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Hardware

LTE-equipped automotive gateway runs Ubuntu on Bay Trail

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s rugged “EvoTrac G102” is an in-vehicle cellular gateway that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 64GB eMMC, GbE, CAN, 2x USB, and a 3G/4G module with GPS.

Kontron unveiled the EvoTrac G102 last month, and earlier this month announced that it will act as the control box for Hyliion’s 6X4HE “intelligent electric hybrid system for Class 8 trucks and trailers.” The 6X4HE provides regenerative braking design to capture power for fuel savings of up to 30 percent,” says Kontron.

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Also: GPD Pocket 2 Launches This Summer with a Faster Processor

15.6-inch Apollo Lake panel PC supports Fedora, Ubuntu, and Yocto Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

DFI’s “KS-156AL” industrial touch-panel PC runs Linux or Windows on Apollo Lake and features a 15.6-inch, 1366 x 768 touchscreen with IP65 protection and shock and vibration resistance.

DFI’s Linux-friendly, 15.6-inch KS-156AL panel PC is based on its AL171 mini-ITX board, which was announced a year ago along with the similar AL173 which is otherwise identical except for the addition of wide-range power. The KS-156AL was recently announced along with a similarly Intel Apollo Lake based, 7-inch KS070-AL panel PC. The 7-inch KS070-AL is supported only with Windows, although it’s based on a 3.5-inch, “coming soon” AL551 SBC that also supports Ubuntu. The two systems are designed for factory automation, transportation, and other embedded applications.

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Also: Compact Kaby Lake embedded PC has SATA, M.2, and mSATA

Intel and OpenIoT Summit EU

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Hardware

Intel in Linux 4.19 and MIPS

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Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Begins Queuing Graphics Driver Improvements For Linux 4.19

    While the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window isn't even over until the end of the week followed by about eight weeks worth of testing before that kernel version will debut as stable, Intel open-source developers have already sent in their first pull request to DRM-Next of material they would like to begin staging for Linux 4.19.

    Intel's OTC developers are usually quite punctual in queuing up their tested work in DRM-Next for the next kernel cycle while even for their standards this is quite early with there being several days left to the current merge window.

  • Linux Kernel Patches Appear For A Line Of Intel MIPS SoCs

    It appears Intel is launching a line of SoCs based on the MIPS architecture.

    Hitting the kernel mailing list overnight is a set of kernel patches for bringing up the Intel GRX500 SoCs, which are based on the MIPS interAptiv design. MIPS interAptiv processor cores are based on a 32-bit, multi-core design and have been available the past few years. Background information on interAptiv is available from MIPS.com.

Zynthian Open Source Raspberry Pi Synthesiser

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Linux
Hardware

Musicians may be interested in a new fully open source Raspberry Pi synthesiser aptly named the Zynthian which provides a “new class of machine” described as a “swiss army knife of synthesis, equipped with multiple engines, filters and effects”. The Raspberry Pi synthesiser is completely configurable and upgradable and offers an open platform for Sound Synthesis based on the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC and Linux operating system making the synthesiser fully hackable.

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Jetson based embedded vision kit has three 4K cameras

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Linux
Hardware

E-con’s “e-CAM120_TRICUTX2” is a camera system powered by a Linux-driven Jetson TX1 or TX2 module that features three 13-megapixel, [email protected] cameras via 4-lane MIPI-CSI-2 interfaces.

Last September, E-con Systems launched an e-CAM30_HEXCUTX2 system with six 3.4-megapixel, HD cameras. Now it has followed up with an e-CAM120_TRICUTX2 camera rig with only three cameras but each with higher [email protected] resolution via 13-megapixel technology.

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First look: Huawei MateBook X Pro with Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Huawei MateBook X Pro is a pretty nice little laptop, featuring a 13.9 inch, 3000 x 2000 pixel touchscreen display with super-slim bezels, an all-metal chassis, and support for up ton an Intel Core i7-8550U processor, 16GB of RAM, 512GB of storage, and NVIDIA GeForce MX150 graphics.

Huawei recently announced that the MateBook X Pro is coming to America, and it’s up for pre-order from B&H.

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Alan Pope: KDE Slimbook 2 Review

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KDE
Hardware
Reviews

The kind folks at Slimbook recently sent me the latest generation of their ultrabook-style laptop line for review, the KDE Slimbook 2. You can hear my thoughts on the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, released on June 7th 2018.

