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Friday, 17 Sep 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open source game achievements

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

Learn how Gamerzilla brings an achievement system to open source games and enables all developers to implement achievements separate from the game platform.

Some open source games rival the quality of commercial games. While it is hard to match the quality of triple-a games, open source games compete effectively against the indie games. But, gamer expectations change over time. Early games included a high score. Achievements expanded over time to promote replay. For example, you may have completed a level but you didn’t find all the secrets or collect all the coins. The Xbox 360 introduced the first multi-game online achievement system. Since that introduction, many game platforms added an achievement system.

Open source games are largely left out of the achievement systems. You can publish an open source game on Steam, but it costs money and they focus on working with companies not the free software community. Additionally, this locks players into a non-free platform.

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Excellent Utilities: Deskreen – live streaming desktop to a web browser

Filed under
OSS
Reviews

This is a series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We cover a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides.

When people talk about screen sharing they typically refer to desktop sharing applications (remote display). Good examples of open source software include TigerVNC, Remmina, X2Go and Veyon. But this review looks at a different approach with live streaming your desktop or a specific application to a web browser.

Deskreen is free and open source software that lets you use any device with a web browser as a secondary screen. This device can be a wide range of hardware such as a smartphone, tablet, smart TV, or a notebook. And you can connect as many devices as required.

If you have a multi-monitor setup, you already appreciate the virtues of multiple screens. But Deskreen offers many of these advantages without additional outlay.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install i3 Window manager on Ubuntu 20.04 or Debian 11

    i3 is a tiling window manager developed from scratch and written in C. It is available under a BSD license, is primarily aimed at professionals and programmers, and has several special features. This slim window manager also supports window stacks, which it stacks in a tab structure similar to a web browser. Here we learn how to install i3 Window manager on Ubuntu 18.04 or 20.04 LTS to get a slim and lightweight interface on this Linux.

    Well, Linux operating systems are known for their low resource consumption, however, due to the latest highly graphical desktops, many distros now become extensive resource guzzling OS. Nevertheless, there are many lightweight Desktop Window Managers and i3 is one of them. This Tiling Window Manager i3 brings particularly a slim interface to your Linux screen.

  • How to install Ksnip, a screen capture tool, on Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian and openSUSE!

    Ksnip is a Qt-based cross-platform screenshot tool that provides many annotation features for your screenshots. In this tutorial, learn how to install Ksnip screenshot on Linux using Flatpak packages.

    The Ksnip has many features and settings that enable the capture of perfect canvas. Make an image of your screen however you like, or the window you need. Do this simply and quickly. Don’t waste any more time and install this powerful tool right now on your Linux.

  • Kali Undercover – How to install, uninstall, enable or disable on Linux!

    If you are a Kali Linux user and you tend to do penetration tests in places with a lot of people, be aware that in a way this can be scary. However, Kali Undercover was created to undo your testing with Kali Linux. Imagine being in a family and trying to run a security test on some network, and everyone assuming you’re breaking into a bank or committing crimes? Well, in the face of repeated scenarios like this, Offensive Security, the company that maintains Kali Linux, created the solution.

    But don’t worry, as stated in the first paragraph, in this article you will learn how to use and install Kali Undercover on Linux. There are few commands, but they should help you not to have problems or distorted looks.

  • How to install Hugo website generator on Ubuntu 20.04

    Writing websites from scratch can be beneficial for learning but it is time-consuming. And there are simple or personal projects that need to be done quickly. To solve this problem is that there are static website builders. Today you will learn how to install Hugo on Ubuntu 20.04 which is perhaps one of the most popular website builders out there.

  • Control RAM and CPU usage by Kodi in real time - LinuxStoney

    As with antivirus or office suites such as Office, a good multimedia player at the moment cannot be missing from any PC. These programs are not used to view our favorite photos, play all kinds of videos and music , or even watch Internet television. A clear example of all this is found with the multimedia center called Kodi .

    This is a complete solution that acts as a multimedia center that will be of enormous help when dealing with all kinds of content of this type. Keep in mind that it not only serves as a player, but also offers us a multitude of functions for managing our own independent libraries. In addition, it offers us a somewhat peculiar user interface that looks like an independent operating system.

