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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE and GNOME: QML, MyPaint Brush Engine, Daniel van Vugt and Pitivi Summer of Code Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 5:12pm
Story GNU Linux-libre 5.8 Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 4:50pm
Story SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 4:44pm
Story Updated Debian 10: 10.5 released Rianne Schestowitz 4 03/08/2020 - 4:42pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 4:39pm
Story Linux 5.8 Released Roy Schestowitz 4 03/08/2020 - 4:37pm
Story Games: FAudio, Wine Staging, Space Haven and More Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 4:16pm
Story Bash Beginner Tutorial: String Operations in Bash itsfoss 03/08/2020 - 3:26pm
Story Kernel: Unicore32 and IO_uring in Linux Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2020 - 11:19am
Story System76's Keyboards for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 3 03/08/2020 - 11:15am

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Filed under
OSS

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses.

You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands.

The Community:

The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level.

Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions.

While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world.

Higher education value for the in-house team

The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get.

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Journey of a Linux DevOps engineer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

After navigating the streets of Manhattan and finding a parking spot, we walked down the block to what turned out to be a large bookstore. You've seen bookstores like this on TV and in the movies. It looks small from the outside, but once you walk in, the store is endless. Walls of books, sliding ladders, tables with books piled high—it was pretty incredible, especially for someone like me who also loves reading.

But in this particular store, there was something curious going on. One of the tables was surrounded by adults, awed and whispering among each other. Unsure of what was going on, we approached. After pushing through the crowd, I saw something that drew me in immediately. On the table, surrounded by books, was a small grey box—the Apple Macintosh. It was on, but no one dared approach it—no one, that is, except me. I was drawn like a magnet, immediately grokking that the small puck-like device moved the pointer on the screen. Adults gasped and murmured, but I ignored them all and delved into the unknown. The year was, I believe, 1984.

Somewhere around the same time, though likely a couple of years before, my father brought home a TI-99/4A computer. From what I remember, the TI had just been released, so this had to be somewhere around 1982. This machine served as the catalyst for my love of computer technology and was one of the first machines I ever cut code on.

My father tells a story about when I first started programming. He had been working on an inventory database, written from scratch, that he had built for his job. I would spend hours looking over his shoulder, absorbing everything I saw. One time, he finished coding, saved the code, and started typing the command to run his code ("RUN"). According to him, I stopped him with a comment that his code was going to fail. Ignoring me, as I was only five or six at the time, he ran the code, and, as I had predicted, it failed. He looked at me with awe, and I merely looked back and replied, "GOSUB but no RETURN."

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Also: Authorizing multi-language microservices with Louketo Proxy

Linux Kernel 5.8 is Here. This is What's New

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A brand new Linux Kernel 5.8 is announced by Linus Torvalds. This kernel release is mostly a big release in terms of hardware, graphics, and other updates.
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Review: Haiku R1 beta 2

Filed under
OS
OSS
Reviews

Haiku is an open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the Be Operating System (BeOS), Haiku aims to be fast, efficient, simple to use, and easy to learn. It is specifically geared toward desktop usage and maintaining a responsive desktop environment.

The Haiku project has been, to date, in perpetual development mode. Which is to say the releases to date have been labelled as being alpha or beta releases. I mention this because while the version label is R1 beta 2, the platform should probably be regarded a relatively mature project with the benefit of nearly 20 years of development behind it.

The R1 beta 2 release includes a number of new features such as improved font scaling and HiDPI support, along with the ability to work with mouse devices that offer more than three buttons. More applications have been ported and are now available through the project's software manager. The installer has mostly remained the same, however users can now exclude the installation of optional packages while setting up Haiku. New driver support has been added and there are some new options for keeping the Deskbar (a sort of combined desktop panel and system tray) out of the way.

The project's latest release is available in 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds. There are also builds for ARM, PowerPC, m68k, and SPARC architectures, however these builds are considered to be unsupported. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is available as a 955MB ZIP file. Unpacking the ZIP file presents us with a 1,108MB (1GB) ISO file we can write to optical media or a thumb drive.

