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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Chromium/Mozilla Firefox: Chrome 78 Beta, Keygen Setback and iframes Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 6:01am
Story DM-Clone Target Added To Linux 5.4 For Efficient Remote Replication Of A Block Device Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 5:58am
Story Devices: One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) XO-1.75, PiCAN3 CAN-Bus Board and BeagleBoard Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 5:49am
Story IBM, Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 5:42am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 5:29am
Story KDE: New Features, Kate, Windows and KItinerary Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 5:23am
Story Stable kernels 5.3.1, 5.2.17, 4.19.75, 4.14.146, 4.9.194, and 4.4.194 Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2019 - 12:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2019 - 9:02pm
Story FreeBSD 12.1 Beta Roy Schestowitz 21/09/2019 - 8:55pm
Story Events: Akademy 2019, Embedded Recipes and Raleigh Licensing Seminar Roy Schestowitz 1 21/09/2019 - 8:52pm

LLVM 9.0.0 released

Filed under
Development

It's my great pleasure to announce that LLVM 9 is now available.

Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#9.0.0

This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past
six months (up to trunk r366426 plus commits on the branch). Some
highlights include:

- Support for asm goto, enabling for example the mainline Linux kernel
for x86_64 to build with Clang
- The RISCV-V target is no longer experimental, but built by default
- Experimental support for C++ for OpenCL

as well as many bug fixes, optimizations, and diagnostics improvements.

Read more

Events: Akademy 2019, Embedded Recipes and Raleigh Licensing Seminar

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
  • Akademy 2019 is over.

    This year Akademy was a little bit different for me. I joined MBition recently to push Open Source and, giving the kind of activity and technologies we use, KDE is an community we can learn a lot from. We have many things in common.

    MBition decided to sponsor the event at the Supporter level and my colleague Julia König came with me for a couple of days to learn more about these kind of events and this community in particular.

    We attended to the welcome event, the sponsors dinner and the first days of talks together. During the second day of talks, I introduced the company to the attendees during the sponsors talk.

    It was also great to see my former employer, Codethink Ltd, as sponsor once again.

  • KDE Mindmap – Akademy 2019

    Akademy is over. =/ And now that I have a little of time I will talk to you about a Birds of Feather that I’ve hosted during the Milan edition of Akademy that was the Mindmap of the community.

    Since I’ve joined KDE I don’t have a clear picture what the structure of the community looks like. And that’s why I hosted this BoF to try to fix that.

  • All the right ingredients in Paris

    Next week, Collaborans will be in Paris to participate in this year's editions of Embedded and Kernel Recipes, organized by hupstream.

    Taking place on September 23 & 24, Embedded Recipes is a conference about open source solutions in the embedded world, wether it's latest developments, contributions, tools or platforms. This year, as the very first speaker on the programme, Collaboran Julian Bouzas will be kicking things off with a look at PipeWire, the new framework for handling audio and video streams on Linux. You can read more about his talk below.

  • Early registration for Raleigh Licensing Seminar extended until September 25th

    We have extended the early registration period of the upcoming Continuing Legal Education Seminar (CLE), to Wednesday, September 25th. The CLE will be held at the Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, on October 16th, 2019.

Server: Kubernetes and So-Called 'DevOps'

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes Project Releases Version 1.16

    SUSE, and the SUSE CaaS Platform team in particular, congratulates the Kubernetes Project of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation on the release of Kubernetes 1.16.
    The most major change in this release is actually a feature that is already in widespread use. Custom Resource Definitions (CRD) are a major foundation of Kubernetes extensibility and are used by many features and projects; however, they have been in beta since version 1.7, over two years ago. They finally graduate to general availability (GA) and stable status in this release, meaning that anyone using the current version of the feature and its API can expect compatibility for any future 1.x release as well as any 2.x release yet to come.

  • The use of open source software in DevOps has become strategic for organizations of all sizes

    A higher percentage of top performing teams in enterprise organizations are using open source software, according to a survey conducted by DevOps Research and Assessment (DORA) and Google Cloud. Additionally, the proportion of Elite performers (highest performing teams) nearly tripled from last year, showing that DevOps capabilities are driving performance.

  • Kubernetes 1.16 Offers New Promise for IPv6 Cloud Native Deployments

    Kubernetes, for the un-initiated is a container orchestration platform that is deployed and supported in all the major public cloud provides and is also widely used on-premises as well. Every new Kubernetes update has features that are in alpha, beta and those that have reached general availability. In the 1.16 update, for networking professionals there is one alpha feature that stands above all others : IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack.