    Precisely because of all these additional features that it offers us, together with the complete user interface that we see, sometimes this program consumes more resources than we would like. It is true that it is optimized to work on most computers, platforms and operating systems, but it will not always do so with the same fluency. In addition, the types of content that we deal with also come into play here. Loading a simple photo is not the same as playing a video in four in 4K .

  • How To Install Spotify on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Spotify on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, Spotify is a free-to-use music streaming service with a subscription for premium content at a small fee. Spotify enables you to stream music of your favorite artists, create custom playlists, shuffle play, share music and podcasts. Spotify is available for installation on Windows, Linux distributions, macOS, and Mobile devices powered by iOS and Android operating systems.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of Spotify’s digital music streaming service on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • How to watch YouTube on the Linux desktop with FreeTube

    FreeTube is available for Linux users on Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Arch Linux AUR, and others. To install this program on your Linux PC, start by opening up a terminal window.

    You can open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard. Alternatively, search for “Terminal” in the app menu to open it. Once the terminal window is open and ready to use, follow the installation instructions outlined below.

i.MX8M Plus comes to Qseven form factor

Filed under
Android
Linux

Congatec’s Qseven form-factor “Conga-QMX8-Plus” module runs Linux or Android on the NPU-equipped i.MX8M Plus with up to 6GB LPDDR4, up to 128MB eMMC, a microSD slot, GbE with TSN, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

Congatec announced the first Qseven-form-factor module we have seen build around NXP’s i.MX8M Plus, which it has already deployed in its Conga-SMX8-Plus SMARC module. The Conga-QMX8-Plus, which follows earlier i.MX8 family Qseven modules, including the i.MX8X based Conga-QMX8X, runs Linux, Yocto, or Android on the 14nm 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 SoC.

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Ampere Altra 80-core Arm Server for GNU/Linux (and Cautionary Tale About DRM-Like Servers)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Camel K Brings Apache Camel to Kubernetes for Event-Driven Architectures – The New Stack

    Applications have increasingly relied on event-driven architectures (EDAs) in recent years, especially with the advent of serverless and microservices. EDAs decouple an event from the subsequent actions that may follow, as opposed to traditional linear architectures, where an event might be processed in that same code. This decoupling makes EDA processes able to be independently scaled and, while EDA does not strictly require microservices or serverless, the respective loose coupling and the on-demand nature is a perfect fit.

    In the cloud native world, the focus might often be on the serverless side of things, with Knative or Lambda taking the spotlight, but, as the name might imply, event-driven architecture is nothing without events. Apache Camel K takes Apache Camel, the fundamental piece of enterprise integration software that first came around as a sort of codification of the 2003 book Enterprise Integration Patterns, and brings it to Kubernetes, providing EDA with a multitude of event sources, explained Keith Babo, Director of Product Management at Red Hat.

  • Automated Live - A Red Hat video collection

    Watch Colin and his trusty tech guru Sean discuss how the Red Hat® Ansible® Automation Platform can help improve your business processes and scale for the future.

  • Shenandoah in OpenJDK 17: Sub-millisecond GC pauses | Red Hat Developer

    Our primary motivation for the Shenandoah OpenJDK garbage collection (GC) project is to reduce garbage collection pause times. In JDK 12, we released the original Shenandoah garbage collector, which implements concurrent heap evacuation, which solved the major problem of cleaning (potentially large) heaps without stopping the application. This version was eventually backported to JDK 11. In JDK 14, we implemented concurrent class unloading, and in JDK 16, we added concurrent reference processing, both of which further reduced pause times in those garbage collection operations. The remaining garbage collection operation under pause was thread-stack processing, which we've solved in JDK 17.

    This article introduces the new concurrent thread-stack processing in Shenandoah GC. Processing thread stacks concurrently gives us reliable sub-millisecond pauses in JDK 17.

  • Applying DevSecOps practices to Kubernetes: security analysis and remediation

    This post explores implementing DevSecOps principles to improve Kubernetes security analysis and remediation across the full development life cycle.