Slimbook are a small laptop vendor based in Spain. All the laptops ship with KDE Neon as the default operating system. In addition to their hardware, they also contribute to and facilitate local Free Software events in their area. I was sent the laptop only for review purposes. There's no other incentive provided, and Slimbook didn't see this blog post before I published it.

Being a small vendor, they don't have the same buying power with OEM vendors as other big name laptop suppliers. This is reflected in the price you pay. You're supporting a company who are themselves supporting Free Software developers and communities.

If you're after the cheapest possible laptop, and don't care about its origin or the people behind the device, then maybe this laptop isn't for you. However, if you like to vote with your wallet, then the KDE Slimbook should absolutely be on your list to seriously consider.

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2018 reader survey of 116 open-spec Linux/Android SBCs

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Android
Linux
Hardware
  • 2018 reader survey of 116 open-spec Linux/Android SBCs

    Vote for your favorites from our freshly updated catalog of 116 sub-$200, hacker-friendly SBCs that run Linux or Android, and you could win one of 15 prizes. An embedded engineer awakening from a 20-year coma might find today’s hacker board scene surprising to say the least.

  • Catalog of 116 open-spec hacker boards

    This catalog accompanies our June 2018 reader survey of hacker-friendly, open-spec SBCs. Here, we provide recently updated descriptions, specs, pricing, and links to details for all 116 SBCs.

    Our June 2018 round-up of hacker-friendly single board computers comprises three resources: an overview of recent SBC market trends; this catalog; and a Google docs spreadsheet that tabulates the boards’ key features. Click on the introduction link below to find the link to the SurveyMonkey site where you can vote for your favorite boards and win a chance at some free SBC prizes.

Devices: Fuchsia, Jolla, and Udoo Bolt

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Linux
Hardware
  • Fuchsia Friday: Google is working on two unusual Fuchsia device prototypes

    Inside of the Zircon repo, is a maintained list of hardware vendors and devices from those vendors that are compatible with the kernel. Some of these vendors include standard ones like Intel (for the NUC and Pixelbook), chip makers like Broadcom and Amlogic, and companies like Khadas and 96Boards who make development hardware. Google themselves are included are vendors in this list with three devices, Gauss, Astro and Machina. We’ll come back to Machina soon™.

  • CCW & The Power of German Community

    Critical Communications World or CCW for short is an international event held in a different part of the world each year. This year the event took place in Berlin on May 15th & 16th. At the event, dozens of companies from all over the globe gather to showcase their critical communication solutions and products, be it services, hardware, software or apps. We were situated at the Critical Communications Finland booth.

    Jolla, who’s flexible, reliable and independent solution: Sailfish OS, is intrinsically private and secure, is highly relevant at such events.

    [...]

    While walking around the event and discussing with the different exhibitors it was clear that participation in this “ecosystem” requires versatile and scalable solutions integrated to long service life infrastructure such as buses, ambulances, drones, tablets and phones. Sailfish 3 brings more scalability with support for feature phone and PDA type devices in addition to existing form factors such as Phones, Tablets and Watches.

    Addressing privacy and security is important to the ecosystem and SailfishOS provides a solid solution for a secure and privacy-respecting product out of the box. You can then plug in features such as secure VPN communication to the Sailfish OS frameworks either with your own, or already provided, technologies. With Sailfish OS you are not locked to our cloud services and servers, but instead you have the freedom to choose a provider of your own. Many companies at the event commented that when they selected a platform they had to first strip down certain services and even change some components in order to reach the privacy requirements.

  • Udoo Bolt is first Ryzen V1000 based hacker board

    Seco has won KS funding for its open-spec, $229 “Udoo Bolt” SBC, which runs Linux or Windows on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. The SBC supports up to 4x displays, and offers SATA III, 3x M.2, 2x HDMI 2.0, and Arduino and Grove expansion.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Source Skills Soar In Demand According to 2018 Jobs Report

Linux expertise is again in the top spot as the most sought after open source skill, says the latest Open Source Jobs Reportfrom Dice and The Linux Foundation. The seventh annual report shows rapidly growing demand for open source skills, particularly in areas of cloud technology. Read more

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland
    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration. This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.
  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support
    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context. Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.
  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode
    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements. First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.
  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018
    - The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop. This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.
  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19
    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation To Be Renamed Fedora Silverblue
    - Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue. Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".
  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot
    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More
    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".
  • Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More
    Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.
  • A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts
    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time
    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report. Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing. The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”
  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer
    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer. HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.