Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 9 Useful Gnome Shell Extensions for Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 8:46am
Story Recently in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 8:31am
Story Fedora Good, Bad, & Ugly and Debian's Rise Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:41am
Story 64-bit ARM FreeBSD Support Is Taking Shape Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:38am
Story QEMU 2.2-rc3 Released, Final Release Pushed Back By Couple Days Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:34am
Story NSA partners with Apache to release open-source data traffic program Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:29am
Story Expensive "Free/Libre Software Laptop" Uses A NVIDIA GPU Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:21am
Story Docker Update Fixes Pair of Critical Security flaws Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:17am
Story Linux-based AUV maps Antarctic sea ice thickness Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:10am
Story DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:05am

Step by step to install OwnCloud server on Ubuntu 14.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

For Ubuntu 14.04 users, you can now easily install OwnCloud server on your desktop. The developer is currently providing a better way to install Owncloud on various Linux distros including Ubuntu 14.04. This tutorial will show you how to install Owncloud on Ubuntu 14.04 easy way.
Link: http://ubuntu-tutorial.com/how-to-install-owncloud-on-ubuntu-14-04-trusty-tahr/

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

Filed under
Reviews

Quad-core media player runs Kodi/XBMC on OpenElec Linux

Filed under
Linux

SolidRun’s tiny, $100 “CuBoxTV” media player runs OpenElec Linux and Kodi (formerly XBMC) on a quad-core i.MX6 SoC, and offers 100Mbps+ video decoding.

The CuBoxTV is the first Freescale i.MX6 based media player to run the Kodi (formerly XBMC) multimedia distribution, says Israel-based SolidRun. CuBoxTV is closely based on the company’s latest i.MX6 based CuBox mini-PC, which now sells for $80 to $140, depending on the number of Cortex-A9 i.MX6 cores and other features. The CuBoxTV, which is available only with the quad-core i.MX6 SoC, goes for a sale price of $100.

Read more

Canonical Is Still Considering Turning the Phone into a Mini-PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical is working to complete their idea of convergence with the launch of Ubuntu Touch, a new operating system for mobile devices. The desktop flavor of Ubuntu will eventually share the same code with the mobile one, and their plans go even further than that.

Read more

Bq Introduces More Android Devices, But Still No Ubuntu Phones

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Bq held a media event today where many were hoping the first Ubuntu Phone would be officially unveiled, but that was not the case with Ubuntu receiving no mentions during the event.

Bq is one of Canonical's first two Ubuntu Phone partners and they had plans to ship the first Ubuntu Phone by the end of 2014. The other phone partner, Meizu, has previously said the MX4 with Ubuntu Touch would come in December.

Read more

Is the ASRock Q1900DC-ITX Intel Motherboard a Good ARM SBC Alternative?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

In the recent series on ARM single board computers I have covered the BeagleBone Black, MaRS, TI's OMAP5432 Board, the Radxa, a few of the ODroid ARM machines, and many more. On the Intel desktop side I've covered the NUC and MinnowBoard. I've learned that outright performance is faster on the Intel NUC than any ARM machine reviewed so far -- the tradeoff, of course, is cost. This time around we'll see whether the ASRock Q1900DC-ITX motherboard retains the high performance characteristic of an Intel board but also dips down to the low cost and lower power draw of the ARM world.

Read more

Apple OS X 10.10 vs. Ubuntu 14.10 Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While I delivered some OS X 10.10 Yosemite preview benchmarks back in August, here's my first tests of the official release of Apple OS X 10.10.1 compared to Ubuntu 14.10 Linux. Tests were done of OS X 10.9.5 and OS X 10.10.1 against Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn when running the benchmarks under both GCC and LLVM Clang compilers.

Read more

Fedora 21 review

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

It's been a while since my last upgrade and there has also been a gap to the latest Fedora 21 release, so now seemed like a good time. I upgraded my laptop by installing over the existing root partition but leaving the /home partition in place to maintain all my settings and files. I wasn't able to even attempt this in the Fedora 16 installer, but it was easy enough in the Fedora 21 installer and it worked surprisingly well. Downtime was only 20 minutes or so for the installation, though a couple of hours was needed to investigate various new settings etc.