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Linux Kernel 5.8 “The Biggest Release of All Time” is Finally Available Now

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News

Linus Torvalds has called it “the biggest release of all time”. Check out what are the key changes in the recently released Linux Kernel 5.8.
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Programming: Python, Perl, and GNOME/GTK

Filed under
Development

           

  • Why proactively clean Python 2 up?

    It seems a recurring complaint that we’re too aggressive on cleaning Python 2 up from packages. Why remove it if (package’s) upstream still supports py2? Why remove it when it still works? Why remove it when somebody’s ready to put some work to keep it working?

    I’m pretty sure that you’re aware that Python 2 has finally reached its end-of-life. It’s past its last release, and the current version is most likely vulnerable. We know we can’t remove it entirely just yet (but the clock is ticking!), so why remove its support here and there instead of keeping it some more?

    This is best explained on the example of dev-python/twisted — but dev-python/pillow is also quite similar. Twisted upstream removed support for Python 2 at version 20. This means that we ended up having to keep two versions of Twisted — 19 that still supports Python 2, and 20 that does not. What does that means for our users?

    Firstly, they can’t normally upgrade Twisted if at least one of its reverse dependencies supports Python 2 and is installed. What’s important is that the user does not have to meaningfully need or use Python 2 in that reverse dependency. It is entirely sufficient that it supports Python 2 and the user is using default PYTHON_TARGETS.

    Of course, you could argue that changing the default PYTHON_TARGETS would resolve the problem without having to proactively remove Python 2 from Twisted revdeps. Today, I’m not sure which of the two options is better. However, back when cleanup started changing default PT would involve a lot of pain for the users. We’d have to reenable 2.7 via package.use for many packages (but which ones?) or the users would have to reenable it themselves. But that’s really tangential now.

  •        

  • Python Bytes: #192 Calculations by hand, but in the compter, with Handcalcs

    Idea by Guido van Rossum to bring back the print statement.

  •        

  • PyDev 7.7.0 released (mypy integration improvements, namespace packages)

    This release brings multiple improvements for dealing with type hints as well as improvements in the Mypy integration in PyDev:

    The MYPYPATH can now be set automatically to the source folders set on PyDev and the --follow-imports flag is set to silent by default (this flag is required because only one file is analyzed at a time in PyDev as failing to do so would end up showing errors for other files).

  •        

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #10
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 10
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 71: Peak Elements and Trim Linked List
  • The Perl Weekly Challenge #071

    With another Linked List related task, I am now enjoying it a lot. It also gives me the opportunity to work with Class in Raku. Learning Raku has changed my thinking a big way. The developer inside me is more organised than before. Also doing regular weekly challenge made me think from unit test point of view every time I come up with a solution. In fact, it dictates the design of my solution. Now with the regular Live Video Raku Reviews by Andrew Shitov gave me the insights of others Raku solutions. It is amazing how he break the code into pieces to make it easy to understand. No book can teach you that. You only learn from experience or watching video from Andrew Shitov.

    Running [The|Perl] Weekly Challenge also taught me how to manage my spare time. I use my spare time very carefully. Before I would jump to anything that excites me. Last few weeks, I have started playing with Swift programming language. I am enjoying the journey. Please checkout my Swift solution to the Task #1 of Peak Elements.

  • Mariana Pícolo: The Second milestone

    By discussing with my mentor how could the best approach be, I found out that the notifications were already grouped on the code level, but these groups were not being represented in the UI.

    In the code, there's a class named Source, which is responsible for the group. They handle the info's about the app that have sent us any notification and store them.

    There's also a class named Notification, that creates a single notification, with title, banner, and has optional parameters such as playing sounds etc.

    Each Source has an array property that contains its notification objects, which gives us the groups.

    [...]

    Lastly, I'd like to talk about GUADEC which this year was completely remote.

    This was my first talk at a conference, in a language that I'm not a native speaker. I want to thank my mentor and the GNOME community for creating a comfortable environment for the interns to talk about their projects.

DragonFlyBSD Pulls In AMD Temperature Driver, SMN Support From FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD has been generally working out well for AMD Zen systems sans a few motherboard specific woes, but now is getting even better thanks to importing some new drivers from FreeBSD.

