Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Cross Desktop | User Error 66

    Linux desktop standards, how the Web has changed over the years, and the ethics of space exploration.

    Plus what to do if you see a crime, and the things we hate the most.

  • Intel Linux Driver Wiring Up Support So Skylake+ Display Engine Can Utilize eDRAM

    A possible optimization being worked on for the Intel Linux graphics driver is allowing the eLLC (eDRAM) of Iris Pro Graphics on Skylake hardware and newer to support caching of the display buffers.

  • 3D Printering: The Past and Future of Prusa's Slicer

    If you own a desktop 3D printer, you’re almost certainly familiar with Slic3r. Even if the name doesn’t ring a bell, there’s an excellent chance that a program you’ve used to convert STLs into the G-code your printer can understand was using Slic3r behind the scenes in some capacity. While there have been the occasional challengers, Slic3r has remained one of the most widely used open source slicers for the better part of a decade. While some might argue that proprietary slicers have pulled ahead in some respects, it’s hard to beat free.

    [...]

    Ostensibly the fork enabled Prusa to fine tune print parameters for their particular machines and implement support for products such as their Multi-Material Upgrade, but it didn’t take long for Prusa’s developers to start fixing and improving core Slic3r functionality. As both projects were released under the GNU Affero General Public License v3.0, any and all of these improvements could be backported to the original Slic3r; but doing so would take considerable time and effort, something that’s always in short supply with community developed projects.

  • Happy Towel Day 2019

    You are also well aware that, for some reason, if non-hitchhikers discover you have your towel with you, they also assume you carry your own toothbrush, soap, space suit, etc; that they will happily lend you anything you need and might – accidentally – have lost. Above all, they will think that anyone who travels along the galaxy and still knows where their towel is, is clearly a nice, careful, reasonable person. And so, you’re very likely carrying a towel with you today.

    The team at Purism wishes you a nice #towelday, and a really amazingly together weekend. We know our readers are cool froods who always know where their towels are.

  • Huawei Cannot Use microSD Cards In Its Future Devices

    A host of companies have severed ties with Huawei after the US government’s order. Without companies like Google, ARM, and Panasonic, it is difficult for Huawei to sustain in the smartphone business.

    Adding more to the list, Huawei has now been banned from using microSD cards in its future devices. The SD Association, a trade group that decides standardized specs for microSD and SD cards, has blacklisted Huawei.

  • Real Estate Title Firm’s Lapse Exposes 885 Million Files

    A security lapse at a major real estate title company exposed the bank account numbers and other sensitive information contained in 885 million files.

    First American Financial confirmed the problem Friday after it was reported by the blog Krebs On Security . A flaw in an internet application allowed anyone with a web browser to see the confidential data until First American blocked all outside access Friday. It’s unclear if any of the exposed information was scooped up by outsiders with criminal intentions.

  • This week’s updates: Chromium, LibreOffice, Flash

    There was an update to Chromium browser code this week as announced a few days ago by Google. I built new Slackware packages for Chromium 74.0.3729.169 and uploaded them earlier this week to slackware.com and slackware.nl (or you can use any mirror site of course).
    There were two intermediate updates to Chromium 74 which I did not compile & package. Both versions address a couple of security issues (CVE’s), but at the time I was unable to work a computer. It’s therefore a good idea to upgrade to this new package.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zombieload, Nextcloud, Peppermint 10, KDE Plasma, IPFire, ArcoLinux, LuneOS | This Week in Linux 67

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ll check out some Distro News from Peppermint OS, ArcoLinux, LuneOS & IPFire. We got a couple apps to talking about like Nextclou0…d and a new Wallpaper tool that has quite a bit of potential. We’ll take a look at what is to come with the next version of KDE Plasma. Intel users have gotten some more bad news regarding a new security vulnerability. Later in the show, we’ll cover some interesting information regarding a couple governments saving money by switching to Linux. Then finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming News. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S12E07 – R-Type

    This week we’ve been installing Lineage on a OnePlus One and not migrating Mastodon accounts to ubuntu.social. We round up the Ubuntu community news from Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Peppermint OS and we discuss some tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 07 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • OpenGL 4.6 / SPIR-V Support Might Be Inching Closer For Mesa Drivers

    We're quickly approaching the two year anniversary of the OpenGL 4.6 release and it's looking like the Intel/RadeonSI drivers might be inching towards the finish line for that latest major revision of the graphics API. 