  • The Enterprisers Project's 8th anniversary: What's next for CIO role? | The Enterprisers Project

    At the Enterprisers Project, we have a clear mission: Help CIOs and IT leaders solve problems. That means not only the technology challenges but also the leadership and career varieties. Our IT leadership community succeeds largely because of all your generosity – in sharing real-world lessons learned with your peers. And what unparalleled lessons they were in 2021.

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software

  • Create a live chat support system with this remarkable Libra solution: LiveHelperChat

    An interactive chat widget embedded in a website or a web app provides a direct communication live channel between the customer (visitor/ user) and the service provider.

    Chat widgets are reliable and easy support channels and ticket sources for many enterprise ticketing and support systems.

    Some CRM solutions have integrated LiveChat support systems and support ticket management solution. We covered 23 open-source CRM solutions here, we recommend checking them out.

    While many embedded chat widgets come as SaaS, our topic of the day LiveHelperChat is free and open-source.

    [...]

    LiveHelperChat is generously released under Apache-2.0 License (Open-source).

  • pgexporter 0.1.0

    The pgexporter community is happy to announce the initial release version 0.1.0.

  • Pgpool-II 4.2.5 released.
  • Success at Apache: from Mentee to PMC

    This post is about how I became a committer and a Project Management Committee (PMC) member of Apache Airflow, and provides guidance to those new to programming, are new to contributing to open-source projects, and want to become committers and PMC members in their respective Apache projects.

    About a year and a half after changing my career from electrical engineering to software development, I became a committer and a Project Management Committee member of Apache Airflow. Becoming a committer and a PMC member is a reward and a kind of validation that you are on the right part of your journey.

    On February 16, 2021, I accepted an invitation to become a committer in Apache Airflow. It came as a surprise, as I was not expecting it. Six months down the line, I received another surprise invitation to become a PMC member in Apache Airflow.

    These are impressive feats for me because before contributing to Apache Airflow, I didn't have experience working with other programmers. I was making websites and taught a few friends of mine how to make their own. I didn't have a mentor, and no one has ever seen my code to advise whether to continue on my journey or drop the idea of becoming a programmer.

    While I desired to work with experienced programmers to improve my skills, I feared people seeing my code would talk me down. I almost gave up on my journey only to come across an Outreachy post on Twitter looking for interns for open source projects. Outreachy is a tech diversity program that provides three months of paid, remote internships to people underrepresented in tech.

  • The Great Resignation: New gig? Here are 7 tips to ensure success

    If recent surveys and polls ring true, over 40% of the global workforce is considering leaving their employer this year. Despite COVID-19 causing initial turnover due to the related economic downturn, the current phenomenon coined “The Great Resignation” is attributed to the many job seekers choosing to leave their current employment voluntarily. Mass vaccinations and mask mandates have allowed offices to re-open just as job seekers are reassessing work-life balance, making bold moves to take control of where they choose to live and work.

    [...]

    As the Great Resignation continues, it is important to keep in mind that getting a new job is just the start of the journey. There are important steps that you can do, and Firefox and Pocket can help, to make sure that you feel ready for your next career adventure.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Generate a minimal GStreamer build, tailored to your needs

    GStreamer is a powerful multimedia framework with over 30 libraries and more than 1600 elements in 230 plugins providing a wide variety of functionality. This makes it possible to build a huge variety of applications, however it also makes it tricky to ship in a constrained device. Luckily, most applications only use a subset of this functionality, and up until now there wasn't an easy way to generate a build with just enough GStreamer for a specific application.

    Thanks to a partnership with Huawei, you can now use gst-build to generate a minimal GStreamer build, tailored to a specific application, or set of applications. In this blog post, we'll look at the major changes that have been introduced in GStreamer to make this possible, and provide a small example of what can be achieved with minimal, custom builds.

  • How to reach craftsmanship? – vanitasvitae's blog

    I also taught myself coding. Well, I learned the basics of Java programming in school, but I kept on learning beyond that. My first projects were the typical mess that you’d expect from a beginner which has no idea what they are doing. Later I studied computer science and now I’m just a few credit points away from getting my masters degree. Yet, the university is not the place where you learn to code. They do teach you the basics of how a computer works, what a compiler is and even the theory behind creating your own compilers, but they hardly teach you how to write *good* code.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 130: Odd Number and Binary Search Tree
  • Debugging by starting a REPL at a breakpoint is fun

    Hello! I was talking to a Python programmer friend yesterday about debugging, and I mentioned that I really like debugging using a REPL. He said he’d never tried it and that it sounded fun, so I thought I’d write a quick post about it.

