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Hardware

Open Hardware: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and RISC-V/ESP32-C3

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Hardware

  • Arduino Blog » Monitor your hoverboard’s power draw with this Arduino-based meter/logger

    If you look at your car’s dashboard, there’s a good chance you’ll find an efficiency rating for how you’re driving. However, what if you instead ride a hoverboard? This functionality is certainly not stock equipment, yet Niklas Roy wanted to understand the power consumption of his transporter during different riding situations. For that reason, he decided to develop a power monitor that not only graphs his stats when scooting around, but records the data for later viewing and analysis.

    Roy’s handheld device is controlled by an Arduino Nano and utilizes a Hall effect ammeter for current sensing. The measurements are shown as numbers and as oscillograms on a 1.8” TFT screen, which can also be logged to the display’s built-in SD card. An RTC module provides timestamp information for these readings, which can be produced using Processing and overlaid on video.

  • STM32U5 Cortex-M33 MCU gets more performance, 2D graphics accelerator, and advanced security

    The new family has a higher 160 MHz clock speed, up to 2048 KB flash, up to 786 KB RAM, a 2D graphics accelerator, several peripherals have been upgraded, and a new autonomous mode lets DMA and peripherals keep working while most of the device sleeps in order to save power.

    [...]

    The board also comes with 512-Mbit octal-SPI Flash memory, 64-Mbit octal-SPI PSRAM, 256-Kbit I2C EEPROM, as well as ARDUINO Uno V3, STMod+, and Pmod expansion connectors, plus an expansion connector for a camera module, and STLink-V3E embedded debugger.

  • Pi Day at the Raspberry Pi Foundation
  • Hello RISC-V! We got samples of the new ESP32-C3 module and it is only 13×17 mm

    We got some engineering samples of ESP32-C3 modules.

Devices: Spectrogram and Boards With (Optional) Linux

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Hardware
  • Spectrogram Drawing For Fun And Coding | Hackaday

    The code is a bit slow so writes its values to a file which is output by a HackRF, but it could just as easily be used by any other capable output device such as GNU Radio and a soundcard if you too want an Aphex Twin moment.

  • Fanless Coffee Lake computer targets testing and analysis

    No OS support was listed for the Neu-X302, but the Neu-X300 runs Linux or Win 10. The new Coffee Lake Refresh options range up to the octa-core, 1.8GHz/2.2GHz Core i7-9100TE with 35W TDP. Once again, there is a choice of Intel Q370 or Intel H310 I/O chipsets, creating two SKUs. However, there are fewer feature differences.

  • Arm-based IoT gateway reaches out with WiFi, Bluetooth, LTE, and NB-IoT

    Aaeon’s compact “SRG-3352C” IoT gateway is equipped with a TI AM3352, 3x USB, 2x RS-485, 2x GbE, WiFi/BT, mini-PCIe with micro-SIM, and an NB-IoT connector.

    It’s always a bit troubling when vendors omit the name of an embedded system’s processor. However, Aaeon’s fanless SRG-3352C Compact Edge IoT Gateway System, which is said to be based on an 800MHz, Cortex-A8 SoC, gives away the mystery in its name: the IoT gateway no doubt features the aging TI Sitara AM3352. No OS support was listed but given the AM3352 — the lowest end model in the AM335x line, with no 3D GPU or PRU-ICSS cores — Linux is almost certainly supported.

  • Embedded Artists launches 1GHz NXP i.MX RT1176 Crossover MCU module and devkit

    Anders Rosvall, CTO at Embedded Artists AB, explains the i.MX RT1176 uCOM board “enables customers to move up to application-level performance without having to move to the Linux world”, and provides an update from the company’s iMX RT1064 uCOM with double the SDRAM, MIPI-DSI interface, and a 2D graphics engine. In case you wonder why a company would not want to move their application to a Linux platform, reasons include code reuse, faster real-time responsiveness, and lower power consumption.