    As we've covered many times, the Mesa drivers have been held up on OpenGL 4.6 support due to their SPIR-V ingestion support mandated by this July 2017 version of the OpenGL specification. While there are the Intel and Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers already with the SPIR-V support that is central to Vulkan, it's taken a long time re-fitting the OpenGL drivers for the likes of ARB_gl_spriv. Then again, there aren't many (actually, any?) major OpenGL games requiring version 4.6 of the specification even with its interoperability benefits thanks to SPIR-V.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OSMC's May update is here

    Last month, we released Kodi v18 for OSMC devices. Since then, we've been working on a number of improvements and bug fixes to keep things running smoothly.

  • Linux Mint 17.x Reached End Of Life (EOL)

    We came to know from the Linux Mint monthly (April-2019) newsletter, the Linux Mint team reported that Linux Mint 17.x has reached the end of its supported life.

    After 5 good years of service, Linux Mint 17.x (i.e. 17, 17.1, 17.2 and 17.3) reached “End Of Life”.

    Although the repositories will continue to work they will no longer receive security updates.

  • Intel's 'Islay Canyon' NUCs Announced

    Introducing the first Intel® NUC with 8th Generation Intel® Core™ processors and Radeon* 540X discrete graphics for all your gaming and entertainment needs. Play casual games, binge watch the latest series, or stream digital music like never before with a quad-core processor that delivers 2x faster performance.

  • Avoiding Big Tech to Protect Your Privacy

    In a recent opinion piece by Jennifer Senior, titled If We Care So Much About What Google Knows, Why Do We Keep Telling it Everything?, she properly describes the privacy paradox as what happens when a person consistently acts in ways that are contradictory to the privacy values professed by that same person.

    The reasons behind the privacy paradox have been highlighted numerous times by our team at Purism: it all boils down to a simple word, convenience. It is convenient to give up your digital rights, it is simple to just click past a privacy wall, and easy to sign up for a service you know exploits you. It is inconvenient to learn about the best practices for privacy protection, from software to browser plugins and applications – let alone to find what service to use that isn’t entirely designed to spy on everything you do.

    The solution to the privacy paradox has also been answered many times by our team at Purism. It all boils down to the same simple word, convenience. People want convenient products that respect them by default, that they can trust will not exploit them, that allow them to participate in digital society with peace of mind, knowing they are in complete control.

  • Google and Binomial Partner to Open Source Basis Universal Texture Codec

    Google and Binomial have announced a partnership to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression.

  • Say Goodbye to the Physical Kilogram (and Perhaps much More)

    Once upon a time we lived in a society that was not only completely analog but infinitely simpler. A time when it seemed the physical world could be understood and described, perhaps even tamed, purely through the application of rational thought. Contemporaries dubbed that era the Age of Enlightenment and looked forward to the wonders that this brave new world would bring. This week, one of the last icons of that heady time was dethroned and retired to a museum in Paris.

    I am speaking, of course, about the kilogram, the last of the seven International System of Units measures to be represented by a physical object rather than an “invariant constant of nature.” But where did it come from? And why, after two hundred twenty years, has it been replaced?

    The story begins with the same school of humanists that provided the philosophic justification for the French revolution which began honorably before descending into a campaign of terror. When they decided to rationalize the multiple systems of weights and measures, the results were both more benign and long-lasting, perhaps because they took their inspiration from the grand canvas of the physical world around them. The metre became the fundamental unit of length and was fixed at one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. Weight, in turn, would henceforth be calculated in reference to the kilogram, defined as the mass of one decimetre of pure water at sea level at a set temperature and barometric pressure.

  • g2k19 hackathon report from Claudio Jeker

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dark Style Rises | LINUX Unplugged 302

    Can the Free Desktop avoid being left behind in the going dark revolution? Cassidy from elementary OS joins us to discuss their proposal.

    Plus we complete our Red Hat arc by giving Silverblue the full workstation shakedown, Drew shares his complete review, and we discuss the loss of Antergros.

  • mintCast 309 – Virtualization
  • curl 7.65.0 dances in

    After another eight week cycle was been completed, curl shipped a new release into the world. 7.65.0 brings some news and some security fixes but is primarily yet again a set of bug-fixes bundled up.

  •  

  • Time for school as the big Cities: Skylines - Campus expansion is out now

    Paradox Interactive and Colossal Order have put school back on the map, as the Cities: Skylines - Campus expansion is out now. In terms of features and new content, this is one of the bigger expansions to be released.