    This debugging method doesn’t work in a lot of languages, but it does work in Python and Ruby and kiiiiiind of in C (via gdb).

  • Crunch numbers in Python with NumPy | Opensource.com

    NumPy, or Numerical Python, is a library that makes it easy to do statistical and set operations on linear series and matrices in Python. It is orders of magnitude faster than Python lists, which I covered in my notes on Python Data Types. NumPy is used quite frequently in data analysis and scientific calculations.

    I'm going to go over installing NumPy, and then creating, reading, and sorting NumPy arrays. NumPy arrays are also called ndarrays, short for n-dimensional arrays.

  • How I patched Python to include this great Ruby feature

    Ruby, unlike Python, makes lots of things implicit, and there's a special kind of if expression that demonstrates this well. It's often referred to as an "inline-if" or "conditional modifier", and this special syntax is able to return one value when a condition is true, but another value (nil, specifically) when a condition is false.

Security and FUD Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (sssd), Fedora (libtpms and vim), openSUSE (kernel and php7-pear), Oracle (kernel), Slackware (curl), and Ubuntu (libgcrypt20 and squashfs-tools).

  • Travis CI flaw exposed secrets of thousands of open source projects [Ed: Hidden cost of bloat, but Microsoft-funded Ars 'Tech'nica spins this as an "Open Source" problem]

    A security flaw in Travis CI potentially exposed the secrets of thousands of open source projects that rely on the hosted continuous integration service. Travis CI is a software-testing solution used by over 900,000 open source projects and 600,000 users. A vulnerability in the tool made it possible for secure environment variables—signing keys, access credentials, and API tokens of all public open source projects—to be exfiltrated.

  • Travis CI flaw exposed secrets of thousands of open source projects (ars technica) [LWN.net]

    Any project storing secrets in this service would be well advised to replace them.

  • The long-term consequences of maintainers’ actions – Ariadne's Space

    OpenSSL 3 has entered Alpine, and we have been switching software to use it over the past week. While OpenSSL 1.1 is not going anywhere any time soon, it will eventually leave the distribution, once it no longer has any dependents. I mostly bring this up because it highlights a few examples of maintainers not thinking about the big picture, let me explain.

    First, the good news: in distribution-wide rebuilds, we already know that the overwhelming majority of packages in Alpine build just fine with OpenSSL 3, when individually built against it. Roughly 85% of main builds just fine with OpenSSL 3, and 89% of community builds with it. The rebuild effort is off to a good start.

    Major upgrades to OpenSSL are not without their fallout, however. In many cases, we cannot upgrade packages to use OpenSSL 3 because they have dependencies which themselves cannot yet be built with OpenSSL 3. So, that 15% of main ultimately translates to 30-40% of main once you take into account dependencies like curl, which builds just fine with OpenSSL 3, but has hundreds of dependents, some of which don’t.

    A major example of this is mariadb. It has been known that OpenSSL 3 was on the horizon for over 4 years now, and that the OpenSSL 3 release would remove support for the classical OpenSSL programming approach of touching random internals. However, they are just now beginning to update their OpenSSL support to use the modern APIs. Because of this, we wound up having to downgrade dozens of packages which would otherwise have supported OpenSSL 3 just fine, because the maintainers of those packages did their part and followed the OpenSSL deprecation warnings as they showed up in OpenSSL releases. MariaDB is a highly profitable company, who do business with the overwhelming majority of the Fortune 500 companies. But yet, when OpenSSL 3 releases started to be cut, they weren’t ready, and despite having years of warning they’re still not, which accordingly limits what packages can get the OpenSSL 3 upgrade as a result.

  • Level up your digital security hygiene! Cybersec Charcha #5

    By popular demand from our staff and community members, this edition of cybersec charcha will explore the basic digital security hygiene practices everyone should follow and how they protect your information from falling into the wrong hands.