Most exciting is the amdtemp driver now being imported from FreeBSD to DragonFlyBSD. This driver allows for temperature monitoring on AMD Family 0Fh, 10h, 11h, 12h, 14h, 15h, 16h, and 17h processors. The AMD Family 17h support covers Zen 1 as well as Zen 2, including the likes of Threadripper and EPYC.

Also imported from FreeBSD is the amdsmn driver. This driver is for the AMD System Management Network (SMN) support on AMD Zen systems.

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BunsenLabs Linux Lithium Release Hits Stable After Two Years, Based on Debian Buster

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Debian

After more than two years in development, BunsenLabs Linux Lithium release has finally hit the stable channel today for this OpenBox-based and lightweight Debian GNU/Linux derivative, a continuation of the acclaimed CrunchBang Linux.

The BunsenLabs Team is proud to announce today the official release of BunsenLabs Lithium, a new major release based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series.

As expected, BunsenLabs Linux Lithium is packed with lots of goodies, including the ability to install the distribution on newer computers that use Secure Boot, a new look and feel featuring a brand-new dark theme with custom-colored Papirus icons by default, and more modularity for user to fully customize the distro to their needs.

For example, users can now replace the default Openbox window manager with another desktop environment and keep many of the settings, such as menu item, key bindings, and autostarted apps. Also, the BunsenLabs session now uses jgmenu by default and can coexist with a default Openbox or Xfce sessions.

[...]

The BunsenLabs Linux Lithium release is available for download right now from the official website as a 64-bit live ISO and a minimal, CD-sized 32-bit non-PAE version, which can be extended to full-size by installing the bunsen-meta-all or bunsen-meta-lite metapackages.

Read more

Direct: [STABLE RELEASE] BunsenLabs Lithium Official ISOs

Also: [Debian-Based SparkyLinux] July 2020 donation report

Linux 5.8 Released

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.8
    So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but
    decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any
    big looming worries around.
    
    Because despite the merge window having been very large, there really
    hasn't been anything scary going on in the release candidates. Yeah,
    we had some annoying noise with header file dependencies this week,
    but that's not a new annoyance, and it's also not the kind of subtle
    bug that keeps me up at night worrying about it.
    
    It did reinforce how nice it would be if we had some kind of tooling
    support to break nasty header file dependencies automatically, but if
    wishes were horses.. Maybe some day we'll have some kind of SAT-solver
    for symbol dependencies that can handle all our different
    architectures and configurations, but right now it's just a manual
    pain that occasionally bites us.
    
    Anyway..
    
    Aside from silly header file noise, the last week was mostly dominated
    by the networking pull, which accounts for about half of the changes
    (mellanox drivers and selftests stand out, but there's other smaller
    things in there too). Some RCU fixes stand out.
    
    Outside of the networking stuff, it's mostly various small driver
    fixes (gpu, rdma, sound and pinctrl being much of it), and some minor
    architecture noise (arm, x86, powerpc). But it's all fairly small.
    
    So there it is, a shiny new kernel. Give it a whirl before all you
    people start sending me the pull requests for the merge window, which
    I'll start handling tomorrow..
    
                     Linus
    
  • Linus Torvalds Officially Releases the Linux 5.8 Kernel, Now Available for Download

    The Linux 5.8 kernel series has been officially announced by Linus Torvalds.

    [...]

    You can download the Linux 5.8 kernel sources right now from the kernel.org website or using the direct link below. However, please keep in mind that this currently marked as a “mainline” kernel, which means it’s not yet ready for mass deployments or use in production environments.

    You should probably wait for the first point release, Linux kernel 5.8.1, to hit the streets before considering upgrading your kernel packages to the new series. Many of the rolling GNU/Linux distributions like Arch Linux or openSUSE Tumbleweed will probably upgrade to Linux 5.8 in the coming weeks.

  • Linux 5.8 Released With AMD Energy Driver, F2FS LZO-RLE, IBM POWER10 Booting

    Linus Torvalds was debating up to the last minutes today of whether to opt for Linux 5.8-rc8 or go ahead and release Linux 5.8 as stable... He opted for Linux 5.8 splashing down on this historic day.

