools of mass innovation” designed to allow people to create and innovate on a very large scale. Second, applications and cloud services are allowing the idea of the Internet as a programmable platform to be realized, and they want to make this accessible to more people. Third, they are accomplishing all of this by building the Docker stack with open standards, open infrastructure, and a development platform with commercial products on top of the stack.

  • How to benchmark your Linux system

    The Software Center list will also include individual tests. These can be fine to use, but they can be tedious to open and configure manually. Keep your eye out for an entry called Phoronix Test Suite, or PTS for short. The Phoronix Test Suite is a powerful program that can run a single test, or an entire battery. PTS offers some built-in suites (collection of tests), or you can design your own suite. When tests are completed, you can choose to upload the test results to, where other users can see your results and even run the exact same tests on their PC.

  • Wunderlist Electron App for Linux

    Missing Wunderlist on Linux? You don’t need to thanks to Wunderlistux, an Electron-based desktop app. It doesn’t claim to be anything more than a wrapper around the official Wunderlist web app (which, yes, you could just open in a new browser tab).

  • Enter the Wasteland: Mad Max now available for Mac and Linux
  • What a lovely day! Mad Max releases for Mac and Linux
  • Mad Max Comes to Linux and Mac
  • GNOME at Linux Install Fest

    It’s an event organized in order to help first year students install a Linux distro on their laptops (here at our uni, we work almost entirely on Linux, so we need to help those that have never used it and set up their distros

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Linux-Based Photographic Workflow on Android with Termux

    The title is a bit of a mouthful, but the basic idea is pretty simple; Instead of schlepping around a Linux machine, you can transform an Android device into a lightweight Linux-based platform for organizing, processing, and backing up photos and RAW files when you are on the move. The key ingredient of this solution is the Termux, a small open source app that combines a terminal emulator and a lightweight Linux environment. The app comes with its own software repository that has all the tools you need to set up a simplified photographic workflow. The Linux Photography book explains exactly how to can go about it, but here are a few pointers to get started.

  • NVIDIA Announces The GeForce GTX 1050 Series

    NVIDIA this morning is expanding the Pascal family with the announcement of the GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti lower-cost graphics cards.

  • GStreamer Conference 2016 Videos, Vulkan Support Was Among The Talks

    The annual GStreamer Conference took place last week in Berlin alongside the Linux Foundation's Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The videos from this multimedia open-source conference are now available.

    The folks from Ubicast have once again done a nice job recording all of the presentations from this GStreamer event. Conference talks ranged from the "stage of the union" to the state of VA-API with GStreamer, GStreamer Video Editing, dynamic pipelines, Vulkan, and more.

    When it comes to Vulkan support in GStreamer, there is work underway on vulkansink and vulkanupload elements, basic Vulkan support modeled on GStreamer's libgstgl API, and more, but much more work is needed before it will be at the level of OpenGL support.

  • Solus 1.2.1 Released With Budgie Desktop Updates, Ships RADV Driver

    Version 1.2.1 of the promising Solus Linux distribution is now available and also premieres a MATE edition ISO to complement its original Budgie desktop.

  • Bill Belichick rants against NFL tablets: 'I'm done'

    After the image of the New England Patriots coach slamming a Microsoft Surface tablet on the sideline in a Week 4 game against the Buffalo Bills went viral, Belichick explained Tuesday why he is fed up with the product.

today's leftovers

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  • Useful Vim editor plugins for software developers - part 2: Syntastic
  • halting problem :: Constraints
  • Release Candidate Available for openSUSE Leap 42.2

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate 1 (RC1).

    Since mid-May, the project has been guiding the development of the next openSUSE community release Leap 42.2, which will be released in 29 days. The release of RC1 completes the development process for openSUSE Leap 42.2 based on source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack (SP) 2.

  • Using feedback loops for greater work satisfaction

    In August I wrote about using feedback loops in your personal life to get unstuck from unproductive habits. This month I'll talk about some new helpful feedback loops for your workplace. I'm going to make this easy for you: Here are my top three, and they're always good ones to start with.

