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Thursday, 22 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: Reproducible Builds, Patches, and 1Password Roy Schestowitz 2 22/10/2020 - 4:00pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 3:42pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 3:35pm
Story Ubuntu 20.10 Released Roy Schestowitz 1 22/10/2020 - 3:16pm
Story Games: Atomix, Get-A-Grip Chip, GDScript in Godot Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 3:07pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 3:03pm
Story Gerrit code review tool taken offline after suspected admin account compromise Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 3:01pm
Story Sailfish OS now lets you share your Mobile Linux device Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 2:55pm
Story System76 Thelio Mega is a quad-GPU Linux desktop powered by Ryzen Threadripper Rianne Schestowitz 4 22/10/2020 - 2:44pm
Story Setup KOrganizer with Operation Tulip Online Calendar Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2020 - 2:28pm

Identify Songs On Your Linux Desktop Using SongRec, A Shazam Client For Linux

Filed under
Software

SongRec is an open source Shazam client for Linux. It's written in Rust, with the GUI using Gtk3.

Using the Shazam audio fingerprinting algorithm, this application can identify a song from an audio file or using the microphone. MP3, FLAC, WAV and OGG formats are supported.

This works by analyzing the captured sound, be it from the microphone or and audio file, and seeking a match based on an acoustic fingerprint in a database of millions of songs. Most of the processing is done server-side (so SongRec connects to the Shazam servers). When finding a match in the Shazam database, SongRec shows the artist, song and album names, as well as the date when the recognition was done. All recognized songs are kept in a history list that you can export to CSV or wipe.

Shazam is a music recognition application own by Apple, available for Android, iOS, watchOS and macOS. It can identify music based on a short sample, provided that the background noise level is not high enough to prevent an acoustic fingerprint being taken, and that the song is present in the software's database.

Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 20.10 released, brings full Linux dekstop to Raspberry Pi

    Open-source software fans will now be able to work across even more devices after Canonical revealed the launch of Ubuntu 20.10.

    The latest version of the world's most popular open-source software features a raft of upgrades and improvements, making it more accessible and easier to use than ever before.

    For the first time, users will be able to enjoy Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi devices, with the new release offering optimised Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server.

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Desktop Now Supports the Raspberry Pi 4

    As of the latest release, Raspberry Pi models with 4GB or 8GB RAM can run the Ubuntu 20.10 desktop. Yup, the Groovy Gorilla dishes up support for full-fledged, full-fat desktop version.

    Groovy is but the first foot forward towards a larger goal: an Ubuntu LTS release on the Raspberry Pi, as Eben Upton, CEO at Raspberry Pi, says:

    “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities.”

  • Ubuntu 20.10 rolls out today, along with official support for the Raspberry Pi 4

    While users who want a properly stable base to game with should probably stick to Ubuntu 20.04 which is the long-term support release, the Ubuntu 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' update is out today.

    For a while there has been a few special Ubuntu flavours that have offered images to install on the Raspberry Pi like Ubuntu MATE, however, that's now becoming official directly within Ubuntu as of the 20.10 release. This is actually awesome, as Ubuntu is one of the easiest Linux distributions to get going with.

    From the press release:

    “In this release, we celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment to put open computing in the hands of people all over the world,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO at Canonical. “We are honoured to support that initiative by optimising Ubuntu on the Raspberry Pi, whether for personal use, educational purposes or as a foundation for their next business venture.”

    “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities” said Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • DISTUTILS_USE_SETUPTOOLS, QA spam and… more QA spam? – Michał Górny

    I suppose that most of the Gentoo developers have seen at least one of the ‘uses a probably incorrect DISTUTILS_USE_SETUPTOOLS value’ bugs by now. Over 350 have been filed so far, and new ones are filed practically daily. The truth is, I’ve never intended for this QA check to result in bugs being filed against packages, and certainly not that many bugs.

