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IBM: OpenPOWER Foundation, Savings and the OpenStack Platform

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
  • OpenPOWER Foundation | The Next Step in the OpenPOWER Foundation Journey

    Today marks one of the most important days in the life of the OpenPOWER Foundation. With IBM announcing new contributions to the open source community including the POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and key hardware reference designs at OpenPOWER Summit North America 2019, the future has never looked brighter for the POWER architecture.

    OpenPOWER Foundation Aligns with Linux Foundation

    The OpenPOWER Foundation will now join projects and organizations like OpenBMC, CHIPS Alliance, OpenHPC and so many others within the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation is the premier open source group, and we’re excited to be working more closely with them.

    Since our founding in 2013, IEEE-ISTO has been our home, and we owe so much to its team. It’s as a result of IEEE-ISTO’s support and guidance that we’ve been able to expand to more than 350 members and that we’re ready to take the next step in our evolution. On behalf of our membership, our board of directors and myself, we place on record our thanks to the IEEE-ISTO team.

    By moving the POWER ISA under an open model – guided by the OpenPOWER Foundation within the Linux Foundation – and making it available to the growing open technical commons, we’ll enable innovation in the open hardware and software space to grow at an accelerated pace. The possibilities for what organizations and individuals will be able to develop on POWER through its mature ISA and software ecosystem will be nearly limitless.

  • How Red Hat delivers $7B in customer savings

    This spring, Red Hat commissioned IDC to conduct a new study to analyze the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux to the global business economy. While many of the findings were impressive, including immense opportunities for partners, we were especially excited to learn more about how our customers benefit from Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    According to the study, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform "touches" more than $10 trillion of business revenues worldwide each year and provides economic benefits of more than $1 trillion each year to customers. Nearly $7 billion of that number comes in the form of IT savings. Even more exciting? As hybrid cloud adoption grows, we expect customers to continue to benefit given the importance of a common, flexible and open operating system to IT deployments that span the many footprints of enterprise computing.

  • The road ahead for the Red Hat OpenStack Platform

    If you didn't have a chance to attend our Road Ahead session at Red Hat Summit 2019 (or you did, but want a refresher) you'll want to read on for a quick update. We'll cover where Red Hat OpenStack Platform is today, where we're planning to go tomorrow, and the longer-term plan for Red Hat OpenStack Platform support all the way to 2025.

    A strategic part of our portfolio

    Red Hat OpenStack Platform is a strategic part of Red Hat's vision for open hybrid cloud. It's the on-prem foundation that can help organizations bridge the gap between today's existing workloads and emerging workloads. In fact, it just earned the 2019 CODiE award for "Best Software Defined Infrastructure."

    One of those emerging workloads, and more on the rest in a moment, is Red Hat OpenShift.

Lauterbach to support JTAG debug for RISC-V Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The Linux Kernel Awareness adaptation for the TRACE32 debugger is MMU aware. This allows symbols to be loaded for each process, kernel module or shared library in the target system and assigns them to the correct memory partition. This approach gives developers the ability to view and control all components of a target system from within the TRACE32 environment: kernel, kernel modules, device drivers, interrupt service routines, processes, threads and shared libraries.

In addition to all standard JTAG features, some unique special extensions are provided, such as process aware breakpoints that can be set to trigger when a piece of shared code is executed by a particular thread or process, ability to read the kernel logs and to inspect the /proc and /sys filesystems and all mountpoints. The system is also fully SMP aware and supports multi-core designs where the kernel is able to schedule processes dynamically across a number of processor cores, providing users with complete system visibility in a system which is self-managing according to real-world demands.

Read more

Raspberry Pi gets MIT's Scratch 3 programming language for Raspbian

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Development
Hardware

Ever since Scratch 3 was released this January, a team at the Raspberry Pi Foundation has been working with MIT to develop an offline, installable version for the Raspberry Pi.

That offline version is now available, offering students and beginners an easy environment to begin coding with the language's visual 'code blocks', as well as paint and sound-editing tools.

Scratch 3 requires installing the latest version of Raspbian known as 'Buster', the latest version of Debian Linux that was released alongside the Raspberry Pi 4 in June.

Due to the memory requirements of Scratch 3, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is recommending it is installed on a Raspberry Pi 4 with at least 2GB of RAM. The 2GB model costs $45.

