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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).

  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder

    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows.

    SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.

  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites

    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click.

    It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.

  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.

GStreamer 1.12 and More

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Software
  • GStreamer 1.12 Multimedia Framework to Support Intel's Media SDK and CineForm

    The GStreamer 1.12 major release is coming next month, but Collabora's Olivier Crête is sharing with us today some of the most important new features implemented so far by various developers.

    Collabora made several contributions to the widely-used open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework, and now that many of you already managed to get an early taste of the new features coming with the GStreamer 1.12 release during the RC (Release Candidate) testing phase, let's take a look at the upcoming changes.

  • Receiving an AES67 stream with GStreamer

    GStreamer is great for all kinds of multimedia applications, but did you know it could also be used to create studio grade professional audio applications? For example, with GStreamer you can easily receive a AES67 stream, the standard which allows inter-operability between different IP based audio networking systems and transfers of live audio between profesionnal grade systems.

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Xed Text Editor: Can It Really Compete with Gedit and Pluma

    There are many text editors available for Linux such as command line editors (vi, vim, nano and so) and GUI editors (Gedit, Pluma, Kate and so on). Linux always has space for new stuff but Xed isn't new and around from quite sometime.
    Xed text editor offers most of the standard editor features, extending this basic functionality with other features not usually found in simple text editors. It supports editing of multiple text files in a window (using Tabs) just like any other famous text editor. Support to encode UTF-8 files, compare files among others, syntax highlighting of source code, auto indentation and manual indentation, printing, print preview support, and many other standard features.

  • NeuLion MC Encoder V2.5 Adds Live HEVC 4K 10-bit Encoding for Linux Servers
  • Lil Tanks is a well polished and action packed side-scroller available for Linux

    I've been playing Lil Tanks [Steam, Official Site] and I think it's a fantastic side-scrolling action game well worth a look.

  • Phoenix Point from the original creator of X-COM is now crowdfunding on Fig

    I haven't been this excited for quite a while, the original creator of X-COM, Julian Gollop, and the rest of his studio Snapshot Games have put up Phoenix Point for crowdfunding on Fig.

    I'm excited for a number of reasons: It will support Linux, it will be on both GOG & Steam and it looks very much like an evolution of the XCOM.

Top 8 Music Player for Ubuntu and Linux Mint

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Software

What’s music to you? Ask this question to people & answers will different. Some would say that its how they enjoy life, some would say it helps them sleep better after a hard day’s work & for some it just make them feel good about them & their surroundings. It can be said without doubt that everybody loves music in one form or another & Linux lovers are no different.

This post is for those Linux lovers who enjoys music & are looking for a music player for their UBUNTU & Linux Mint systems. Though there are many music players available for Linux lovers but we have prepared a list of ‘Top 8 music players for Ubuntu and Linux Mint‘

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 3 signs your Kubernetes distro is built to last

    It's hard to turn around these days without bumping into a Kubernetes distribution. For example, Mirantis recently buffed its OpenStack distribution to use Kubernetes as an internal component and for container management. Major Linux server distributions include it now.

    For Kubernetes adopters, it's all good news. It means the most remarkable development in the container world since, well, containers themselves is enjoying strong uptake and acceptance.

  • Cockpit – An Easy Way to Administer Multiple Remote Linux Servers via a Web Browser

    Cockpit is a free and open source web-based system management tool where users can easily monitor and manage multiple remote Linux srvers. It is very thin and light weight utility & directly interacts with the operating system from a real Linux session and doesn’t require any difficult configuration so just install it, it is ready for use.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

  • SRT Video Transport Protocol Open-Sourced

    In aiming to enhance online video streaming, the SRT video protocol has been open-sourced and an alliance forming around that for low-latency video.

    SRT is short for Secure Reliable Transport and is a low-latency video transport protocol developed by Haivision. The SRT protocol is being opened under the LGPL license.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released

    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.

  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]

    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.

  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!

    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.

  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).

  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux

    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.

  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features

    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.

  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself

    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.

  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released

    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Fasd – A Commandline Tool That Offers Quick Access to Files and Directories

    Fasd (pronounced as “fast“) is command-line productivity booster, a self-contained POSIX shell script which enables quick and more efficient access to files and directories.