    Adding in a little extra complexity for those who want it while also giving you even more freedom at the same time with the way you design your campus. Much like what came with the Parklife expansion, Campus lets you freely zone an entire area to build your fancy new education system.

  • The Humble tinyBuild Bundle 2019 is live with some lovely Linux games

    Here's something to keep you going for a little while, the Humble tinyBuild Bundle 2019 went live today and it has plenty of Linux games.

  • Academic Support Center BiASC connects the SUSE Academic Program with Belgium and Luxembourg

    The SUSE Academic Program has taken significant strides in new territories with the help of trusted academic partners from different regions. BiASC is an academic support organization that connects with IT academies from higher and secondary education and from non-commercial and professional training institutions. Already working with a number of universities, including the University of Luxembourg and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, we hope to see our footprint spread with support from BiASC.

  • Raspberry Pi Close To Seeing CPUFreq Support

    Nicolas Saenz Julienne of SUSE has been working on CPUFreq support for the Raspberry Pi single board computers to allow for the Linux kernel to provide CPU frequency scaling controls.

    This CPUFreq support communicates with firmware running on a dedicated processor on the Raspberry Pi that is responsible for adjusting the CPU frequencies as well as that of the VPU and related blocks. The driver can request changes to the CPU frequencies though isn't necessarily honored depending upon thermal factors and other criteria. The firmware also offers the ability to request a turbo mode, but that can boost up other clocks and appears to be causing issues at least with the current state of the Raspberry Pi kernel drivers.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • RC candidate of the day (1)

    Sometimes the list of release-critical bugs is overwhelming, and it’s hard to find something to tackle.

    So I invite you to have a go at #928040, which may only be a case of reviewing and uploading the included patch.

  • [GSoC – 1] Achieving consistency between SDDM and Plasma

    I’m very excited to start off the Google Summer of Code blogging experience regarding the project I’m doing with my KDE mentors David Edmundson and Nate Graham.

    What we’ll be trying to achieve this summer is have SDDM be more in sync with the Plasma desktop.

    What does that mean? The essence of the problem is quite simple: you can customize Plasma to no end, yet the only thing you can customize in SDDM is the cursor theme. As a customization-loving user, this has been a big pet peeve of mine. In my attempts to work around the issue I’ve already went as far as adding one too many config points to the Breeze SDDM theme. So to finish that project and thereby solve our GSoC issue, perhaps we could just hook up the respective KCM’s UI to those options…

  • Guaranteed Hard Real-time Response and Determinism from Aitech's Space SBC Processor Using NASA cFS Linux
  • Embedded PC with 6th or 7th Gen CPUs offers optional mini-PCIe and PCIe x4

    Aaeon’s barebones, semi-rugged “EPIC-KBS9-PUC” embedded PC runs on 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs with up to 4x GbE and 2x serial plus 4x USB, mSATA, dual displays, and optional mini-PCIe, PCIe x4, or 2.5-inch HDD.

    Aaeon has spun last year’s EPIC form-factor EPIC-KBS board into an embedded system for light industrial duty including “automated warehouse robots, retail POS systems, and even a 3D printer for cakes.” The barebones, 216 x 180 x 65mm system will presumably let you load either Linux or Windows on a range of 6th (Skylake) or 7th (Kaby Lake) generation Intel Core CPUs up to 65W.

  • How to install Microsoft Visual Studio Code (VS Code) on Ubuntu [Ed: Jack Wallen pushing Microsoft agenda and helps Microsoft impose proprietary software, MSVS, on GNU/Linux users. Wallen should know better than this, but LF now pays him.]
  • Apple Is Finally Fixing the Keyboards on MacBook Pros

    Apple’s newest MacBook Pros, which are being announced today and include significant bumps in power and performance, are still using Apple’s third-generation “butterfly” keyboard. But the company says these keyboards have a change in the physical material that exists within the butterfly mechanism that will address some of the issues that MacBook users have been experiencing. The company declined to say exactly what the material change was. [...]

  • Flex PCB Fabrication

    I’ve gotten a few people asking me where I get my flex PCBs fabricated, so I figured I’d make a note here. I get my flex PCBs (and actually most of my PCBs, except laser-drilled microvia) done at a medium-sized shop in China called King Credie. Previously it was a bit hard to talk about them because they only took orders via e-mail and in Chinese, but they recently opened an English-friendly online website for quotation and order placement. There’s still a few wrinkles in the website, but for a company whose specialty is decidedly not “web services” and with English as a second language, it’s usable.