Read more

Rescatux Is a Useful Tool to Fix Grub and Promote Windows Users to Admin

Filed under
Linux

Rescatux, a Linux distribution that allows users to perform all kinds of rescue operations with the help of an easy-to-use wizard called Rescapp, has been upgraded to version 0.32 Beta 3, and the developer has made a number of important fixes.

Read more

Finland’s Innovillage spurs open development of e-gov services

Filed under
OSS

Finlands Innovillage - an online collaborative platform for the development and implementation of new government service models and practices - shows that innovation demands an open process that involves users, professionals, managers, experts and policy-makers. “Fundamentally, e-government innovation needs to be open and allow participation”, says Pasi Pohjola, coordinator of Finland’s Development Programme for Social Welfare and Healthcare.

Read more

First Beta Version of LibreOffice 4.4 Is Now Ready for Testing

Filed under
LibO

The work for LibreOffice never stops and this is actually one of the perks of being open source software. The application is constantly improved and the users can easily see what is being done in this regard. Usually, new major updates for a new branch will have several devel versions before the stable one is released, and that means we are still pretty far away from that milestone.

Read more

Open Seat on the Fedora Server Working Group

Filed under
Red Hat

This past week, David Strauss chose to step down from his position on the Fedora Server Working Group, citing a lack of alignment with his current work usage. The Fedora Server SIG would like to thank David for his contributions up to this point and wish him well.

This means that there is currently a vacancy in the Fedora Server Working Group. The Working Group is the nine-person volunteer body that oversees the development, testing, release, documentation, marketing and evangelism of the Fedora Server. Membership on this Working Group is a moderate commitment requiring a participation of a minimum of two hours a week, one hour of which being the (usually) weekly meeting.

Read more

Linux Mint 17.1 to Have Better Support for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Languages

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" is already exected by the community and most users will choose to upgrade, but the developers have made a few improvements for the Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages.

Read more

Android Auto is great, but automakers are holding it back

Filed under
Android

At the LA Auto Show this week, I spent time with a recent pre-release build of Android Auto using a Nexus 5 connected to a 2015 Hyundai Sonata. It's mostly the same as the version we were shown at Google I/O in June, apart from some minor refinements. For instance, the green, circular "a" logo that appears on the phone when it's jacked into the car now reads "Android Auto," and voice-based searches no longer cause a full-screen "listening" window to pop up — you just get a little pulsing "g" in the corner. The underlying concept, though, is unchanged: it's Material Design-infused Android for your dashboard, boiled down to the basics with copious use of speech output and voice recognition so that driver distraction is kept to a bare minimum. You're also locked out of using your actual phone when Android Auto is in use, another stab at limiting distraction by keeping eyes off screens and on the road.

Read more

Not just token: Red Hat's Women in Open Source Awards

Filed under
Red Hat

DeLisa Alexander would like to make one thing clear about Red Hat's Women in Open Source Awards (WIOSA): They're not just a token gesture towards diversity. Instead, she describes them as one step in a larger, more varied strategy to increase women's participation in open source.

"It's one key," says Alexander, executive vice-president and chief people officer at Red Hat. "But it's an important part of the puzzle to help tech and open source attract more talent." According to Alexander, the idea was first generated several years ago, but the company "waited until we had a larger sense of the puzzle."

Read more

Why open source runs the world

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

GNU/Linux as an operating system and open source as a movement have become phenomenal driving forces in the technology world. Without it the internet wouldn't exist as the free and open resource we enjoy today.

Read more

Google's Chrome to pull plug on plugins next September

Filed under
Google
  • Google's Chrome to pull plug on plugins next September

    Google is moving ahead with its plan to end support for Netscape plugins in its Chrome browser – and has set next September as the date for when they will stop working altogether.

  • The Final Countdown for NPAPI

    Last September we announced our plan to remove NPAPI support from Chrome, a change that will improve Chrome’s security, speed, and stability as well as reduce complexity in the code base. Since our last update, NPAPI usage has continued its decline. Given this usage data, we will continue with our deprecation plan.

  • Fair Warning: Chrome Team Starts Final Countdown for NPAPI Extensions

    As we've reported several times, Google is introducing big changes in its Chrome browser, especially when it comes to how the browser handles extensions. If you've regularly used either or both of the most popular open source Internet browsers--Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--then you're probably familiar with the performance and security problems that some extensions for them can cause.

Syndicate content