  • Cortex-A7 module debuts with optional Pico-ITX carrier

    DH unveiled a “DHCOM STM32MP1” module that runs Linux on ST’s Cortex-A7/M4 SoC with up to 1GB RAM, 16GB eMMC, and WiFi/BT. “DH PicoITX2” and “DH PDK” carriers are also available.

Open Hardware/Modding: RISC-V in Linux 5.12, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

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Hardware
  • RISC-V With Linux 5.12 Begins Mainlining SiFive's FU740 Support, NUMA - Phoronix

    Notable with RISC-V in Linux 5.12 is initial support for the SiFive FU740, the SoC design announced at the end of last year. The most notable major user coming to market at the moment with the FU740 is the HiFive Unmatched development board. The SoC with its quad-core U74-MC and single S7 embedded core is joined by four USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports, PCI Express x16 (at x8 speeds), NVMe M.2, Gigabit Ethernet, and 16GB of RAM to make for the most interesting RISC-V development board to date. The HiFive Unmatched is slated to still begin shipping later this quarter for about $665 USD.

  • Arduino Blog » Putting a modern spin on the phenakistoscope

    The phenakistoscope was invented in the 1800s as a way to view a series of moving pictures on a spinning disc. While the traditional implementation is ingenious in its own right, Nick Lim has created his own take on this venerable concept, using strobing light to break up frames instead of the slits-and-mirror arrangement of the original.

    His system utilizes a repurposed CD-ROM BLDC motor to rotate the discs — which feature phenakistoscope patterns that were printed out and pasted on top — and an overhead array of strobing LEDs to make the images come to life.

  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 industrial carrier board supports M.2 NVMe SSD, 4G LTE modem

    Since the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 launch last fall, we’ve seen several interesting carrier boards for the system-on-module including Wiretrustee to build a NAS with up to four SATA drives, the compact, Arduino-sized Piunora board that also include an M.2 socket, or Over:Board mini-ITX carrier board.

    Oratek brings another one specially designed for industrial use cases with TOFU Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 carrier board offering wide DC input, Gigabit Ethernet with PoE, M.2 NVMe SSD or 4G LTE modem support, among many other features.

Open Hardware/Modding: Arduino, RPi CM4 and Pico

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Hardware
  • Arduino MKR IoT Carrier embeds display, sensors, and I/Os for IoT projects

    Arduino Oplà IoT Kit was launched last fall as the first open programmable IoT platform from the company. The kit included everything you need to create your own IoT devices with MKR IoT carrier with a 1.3-inch OLED color display, environmental sensors, capacitive touch buttons, Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 board, external PIR motion and moisture sensors, a circular plastic enclosure, and various cables.

  • Open-spec Raspberry Pi CM4 carrier has M.2 and GbE with PoE

    Oratek’s $110 “Tofu” carrier for the RPi CM4 is equipped with GbE with PoE, HDMI, 3x USB, Type-C, MIPI DSI- and CSI, 7.5-28VDC input, and M.2 with micro-SIM and NVMe support.

    The Oct. 2020 launch of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, which lacks pin compatibility with the RPi CM3, has attracted a new wave of companies selling carrier board alternatives to the official $35 carrier. The latest is Switzerland based Oratek, which has opened pre-orders for a Tofu board for 99 Swiss Francs (about $110), with shipments due in mid-March. The board ships with schematics, mechanical drawings, a STEP file, and other open hardware resources.

  • Now you can run Unix on the tiny $4 Raspberry Pi Pico | ZDNet

    Developers who have one of Raspberry Pi's latest gadgets, the Pi Pico, have a newly ported potential operating system to work with called Fuzix, a Unix-like OS for small things.

    "So you can now run Unix on a $4 microcontroller," said Raspberry Pi in its blog post about the project.

The Innovation Lab: A Space for Creative Learning

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The reason why we use System76 to power all the computers in the space is because I’m a big supporter of Linux in general, and System76 has been really consistent and helpful. I think the openness of System76 definitely gives the students the ability to experiment and the freedom to break stuff in a creative environment, without being too constrained by proprietary software.