    This is not an important problem to be fixed immediately. The vast majority of Python packages depend on setuptools at build time (this is why the build-time dependency is the eclass’ default), and being able to unmerge setuptools is not a likely scenario. The underlying idea was that the QA check would make it easier to update DISTUTILS_USE_SETUPTOOLS when bumping packages.

    Nobody has asked me for my opinion, and now we have hundreds of bugs that are not very helpful. In fact, the effort involved in going through all the bugmail, updating packages and closing the bugs greatly exceeds the negligible gain. Nevertheless, some people actually did it. I have bad news for them: setuptools upstream has changed entry point mechanism, and most of the values will have to change again. Let me elaborate on that.

  • Python and the infinite [LWN.net]

    A recent proposal on the python-ideas mailing list would add a new way to represent floating-point infinity in the language. Cade Brown suggested the change; he cited a few different reasons for it, including fixing an inconsistency in the way the string representation of infinity is handled in the language. The discussion that followed branched in a few directions, including adding a constant for "not a number" (NaN) and a more general discussion of the inconsistent way that Python handles expressions that evaluate to infinity.

    In general, Python handles floating-point numbers, including concepts like infinity, following the standards laid out by IEEE 754. Positive and negative infinity are represented by two specific floating-point values in most architectures. Currently, representing a floating-point infinite value in Python can be done using a couple of different mechanisms. There is the float() function, which can be passed the string "inf" to produce infinity, and there is the inf constant in the math library, which is equivalent to float('inf'). Brown provided several reasons why he believed a new, identical, and built-in constant was necessary. One of his reasons was that he felt that infinity is a "fundamental constant" that should be accessible from Python without having to call a function or require a library import.

  • Further analysis of PyPI typosquatting [LWN.net]

    We have looked at the problem of confusingly named packages in repositories such as the Python Package Index (PyPI) before. In general, malicious actors create these packages with names that can be mistaken for those of legitimate packages in the repository in a form of "typosquatting". Since our 2016 article, the problem has not gone away—no surprise—but there has been some recent analysis of it, as well as some efforts to combat it.

    On the IQT blog, John Speed Meyers and Bentz Tozer recently posted some analysis they had done to quantify PyPI typosquatting attacks and to categorize them. They started by looking at the examples of actual attacks against PyPI users from 2017 to 2020; they found 40 separate instances over that time span. The criteria used were that the package had a name similar to another in PyPI, contained malware, and was identified and removed from the repository.

  • Automating PDF generation using Python reportlab module

    Generating PDF using python reportlab module, Adding table to PDF using Python, Adding Pie Chart to PDF using Python, Generating PDF invoice using Python code, Automating PDF generation using Python reportlab module

  • Level Up Your Skills With the Real Python Slack Community – Real Python

    The Real Python Community Slack is an English-speaking Python community with members located all over the world. It’s a welcoming group in which you’re free to discuss your coding and career questions, celebrate your progress, vote on upcoming tutorial topics, or just hang out with us at the virtual water cooler.

    As a community member, you also get access to our weekly Office Hours, a live online Q&A session with the Real Python team where you’ll meet fellow Pythonistas to chat about your learning progress, ask questions, and discuss Python tips and tricks via screen sharing.

  • Remove Duplicates From a List

    How do we remove duplicates from a list? One way is to go through the original list, pick up unique values, and append them to a new list.

    About the "Writing Faster Python" series

    "Writing Faster Python" is a series of short articles discussing how to solve some common problems with different code structures. I run some benchmarks, discuss the difference between each code snippet, and finish with some personal recommendations.

    Are those recommendations going to make your code much faster? Not really.
    Is knowing those small differences going to make a slightly better Python programmer? Hopefully!

    You can read more about some assumptions I made, the benchmarking setup, and answers to some common questions in the Introduction article.