  • Red Hat study shows virtualization will keep growing

    With the rise of exciting new technologies like containers, virtualization might sometimes seem like it’s old hat. But not according to Red Hat, whose latest research shows that enterprise adoption is still on the rise.

    In a new survey of over 900 enterprise information technology pros, Red Hat discovered that virtualization is still gaining traction thanks to its ability to drive server consolidation, reduce provisioning times, serve as platform for app development and deployment and save enterprises money.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • VMware & AWS Offer Combined Private and Public Cloud Service

    VMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS) today confirmed rumors they will deliver a joint service that lets customers run their vSphere private clouds from VMware alongside their applications in AWS’s public cloud.

  • Is there a competition law issue lurking on the horizon of cloud computing?

    This in itself is an interesting comment. This Kat is hoary enough to remember the antitrust case against IBM, filed in 1969, which dragged on until 1982. There, the issue was IBM’s alleged anti-competitive conduct based on its alleged dominance of the mainframe computer industry. What is notable is that this decade-long lawsuit came to an end because the US Depart of Justice ultimately decided to dismiss the case. Developments in the computer world had moved on since the filing of the law suit in the late 1960’s, and the capacity of IBM to dominate the computer world had passed.

  • The Hyperledger Project Continues to Grow Rapidly; Executive Director Brian Behlendorf Elaborates on Strategy and Goals

    The Hyperledger Project, a collaborative cross-industry effort to advance blockchain technology led by The Linux Foundation, continues to announce new organizations joining the project to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications. The project now has more than 85 members, which represents a growth of nearly 200 percent over the last six months.

  • 4 open music players compared: VLC, QMMP, Clementine, and Amarok

    In August 2016, I wrote about about why I like the Guayadeque music player, and then I used the six characteristics that seemed most important to me to evaluate other music players: Quod Libet, Gmusicbrowser, DeaDBeeF, Audac

  • How to spin up OrangeHRM as a virtual machine in less than 5 minutes
  • Outreachy Deadlines Are Due Next Week For Winter Open-Source Internships

    For women and other select groups, the GNOME Outreachy Winter 2016 internship program has its application deadline due next week for those wishing to get involved in open-source / free software development.

    Outreachy is preparing for its Winter 2016 program that will run from December to March. Like past rounds, interns get paid $5,500 USD for their work on various open-source projects.

  • Game: Temple Run 2 Finally on the Tizen Store
  • VMS will be ready to run on x86 in 2019!

    VMS Software Inc (VSI), which became the custodian of the venerable OpenVMS in 2014, is getting close to its Holy Grail of running the OS on x86.

    HP had decided that the operating system it inherited from DEC was end-of-life back in 2013, but in 2014 signed over an exclusive licence to VSI.

    At that time, the company's CEO Duane Harris said VSI's “passion for taking OpenVMS into future decades” would see it ported to Itanium and then x86 architectures.

today's leftovers

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  • TNS Guide to Serverless Technologies: The Best of FaaS and BaaS

    Like the terms “microservices” and “containers” before it, “serverless” is a loaded word. Countless blogs have argued about the meaning or importance.

    The first, obvious statement everyone makes is that, yes, there are servers or hardware of some sort somewhere in the system. But the point of “serverless” is not that servers aren’t used; it’s just that developers and administrators do not have to think about them.

    Serverless architectures refer to applications that significantly depend on third-party services. “Such architectures remove the need for the traditional ‘always on’ server system sitting behind an application,” said software developer Mike Roberts, in an article on Martin Fowler’s site. Inserting serverless technologies into systems can reduce the complexity that needs to be managed, and could also potentially save money.

  • One Day Is a Lifetime in Container Years

    The average life span of a container is short and getting shorter. While some organizations use containers as replacements for virtual machines, many are using them increasingly for elastic compute resources, with life spans measured in hours or even minutes. Containers allow an organization to treat the individual servers providing a service as disposable units, to be shut down or spun up on a whim when traffic or behavior dictates.