Read more

Also: Activate Linux on Your Chromebook

Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and More

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Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi relaunches four IQAudio HATs

    Raspberry Pi Ltd has relaunched four IQaudio HATs as official Pi audio add-ons with lower prices ranging from $20 to $30: the IQaudio DAC+, DAC Pro, DigiAMP+ and Codec Zero.

    In December, Raspberry Pi Trading announced it had acquired IQAudio and would be relaunching their Raspberry Pi audio HATs at lower prices. As reported by MagPi, IQAudio’s four most popular HATs have now been relaunched as official Pi accessories and are available via the usual Pi resellers.

  • Crowbits magnetic blocks for STEM Education work with Arduino, Micro:bit, ESP32, and Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Elecrow develops and manufactures electronics products for the maker market, and in recent years entered the STEM education market with products such as CrowPi2 Raspberry Pi 4 education laptop that I reviewed last year.

  • Arduino Blog » Arduino MKR IoT Carrier: Control what you want, how you want to!

    By popular demand, we are pleased to announce that it’s now possible to buy the Arduino MKR IoT Carrier. Originally forming a key part of the Arduino Oplá IoT Kit, we’ve responded to our community to make the carrier available on it’s own, thus enabling you to benefit from having a bunch of sensors, actuators and a display all featured on the one board — making it quicker and easier to take your IoT projects to the next level.

    Featuring a large set of built-in sensors and actuators as well as a useful color display, the carrier lets you focus on prototyping your IoT ideas right away by saving on the hassle of wiring and soldering these components.

    The carrier can become a WiFi, LoRa, NB-IoT or GSM-compatible device by seamlessly connecting to any MKR family board. Building a user interface for these boards is easy with the embedded color OLED screen, five capacitive touch buttons, and the five RGB LEDs. The integrated sensors (temperature, humidity, pressure, RGBC light, gesture and proximity) allow you to map the environment around the carrier, and should you need to capture any other data there are over 100 additional Grove sensors that can easily be connected directly to the carrier.

Modded Hardware: RISC-V and RasPi Stuff

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Hardware
  • ZiHintPause is the first RISC-V extension ratified under the Fast Track Architecture Extension Process

    RISC-V open architecture allows designers to implement their own instructions, and some of those may become an official RISC-V extension. But the process to approve a new extension may have been suboptimal, so RISC-V International has just unveiled the Fast Track Architecture Extension Process, or Fast Track for short, that streamlines the ratification of small architecture extensions, as well as ZiHintPause, the first extension to be ratified under the new Fast Track process.

  • Kiwikit Raspberry Pi Pico baseboard takes off-the-shelf modules

    While it’s possible to use Raspberry Pi Pico with a breadboard or Veroboard, we’ve seen the benefits of inserting the board into a baseboard such as Maker Pi Pico providing LEDs, a MicroSD card, audio output, and the ability to add ESP-01 WiFi module or well as up to two Grove expansion modules.

    Hammond Pearce decided to design his own Raspberry Pi Pico baseboard with Kiwikit board supporting some of the off-the-shelf modules and interfaces he commonly uses.

  • Google kit uses RPi Zero and Coral Accelerator for machine learning

    Google Creative Lab’s Alto project tasks the Coral USB Accelerator and Raspberry Pi Zero SBC to implement easy-to-understand machine learning using an open-source mini robot that you build yourself.

    Google Creative Lab has unveiled a project called Alto. Alto by Google Creative Lab is a “teachable object using the Coral USB Accelerator.” “ALTO” stands for “A Little Teachable Object.” It’s designed to enable users to gain a basic handle understanding of machine learning. Alto uses the Coral USB Accelerator and Raspberry Pi to help users easily add machine learning to their hardware projects.

    Google’s Alto GitHub repository contains all of the instructions and files required to build an Alto from scratch. Best of all, Alto is completely open source —the code and template for this project are all free for access. Google notes that Alto is not an official Google product, but rather a collaborative effort between Google Creative Lab and its partners at RRD Labs.

  • How to get started with FUZIX on Raspberry Pi Pico

POWER9, ARM64 and 64k page sizes

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The GNU/Linux kernel for these platforms can be compiled with either 4k or 64k page size. The distribution chooses which of these options to select. The kernel created by the distribution is included in the installation disk for the distribution.