    Knowing your PCB vendor is advantageous for a boutique hardware system integrators like me. It’s a bit like the whole farm-to-table movement — you get better results when you know where your materials are coming from. I’ve probably been working with King Credie for almost a decade now, and I try to visit their facility and have drinks with the owner on a regular basis. I really like their CEO, he’s been a circuit board fabrication nerd since college, and he’s living his dream of building his own factory and learning all he can about interesting and boutique PCB processes.

  • TechnicalDebt

     

    Thinking of this as paying interest versus paying of principal can help decide which cruft to tackle. If I have a terrible area of the code base, one that's a nightmare to change, it's not a problem if I don't have to modify it. I only trigger an interest payment when I have to work with that part of the software (this is a place where the metaphor breaks down, since financial interest payments are triggered by the passage of time). So crufty but stable areas of code can be left alone. In contrast, areas of high activity need a zero-tolerance attitude to cruft, because the interest payments are cripplingly high. This is especially important since cruft accumulates where developers make changes without paying attention to internal quality - the more changes, the greater risk of cruft building up.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Week Twitter Taught Me: Thunderbird is Go, But Windows Text Editors are Not!

    Although it’s proving difficult to stay on (Linux related) topic, this series has proven a great success in only 3 weeks — so much so that I’m planning to launch three separate spin-offs!

    I mean, I might as well milk the franchise for all I can while the udders drip with goodwill, right?

    Keep an eye out for “This Week My Spam Folder Taught Me“, “This Fortnight a Disqus Bot Taught Me” (spoiler: bit repetitive that one) and, to serve the overlooked people-who-read-this-site-whilst-diving niche, “This Month Diving Taught Me”.

    I wouldn’t get your hopes up for the latter, though. I can’t swim, let alone dive…

  • Timetable Scheduler App For Linux

    Timetable is a scheduling app available on flathub repositories. The app is maintained by the Elementary OS team and thus it’s User Interface looks like its own native OS. Might look a bit out of place on GNOME, KDE, Cinnamon, etc but still yet the app works like a charm. Read on below to get more done with Timetable.

  • Juan Luis Baptiste : New docker images for upcoming mageia 7

    I have added new docker images for the upcoming mageia 7 release. Thanks to the latest work on our image build tools, the images are available in all architectures mageia 7 supports:
    x86_64
    armv7hl
    aarch64

  • Manas and Marek: Improving Fedora release process

    Manas Mangaonkar (pac23) is working on the Change Management Tool, a tool for the Fedora Program Managers and contributors to propose, edit, and approve changes per Fedora’s change process. He was selected for Google Summer of Code 2019.

    We asked Manas a few questions as he prepares for his next three months working with Ben Cotton, his mentor for the summer.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy 2019 March-August Internship – The Application Process

    Really excited to be accepted for the project “Debian Continuous Integration: user experience improvements” (referred to as debci in this post) of the 2019 March-August round of the Outreachy internship! A huge thanks to my company and my manager Frank for letting me do this since I mentioned it out of the blue. Thanks to the Women Techmakers community for letting me know this program exists.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 579
  • Sony's Deal With Microsoft Blindsided Its Own PlayStation Team [iophk: "RIP Playstation"]

    Last week, the companies announced a strategic partnership to co-develop game streaming technology and host some of PlayStation’s online services on the Redmond-based company’s Azure cloud platform. It comes after PlayStation spent seven years developing its own cloud gaming offering, with limited success.

    Negotiations with Microsoft began last year and were handled directly by Sony’s senior management in Tokyo, largely without the involvement of the PlayStation unit, according to people familiar with the matter. Staff at the gaming division were caught off-guard by the news. Managers had to calm workers and assure them that plans for the company’s next-generation console weren’t affected, said the people, asking not to be identified discussing private matters.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LHS Episode #285: Hamvention 2019 Day One

    Thank you for tuning in to Episode 285 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode we wrap up our experiences with day one of the 2019 Hamvention in Xenia, Ohio. We would sincerely like to thank our supports who got us here and for everyone who has visited us in our booth at the show. We hope to see everyone before we leave town on Sunday.