    Since the value of an individual container is low, and startup time is short, a company can be far more aggressive about its scaling policies, allowing the container service to scale both up and down faster. Since new containers can be spun up on the order of seconds or sub seconds instead of minutes, they also allow an organization to scale down further than would previously have provided sufficient available overhead to manage traffic spikes. Finally, if a service is advanced enough to have automated monitoring and self-healing, a minuscule perturbation in container behavior might be sufficient to cause the misbehaving instance to be destroyed and a new container started in its place.

    At container speeds, behavior and traffic monitoring happens too quickly for humans to process and react. By the time an event is triaged, assigned, and investigated, the container will be gone. Security and retention policies need to be set correctly from the time the container is spawned. Is this workload allowed to run in this location? Are rules set up to manage the arbitration between security policies and SLAs?

  • Linus Torvalds: “Linux Kernel 5.0 Will Be Released When We Hit 6 Million Git Objects”

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds has shared the news that we are half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0 as the Git object database has crossed the 5 million object mark. Some of you might be knowing that major version transition happens at every two million objects in the database. So, after 1 more million Git objects, we can expect the release of Linux kernel 5.0 in 2017.

  • GNOME 3.22.1 Released

    For those on rolling-release distributions that tend to wait until the first point release before upgrading your desktop environment, GNOME 3.22.1 is now available as the first update since last month's GNOME 3.22 debut.

  • Cyanogen's Android Alternative Goes Modular
  • Google Pixel: Devices are a dangerous distraction from the new AI interface

today's leftovers

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  • Wire, the Encrypted Chat App, Is Now Available for Linux

    Wire is an open-source messaging service that offers fully encrypted calls, video and group chats — and now it’s available for Linux. Wire for Linux beta is available to download from today via the Wire website. It has the same feature set as Wire’s other desktops and mobile apps, including always-on end-to-end encryption.

  • stardicter 0.10
  • Skype for Linux users can crash-test video calls in v1.10 Alpha
  • SolarWinds' SAM simplifies management of Linux and Windows environments
  • Qt 5.6.2 Released With ~900 Improvements
  • Intel's new 7th-gen CPUs sail into System76's updated Lemur laptop

    System76 said on Tuesday that it has updated its Lemur-branded laptop with Intel’s new seventh-generation “Kaby Lake” processors. This laptop specifically ships with Ubuntu 16.04.01 LTS (64-bit) installed, thus offering a cheaper price point than an identical solution packing Windows 10. Pricing for the Lemur starts at $700.

    According to the product page, this laptop provides five areas that can be configured: processor, memory, operating system drive, additional storage, and the type of Wireless AC connectivity. On the processor front, there are only two choices: the Intel Core i3-7100U (default) and the Intel Core i7-7500U (an added $160).

  • Indulge Your Nostalgia With This Ubuntu Timeline Wallpaper

    It’s Ubuntu 16.10 release week, which means you might be feeling a little nostalgic for releases past.

    You could take a look back at every Ubuntu default wallpaper, from the very first release to this week’s pending one, or you could set every Ubuntu wallpaper as your desktop background.

  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Graphics Driver Working To Support QPU Shaders

    The latest Raspberry Pi graphics driver hacking by Eric Anholt of Broadcom has been working to support QPU shaders by this open-source driver stack. QPUs are the shader core of the graphics hardware found in the Raspberry Pi SoC, but come up short of supporting OpenCL or OpenGL compute shaders.

  • Cyanogen mods self away from full Android alternative [Ed: Good riddance to another Microsoft proxy (which didn’t have to become that 2 years ago)]

    Android alternative Cyanogen looks to have given up on trying to sell a full mobile operating system.

    The shine has gone off the outfit of late, and in July, it reportedly axed 30 staffers. While there's a core of users who stick with the CyanogenMod code that's the genesis of the company, mobe-makers taking Cyanogen licenses are in short supply (the company claims 20 phones and millions of customers; IDC says nearly 345 million smartphones shipped in 2015).

  • Google sets the date for first sniff at Android 7.1

    Developers can get their hands on Android 7.1 by the end of the month, Google has said.

    And almost all Nexus owners will have it implanted in their gadgets by the end of the year, albeit with some reservations.