    "If you enable IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack networking for your Kubernetes cluster, the cluster will support the simultaneous assignment of both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses," the Kubernetes feature documentationstates.

    The dual stack will support both Kubernetes Pods, which represent a set of running containers; as well as Kubernetes Services, which provide a way to abstract an application running on a set of Pods as a network service. The Kubernetes Enhancement Proposal (KEP) that defines the dual-stack feature, notes that Kubernetes has provides support for IPv6-only clusters as alpha features since the Kubernetes 1.9release which debuted in December 2017.

  • No, Kubernetes is Not the New OpenStack, Says Canonical

    It’s easy to think of Kubernetes as the great disruptor of earlier generations of cloud-native platforms, such as OpenStack. But that view would be just as wrong as assuming that Kubernetes and containers have totally killed off old-school virtual machines. That’s what Stephan Fabel of Canonical had to say in an interview about the past, present and future of Kubernetes and other cloud-native technologies within the enterprise.

    [...]

    As a result of these differences, Fabel says OpenStack and Kubernetes each serve distinct types of workloads. For example, OpenStack might appeal to telcos, which are “more prone to adopting configuration management type approaches, where workloads have to be stateful and long-running.” Kubernetes, meanwhile, is better-suited for workloads that are deployed as REST- or HTTP-based services.

    To help prove his point about the continued relevance of OpenStack, Fabel says Canonical is on track to witness “the most commercial activity in OpenStack” ever in the coming quarter, with business coming from a variety of verticals. Clearly, Fabel says, OpenStack remains a go-to solution for enterprises of many different stripes.

Systemd-homed: Systemd Now Working To Improve Home Directory Handling

Filed under
Linux

Kicking off today in Berlin is the annual All Systems Go conference focused on systemd and other user-space components. Systemd lead developer Lennart Poettering presented on systemd-homed as a new component to systemd that is focused on improving home directory handling.

Improving the Linux handling of user home directories is the next ambition for systemd. Among the goals are allowing more easily migratable home directories, ensuring all data for users is self-contained to the home directories, UID assignments being handled to the local system, unified user password and encryption key handling, better data encryption handling in general, and other modernization efforts.

Read more

Parrot 4.7 release notes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

We are proud to announce the release of Parrot 4.7, which represents an important step forward for our project.

Read more

Safe Eyes – protect your eyes from eye strain

Filed under
Software

Many people who regularly use computers suffer from eye strain and fatigue. Looking at a monitor for a long time can strain your eyes or can make any other problems you are having with your eyes seem more apparent. There is also research to show that late-night exposure to bright lights can affect sleep quality. This can be mitigated by reducing blue-light exposure.

Some monitors offer various eye care technologies including flicker-free technology, and an ultra-low blue light filter with different filter settings. But even if your display offers eye care technology and it’s well designed e.g. offering hotkeys that let you easily adjust filter settings. there’s still a good case to use a software solution as well. This is because the software typically offers more flexibility, such as the ability to automatically adjust the backlight and screen temperature based on the ambient brightness in your surroundings, or on a time schedule.

There are lots of simple steps you can take to reduce eye strain and fatigue. These include adjusting the brightness, contrast settings, and text size displayed, as well as minimizing glare, and ensuring your room has proper lighting. Taking regular breaks is also very important. This is where Safe Eyes can help. It’s a clone of EyeElo, Windows proprietary software designed to protect your eyes.

Read more

Lakka 2.3 with RetroArch 1.7.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After almost a year of hiatus, the team is proud to release Lakka 2.3, featuring new platforms, new cores, and of course RetroArch 1.7.8.

As always, you can update through the Online Updater, or by visiting the download page of your platform here on the website.

Read more

Linux 5.4 Developments

Filed under
Linux
  • F2FS Linux 5.4 Changes Sent In With Case-Insensitivity, Get/Set Label Support

    While most of the other Linux file-systems are seeing mostly mundane changes for the Linux 5.4 feature work, the F2FS activity is fairly notable.