Read more

Also: GCC 10 Lands Support For -march=tigerlake & -march=cooperlake

7 of the Best IoT Projects Using Arduino

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets

If you’re an electronics hobbyist, chances are you’ve heard of the Arduino. It’s a tiny computer that you can use to do surprisingly complex things. It also happens to be behind a fair number of Internet of Things projects.

While some people reach a for Raspberry Pi or something even more powerful, an Arduino or Arduino Uno might be all you need. We’ve put together a list of IoT projects that prove this to be true.

Read more

Also: mDash Cloud platform for IoT Devices Targets ESP8266/ESP32, STM32, and TI CC3220 Wireless MCUs

Software, HowTos and Storage

Filed under
Hardware
Software
HowTos
  • Pause Music When Locking The Screen And Resume On Unlock For Spotify, Rhythmbox, Others

    When you lock your computer screen (without suspending the system), most desktop audio players continue playback in the background, sometimes not emitting any sound ¹. Due to this you may unintentionally skip parts of podcasts or songs in a playlist, etc.

    Enter pause-on-lock, a Bash script that pauses your music player when you lock the screen and resumes playback once the screen is unlocked.

    pause-on-lock works on Unity, GNOME, Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments, and by default it supports Spotify and Rhythmbox. With the help of playerctl (a command line controller for controlling media players that support the MPRIS D-Bus interface), this script can extend its supported music players to many others, including Audacious, VLC, Cmus, and others.

  • Easy Way to Screen Mirroring Android on Ubuntu!

    Screen Mirroring is one of the features found on smartphones, one of which is on Android. This feature serves to display the smartphone to a computer. This is very useful for example when used for demo applications that you make, or maybe for other things related to smartphones.

    In Ubuntu, we can do screen mirroring with applications available on Android, for example is AirDroid which can be used for screen mirroring through a browser. But I feel less optimal when using this instant method.

    Because there is a lag between activity on the smartphone and on the monitor screen on the computer, and the results are less than optimal. What might be the cause because it is opened through a browser and uses wi-fi? (Personal question).

    I am looking for another application for screen mirroring on Ubuntu, and one of the very good applications is Scrcpy. This application can be used for screen mirroring without a root device.

  • Command line quick tips: Searching with grep
  • How to Install Cezerin on Debian 9
  • How to Create a Bootable USB Stick from the Ubuntu Terminal
  • How to Install Git on Debian 10
  • How to Copy/Move a Docker Container to Another Host
  • Six practical use cases for Nmap
  • The Next Stage of Flash Storage: Computational Storage
  • NAS upgrade

    At some point in the future I hope to spend a little bit of time on the software side of things, as some of the features of my set up are no longer working as they should: I can't remote-decrypt the main disk via SSH on boot, and the first run of any backup fails due to some kind of race condition in the systemd unit dependencies. (The first attempt does not correctly mount the backup partition; the second attempt always succeeds).

  • Storage Concepts And Technologies Explained In Detail

Devices With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

HealthyPi v4 open source, wireless, wearable for human vital signs monitoring

Filed under
Hardware

A new piece of hardware will soon be launching via the Crowd Supply website called HealthyPi v4, offering a fourth-generation built on the technology and feedback from previous versions. The open source, wireless, wearable has been specifically designed to monitor human vital signs and is powered by an ESP32.

Read more

Also: EEZ Bench Box 3 open source modular test chassis

Open Hardware and Devices

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • RAKWireless Introduces RAK7200 LoRa Tracker | Features & Specifications
  • Padauk PMS150C “3 Cents” MCU Supports SDCC Open Source Toolchain
  • OpenHW Group Launched
  • Spain's First Open Source Satellite

    [Fossa Systems], a non-profit youth association based out of Madrid, is developing an open-source satellite set to launch in October 2019. The FossaSat-1 is sized at 5x5x5 cm, weighs 250g, and will provide free IoT connectivity by communicating LoRa RTTY signals through low-power RF-based LoRa modules. The satellite is powered by 28% efficient gallium arsenide TrisolX triple junction solar cells.

    The satellite’s development and launch cost under EUR 30000, which is pretty remarkable for a cubesat — or a picosatellite, as the project is being dubbed. It has been working in the UHF Amateur Satellite band (435-438 MHz) and recently received an IARU frequency spectrum allocation for LoRa of 125kHz.