    Linus wrote in the 5.8 release announcement that despite this cycle being very large, it turned out fairly well and didn't need a 5.8-rc8 release. Though due to some last minute changes, he does dream of having a sort of SAT-solver for symbol dependencies that would work across architectures and configurations for cleaning up the Linux kernel header file dependency mess. But that for now is just a dream.

  • The 5.8 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 5.8 kernel. "So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any big looming worries around." Headline features in this release include: branch target identification and shadow call stacks for the arm64 architecture, the BPF iterator mechanism, inline encryption support in the block layer, the CAP_PERFMON and CAP_BPF capabilities, a generalized kernel event-notification subsystem, the KCSAN data-race detector, and more. As always, see the KernelNewbies 5.8 page for more information.

openSUSE 15.2 Is The Mercedes-Benz of Linux Distributions

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The openSUSE DVD comes with a large collection of software packages, which include the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, MATE desktops and much more. The installer will allow you to select the desktop environment you want during the installation, beside any other packages you may desire.

[...]

Overall, the openSUSE 15.2 distribution is a good release, as it ever was. We recommend upgrading to the new version or installing it on a fresh hardware if you are willing to transfer to the openSUSE world.

One can also give a word about how awesome the available documentation for openSUSE is; You can search in their wiki, for any information you desire and you’ll probably find it in no time.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why making mistakes makes me a better sysadmin

    I've been a Fedora Linux contributor for a little over a decade now. Fedora has a large community of developers and users, each with a unique set of skills ranging from being a particularly discerning user to being an amazing programmer. I like this because it inspires and motivates me to develop new skills of my own.

    For me, the best way to develop skills has always been to make mistakes. Like, really mess things up. It doesn't really matter what kind of mistake it is because it's less about the mistake itself and more about what I learn in the process of having to dig myself out of whatever hole I managed to get myself into.

    Why mistakes are good

    I remember my first computer mistake. My family's first computer was an Epson laptop that my uncle gave us when he upgraded. It had a blazing fast 10 MHz processor and a carrying handle because it was so heavy. I loved that machine.

    It ran DOS, but it had a text-based menu application to make it a little friendlier for the novice user. Hard Disk Menu had ten "pages," each of which could have ten commands configured. We had a page for games, another for "boring stuff" like word processors and spreadsheets, etc.

    Hard Disk Menu had some other features that, when I got bored of playing the games, I would explore. At some point, I decided that I should make use of the account feature. It didn't change what applications appeared, but it would prevent unauthorized access, sort of. You could just drop to the DOS shell instead, but still, it was a nice try.

    I created accounts for myself, my parents, and my sisters. My parents were a little annoyed, but they humored me. Everything was fine for a while. Then my sister forgot her password. My parents told me to remove the passwords. But without my sister's password, I couldn't remove the password on her account (it was the early 90s, a much simpler time). What to do? What to do?

    For a little while, we kept going with the attempted passwords until one day when I decided I'd try something I hadn't done yet. When I was first creating the accounts, I set a master password. What would happen if I typed the master password in place of my sister's password?

  • DebConf4

    This tshirt is 15 years old and from DebConf4. Again, I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

    DebConf4 was my 2nd DebConf and took place in Porto Alegre, Brasil.

    Like many DebConfs, it was a great opportunity to meet people: I remember sitting in the lobby of the venue and some guy asked me what I did in Debian and I told him about my little involvements and then and asked him what he did, and he told me he wanted to become involved in Debian again, after getting distracted away. His name was Ian Murdock...

    DebConf4 also had a very cool history session in the hallway track (IIRC, but see below) with Bdale Garbee, Ian Jackson and Ian Murdock and with a young student named Biella Coleman busy writing notes.

    That same hallway also saw the kickoff meeting of the Debian Women project, though sadly today http://tinc.debian.net ("there's no cabal") only shows an apache placeholder page and not a picture of that meeting.

    [...]