    Most notably, F2FS now has case-folding/case-insensitive support. The F2FS case-insensitive support is based upon the recent addition to the EXT4 file-system and allows for per-directory case-insensitive file/folder look-ups. On a per-directory basis (such as for Wine and other use-cases), Unicode-based case-folding can be enabled if desiring this functionality. This F2FS support for Linux 5.4 case-folding includes a port of the recent EXT4 case-folding optimization to allow for faster look-ups.

  • Linux 5.4 Kernel Adds Driver For The Mysterious Pensando Ionic Network Hardware

    Little is publicly known about stealth networking startup Pensando Systems, which is founded by former Cisco executives. They've been ramping up efforts since early 2018 but to date their web-site hasn't launched nor formally introduced any products, but they now have a networking driver in the mainline Linux kernel.

  • Linux 5.4 Prepares IBM POWER For The Ultravisor / Secure Virtual Machines

    The PowerPC/POWER architecture changes were sent in today for the ongoing Linux 5.4 merge window. This time around are some interesting POWER changes with work on their means of secure virtual machines.

    The Linux 5.4 kernel for POWER is bringing initial support for running on a system with an Ultravisor, which is IBM's approach for code running underneath a hypervisor and used for protecting guests from attacks by the hypervisor. Similarly, Linux 5.4 brings support for building a kernel to run as a Secure Virtual Machine (SVM) -- a guest running within an Ultravisor-ed environment.

Games: Zombie Night Terror, Police Stories, FlightGear flight

Filed under
Gaming
  • Zombie Night Terror | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play
  • Police Stories attempts to offer a different take on the top-down shooter genre

    Police Stories from Mighty Morgan and HypeTrain Digital is officially out now and after a very short delay the Linux version has also been released too.

    A slower, more tactical top-down shooter that isn't all about going in loud? Certainly sounds interesting and it does look good. It released on the 19th with the Linux support appearing a day later. Early reports on it are good, with nearly 200 user reviews on Steam giving at a "Very Positive" rating overall so we might be onto a winner here.

  • How to Install FlightGear 2019.1.1 in Ubuntu 19.04/18.04

    FlightGear flight simulator 2019.1 was released almost two months ago. Not it’s finally made into PPA for Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Linux Mint 19.x and their derivatives.

    FlightGear 2019.1 contains many exciting new features, enhancements and bug-fixes. See the changelog for details.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Maintainer wanted: gnome-directory-thumbnailer

    I’m giving up maintaining gnome-directory-thumbnailer as it no longer scratches my itch — it’s yours if you want it.

    gnome-directory-thumbnailer is a little project I started a while ago for creating thumbnails for directories (rather than showing a plain directory icon for them in the file manager). Times change, I no longer have the itch that it was developed to scratch, and so I’m giving up maintenance of it after making the 0.1.11 release.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-38

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019: Partnership with “Chalet 12”: coworking space and Ubucon Europe warm-up party!

    Have you still not finished your presentation for Ubucon Europe and need a quiet place to work on the slides?

    Perhaps you need to push some code to your favorite opensource projects and you need a place to focus?

    We are happy to announce that we have got some sweet deals with “Chalet 12” to provide a shared co-working space within a 5 minutes walk from the Ubucon Europe event.

    “Chalet 12” is a romantic chalet from the early XX century, it provides meeting and event rooms, private offices, kitchen and dining room, several living rooms, a makerspace, a garden, and terraces, are spread over 4 floors, overlooking the palace and castle that are part of the Unesco World Heritage Site of Sintra.

  • 2019.3 EAP 2

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website.

Microsoft Distrust, Lock-in, and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
  • [Old] Microsoft, there is a way to win our trust

    The purpose of this post is to explain why I think it's both justified and crucial to be very skeptical of these claims from Microsoft, and what Microsoft can do to allay our well-warranted doubts. And Microsoft, in keeping with the open source tradition from which it arises, I hope you take this unsolicited tunking in the way it's intended.

  • Why not GitHub?

    GitHub has investors who do not care a whit for free software principles, and eventually the company will get acquired—maybe tomorrow, maybe next year—and as we all know, money changes everything.

    Don’t leave your project’s nerve center—its primary address, its means of contribution, its issue tracker, its website, its primary documentation, its continuous integration, everything—in a way you can’t redirect!—at the mercy of people who merely want a return on their investment, and do not care about the principles of a minority of angry nerds.

    Using Git does not require GitHub!