  • OpenIndiana 2019.04 overview | Community-driven illumos Distribution

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of OpenIndiana 2019.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Debian XMPP Team Starts a Blog

    The Debian XMPP Team, the people who package Dino, Gajim, Mcabber, Movim, Profanity, Prosody, Psi+, Salut à Toi, Taningia, and a couple of other packages related to XMPP a.k.a. Jabber for Debian, have this blog now. We will try to post interesting stuff here — when it's ready!

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 5.1, Red Hat's RHEL 8, Ubuntu Touch, GCC, App Store, Alpine, WSL2 | This Week in Linux 66

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of big news to cover like the release of Linux 5.1, the new version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Microsoft announcing the Linux Kernel inside of Windows 10, Linux on Chromebooks, and more. We’ll also check out the latest release from Ubuntu Touch,…

  • Open Source Advocates express concern about Microsoft monopolizing OSS tooling [Ed: Everyone needs to delete GitHub now that dedicated Microsoft propaganda sites try to dismiss claims that Microsoft uses GitHub to sabotage the FOSS world]

    The executive director of the Eclipse Foundation, Mike Milinkovich now believes that Microsoft is heading for a complete monopoly which might endanger other companies and projects like Eclipse IDE. According to a recent survey by Stack Overflow (via The Register), Eclipse leads the market share for Jakarta EE development and is followed by IntelliJ IDEA and Visual Studio Code.

  • Recap: FOSDEM19

    This year’s FOSDEM (Free and Open source Software Developers’ European Meeting) has been held in in the beautiful city of Brussels (Belgium), as usual, on February 2 & 3, 2019. It was organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software..

    This was my first FOSDEM as a deputy member of the MC, and a fresh member of the Collabora team.

    I will try to give some information about my talks, and share my experience.

  • AT&T, DT, China Telecom throw support behind TM Forum's Open APIs

    The TM Forum announced that AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, Salesforce and China Telecom have signed on in support of its Open APIs.

    Those companies showed their support by signing the TM Forum's Open API Manifesto, which commits them to using the TM Forum's APIs in their products and service offerings as well as in their request-for-proposal (RFP) processes.

    “Open APIs and open source software are at the heart of our network transformation, and we're thrilled at the broader ecosystem that's adopting the same approach,” said AT&T's Chris Rice, senior vice president, network cloud and infrastructure, in a statement. “TM Forum has played a critical role in nurturing this ecosystem, and we're pleased to support their Open API initiative.”

    The new members also agreed to take part in the TM Forum’s Collaboration program to continuously innovate and update the suite of Open APIs. Those APIs are in use by more than 7,000 software developers In over 1,200 companies worldwide

  • Cisco Making its MindMeld Conversational AI Platform Open Source [Ed: Cisco openwashing of mass surveillance listening devices]
  • A Cisco Router Bug Has Massive Global Implications

    THE CISCO 1001-X series router doesn't look much like the one you have in your home. It's bigger and much more expensive, responsible for reliable connectivity at stock exchanges, corporate offices, your local mall, and so on. The devices play a pivotal role at institutions, in other words, including some that deal with hypersensitive information. Now, researchers are disclosing a remote attack that would potentially allow a hacker to take over any 1001-X router and compromise all the data and commands that flow through it.

  • Daily News Roundup: Apple’s App Store Monopoly

    As of late, Apple has been under fire for its App Store practices. Specifically, the fact that it takes a 30% cut of all app sales, causing developers to raise prices, leaving users no other choice but to pay up.

    Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled iPhone owners could proceed with a suit against Apple for the practice. Since Apple only allows apps to be downloaded directly from its App Store on iOS, the claim is that it has a monopoly over app distribution. It’s an interesting angle because iOS is one of the only (or perhaps the only?) operating systems that works like this. Android, Windows, Linux, and even macOS allow users to install whatever they like outside of any official channels that exist.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • When to be concerned about memory levels on Linux

    Running out of memory on a Linux system is generally not a sign that there's a serious problem. Why? Because a healthy Linux system will cache disk activity in memory, basically gobbling memory that isn't being used, which is a very good thing.

    In other words, it doesn't allow memory to go to waste. It uses the spare memory to increase disk access speed, and it does this without taking memory away from running applications. This memory caching, as you might well imagine, is hundreds of times faster than working directly with the hard-disk drives (HDD) and significantly faster than solid-state drives. Full or near full memory normally means that a system is running as efficiently as it can — not that it's running into problems.

  • Linux Journal ASCII Art Contest

    Do you have l33t ASCII/ANSI art skillz? Your work could grace the cover of Linux Journal!