LibreOffice 6.4.7 Released as the Last in the Series, End of Life Set for November 30

Filed under
LibO

Containing a total of 72 bug fixes across most of its core components, the LibreOffice 6.4.7 update is here about two months after LibreOffice 6.4.6 to add one last layer of improvements and fixes, ensuring the LibreOffice 6.4 series remains as stable and reliable as possible, as well as to improve document compatibility and interoperability with other office suites.

While it’s already working on fixing bugs for the latest LibreOffice 7.0 office suite series, The Document Foundation currently still recommends LibreOffice 6.4 for enterprise users and any other type of organization that wants to save money by not buying expensive licenses for proprietary office suites.

Read more

Kernel (Linux): ABI, NFS, NAPI (new API), Stats and Security Hardening

Filed under
Linux

  • The ABI status of filesystem formats [LWN.net]

    One of the key rules of Linux kernel development is that the ABI between the kernel and user space cannot be broken; any change that breaks previously working programs will, outside of exceptional circumstances, be reverted. The rule seems clear, but there are ambiguities when it comes to determining just what constitutes the kernel ABI; tracepoints are a perennial example of this. A recent discussion has brought another one of those ambiguities to light: the on-disk format of Linux filesystems.
    Users reporting kernel regressions will receive a varying amount of sympathy, depending on where the regression is. For normal user-space programs using the system-call API, that sympathy is nearly absolute, and changes that break things will need to be redone. This view of the ABI also extends to the virtual filesystems, such as /proc and sysfs, exported by the kernel. Changes that break things are deemed a little more tolerable when they apply to low-level administrative tools; if there is only one program that is known to use an interface, and that program has been updated, the change may be allowed. On the other hand, nobody will be concerned about changes that break out-of-tree kernel modules; the interface they used is considered to be internal to the kernel and not subject to any stability guarantee.

    But those are not the only places where user space interfaces with the kernel. Consider, for example, this regression report from Josh Triplett. It seems that an ext4 filesystem bug fix merged for 5.9-rc2 breaks the mounting of some ext4 filesystems that he works with.

  • NFS Client With Linux 5.10 Adds "READ_PLUS" For Faster Performance - Phoronix

    The NFS client code with Linux 5.10 has another performance optimization.

    The NFS client code now supports the READ_PLUS operation supported by NFS v4.2 and later. READ_PLUS is a variant of READ that supports efficiently transferring holes. In cases where READ_PLUS is supported by both the NFS client and server, this operation should always be used rather than READ.

  • NAPI polling in kernel threads

    Systems that manage large amounts of network traffic end up dedicating a significant part of their available CPU time to the network stack itself. Much of this work is done in software-interrupt context, which can be problematic in a number of ways. That may be about to change, though, once this patch series posted by Wei Wang is merged into the mainline.
    Once a packet arrives on a network interface, the kernel must usually perform a fair amount of protocol-processing work before the data in that packet can be delivered to the user-space application that is waiting for it. Once upon a time, the network interface would interrupt the CPU when a packet arrived; the kernel would acknowledge the interrupt, then trigger a software interrupt to perform this processing work. The problem with this approach is that, on busy systems, thousands of packets can arrive every second; handling the corresponding thousands of hardware interrupts can run the system into the ground.

    The solution to this problem was merged in 2003 in the form of a mechanism that was called, at the time, "new API" or "NAPI". Drivers that support NAPI can disable the packet-reception interrupt most of the time and rely on the network stack to poll for new packets at a frequent interval. Polling may seem inefficient, but on busy systems there will always be new packets by the time the kernel polls for them; the driver can then process all of the waiting packets at once. In this way, one poll can replace dozens of hardware interrupts.

  • Some 5.9 kernel development statistics [LWN.net]

    The 5.9 kernel was released on October 11, at the end of a ten-week development cycle — the first release to take more than nine weeks since 5.4 at the end of 2019. While this cycle was not as busy as 5.8, which broke some records, it was still one of the busier ones we have seen in some time, featuring 14,858 non-merge changesets contributed by 1,914 developers. Read on for our traditional look at what those developers were up to while creating the 5.9 release.