  • Fitness Trackers Don't Have To Be Proprietary

    The OpenHAK is an open-source fitness tracker in a 3D printed wristwatch case that measures your heart rate and counts your steps, offering the resultant data for you to collect via Bluetooth. At its heart is a Sparkfun Simblee module, with heart rate sensing through a Maxim MAX30101 and step counting .by a Bocsh BMI160. It’s designed for expandability from the start with a header bringing out useful interface lines. In the prototype, they’ve used this to support a small OLED display. The result is a fitness tracker watch that may not match some of the well-known proprietary devices, but which remains completely open and probably costs a lot less too.

  • CutiePi is an open source Raspberry Pi-based tablet (coming in late 2019?)

    The CutiePi is hardly the first tablet built around one of Raspberry Pi’s tiny, low-cost computers. But it’s a pretty nifty looking addition to the category that combines an 8 inch touchscreen display with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite, a custom carrier board, and software to make the Linux-based Raspbian operating system touch-friendly.

    CutiePie’s developers have a working prototype and hope to begin selling the tablet later this year. But the whole project is open source, so anyone who wants to build their own can check out the code and hardware design files and give it a try.

  • CutiePi open source Raspberry Pi tablet unveiled

    Unfortunately, no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet for the CutiePi, but as soon as information comes to light, we will keep you updated as always.

Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux 5.4 Set To Remove Intel XScale IOP33X/IOP13XX CPU Support

    Linux 5.4 is set to remove the Intel IOP33X and IOP13XX series of processors that are part of the company's former XScale product line for ARM-based CPUs. 

    The XScale IOP processors were intended for handling I/O offloading from the main device CPU. These sub-1.2GHz processors were part of Intel's ARMv8.5-based XScale product portfolio. But with no apparent users of the Intel IOP33X/IOP13XX hardware left -- at least anyone that would likely be riding new Linux kernel releases -- that support is going to be removed later this year with the Linux 5.4 release. 

  • Type 2 customers can now update to Skylake and Kaby Lake

    Adlink has released two Linux-ready COM Express Basic Type 2 modules for legacy customers: The Express-SL2 offers Intel 6th Gen and the Express-KL2 features 7th Gen processors.

    Back in 2014, Adlink launched a pair of COM Express Type 2 drop-in replacement modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core (Express-HL2) and Bay Trail Atom (cExpress-BT2). We had thought that might be the end of Type 2 replacement products. Yet, there are still many customers that are not ready to move to the identically sized (125 x 95mm) Basic Type 6. As a result, Adlink is back with the 6th Gen Skylake Express-SL2 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake Express-KL2 to keep legacy Type 2 customers up to date “for at least another 10 years,” says the company.

  • Wear Estimation for Devices with eMMC Flash Memory

Open Hardware and ARM

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

    Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.

    For this article, I contacted Håvard Skrödahl, founder of Muffsy. His hobby is designing open source audio hardware, and he offers his designs as kits for those of us who can't wait to wind up the soldering iron for another adventure.

    I've built two of Håvard's kits: a moving coil (MC) cartridge preamp and a moving magnet (MM) cartridge phono preamp. Both were a lot of fun to build and sound great. They were also a bit of a stroll down memory lane for me. In my 20s, I built some other audio kits, including a Hafler DH-200 power amplifier and a DH-110 preamplifier. Before that, I built a power amplifier using a Motorola circuit design; both the design and the amplifier were lost along the way, but they were a lot of fun!

  • Nuvoton Launches Brand New M261/M262/M263 Series MCUs for IoT Applications

    Low power and robust security are two major requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) applications. In terms of low power consumption, NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series provides multiple power modes for different operating scenarios, integrating RTC with independent VBAT to support low power mode. The power consumption in normal run mode is 97 μA/MHz (LDO mode) and 45 μA/MHz (DC-DC mode). Standby power-down current is down to 2.8 μA and Deep power-down current is less than 2 μA. The low power, low supply voltage, and fast wake-up (9 μs from Fast-wakeup Power-down mode) features make M261/M262/M263 series suitable for battery-powered IoT applications.

    The robust security functions of NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series include secure boot function to ensure that a device boots using only trusted software through a series of digital signature authentication processes. The M261/M262/M263 series integrates complete hardware crypto engines such as AES 256/192/128, DES/3-DES, SHA, ECC, and True Random Number Generator (TRNG). Furthermore, it provides 4-region programable eXecute-Only-Memory (XOM) to secure critical program codes and up to six tamper detection pins against outer physical attack, which significantly improves the product security.

    [...]