    The next chewy chunk of Nougat includes support for better storage management and telephony software, App shortcut APIs to build single click links directly into core directories, and UI changes to build cuddlier and more numerous graphics into the background. There’s also support for Google’s Daydream VR system, for the few phones that can handle it.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.8.4

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.4 kernel. And yeah, sorry about the quicker releases, I'll be away tomorrow and as they seem to have passed all of the normal testing, I figured it would be better to get them out earlier instead of later. And I like releasing stuff on this date every year... All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.7.10 Linux 4.4.27

New Releases: Budgie, Solus, SalentOS, and Slackel

  • Open-Source Budgie Desktop Sees New Release
    The pet parakeet of the Linux world, Budgie has a new release available for download. in this post we lookout what's new and tell you how you can get it.
  • Solus Linux Making Performance Gains With Its BLAS Configuration
    - Those making use of the promising Solus Linux distribution will soon find their BLAS-based workloads are faster. Solus developer Peter O'Connor tweeted this week that he's found some issues with the BLAS linking on the distribution and he's made fixes for Solus. He also mentioned that he uncovered these BLAS issues by using our Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.
  • SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0 released!
    With great pleasure the team announces the release of SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0.
  • Slackel "Live kde" 4.14.21
    This release is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, while the 64-bit iso supports booting on UEFI systems. The 64-bit iso images support booting on UEFI systems. The 32-bit iso images support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems. Iso images are isohybrid.