  • Introducing Microsoft’s AirSim, an open-source simulator for autonomous vehicles built on Unreal Engine

Mirrors for Speedier Downloads

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

To put it briefly, PureOS provides ISO images and packages for download. Recently, we’ve seen increased traffic on our download site, and we expect that traffic to grow. We’re hoping to address increased traffic with mirrors for both package updates and downloads.

We’re very happy to announce that Sonic, a highly-ranked and privacy-respecting ISP, has offered to host a mirror for PureOS. This will alleviate some of the traffic, especially for those in North America, without compromising security. The security of the packages remains guaranteed by our signatures; the mirror simply holds another, identical set of packages, signed with Purism’s key.

The mirror is easy to use. For example, if you’d like to use the mirrors for downloading an image, simply use this URL: https://mirrors.sonic.net/pureos/downloads/. And here’s the link to the most recent GNOME Live build.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #303: The Weekender XXXIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 09/20/2019 | Linux Headlines

    The first Open Core Summit, an activist programmer takes aim at Chef, a French court disagrees with Valve’s licensing model, and Lennart Poettering wants to rethink the Home directory.

  • Too Good To Be True | TechSNAP 412

    It's TechSNAP story time as we head out into the field with Jim and put Sure-Fi technology to the test.

    Plus an update on Wifi 6, an enlightening Chromebook bug, and some not-quite-quantum key distribution.

Graphics: AMD, GNOME Shell on Wayland and NVIDIA Nsight Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Pushes Back 3rd Gen Threadripper & Ryzen 9 3950X Until November

    While the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors were reportedly on track for launching in October with updates as of a few weeks ago, today AMD announced a slight delay in launching these new processors.

  • AMD have delayed the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd generation Threadripper until November

    Today, AMD sent out a brief statement about a delay in their 16 core Ryzen 9 3950X and the 3rd generation Threadripper.

    [...]

    So if you were looking to grab either, keep an eye out in November. Will share any more news when they send it about the expected date and pricing.

  • AMD Sends In Initial Batch Of Fixes To Linux 5.4 - Includes Dali Support

    While just yesterday the big DRM feature pull was sent in for Linux 5.4, AMD has also volleyed out their initial batch of fixes for this next version of the kernel.

    This new AMDGPU pull isn't strictly fixes but as anticipated does include the recently reported Dali APU support. Dali along with Renoir -- also newly-supported in Linux 5.4 -- are some of AMD's 2020 APUs. Dali will be targeting the lower-end of the spectrum it's expected for value mobile/embedded. From the driver code, Dali looks like a newer revved version of the current-gen Picasso APUs. Both Dali and Renoir are based on the Vega architecture.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019, part 2

    Pain points and missing pieces with Wayland, or specifically GNOME Shell:

    GNOME Shell is slower
    Synergy doesn't work(?) - needs to be in the compositor
    With Nvidia proprietary driver, mutter and native Wayland clients get GPU acceleration but X clients don't
    No equivalent to ssh -X. Pipewire goes some way to the solution. The whole desktop can be remoted over RDP which can be tunnelled over SSH.
    No remote login protocol like XDMCP
    No Xvfb equivalent
    Various X utilities that grab hot-keys don't have equivalents for Wayland
    Not sure if all X's video acceleration features are implemented. Colour format conversion and hardware scaling are implemented.
    Pointer movement becomes sluggish after a while (maybe related to GC in GNOME Shell?)
    Performance, in general. GNOME Shell currently has to work as both a Wayland server and an X compositor, which limits the ability to optimise for Wayland.

  • NVIDIA's Nsight Graphics 2019.5 Released With Better Vulkan Coverage

    NVIDIA this week released Nsight Graphics 2019.5 as the newest feature update to their proprietary developer tool for graphics profiling and debugging across multiple APIs.

    The Nsight Graphics 2019.5 release brings support for more than a dozen new Vulkan extensions, a variety of user-interface improvements, compatibility enhancements, and better syntax highlighting.

Ubuntu: Video Encoder Performance, Ubuntu Touch, LZ4 Compression

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 Video Encoder Performance On The Core i9 9900K

    Often when doing cross-distribution benchmarks, readers often comment on the performance of Clear Linux particularly for video encoding use-cases as surprisingly different from other distributions. Some argue that it's just over the default CPU frequency scaling governor or compiler flag defaults, so here is a look at that with Ubuntu 19.10 daily benchmarked against Clear Linux.