    Of the 1,914 developers contributing to 5.9, 306 made their first contribution for this release. This is the largest number of new contributors we have seen since 4.12 (which had 334 first-time contributors) was released in 2017 and, indeed, the second-highest number ever seen. All together, the 5.9 contributors added just over 730,000 lines of code and removed nearly 262,000 for a net growth of 468,000 lines of code.

  • Linux 5.10 Hardens Against Possible DMA Attacks By External PCIe Devices - Phoronix

    The PCI changes were submitted on Wednesday for the Linux 5.10 kernel. 

    The PCI subsystem updates for Linux 5.10 aren't too exciting this round but there are a few items worth noting. One change is the enabling of ACS translation blocking for external PCIe devices in protecting against possible DMA attacks. 

    Translation Blocking is enabled for untrusted/external PCIe devices to harden against direct memory access attacks. ACS (Access Control Services) Translation Blocking will block any request with the AT bit set as an effort to protect against improper routing of PCIe packets. 

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.4.7

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation announces the availability of LibreOffice 6.4.7, the 7th and last minor release of the LibreOffice 6.4 family, targeted at users relying on the application for desktop productivity. LibreOffice 6.4.7 includes bug fixes and improvements to document compatibility and interoperability with software from other vendors.

Read more

Standards/Consortia: Abolishing OOXML, Web Standards, and the European Commission's Interoperability Drive

Filed under
LibO
Web
OOo
  • Professors, please let us submit PDFs

    We are under two weeks away from a presidential election and already eight months into a deadly pandemic, but we still have time for the little things. No, I don’t mean smelling flowers and sipping pumpkin spice lattes, though you are welcome to do so—I mean the types of file formats that professors request students use to submit papers.

    In my experience, most professors ask for files with a DOCX extension, a format which was developed by Microsoft in 2007 to help standardize its file extensions across its various applications. Officially known as Office Open XML, the DOCX format broke backwards compatibility with the old .doc format. This meant that all previous versions of Microsoft Word prior to the new standard would be unable to open files with this particular extension. Consternation followed that development in 2007 (or 2008 for Mac users), but in the year 2020 we have mostly solved that issue, as most computers these days do not run any pre-2006 versions of Microsoft Office.

    The modern problems with DOCX are really not problems with DOCX itself, but rather with its place in the pantheon of file extensions that are now available. Most students in our current age produce their work in a Google Doc (in point of fact, this very article was produced in a Google Doc). It’s a simple workflow that has all the functionality of a full-blown application without having to leave a web browser or fight with a sign-in form (beyond the one that we’re always signed into as a part of daily campus life). I don’t support submitting an essay or exam as a raw Google Doc, however, and my reasons for not doing so are partially shared with my aversion to submitting in DOCX: all the writing tools are immediately available upon opening the document.

    [...]

    The obvious solution is for professors to request papers in Portable Document Format, PDF. Originally developed in 1993, the PDF file format has not outlived its usefulness. Anything, from Windows 10 to Windows 95, MacOS to OS X or Unix to Ubuntu, anything can open a PDF. And since anything can open it, when students finish writing and export to PDF, we can see exactly what it is we’re submitting with our names attached. And it’s not like professors should hate it; it’s the default format for any downloaded academic document, and providing comments is much closer to how comments are written on physical paper.

    Students shouldn’t be the only ones submitting files in PDF format either. For every file in DOCX a professor puts on Moodle, there are probably three copies on every student’s hard drive. Every weekday we face the choice of digging through our downloaded files for the syllabus we downloaded a week ago or downloading yet another copy of that same syllabus. Uploading PDF files instead of DOCX to Moodle lets students open it in a web browser, a faster and less cluttered operation that lets our focus stay on class instead of going through old files.