  • What’s new in SSHGuard 2.0

    SSHGuard is an intrusion prevention utility that parses logs and automatically blocks misbehaving IP addresses with the system firewall. It’s less configurable than the better-known Fail2Ban but has a smaller resource footprint and ships with full IPv6 support. The newly released SSHGuard version 2.0 have been made easier to configure for new users. It also gained support for FirewallD, ipset, and ipfilter firewall backends on Linux; as well as Capsicum sandboxing support on *BSD.

    While we’re still waiting for the next release of Fail2Ban with IPv6 support, I took a look around at some of the alternatives and found an interesting option in SSHGuard. I had to address some Linux compatibility issues when getting started with SSHGuard as the development team was mostly focused on FreeBSD. I submitted patches for those issues and got more involved in the development and release of SSHGuard 2.0 in the process.

  • Steghide – An Easy way to Hide Confidential Data Inside Images and Sound Objects in Linux

    As of now, we have wrote few articles about the same topics but the way of method is different, how to hide files and folders in Linux & how to protect files and folders with password to safe the personal documents from others. It help us to send the secret information over the Internet like mail.

    Today we are going to discuss the same topic once again but the method is completely different. I mean, i will show you, how to hide sensitive data inside image and audio files using steghide utility.

  • 3 Emacs extensions for getting organized

    In the colophon to his book, Just a Geek, actor and writer Wil Wheaton wrote that he wanted to use Emacs to write the book but "couldn't find the text editor." Wheaton was joking, of course, but he highlighted an important point about Emacs: it's gone way beyond its roots as a tool for editing text.

    Thanks to its many modes (extensions that change the way the editor behaves), you can use Emacs for just about anything: browsing the web, reading and sending email, publishing blog posts and books, managing databases, learning with flashcards, and much more.

Wine Releases

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Software
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FOSS Events: M|17, GNU Hackers' Meeting, and Upcoming FreeBSD Events

Debian and Tails (Based on Debian)

  • Debian Project to Shut Down Its Public FTP Services, Developers Are Not Affected
    The Debian Project, a group of developers from all over the world who create one of the most popular and used free operating systems on the planet, Debian GNU/Linux, announced that they're shutting down their FTP servers for users.
  • LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week Debian Linux 8.7 (Jessie)
    ​I have always been a Ubuntu guy. I use Ubuntu or some other derivatives like Mint or elementary but never have I tried Debian. Well not anymore. I tested Debian and I must say I really like it. The thing with Debian is that stability is prioritized over all other factors. So if you are looking for the latest updates to packages, Debian is not the one. Debian is very popular amongst Linux users and rightly so. It enjoys a very superior community support compared to many other distros and most importantly the stability. So my experience? Let's start the distro review of the week, Debian 8.7.
  • Improve Your Online Security with Tails
    The popular image of online dangers is scary bad guys trying to steal our stuff. This image is accurate if you remember to include unfettered corporate interests as the scary bad guys. Our protections against our good friends the telcos and cable companies have never been strong, and now they're nearly non-existent. Repealing Broadband Privacy Rules, Congress Sides with the Cable and Telephone Industry sums it up beautifully: "Internet providers will be given new powers to harvest your personal information in extraordinarily creepy ways." And buy and sell it with no oversight or accountability, and law enforcement will get their hands on it as surely as road apples draw flies. What can we do about it? I believe that the best solution is legislative. I prefer technical solutions for protecting ourselves from hostile and predatory interests, but there aren't many, and they're incomplete. Internet access is a requirement for many routine aspects of our daily lives, and even if you avoid going online you have no knowledge or control of the information the vendors and service providers that you use are collecting and trading, or what people share about you on social media. Stores, electric and gas utilities, healthcare providers, tradespeople, private clubs, non-profit organizations, charitable groups, banks, insurance companies, and on and on. They all collect information about you, and many trade it freely. Of course, it's not fair to assume that everyone is venal, but even when a vendor has a heart of gold they may be lacking in technical competence.

Leftovers: Gaming

Thunderbird 'redesign'