    On the same Core i9 9900K system I recently ran some benchmarks looking at Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 and then Ubuntu 19.10 with various common tunables to make it more akin to Clear Linux. Ubuntu 19.10 was used due to its recent software components being at similar versions to Intel's rolling-release distribution.

  • Serge Hallyn: First experience with Ubuntu Touch

    For the past few weeks I’ve been using a nexus 4 running ubuntu touch as, mostly, my daily driver. I’ve enjoyed it quite a bit. In part that’s just the awesome size of the nexus 4. In part, it’s the ubuntu touch interface itself. If you haven’t tried it, you really should. (Sailfish ambiances are so much prettier, but ubuntu touch is much nicer to use – the quick switch to switch between two apps, for instance. Would that I could have both.). And in part it’s just the fact that it really feels like – is – a regular ubuntu system.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 to use LZ4 compression to boot even faster

    anonical’s Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” will boot even faster than its predecessor, Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” according to Ubuntu’s kernel team.

    After extensive testing on a variety of compression options on the Ubuntu installation image, Canonical engineers determined that the LZ4 decompression method provided a most appreciable gain in speed.

The Vivaldi 2.8 Release (Proprietary)

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Vivaldi 2.8 Released with Unified Sync Support for Desktop and Android

    Vivaldi Technologies released today the Vivaldi 2.8 web browser for desktop platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, an incremental update that adds significant improvements.
    With Vivaldi 2.8, Vivaldi Technologies continues to give desktop users full control over their browsing experience by adding various improvements across the board, starting with Vivaldi Sync, which now lets you sync bookmarks, passwords, history, notes, and autofill information across desktop and mobile.

    That's right, starting with Vivaldi 2.8, all your browsing data will be automatically synchronized between your installations of Vivaldi on desktop platforms, such as Linux, Mac, or Windows, and your mobile device where Vivaldi for Android is installed if you use Vivaldi Sync.

  • New Version Vivaldi Web Browser Has Been Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux

    Vivaldi is the new web browser compare to other famous browsers, the initial release of Vivaldi was in January, 2015. It has improved a lot and evolved since the first release. Basically it is based on the open-source frameworks of Chromium, Blink and Google's V8 JavaScript engine and has a lot of great feature which I will table later. It is known to be the most customizable browser for power users, debuts features that make browsing more personal than ever before.
    Do we really need another browser? Since we already have a lot of them such as mostly used Firefox, Chrome, Opera and so on. The former CEO of Opera Software Jon Von Tetzchner didn't liked the direction of Opera Web Browser and said "Sadly, it is no longer serving its community of users and contributors - who helped build the browser in the first place." Then created a web browser which has to be fast, rich feature, highly flexible and puts the user first, so Vivaldi was born.

  • Vivaldi 2.8: Inspires new desktop and mobile experiences

    Today we are launching a new upgrade to our desktop version – Vivaldi 2.8.

    We’re always focused on giving you complete control over your desktop experience, while also making sure to protect your privacy and security online.

    Vivaldi on the desktop has been our foundation. And now – our inspiration. It continuously pushes us forward to deliver a browser that is made for you.

  • Privacy and the rise of the alternative search engine

    Over the summer we opened our blog to guest bloggers eager to share their perspectives on privacy. In this story, Finn Brownbill explains how we can put an end to tracking in search for the purpose of data collection.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (bird, opendmarc, php7.3, and qemu), Fedora (bird, dino, nbdkit, and openconnect), Oracle (nginx:1.14, patch, and thunderbird), Red Hat (dovecot, kernel, kernel-alt, and kernel-rt), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), and SUSE (kernel, openssl, openssl-1_1, python-SQLAlchemy, and python-Werkzeug).

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access [Ed: This is not a "Linux" issue any more than Adobe Photoshop malicious files are a "Windows" issue ]

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats.

    Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post.

  • Linux for ethical hackers 101

    In order to familiarize yourself with the full range of ethical hacking tools, it is important to be conversant with the Linux OS. As the systems engineer Yasser Ibrahim said in a post on Quora: “In Linux you need to understand from the basics to the advanced, learn the console commands and how to navigate and do everything from your console, also shell programming (not a must, but always preferable), know what a kernel is and how it works, understand the Linux file systems, how to network on Linux.”