    As attacks like Pegasus gain more limelight and become part of public knowledge, many of us feel that there is nothing we can do to protect ourselves. And currently, this stands true for sophisticated attacks like Pegasus. However, it’s important to remain cognizant that every time someone’s data is compromised, it’s not because they were targeted with a military grade spyware. It’s crucial for us to be aware of our personal threat levels. This threat level can be determined through a process called Threat Modelling.

  • Microsoft Releases Security Update for Azure Linux Open Management Infrastructure [Ed: This is how CISA covers Microsoft 'bug doors' inside Linux]

    Microsoft has released an update to address a remote code execution vulnerability in Azure Linux Open Management Infrastructure (OMI). An attacker could use this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.

  • Drupal Releases Multiple Security Updates

    Drupal has released security updates to address multiple vulnerabilities affecting Drupal 8.9, 9.1, and 9.2. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

  • New Go malware Capoae targets WordPress installs, Linux systems [Ed: Charlatans and frauds at ZDNet now try to blame some malware that targets WordPress on "Linux" and on the programming language the malware is written in (Go); this isn't journalism and it's even lower than tabloid level. Part of a trend. Imagine ZDNet blaming Photoshop holes on Windows and on C++ (if some malware is coded in that language).]
  • Democracy Now: NSO Group Spies Secretly Seized Control of Apple Devices by Exploiting Flaw in Code - The Citizen Lab

    Ron Deibert joined Democracy Now to discuss how Citizen Lab research of a zero-click zero-day exploit—used by NSO Group—led Apple to issue a patch to over 1.65 billion products.

  • Theory confirmed: Lumen Black Lotus Labs discovers Linux executable files have been deployed as stealth Windows loaders [Ed: WSL was always a security joke; it's compromised, totally controlled by Microsoft, and only a fool would call that "Linux"]
  • Theory confirmed: Lumen Black Lotus Labs discovers Linux executable files have been deployed as stealth Windows loaders [Ed: They've paid to spread this misleading thing which conflates WSL with "Linux"]
  • ACSC Releases Annual Cyber Threat Report

    The Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) has released its annual report on key cyber security threats and trends for the 2020–21 financial year.

    The report lists the exploitation of the pandemic environment, the disruption of essential services and critical infrastructure, ransomware, the rapid exploitation of security vulnerabilities, and the compromise of business email as last year’s most significant threats.

A couple of big features for Thunar

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Welcome to my first post-GSoC blogpost. Google Summer of Code might have ended but I'm continuing my daily work on Thunar and Xfce Terminal (more on that later). This blog-post is accompanied by a video that showcases what is written here.

Read more

Canonical to Push More Snaps in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu to Make Firefox Snap Default in 21.10

    Ubuntu plans to make the Firefox Snap the default version for new installations of Ubuntu 21.10.

    A feature freeze exception (FFE) filed by Canonical’s Olivier Tilloy will replace the Firefox .deb package in the Ubuntu ‘seed’ with the Snap version. He writes: “Per Canonical’s distribution agreement with Mozilla, we’re making the snap the default installation of firefox on desktop ISOs starting with Ubuntu 21.10.”

    Firefox is currently distributed via the Ubuntu repos as a deb package. If this feature freeze request is granted users who install Ubuntu 21.10 next month will find the official Snap version of the vaunted web browser there, in its place.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Snap Performance Skunk Works – Ensuring speed and consistency for snaps

    Snaps are used on desktop machines, servers and IoT devices. However, it’s the first group that draws the most attention and scrutiny. Due to the graphic nature of desktop applications, users are often more attuned to potential problems and issues that may arise in the desktop space than with command-line tools or software running in the background.

    Application startup time is one of the common topics of discussion in the Snapcraft forums, as well as the wider Web. The standalone, confined nature of snaps means that their startup procedure differs from the classic Linux programs (like those installed via Deb or RPM files). Often, this can translate into longer startup times, which are perceived negatively. Over the years, we have talked about the various mechanisms and methods introduced into the snaps ecosystem, designed to provide performance benefits: font cache improvements, compression algorithm change, and others. Now, we want to give you a glimpse of a Skunk Works* operation inside Canonical, with focus on snaps and startup performance.