    Third-Party IDEs such as Keil MDK, IAR EWARM, and NuEclipse IDE with GNU GCC compilers are also supported.

  • Arm, WDC and Qualcomm Announce OpenChain Conformance Activities

    Arm and Western Digital Corporation, Platinum Members of the OpenChain Project and key participants in the global supply chain, today announce conformance with the OpenChain Specification. Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., Platinum Member and founding contributor of the OpenChain Project, today announces expanded conformance to the latest version of the OpenChain Specification.

    The OpenChain Project establishes trust in the open source from which software solutions are built. It accomplishes this by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. The OpenChain Specification defines inflection points in business workflows where a compliance process, policy or training should exist to minimize the potential for errors and maximize the efficiency of bringing solutions to market. The companies involved in the OpenChain community number in the hundreds. The OpenChain Specification is being prepared for submission to ISO and evolution from a growing de facto standard into a formal standard.

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IBM: OpenPOWER Foundation, Savings and the OpenStack Platform

  • OpenPOWER Foundation | The Next Step in the OpenPOWER Foundation Journey

    Today marks one of the most important days in the life of the OpenPOWER Foundation. With IBM announcing new contributions to the open source community including the POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and key hardware reference designs at OpenPOWER Summit North America 2019, the future has never looked brighter for the POWER architecture. OpenPOWER Foundation Aligns with Linux Foundation The OpenPOWER Foundation will now join projects and organizations like OpenBMC, CHIPS Alliance, OpenHPC and so many others within the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation is the premier open source group, and we’re excited to be working more closely with them. Since our founding in 2013, IEEE-ISTO has been our home, and we owe so much to its team. It’s as a result of IEEE-ISTO’s support and guidance that we’ve been able to expand to more than 350 members and that we’re ready to take the next step in our evolution. On behalf of our membership, our board of directors and myself, we place on record our thanks to the IEEE-ISTO team. By moving the POWER ISA under an open model – guided by the OpenPOWER Foundation within the Linux Foundation – and making it available to the growing open technical commons, we’ll enable innovation in the open hardware and software space to grow at an accelerated pace. The possibilities for what organizations and individuals will be able to develop on POWER through its mature ISA and software ecosystem will be nearly limitless.

  • How Red Hat delivers $7B in customer savings

    This spring, Red Hat commissioned IDC to conduct a new study to analyze the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux to the global business economy. While many of the findings were impressive, including immense opportunities for partners, we were especially excited to learn more about how our customers benefit from Red Hat Enterprise Linux. According to the study, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform "touches" more than $10 trillion of business revenues worldwide each year and provides economic benefits of more than $1 trillion each year to customers. Nearly $7 billion of that number comes in the form of IT savings. Even more exciting? As hybrid cloud adoption grows, we expect customers to continue to benefit given the importance of a common, flexible and open operating system to IT deployments that span the many footprints of enterprise computing.

  • The road ahead for the Red Hat OpenStack Platform

    If you didn't have a chance to attend our Road Ahead session at Red Hat Summit 2019 (or you did, but want a refresher) you'll want to read on for a quick update. We'll cover where Red Hat OpenStack Platform is today, where we're planning to go tomorrow, and the longer-term plan for Red Hat OpenStack Platform support all the way to 2025. A strategic part of our portfolio Red Hat OpenStack Platform is a strategic part of Red Hat's vision for open hybrid cloud. It's the on-prem foundation that can help organizations bridge the gap between today's existing workloads and emerging workloads. In fact, it just earned the 2019 CODiE award for "Best Software Defined Infrastructure." One of those emerging workloads, and more on the rest in a moment, is Red Hat OpenShift.

Android Leftovers

Is Fedora Linux a Good Distro? The 15 Best Reasons to Use Fedora Linux

It goes without saying that Fedora Linux is one of the best Linux distributions and significantly distinct with its properties. There is no denying that it is an enticing version of Linux and there are enough reasons to be lured with the Fedora. It offers far ranges of features that have made it an undeniable choice for the users. There is a close and intimate collaboration between Fedora and “Redhat” what has given a new dimension of this Linux version. It is more comfortable to use, user-friendly and latest technology oriented; thus, there are many obvious reasons for loving in it. [...] The various distribution of Linux system is recognized for easy-going properties, albeit Fedora is the easiest one in this context. Having an easier interface, users are capable of dealing with it very easily since the boot phase. When the boot is done, users will be guided with simple features to run it the way they desire. Read more