    Finally, DebConf4 and more importantly FISL, which was really big (5000 people?) and after that, the wizard of OS conference in Berlin (which had a very nice talk about Linux in different places in the world, illustrating the different states of 'first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win'), made me quit my job at a company supporting Windows- and Linux-setups as I realized I'd better start freelancing with Linux-only jobs. So, once again, my life would have been different if I would not have attended these events!

  • Design game graphics with Digital Making at Home
  • Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 6 - Turing Pi Review

    So today, I'm wrapping up my Raspberry Pi Cluster series with my thoughts about the Turing Pi that I used to build a 7-node Kubernetes cluster.

  • Three Charged in July 15 Twitter Compromise

    Three individuals have been charged for their alleged roles in the July 15 [attack] on Twitter, an incident that resulted in Twitter profiles for some of the world’s most recognizable celebrities, executives and public figures sending out tweets advertising a bitcoin scam.

  • ‘Mastermind’ Accused of Twitter [Attack] Just Out of High School

    Graham Ivan Clark, 17, allegedly hijacked 130 Twitter accounts as part of a cryptocurrency scam, according to a criminal affidavit filed in Tampa, Florida. The accounts that were [cr]acked included those of former President Barack Obama, Amazon.com Inc. Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos and Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk.

Programming: Perl, Python, Java, Fortran and More

Filed under
Development
  • [Perl] Monthly Report - July

    God, the year 2020 seems never ending. I just pray it gets over quickly and we start fresh with new year 2021. Unfortunately we have to wait for another 5 months. In the current situation, anything can happen in this period. Please stay safe and avoid unnecessary human contacts.

    So what was the main attraction of last month?

    Well, quite a few, to begin with, I submitted 12 Pull Requests which is much better than the month before i.e. 9 Pull Requests. I remember there was time when I used to submit at least 50 PR every month. I aim to do at least 1 PR every 2 days i.e. 15 PR every month. Unfortunately I have only managed to do that in January i.e. 22 Pull Requests. I did come close to the target in two months e.g. May (13 Pull Requests) and July (12 Pull Requests). I am going to keep trying hard. Wish me luck.

    I would like to talk about my participation to the Pull Request Club contributions. Ever since I joined i.e. January 2019, I have never missed a single month. As of today, I have submitted 20 Pull Requests to 20 different distributions. Of those 10 have been accepted and merged. There are 9 PR still open and 1 closed without merge. So overall 50% success rate, not a bad attempt so far.

  • How and why I built Machine Learning model to predict tennis table matches results

    First of all I have chosen Python as the language for the project since python provides many libraries and documentations to support with any challengs during this milestone.

  •         

  • Just updated - Optimize Images v1.3.6

    Optimize Images has just been updated to version 1.3.6, a minor but still important release that fixes a few bugs and improves its overall stability. Thank you for using Optimize Images and/or contributing with feature suggestions, bug reports, or pull requests!

  • Java ternary operator

    Ternary operator can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else’ and ‘if-else-if’ statements. It is called a ternary operator because it takes three operands to do any task. If the conditional expression that is used in a ternary statement returns true, then it executes a particular statement; otherwise, it executes another statement. The ‘?’ and ‘:’ symbols are used to define the ternary statement. The ternary operator is better to use for solving a very simple task in place of ‘if’ statement. Different uses of the ternary operator in java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java List Tutorial

    The list is a useful way to store ordered multiple data like an array in Java. But It has many features that do not exist in the array. The list is called an ordered collection, and it is an interface that extends the Collection interface. It cannot create an object like an array, but it implements four classes to use the functionalities of the list. These classes are ArrayList, LinkList, Stack, and Vector. These are defined in the Java Collection Framework. ArrayList and LinkList classes are widely used in Java. The insert, update, delete, and search operations are done in the list based on the index-value like an array. It can store both null and duplicate values. java.util package contains the ‘list’ interface, and it will require to import to use the ‘list’. How the different methods of the ‘list’ can be used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java switch case statement

    ‘switch-case’ statement can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else-if’ statement where different conditions are defined in different ‘if’ statements. If the first condition returns false, then check the second condition and so on. Defining multiple conditions using this way is a very lengthy process. The same task can be done very simply by using a switch-case statement. It contains different execution parts and executes the statement where the particular value matches with any ‘case’ value. The switch statement can be applied to the various types of primitive data such as int, char, byte, etc. The different uses of switch-case statements in Java are explained in this tutorial.