  • Static versus dynamic web sites

    In this post, I want to explore two fundamental principles or criteria that underpinned my original article, but were more or less unpronounced: sustainability and power. I also want to update you on my current site configuration.

  • [Old] Writing HTML in HTML

    I've just finished the final rewrite of my website. I'm not lying: this is the last time I'm ever going to do it. This website has gone through countless rewrites – from WordPress to Jekyll to multiple static site generators of my own – but this is the final one. I know so, because I've found the ultimate method for writing webpages: pure HTML.

    It sounds obvious, but when you think about how many static site generators are being released every day – the list is practically endless – it's far from obvious. Drew DeVault recently challanged people to create their own blog, and he didn't even mention the fact that one could write it in pure HTML:

    If you want a hosted platform, I recommend write.as. If you're technical, you could build your own blog with Jekyll or Hugo. GitHub offers free hosting for Jekyll-based blogs.

    Now, there's nothing wrong with Jekyll or Hugo; it's just interesting that HTML doesn't even get a mention. And of course, I'm not criticizing Drew; I think the work he's doing is great. But, just like me and you, he is a child of his time.

    That's why I'm writing this blog post – to turn the tide just a little bit.

  • Shaping the future interoperability policy

    The European Commission is currently evaluating the ISA² programme and the European Interoperability Framework to present a reinforced public sector interoperability policy in 2021.

    The related roadmaps (EIF and ISA²) are now published for feedback on the Commission’s Have your say portal. You can provide feedback on the EIF and future interoperability policy roadmap till 12 November 2020. Feedback on the roadmap for the evaluation of the ISA² programme is open till 13 November 2020.

FreeBSD Can Now Be Built From Linux/macOS Hosts, Transition To Git Continues

Filed under
BSD

The FreeBSD project has published their Q3-2020 report on the state of this leading BSD operating system.

Among the highlights they made during the third quarter include:

- The FreeBSD Foundation issued additional grants around WiFi and Linux KPI layer improvements, Linux application compatibility improvements with the Linuxulator, DRM/graphics driver updates, Zstd compression for OpenZFS, online RAID-Z expansion, and modernizing the LLDB target support for FreeBSD.

- FreeBSD Foundation staff members have been working to improve the build infrastructure, ARM64 support, migrating their development tree to Git, rewriting the UNIX domain socket locking, and run-time dynamic linker and kernel ELF loader improvements.

Read more

Original/source:

  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Third Quarter 2020
    FreeBSD Project Quarterly Status Report - Third Quarter 2020
    Introduction
    
       This report covers FreeBSD related projects for the period between July
       and September, and is the third of four planned reports for 2020.
    
       This quarter brings a good mix of additions and changes to the FreeBSD
       Project and community, from a diverse number of teams and people
       covering everything from architectures, continuous integration,
       wireless networking and drivers, over drm, desktop and third-party
       project work, as well as several team reports, along with many other
       interesting subjects too numerous to mention.
    
       As the world is still affected by the epidemic, we hope that this
       report can also serve as a good reminder that there is good work that
       can be done by people working together, even if we're apart.
    
       We hope you'll be as interested in reading it, as we've been in making
       it. Daniel Ebdrup Jensen, on behalf of the quarterly team.
    

[Old] History of FreeBSD: Part 1: UNIX and BSD

Programming Languages, Games and Going GPL

Filed under
Development
Gaming
  • Developer survey: C# losing ground to JavaScript, PHP and Java for cloud apps, still big in gaming [Ed: When Microsoft Tim writes about development trends he expectedly focuses on largely rejected Microsoft stuff, not what actually matters.]

    A new developer survey has shown the popularity of C#, the primary language of Microsoft's .NET platform, slipping from third to sixth place in three years, though usage is still growing in absolute terms and it is particularly popular in game development.

    Research company Slashdata surveyed over 17,000 developers globally for its 19th “State of the Developer Nation” report. The researchers make a point of attempting to measure the absolute number of programming language users, rather than simply looking at relative popularity, as done by indexes from the likes of StackOverflow or Redmonk.