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.16 To Add Quirk For The Steam Deck, Other DRM-Misc-Next Changes - Phoronix

    With the Linux 5.15 merge window out of the way, the first drm-misc-next pull request has been sent in to DRM-Next for staging until the Linux 5.16 merge window opens up about two months from now.

    With this initial drm-misc-next pull the material is rather light considering the brief time since the merge window. There are some DMA-BUF updates, new macros, a number of new device quirks, documentation improvements, the V3D driver has a fix for a Vulkan CTS failure, new PCI IDs for the Bochs driver, VirtIO now supports mapping exported vRAM, and the ZTE driver has been removed for being obsolete.

  • Running Linux 5.15-rc1 Causing A New Slowdown... Here's A Look - Phoronix

    Linux 5.15-rc1 performance overall has been looking good at the assortment of systems I have tested so far this week. The performance overall has been inline with expectations and jiving well with the many new Linux 5.15 features. But it quickly became apparent that something was wrong with compiler performance when running on Linux 5.15... Not the speed to compile the kernel, but rather the performance of building other codebases while the system is running Linux 5.15-rc1. This slowdown for build tests was happening for multiple codebases of very real-world and relevant projects and on multiple systems, making it an interesting regression to look at and worth bisecting for an article.

  • OpenZFS 2.1.1 Arrives As A Big Point Release - Phoronix

    Following the big OpenZFS 2.1 release from July that brought Distributed SPARE RAID, a compatibility property for pools, and other new features, OpenZFS 2.1.1 is available today as a follow-up release for this open-source ZFS file-system implementation for Linux and FreeBSD systems.

  • The Linux Foundation and Fintech Open Source Foundation Announce Keynote Speakers for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021
  • The Linux Foundation and Fintech Open Source Foundation Announce Keynote Speakers for Open Source Strategy Forum London 2021

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-host Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced keynote speakers for Open Source Strategy Forum London (OSSF). The event takes place October 5, preceded by a FINOS Member event on October 4, in London, England. The schedule can be viewed here and the keynote speakers can be viewed here.

Graphics: XDC2021, Chromebooks, and LLVMpipe

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Talks More About Their Open-Source Vulkan Ray-Tracing Bring-Up - Phoronix

    Prominent Intel open-source Vulkan Linux driver developer Jason Ekstrand presented at today's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC2021) about their work on enabling Vulkan ray-tracing support.

    As has been covered many times already, with forthcoming Xe-HPG graphics card will feature hardware ray-tracing capabilities. While Windows users are getting excited over DirectX 12 DXR prospects with Intel graphics, on the Linux side that is obviously focused on the Vulkan ray-tracing extensions.

  • X.Org Could Use More Help Improving & Addressing Its Security - Phoronix

    Those reading Phoronix over the years likely know the X.Org Server has had an increasing number of vulnerabilities come to light in recent times and statements by security researchers like the security being even worse than it looks. Given the age of the X.Org/X11 codebase and many components being rather unmaintained these days, the security situation isn't that great combined with a lack of manpower. The security topic was under the spotlight today at the XDC2021 conference.

  • Google Is Successfully Using The Open-Source Qualcomm GL/VLK Drivers On Chromebooks - Phoronix

    It's been known that Google has been using the open-source "MSM" DRM/KMS driver on Qualcomm-powered devices that originally started out as a reverse-engineered driver project separate from the company. Now it's also been confirmed how Google is successfully using the open-source Mesa Freedreno OpenGL and TURNIP Vulkan drivers on Qualcomm-powered Chromebooks too.

  • Mesa's LLVMpipe + Lavapipe Land FP16 Support - Phoronix

    The latest work landing for Mesa 21.3 is supporting FP16 within the LLVM-based software driver code namely for the LLVMpipe Gallium3D OpenGL and Lavapipe Vulkan drivers.

    VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and VK_KHR_shader_subgroup_extended_types are now exposed for the LLVMpipe code with this OpenGL FP16 support in place. The Lavapipe Vulkan code is similarly exposing this FP16 support too.

Videos/Shows: Command Line Heroes, New in Invidious (YouTube), BSDNow, and Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes: Season 8: Robot as Servant

    The 1980s promised robotic servants were in reach. They’d clean up our houses. Bring us drinks. Usher in an era of leisure. We didn’t get robot butlers. But if we look around, we’ll find an army of robotic servants already automating away domestic drudgery.