    That's right—your ASCII art on the cover of the longest-running Linux publication on the planet.

  • An other look at nir

    There has been interest in NIR support for etnaviv for a while, for the obvious reasons: gaining access to common optimizations, better support for non-trivial code transformations, better register allocation, and the promise of OpenCL and SPIR-V support in the future.

    [...]

    So it comes down to my limted time and the big architectural changes I have done with unit tests and real shader compiles on the targets.

  • Etnaviv Developer Working On "EIR" Compiler Backend - Hopes For Vulkan Future

    Christian Gmeiner, one of the leading contributors to the Etnaviv Gallium3D code for providing open-source OpenGL driver coverage for Vivante graphics IP, has posted a series of patches for "EIR" as a new back-end IR based on NIR and other modern open-source driver graphics compiler back-ends. 

    After studying the other Mesa compiler back-ends and NIR itself, Christian began work on EIR to provide "the best parts" of these different projects, including features like legalization, optimizations, a register allocator, and unit tests. He resisted from wiring NIR support into Etnaviv itself on the basis of NIR being a fast moving target and concerns about how well it will map to future hardware/drivers.

  • Millions Of Cisco Routers Worldwide Are At Risk Due To ‘Thrangrycat’ Bug

    recent report from Red Balloon pits the security of millions of Cisco Routers around the world for a serious test. The report labels the potential exploit termed as “Thrangrycat“, a Cisco Router Bug in the routers. It can be exploited to gain access to the data flowing through the huge number of Cisco devices around the world.

  • This WhatsApp Flaw Allowed Israeli Hackers To Send Spyware Via Voice Call

    WhatsApp has today disclosed that a vulnerability allowed hackers to install national grade spyware on phones. The vulnerability was discovered in May this year and exploited a flaw in the audio call feature of the messaging app. The caller was able to install the spyware on the affected phones even though the receiver declined the call.

    The spyware installed on the phones is called ‘Pegasus’ which is a creation of Israeli cyber-intelligence company NSO. WhatsApp did not mention NSO in its official statement, but it was evident from the statement.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SUSE CaaS Platform 3 validated for SAP Data Hub 2.5

    We are happy to share the news that SUSE CaaS Platform 3 on premise is validated for SAP Data Hub 2.5 with SUSE Enterprise Storage as storage backend.

  • Community Member Monday: Vera Blagoveschenskaya

    I live in Obninsk, Russia – it’s one of the major Russian science cities. You know, the first nuclear power plant was built in Obninsk. At the moment I work at BaseALT as a QA engineer. I really love testing! (I’ve noticed a minor bug in LibreOffice Writer while typing these words – I will surely report it later)

    I’m also mother of a teenage girl, so a lot of my spare time is dedicated to supporting her interests. Now she is really into biking and swimming, and we dream of visiting the Tokyo Olympics in 2020.

  • GNU Radio Conference 2019 Seeks Papers, Presentations

    The GNU Radio Conference highlights the substantial and remarkable progress of the world’s premier open-source digital signal processing framework for software-defined radios. In addition to presenting GNU Radio’s theoretical and practical presence in academia, industry, the military, and among radio amateurs and hobbyists, GNU Radio Conference 2019 will have a special focus on the 50th anniversary of NASA’s Apollo 11 mission, which landed the first humans on the moon — hence, the selection of “The Rocket City,” home to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, as the venue.

  • The House gives data standardization another go

    Congress is offering up another bite at the data standards apple, introducing H.R.1530 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Financial Transparency Act.

    [...]

    The data standards must:

    render information fully searchable and machine-readable;
    be nonproprietary;
    incorporate standards developed and maintained by voluntary consensus standards bodies; and
    be consistent with accounting and reporting principles.

  • Hackers are collecting payment details, user passwords from 4,600 sites

    Currently, it is unknown how hackers breached Picreel or the Cloud CMS's Alpaca Forms CDN. In a Twitter conversation, de Groot told ZDNet the hack appears to have been carried out by the same threat actor.

  • 4,600 Websites Prone To Hacking! Payment Data And Passwords At Risk!

    The two services in question are open source Alpaca Forms and analytics service Picreel.