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Traders Who Can’t Code May Become Extinct, Goldman’s Tech Pioneer Warns

    Chavez, 55, outlined strengths that can help humans stay relevant, such as their relationship skills and ability to assess risks. Yet he predicted that longstanding career dichotomies on Wall Street, like trader versus engineer, will go away. To keep working, people will need both of those skills. Even money is going digital, a shift that goes far beyond cryptocurrencies, he said, pointing to the success of Stripe Inc. as an example of creating new ways to move funds.

    Stripe, for its part, has become one of the most valuable companies in Silicon Valley.

  • The use of open source software in DevOps has become strategic for organizations of all sizes

    The 2019 Accelerate State of DevOps Report showed that elite and high performing teams report strong use of open source software. This echoes findings from earlier research, showing that elite performers were 1.75 times more likely to make extensive use of open source than low performers, and were 1.5 times more likely to plan to expand their use of open source software.

  • What's Wrong with the Tech Interview Process?

    [...] The issues seem to boil down to three things:

    1. Coding tests are arbitrary, needlessly difficult and disconnected from the skills actually required for the job.

    2. The number of rounds and the time demands of interviewing are difficult to manage.

    3. Hiring decisions often seem arbitrary and communication about why someone failed a stage are often poorly communicated, when they are communicated at all.

    Let’s take a closer look at each of these.

  • [Old] Codes of Conduct and Hypocrisy

    It is generally accepted that leaders of modern organizations should act to prevent lynchings and mobbings in their organizations. Yet in recent cases in both Debian and Wikimedia, it appears that the leaders have been the instigators, using the lynching to turn opinion against their victims before there is any time to analyse evidence or give people a fair hearing.

    What's more, many people have formed the impression that Molly de Blanc's talks on this subject are not only encouraging these practices but also trolling the victims. She is becoming a trauma trigger for anybody who has ever been bullied.

    Looking over the debian-project mailing list since December 2018, it appears all the most abusive messages, such as the call for dirt on another member, or the public announcement that a member is on probation, have been written by people in a position of leadership or authority, past or present. These people control the infrastructure, they know the messages will reach a lot of people and they intend to preserve them publicly for eternity. That is remarkably similar to the mindset of the men who perpetrate acid attacks on women they can't control.

    Therefore, if the leader of an organization repeatedly indulges himself, telling volunteers they are not real developers, has he really made them less of a developer, or has he simply become less of a leader, demoting himself to become one of the despots Lord Denning refers to?

  • Best text editors in 2019: For macOS, Windows, Linux coders and programmers
  • How to compare strings in Java

    String comparison is a fundamental operation in programming and is often quizzed during interviews. These strings are a sequence of characters that are immutable which means unchanging over time or unable to be changed.

    Java has a number of methods for comparing strings; this article will teach you the primary operation of how to compare strings in Java.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS and Openwashing Leftovers

  • Why retail marketers must get CX right the first time and how open source plays a key role

    One of the great things about technology is that it has raised all of our expectations. Once upon a time, people worried that controlling their television with a remote would make them lazy. Now, we don't even have to find the remote. We just talk to the TV — literally. We access hundreds of goods and services easily, without leaving the comfort of our chairs: we download games, order the supermarket shop, watch films and read books online. It really is a brave new world. But with new worlds come new challenges, and the challenge of the new, tech-driven, marketplace is to make your business stand out in a global crowd. Of all the businesses in all the world, why should your customers choose (and stick with) you? Lots of people will tell you that the key to gaining market share lies in improving the customer experience. And they'll be right. A combination of the need to impress and increased customer expectations have combined to make CX fundamental to gaining and retaining custom.

  • The Future of Great Customer Experience Relies on Open Source

    A majority of U.S. consumers feel that brands don't meet their expectations. The bar for customer experience has been set high -- and its on marketers to reach it. [...] In the early 2000s, enterprise IT was dominated by proprietary software companies. Now, with the rise of public cloud computing, more and more developers are adopting open source tools within their organizations due to lower overall costs and access to the latest innovations. The adoption is spreading from IT into other sectors of the business as well, notably marketing. In total, marketing and experience cloud vendors invested over $8 billion to acquire open source companies in 2018, according to PitchBook.

  • ReactOS 0.4.12 Pulls In Wine-Staging 4.0 DLLs, Many Kernel Improvements

    ReactOS, the open-source operating system still striving for binary compatibility with Microsoft Windows as a drop-in replacement, has version 0.4.12 now available as its first big alpha update in six months. ReactOS 0.4.12 features a lot of work on its open-source kernel including some driver compatibility enhancements, rewritten write-protecting system images, Blue Screen of Death fixes, and a lot of other low-level work.