  • No The Steam Deck Won't Play Every Game - Invidious

    Due to some early information floating around some outlets reported that the Steam Deck will play every single game out there but anyone who has played games on Linux knows that would be impossible, proton is frankly not at this state.

  • JC's Linux Notes - Invidious

    A screencast in which we take a look at notes about Linux I have saved over the last few years.

  • GNOME redesign, Manjaro Cinnamon goes Vivaldi, and Steam Deck hype deflation - Linux news - Invidious
  • BSDNow 420: OpenBSD makes life better

    Choosing The Right ZFS Pool Layout, changes in OpenBSD that make life better, GhostBSD 21.09.06 ISO's now available, Fair Internet bandwidth management with OpenBSD, NetBSD wifi router project update, NetBSD on the Apple M1, HardenedBSD August Status Report, FreeBSD Journal on Wireless and Desktop, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E28 – Tanks Rewarding Gender [Ed: Ubuntu Podcast will end soon. So they decided to push proprietary software like Windows and DRM like Steam.]

    This week we’ve been playing with Steam and the Windows Terminal. We look back at how Ubuntu and evolved over the years, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 28 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Watch commands and tasks with the Linux watch command | Opensource.com

    See how the watch command can let you know when a task has been completed or a command has been executed.

  • Proxmox VE Full Course: Class 8 - Creating Container Templates - Invidious

    Welcome back to LearnLinuxTV's full course on Proxmox Virtual Environment! In class #8, we look at the process of converting a container into a template, that can then be used as a basis for launching additional containers.

  • LibreOffice Master Document Fixes

    Earlier this year, allotropia software GmbH was awarded a tender to fix a number of problems around the master document feature (Tender to implement master document fixes (#202106-02)) by The Document Foundation (TDF).

    We have finished implementing the necessary changes, and all fixes will be available for testing in LibreOffice 7.2.2.

    Using master documents is a somewhat hidden, but extremely useful feature of LibreOffice Writer, when producing longer documents (like books, or the help guides the LibreOffice documentation team is maintaining). With it, users can split a larger document into a number of smaller pieces, to work on independently. If this feature sounds interesting to you, the excellent Writer Guide has a chapter about it.

  • Czech translation of Impress Guide 7.0 is here!
  • 15 Practical Examples of ‘echo’ command in Linux

    The echo command is one of the most commonly and widely used built-in commands for Linux bash and C shells, that typically used in a scripting language and batch files to display a line of text/string on standard output or a file.

  • Plex repository for Linux - blackMORE Ops

    Add Plex repository for Linux and Plex Media Server will automatically get updated.

  • How to add system information to the Linux desktop

    Conky is a system monitor tool for the Linux desktop. With it, users can view everything from their RAM usage, CPU usage, disk usage, and more right on the desktop. Here’s how to get it working on your system.

  • How to install Zoom on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Zoom on Linux Lite 5.4.

  • Check How Long a Process Has Been Running in Linux - Putorius

    Have you ever started a script that needs to run for an extended period of time? Maybe you kicked off a job and it is still running next time you log in? Whatever the situation is, there may be times when it is necessary to check how long a process has been running in Linux. In this short tutorial we will discuss using the ps command to show elapsed time since a process was started.

    Every time you start a process on a Linux system it is assigned a process id (PID). The system keeps track of this process, it’s elapsed time, and other important information using this process id. Before we can find out how long a process has been running we need to find its PID.

  • How to install FNF Battle Royale Mod on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install FNF Battle Royale Mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

  • How to Install Microsoft Teams on Linux [Ed: Bad idea because it is technically malware]

    Communication platforms like Microsoft Teams have become an integral part of everyone's day-to-day lives. From organizing team meetings in corporates to scheduling classes in educational institutions, Microsoft Teams is used everywhere. But is it available to Linux users?

Linux Mint’s New Website is Live (And Yes, It Looks Fresh

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GNU
Linux

A brand-new Linux Mint website has gone live.

Mint devs said that a revamped homepage was in the work, even inviting the community to get involved in shaping the form and function of it. All of that hardwork has paid off as the new Linux Mint website is online.

And it’s looking great...

Read more

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Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3