  • Nvidia GPU Display Drivers Could Be Exploited To Launch DoS Attack

    vidia GPU display drivers could be on the radar of hackers. According to the latest news, Nvidia is prompting Geforce graphics card owners running Windows OS, to update their drivers.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Running Deep Learning Models On Intel Hardware? It's Time To Consider A Different OS

Firstly, Intel has done extensive work to make the Xeon family of processors highly optimized for AI. The Intel Xeon Scalable processors outsmart GPUs in accelerating the training on large datasets. Intel is telling its customers that they don’t need expensive GPUs until they meet a threshold. Most of the deep learning training can be effectively done on CPUs that cost a fraction of their GPU counterparts. Beyond the marketing messages and claims, Intel went onto prove that their deep learning stack performs better than NVIDIA GPU-based stack. Recently, Intel published a benchmark to show its leadership in deep learning. Intel Xeon Scalable processers trained a deep learning network with 7878 images per second on ResNet-50 outperforming 7844 images per second on NVIDIA Tesla V100. Intel’s performance optimization doesn’t come just from its CPUs. It is delivered by a purpose-built software stack that is highly optimized at various levels. From the operating system to the TensorFlow framework, Intel has tweaked multiple layers of software to deliver unmatched performance. To ease the process of running this end-to-end stack, Intel has turned to one of its open source projects called Clear Linux OS. Clear Linux project was started as a purpose-built, container-optimized, and lightweight operating system. It was started with the premise that the OS running a container doesn’t need to perform all the functions of a traditional OS. Container Linux, the OS developed by CoreOS (now a part of Red Hat) followed the same philosophy. Within a short span, Clear Linux gained popularity among open source developers. Intel kept improving the OS, making it relevant to run modern workloads such as machine learning training jobs, AI inferencing, analytics and edge computing. Read more Also: Intel Core i9 9900KS Allowing 5.0GHz All-Core, Icelake News Coming This Week

Games: Pathfinder: Kingmaker, MidBoss, CorsixTH, Railway Empire and Unbound: Worlds Apart

  • The RPG 'Pathfinder: Kingmaker' is getting a free Enhanced Edition update next month + new DLC
    Pathfinder: Kingmaker, the party-based RPG from Owlcat Games and Deep Silver is going to expand with a free Enhanced Edition and another DLC. They say it's going to include plenty of "gameplay-enriching content additions" along with the usual quality of life improvements to existing features, new abilities and ways to build your character, a new Slayer class, new items and weapons, improved balance especially in the beginning and last two chapters, an improved kingdom management system, an increased variety to the random encounters on the map and so on.
  • MidBoss, the unique body-snatching roguelike turns 2 with a big sale and future plans details
    MidBoss is a game we've covered here numerous times, mainly due to how unique it is. You take down enemies, take their body and it's pretty amusing. The developer, Kitsune Games, has supported Linux rather nicely and now that MidBoss is over two years old they've decided to put it on a big sale. Not just that, they've also announced a fancy sounding DLC that's coming along with a free update for everyone. The DLC will have brand new pixel-art for all of the monsters, which will include idle animations for them too so the DLC should make the game look a lot more interesting. Also being added in the DLC is a "randomizer mode", to make repeated runs in the game vastly different.
  • FOSS game engine 'CorsixTH' for Theme Hospital update 0.63 is out
    The first major release for the FOSS game engine in some time, CorsixTH 0.63 is out following the recent release candidate build. CorsixTH might not be "finished" but it's incredibly playable and does provide a better experience (mostly) over running the original Theme Hospital.
  • Railway Empire has another update and it's off to France in the latest DLC out now
    There appears to be no stopping this train, Railway Empire continues to see plenty of post-release support and extra optional content. Firstly, the latest "Community Update" is out taking feedback from (you guessed it) the community of players. They've introduced modding support to DLC scenarios, increased the total number of trains and stations you can have, new tooltips, you can skip the current music track using the new "P" hotkey, the train list will actually show problems employees have, new train list filtering options, train speed reduced if they're missing supplies and lots of other nice quality of life updates.
  • A Linux version of the mind-bending multi-dimensional 'Unbound: Worlds Apart' will come at release
    Unbound: Worlds Apart from Alien Pixel Studios is currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter, this hand-crafted puzzler looks like it could melt my mind with the portal system.

Linux 5.2-rc2

Hey, what's to say? Fairly normal rc2, no real highlights - I think most of the diff is the SPDX updates. Who am I kidding? The highlight of the week was clearly Finland winning the ice hockey world championships. So once you sober up from the celebration, go test, Linus Read more Also: Linux 5.2-rc2 Kernel Released As The "Golden Lions"

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order