One acute consequence of this is the relationship between Btrfs sectorsize and kernel page size. Btrfs filesystems can only be used on systems with the same page size. The Btrfs driver is being improved to remove this restriction but for users of Fedora 34 and older systems, this is a very inconvenient issue. If you need to move Btrfs filesystems between systems with different page sizes then they simply won't work.

It appears that nobody tests the kernel and amdgpu drivers on these non-standard page sizes before each official release. Consequently, if there is a problem, it is only discovered by users after the upstream release. This means that users on these platforms are always a step behind users on other platforms.

Read more

Fuzix Unix-like operating system ported to Raspberry Pi Pico and ESP8266

Filed under
OS
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi Pico is not compatible with Linux, but now supports another Unix-like operating system known as Fuzix. Alan Cox’s Fuzix is a Unix-like operating system for older devices with less performance capacity. David Given’s two recent posts have brought to the attention about the operating system’s compatibility with ESP8266 MCU and Raspberry Pi Pico.

Fuzix operating system has a kernel which is the central core of the system. Also, it has a C compiler and a set of core applications similar to the UNIX filesystem. The Raspberry Pi Pico port comes with many benefits like a well-structured Unix filesystem with its compatibility for SD cards through the SPI interface. Hence, supporting the Fuzix operating system. The full set of Fuzix binaries is available through a serial console to UART0.

Read more

Hardware/Modding: Arduino, Fuzix, Advantech

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Hardware
  • Arduino Blog » Bikelangelo is a water-dispensing graffiti bicycle trailer

    Inspired by persistence of vision (POV) projects, Sagarrabanana built a system that incrementally dispenses water as pixels on a flat surface, creating ephemeral dot matrix text/images. This so-called “Bikelangelo” device is towed by a bicycle for ultra-mobile marking, and uses a pressurized tank for fluid storage.

    As he pedals, a series of seven valve open and close under Arduino Nano control. A Hall-effect sensor allows it to dispense accurately based on the bike’s speed, and a Bluetooth phone connection via an HC-05 module is implemented for text input on-the-go.

  •  

  • Fuzix Unix-like operating system ported to Raspberry Pi Pico and ESP8266

    The Raspberry Pi Pico is not compatible with Linux, but now supports another Unix-like operating system known as Fuzix. Alan Cox’s Fuzix is a Unix-like operating system for older devices with less performance capacity. David Given’s two recent posts have brought to the attention about the operating system’s compatibility with ESP8266 MCU and Raspberry Pi Pico. Fuzix operating system has a kernel which is the central core of the system. 

  •  

  • Elkhart Lake arrives on thin Mini-ITX

    Advantech’s Linux-friendly “AIMB-218” thin Mini-ITX board ships with Elkhart Lake SoCs including a new 2GHz/3GHz Pentium J6426 plus 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 3x USB 3.2 Gen2, DP and HDMI, 2x M.2, SATA, and PCIe x1 Gen3.

    Advantech announced the AIMB-218, the first thin Mini-ITX board we have seen equipped with Intel’s next-gen Atom platform, Elkhart Lake processors. Yet, we now see that DFI has posted a preliminary product page for EHL171 and EHL173 thin Mini-ITX boards with dual 2.5GbE ports, but with scant details and no listed OS support.

    MiTac, meanwhile, has posted a more detailed product page on a PD10EHI thin Mini-ITX board that runs Windows, with Linux available on request. Unlike Advantech’s entry, neither board has been formally announced. We may report on these later.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and RISC-V/ESP32-C3

  • Arduino Blog » Monitor your hoverboard’s power draw with this Arduino-based meter/logger

    If you look at your car’s dashboard, there’s a good chance you’ll find an efficiency rating for how you’re driving. However, what if you instead ride a hoverboard? This functionality is certainly not stock equipment, yet Niklas Roy wanted to understand the power consumption of his transporter during different riding situations. For that reason, he decided to develop a power monitor that not only graphs his stats when scooting around, but records the data for later viewing and analysis. Roy’s handheld device is controlled by an Arduino Nano and utilizes a Hall effect ammeter for current sensing. The measurements are shown as numbers and as oscillograms on a 1.8” TFT screen, which can also be logged to the display’s built-in SD card. An RTC module provides timestamp information for these readings, which can be produced using Processing and overlaid on video.