  • Tencent Offers Open-Source System for IoT Innovation

    Chinese internet giants are quickly cottoning onto the benefits of offering open-source technologies to global developers. Tencent is the latest to throw its hat into the ring. The company announced Wednesday that it is allowing developers to use an open-source operating system to create an internet-of-things (IoT) projects that will allow Tencent to improve the performance of its IoT solutions and strengthen its foothold in the sector. Called “TencentOS tiny,” the operating system is lighter, requires fewer resources, and uses less energy compared with other major systems, according to a Tencent release. The company also said it hopes TencentOS tiny will encourage developers to create IoT projects for smart cities, intelligent connected vehicles, and digital wearables — sectors that Tencent is aggressively targeting.

  • WordPress Parent Automattic Raises $300M from Salesforce Ventures

    Automattic, the company behind the open source WordPress content management (CMS) announced on Sept. 19 that it has raised $300 million in a new Series D round of funding. Of note, the entire round was contributed by Salesforce Ventures, bringing total funding to data for Automattic up to $617 million. The Series D marks the first new raise for Automattic since 2014 "This puts us at a post-round valuation of $3 billion, three times what it was after our last fundraising round in 2014," Matt Mullenweg, founder of Automattic wrote. "It’s a tremendous vote of confidence for Automattic and for the open web."

  • Open-source companies gather to gripe: Cloud giants sell our code as a service – and we get the square root of nothing [Ed: So openwashing gets its own summit to sell proprietary software under the false guise of "open"]
  • Software Freedom Day

    As part of its social purpose charter, all software released by Purism is free software. That means our software includes a lot of free software created by others–thank you! We make this commitment with a “free software license” that formally grants these freedoms. This means you don’t need to ask us permission to use our software–you already have it. If you are a programmer, you are free to tweak or even overhaul an application. If you are a consultant, you are free to provide supporting services. If you are an everyday user, you are free to choose whoever you like to provide programming and other services, or even learn how to do it yourself.

  • How spicy should a jalapeno be?

    Everyone has opinions and preferences, especially when it comes to food. To establish a criterion when answering "How spicy should a jalapeño be?." the Scoville Heat Scale was developed as a standard to measure spiciness. This scale allows people to communicate and share information about how spicy we like our peppers. Similarly, open source technology standards, such as USB, I2C, MQTT, and others, were developed to enable global compatibility. Furthermore, open source hardware platforms have enabled communities to “speak the same language” without reinventing the wheel. For example, Raspberry Pi makes it easy for people to use their hardware as a baseline and then add onto it. This has created a revolution in many industries by enabling individuals, startups, and large corporations to apply hardware and software to complex problems without having to design them from the ground up.

Linux 5.4 Adds Support For The FlySky FS-iA6B - A Receiver Popular With DIY Drones

The input driver updates for the Linux 5.4 kernel include the addition of an interesting, budget-friendly RC receiver that can be used for home-built drones and other use-cases while now the driver allows the receiver when paired with a supported RC controller to serve as a traditional Linux joystick input. The input updates were sent in earlier this week and among the changes are allowing drivers to support more precise timestamps for better velocity tracking, improvements to the BU21013 touchpad driver, and other changes as outlined in the pull request. Read more

Android Leftovers

GNOME: Wayland With MATE, NetworkManager and Sébastien Wilmet

  • Ubuntu/Mir Developer Issues Porting Guide To Help Port MATE To Wayland

    Canonical's Mir developers since re-shifting focus to serving as a Wayland compositor have been working with the likes of the GNOME2-forked MATE desktop environment to implement Wayland support using Mir. For helping those interested in porting MATE applications from X11 to Wayland, one of the Mir developers has now issued a porting guide.

  • NetworkManager Will Now Roam For WiFi Signals More Aggressively

    NetworkManager has shifted its threshold for a weak WiFi signal for when to begin searching for other WLAN networks. Up to now NetworkManager used a -80dBm threshold for when to roam for other network signals while now that has changed to find hopefully stronger network signals sooner. 

  • Sébastien Wilmet: Back to University

    And to avoid stress/burnout, I try to no longer work the evenings and weekends, so it drastically limits my time that I’ll devote to GNOME.