  • Fortran newsletter: August 2020

    Welcome to the August 2020 edition of the monthly Fortran newsletter. The newsletter comes out on the first calendar day of every month and details Fortran news from the previous month.

  • Which Is The Best WordPress Caching Plugin?

    I’ve talked about how I optimise this site before, but I wanted to do some digging into which is the best WordPress caching plugin. I’ve tested some of the most popular caching plugins available, and decided to write this post with the results.

  • 10 Tips to Defeat Your Fear of Coding

    Why do you fear to code? Is it because you’re afraid to mess up or break something? is it because the technical concepts are confusing for you? is it because of so many overwhelming concepts in programming? Whatever your answer is…but, the most pleasurable thing for a programmer is the moment when they see their code run in the blink of an eye and the magic happens on the screen.

    Coding is intimidating, coding is overwhelming but if anyone defeats the fear of coding then it’s also one of the most enjoyable and fun things to do. Some people who enjoy coding get addicted to it and they start spending hours either trying different programming strategies or building the new applications, or solving some coding-related challenging problems. In this blog, we will discuss the top reasons why people fear of coding and tips to overcome this problem.

  • July 2020: webmail, custom MDA and python framework work

    The issue is that folder pinning is far from being the only thing I want to do with incoming mails at delivery time, and shoving everything in the mda executable is not ideal. I rewrote the MDA to have it handle delivery only and call an API to determine where it should do it, this let me play with a ton of ideas on a custom API server without tweaking the working MDA. At the end of the day, I had incoming mails processed by various text analyzers, attachments automatically extracted and put in an s3 backing store, and mails indexed for fast lookups.

    I will not expand much on how I did this as I think it makes a nice topic for a dedicated article on custom MDA, and fun stuff you can easily do with them to provide some awesome features on your mail setup.

  • Intel ISPC 1.14 Released With Initial GPU Offloading Support

    A few days back we wrote of Intel's ISPC compiler landing GPU code generation support for their UHD/Iris/Xe Graphics from Gen9 Skylake and beyond. Following that code being merged, ISPC 1.14.0 was quickly tagged.

    Intel ISPC 1.14.0 was released shortly after the GPU support code landed for the Implicit SPMD Program Compiler. See more details on the GPU code landing in the aforelinked article. It's an exciting milestone and another great Intel software achievement playing into their oneAPI efforts. ISPC 1.14.0 continues offering great first-rate CPU support across all platforms. All of these open-source goodies remain open-source as one of Intel's continued strong points.

Games: “Reality Check,” Valve's Steam, and Fedora 32

Filed under
Gaming
  • Where Virtual and Augmented Reality Stand in 2020

    “Reality Check,” the new 21-page special report from Variety Intelligence Platform (VIP), explores the hype machine behind virtual and augmented reality, and how investors, particularly in the entertainment space, may have jumped the gun too soon and projected outlandish expectations onto a medium that still has plenty of significant, unexplored potential.

    The initial wave of investments in VR and AR following Facebook’s acquisition of start-up Oculus VR in 2014 was a seemingly great sign for the gaming and tech spaces, with up to an estimated $2.3 billion in funding for VR and AR companies in 2016 (per Digi-Capital).

    But something happened on the way to VR and AR’s happy Hollywood ending.

  • Valve's Steam July 2020 Numbers Point To A Small Dip For Linux

    While some platforms like Netmarketshare have reported increases month-over-month for Linux desktop usage, that doesn't appear to be translating similarly to the Linux gaming market-share, or at least not at the rate Steam is growing on Windows and macOS. Valve has just published their July 2020 numbers that are part of the Steam Survey.

  • Fedora 32 : Play games with Steam service.