  • STM32U5 Cortex-M33 MCU gets more performance, 2D graphics accelerator, and advanced security

    The new family has a higher 160 MHz clock speed, up to 2048 KB flash, up to 786 KB RAM, a 2D graphics accelerator, several peripherals have been upgraded, and a new autonomous mode lets DMA and peripherals keep working while most of the device sleeps in order to save power. [...] The board also comes with 512-Mbit octal-SPI Flash memory, 64-Mbit octal-SPI PSRAM, 256-Kbit I2C EEPROM, as well as ARDUINO Uno V3, STMod+, and Pmod expansion connectors, plus an expansion connector for a camera module, and STLink-V3E embedded debugger.

  • Pi Day at the Raspberry Pi Foundation
  • Hello RISC-V! We got samples of the new ESP32-C3 module and it is only 13×17 mm

    We got some engineering samples of ESP32-C3 modules.

Documentation Improvements in KDE

Doxyqml, our documentation bridge between QML and doxygen, got various improvements, thanks to Olaf Mandel and Lasse Lopperi. Now QML enums are supported and the lexer/parser got various bug fixes. Speaking of QML documentation, the Kirigami API documentation was improved and now uses more correctly @inherit tags and @property tags. There is still room for improvements, but the current state is already a lot better. Most Components are now showing all their properties correctly and the type of the property is correct. (kirigami!239) Another improvement is that the generated Kirigami documentation now shows more accurate names: e.g. Kirigami.Page instead of org::kde::kirigami::Page. This makes it easier to read and navigate the documentation. There was also a bit of background work inside KApiDox, Jannet added support for QDoc, allowing to use QDoc as an alternative to Doxygen. This might be a better solution for generating documentation for projects with a lot of QML. Read more Also: MJ Inventory Released

today's howtos

  • What is Automation and Configuration Management with CHEF – Part 1

    Configuration Management is the key focus point of DevOps practice. In the Software development cycle, all the servers should be software-configured and maintained well in such a way that they should not make any break in the development cycle. Bad configuration Management can make system outages, leaks, and data breaches. Using Configuration Management tools is about facilitating accuracy, efficiency, and speed in the DevOps-driven environment. There are two models of configuration Management tools – PUSH-based & PULL-based. In the PUSH-based, the Master server pushes the configuration code to the servers wherein PULL-based individual servers contact the Master for getting configuration code. PUPPET and CHEF are widely used PULL-based models, ANSIBLE is a popular PUSH-based model. In this article, we will see about CHEF.

  • How to Install XWiki on Ubuntu 20.04

    XWiki is a free and open-source Wiki Software platform written in Java. It runs on servlet containers like Tomcat and uses a database such as MySQL to store information.

  • How To Install Zoom on Manjaro 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Zoom on Manjaro 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Zoom is the leader in modern enterprise video communications, with an easy, reliable cloud platform for video and audio conferencing, chat, and webinars across mobile, desktop, and room systems. It is commonly used in education sectors, in workplaces for communication with clients and colleagues, teleconferencing, and even for social relations. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of Zoom on a Manjaro 20 (Nibia).

  • Starting LaTeX on Ubuntu with the User Friendly Gummi

    Academics people and alike tend to love documents written with LaTeX -- one of the best text creation systems you can run on computer. The benefit is, the resulting document is truly beautiful. To start making LaTeX document on Ubuntu, you can start with the user friendly application, Gummi, which features preview. This short tutorial includes examples for basic texting and several math formulas. Now let's learn!

What is GNU/Linux Copypasta?

I’d just like to interject for a moment. What you’re refering to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX. Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called Linux, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called Linux distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux! Read more