Security News

  • Free tool protects PCs from master boot record attacks [Ed: UEFI has repeatedly been found to be both a detriment to security and enabler of Microsoft lock-in]
    Cisco's Talos team has developed an open-source tool that can protect the master boot record of Windows computers from modification by ransomware and other malicious attacks. The tool, called MBRFilter, functions as a signed system driver and puts the disk's sector 0 into a read-only state. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows versions and its source code has been published on GitHub. The master boot record (MBR) consists of executable code that's stored in the first sector (sector 0) of a hard disk drive and launches the operating system's boot loader. The MBR also contains information about the disk's partitions and their file systems. Since the MBR code is executed before the OS itself, it can be abused by malware programs to increase their persistence and gain a head start before antivirus programs. Malware programs that infect the MBR to hide from antivirus programs have historically been known as bootkits -- boot-level rootkits. Microsoft attempted to solve the bootkit problem by implementing cryptographic verification of the bootloader in Windows 8 and later. This feature is known as Secure Boot and is based on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) -- the modern BIOS.
  • DDOS Attack On Internet Infrastructure
    I hope somebody's paying attention. There's been another big DDOS attack, this time against the infrastructure of the Internet. It began at 7:10 a.m. EDT today against Dyn, a major DNS host, and was brought under control at 9:36 a.m. According to Gizmodo, which was the first to report the story, at least 40 sites were made unreachable to users on the US East Coast. Many of the sites affected are among the most trafficed on the web, and included CNN, Twitter, PayPal, Pinterest and Reddit to name a few. The developer community was also touched, as GitHub was also made unreachable. This event comes on the heels of a record breaking 620 Gbps DDOS attack about a month ago that brought down security expert Brian Krebs' website, KrebsonSecurity. In that attack, Krebs determined the attack had been launched by botnets that primarily utilized compromised IoT devices, and was seen by some as ushering in a new era of Internet security woes.
  • This Is Why Half the Internet Shut Down Today [Update: It’s Getting Worse]
    Twitter, Spotify and Reddit, and a huge swath of other websites were down or screwed up this morning. This was happening as hackers unleashed a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the servers of Dyn, a major DNS host. It’s probably safe to assume that the two situations are related.
  • Major DNS provider Dyn hit with DDoS attack
    Attacks against DNS provider Dyn continued into Friday afternoon. Shortly before noon, the company said it began "monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack" against its Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. The attack may also have impacted Managed DNS advanced service "with possible delays in monitoring."
  • What We Know About Friday’s Massive East Coast Internet Outage
    Friday morning is prime time for some casual news reading, tweeting, and general Internet browsing, but you may have had some trouble accessing your usual sites and services this morning and throughout the day, from Spotify and Reddit to the New York Times and even good ol’ For that, you can thank a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) that took down a big chunk of the Internet for most of the Eastern seaboard. This morning’s attack started around 7 am ET and was aimed at Dyn, an Internet infrastructure company headquartered in New Hampshire. That first bout was resolved after about two hours; a second attack began just before noon. Dyn reported a third wave of attacks a little after 4 pm ET. In all cases, traffic to Dyn’s Internet directory servers throughout the US—primarily on the East Coast but later on the opposite end of the country as well—was stopped by a flood of malicious requests from tens of millions of IP addresses disrupting the system. Late in the day, Dyn described the events as a “very sophisticated and complex attack.” Still ongoing, the situation is a definite reminder of the fragility of the web, and the power of the forces that aim to disrupt it.
  • Either IoT will be secure or the internet will be crippled forever
    First things first a disclaimer. I neither like nor trust the National Security Agency (NSA). I believe them to be mainly engaged in economic spying for the corporate American empire. Glenn Greenwald has clearly proven that in his book No Place to Hide. At the NSA, profit and power come first and I have no fucking clue as to how high they prioritize national security. Having said that, the NSA should hack the Internet of (insecure) Things (IoT) to death. I know Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating where the DDoS of doomsday proportions is coming from and the commentariat is already screaming RUSSIA! But it is really no secret what is enabling this clusterfuck. It’s the Mirai botnet. If you buy a “smart camera” from the Chinese company Hangzhou XiongMai Technologies and do not change the default password, it will be part of a botnet five minutes after you connect it to the internet. We were promised a future where we would have flying cars but we’re living in a future where camera’s, light-bulbs, doorbells and fridges can get you in serious trouble because your home appliances are breaking the law.
  • IoT at the Network Edge
    Fog computing, also known as fog networking, is a decentralized computing infrastructure. Computing resources and application services are distributed in logical, efficient places at any points along the connection from the data source (endpoint) to the cloud. The concept is to process data locally and then use the network for communicating with other resources for further processing and analysis. Data could be sent to a data center or a cloud service. A worthwhile reference published by Cisco is the white paper, "Fog Computing and the Internet of Things: Extend the Cloud to Where the Things Are."
  • Canonical now offers live kernel patching for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users
    Canonical has announced its ‘Livepatch Service’ which any user can enable on their current installations to eliminate the need for rebooting their machine after installing an update for the Linux kernel. With the release of Linux 4.0, users have been able to update their kernel packages without rebooting, however, Ubuntu will be the first distribution to offer this feature for free.
  • ​The Dirty Cow Linux bug: A silly name for a serious problem
    Dirty Cow is a silly name, but it's a serious Linux kernel problem. According to the Red Hat bug report, "a race condition was found in the way the Linux kernel's memory subsystem handled the copy-on-write (COW) breakage of private read-only memory mappings. An unprivileged local user could use this flaw to gain write access to otherwise read-only memory mappings and thus increase their privileges on the system."
  • Ancient Privilege Escalation Bug Haunts Linux
  • October 21, 2016 Is Dirty COW a serious concern for Linux?
  • There is a Dirty Cow in Linux
  • Red Hat Discovers Dirty COW Archaic Linux Kernel Flaw Exploited In The Wild
  • Linux kernel bug being exploited in the wild
  • Update Linux now: Critical privilege escalation security flaw gives hackers full root access
  • Linux kernel bug: DirtyCOW “easyroot” hole and what you need to know
  • 'Most serious' Linux privilege-escalation bug ever discovered
  • New 'Dirty Cow' vulnerability threatens Linux systems
  • Serious Dirty Cow Linux Vulnerability Under Attack
  • Easy-to-exploit rooting flaw puts Linux PCs at risk
  • Linux just patched a vulnerability it's had for 9 years
  • Dirty COW Linux vulnerability has existed for nine years
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found After Nine Years
  • FakeFile Trojan Opens Backdoors on Linux Computers, Except openSUSE
    Malware authors are taking aim at Linux computers, more precisely desktops and not servers, with a new trojan named FakeFile, currently distributed in live attacks. Russian antivirus vendor Dr.Web discovered this new trojan in October. The company's malware analysts say the trojan is spread in the form of an archived PDF, Microsoft Office, or OpenOffice file.

today's howtos