    Steam is a video game digital distribution service by Valve. It was launched as a standalone software client in September 2003 as a way for Valve to provide automatic updates for their games, and expanded to include games from third-party publishers., see Wikipedia.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Julia v1.5.0 has been released

Thank you to everyone who made this year’s JuliaCon great! As a parting gift, the Julia developers are pleased to announce the release of Julia v1.5.0, the fifth minor release in the 1.x series. Jeff and Stefan put together a blog post highlighting some of the most exciting new features in 1.5. Check it out! As usual, binaries are available for all of your favorite platforms (Linux, macOS, Windows, and FreeBSD) at https://julialang.org/downloads. As a minor release, v1.5.0 contains no breaking changes, only new features, performance improvements, and marginal, undisruptive changes in behavior. You can also see the NEWS file for the full set of changes. Note that like 1.5, like its predecessor 1.4, does not have long term support. As of this release 1.4 has been effectively superseded by 1.5, which means that there will not likely be any further 1.4.x releases. Julia 1.0 is still currently the only long term support version. We encourage everyone to give it a try. Packages can test with 1.5.0 on CI by specifying 1.5 on Travis, AppVeyor, Cirrus, and GitHub Actions. As always, let us know in the issue tracker if you run into any issues. Read more Also: Julia 1.5 has been released

Meet Super Container OS, a Debian-Based Live Distro with a Built-In Container Engine

I told you I love new projects, right? Well, today I have a brand-new distro that I’d like to introduce you to, called Super Container OS, and targeted at developers who want to run containerized apps. The Super Container OS developer Harshad Joshi pinged me earlier on Twitter earlier to check out his new distro, which he says it’s a live and installable Linux OS that comes pre-loaded with a container engine powered by Docker and systemd-nspawn. Based on the Bufferstack.IO computing platform, Super Container OS wants to be the ideal tool for those who want to create, deploy and distribute apps that can run on IIoT Gateways, servers, or even virtual machines. Now that Container Linux from CoreOS is no more, I guess we need more alternatives. Super Container OS is based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series and aims to make deploying, running and managing containerized applications easier by using OS level virtualization. Read more Also: Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - July 2020

Software: RedNotebook, Stretchly, Vesta Control Panel and GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program)

  • RedNotebook 2.20

    RedNotebook is a modern desktop journal. It lets you format, tag and search your entries. You can also add pictures, links and customizable templates, spell check your notes, and export to plain text, HTML, Latex or PDF. RedNotebook is Free Software under the GPL. [...] RedNotebook 2.20 changelog: Fix drag and drop (#492, @dgcampea). Fix external previews (Eric Chazan). Document how to change the theme on Windows (#487, Ankur A. Sharma). Allow symlinking to ./run script (#509).

  • Stretchly – reminder to take breaks

    Many people who regularly use computers suffer from eye strain and fatigue. Looking at a monitor for a long time can strain your eyes or can make any other problems you are having with your eyes seem more apparent. There are lots of simple steps you can take to reduce eye strain and fatigue. These include adjusting the brightness, contrast settings, and text size displayed, as well as minimizing glare, and ensuring your room has proper lighting. Taking regular breaks is also very important. This is where Stretchly is designed to help. Stretchly is a cross-platform open source app that reminds you to take breaks when working with your computer.

  • Vesta Control Panel – Simple Yet Powerful Control Panel For Linux

    cPanel web hosting is easier to set up and manage. Users who are not familiar with Linux servers can easily maintain servers using cPanel, a GUI control panel for web servers. Buying shared hosting or managed web hosting can provide users a control panel. But both types of hostings have their own advantages and disadvantages. Read this article to know things to remember before buying web hosting. In this Linux cPanel series, I am discussing the best open source alternatives of cPanel. Most of the open-source alternatives of cPanel are free. Today in this article, I am going to talk about Vesta Control Panel, a free and open-source control panel for Linux servers. Vesta CP can be deployed on Red hat/CentOS (version 5,6,7), Debian (version 7, 8, 9), and Ubuntu (version 12.04 – 18.10).

  • The Best Photoshop Alternatives That Are Totally Free

    GIMP (Gnu Image Manipulation Program) is usually the default go-to alternative for anyone looking for Photoshop-level capabilities in a freeware desktop program. It’s not quite as feature-rich as Adobe’s powerhouse, but it comes with an impressive stack of tools nevertheless — and while it can be bewildering for first-timers, it shouldn’t take you too long to learn the ropes.