  • Minecraft Java will move to Microsoft accounts in 2021, gets new social screen [Ed: Can Microsoft use Minecraft Java to attack Java itself?]
  • Classic 3D RTS 'Machines: Wired for War' goes open source under the GPL

    Machines: Wired for War is a true classic 3D RTS from the late 90s, and it appears to now be open source under the GPL and up on GitHub. This was in the list of actually being one of the first proper 3D games of the genre, although not as well known as many other RTS games.

    Back in 2019, one dedicated fan posted on their website about how they managed to grab a copy of the source, update it a bit and port it to modern platforms (Linux included). The actual rights to the game appear to sit with Nightdive Studios now, and they appear to have given the greenlight on open sourcing the code from that same fan which they've now listed on their own official GitHub.

  • Stellaris gets spooky with the Necroids Species Pack on October 29 | GamingOnLinux

    The latest expansion pack for Stellaris arrives on October 29 and it's going to get a little spooky with the Necroids Species Pack. Diving into the darker side of the galaxy, the expansion comes with as you prepare to meet the Necroids, an intelligent species who believe that death is not the end, but rather the beginning of their journey.

    Necroids are known to spend their days excitedly studying in preparation for their eventual "transformation" in the Elevation Chamber. They're not exactly the nicest bunch, and they certainly look the part too.

Security: Reproducible Builds, Patches, and 1Password

Filed under
Security
  • Reproducible Builds: Supporter spotlight: Civil Infrastructure Platform 01:00

    The Reproducible Builds project depends on our many projects, supporters and sponsors. We rely on their financial support, but they are also valued ambassadors who spread the word about the Reproducible Builds project and the work that we do.

    This is the first installment in a series featuring the projects, companies and individuals who support the Reproducible Builds project. If you are a supporter of the Reproducible Builds project (of whatever size) and would like to be featured here, please let get in touch with us at contact@reproducible-builds.org.

    However, we are kicking off this series by featuring Urs Gleim and Yoshi Kobayashi of the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project.

    [...]

    A: Reproducibility helps a great deal in software maintenance. We have a number of use-cases that should have long-term support of more than 10 years. During this period, we encounter issues that need to be fixed in the original source code. But before we make changes to the source code, we need to check whether it is actually the original source code or not. If we can reproduce exactly the same binary from the source code even after 10 years, we can start to invest time and energy into making these fixes.

  • Security updates for Wednesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (kdeconnect, kernel, kpmcore, lib32-freetype2, linux-hardened, linux-lts, linux-zen, lua, and powerdns-recursor), Debian (mariadb-10.1 and mariadb-10.3), Fedora (thunderbird), Mageia (claw-mail, freetype2, geary, kernel, and tigervnc), Oracle (nodejs:12), Red Hat (python27, rh-postgresql96-postgresql, and rh-python38), Slackware (freetype), SUSE (hunspell, kernel, libvirt, and taglib), and Ubuntu (grunt, quassel, and tomcat9).

  • 1Password for Linux Beta now available on Ubuntu, Mint, Manjaro, Fedora, and more [Ed: Who would trust proprietary software for password handling when our governments (nowadays) openly demand back doors in everything?]

    Back in August, we told you about some very exciting news -- 1Password had come to Linux... as a development preview. Yeah, it was a pre-beta release, but still, it was a huge win for the Linux community overall.

    1Password is an extremely popular password management service, available for Mac, Windows, Android, and iOS/iPadOS. Bringing it to Linux makes the software truly cross-platform. Not to mention, it says a lot about the growing popularity of Linux that Agilebits found it beneficial to assign precious resources to its development.

  • 1Password’s Linux App is Now in Beta

    The official 1Password Linux app is available for wider testing ahead of a planned stable release next year.

    Preview builds of the 1Password Linux app were soft-launched earlier this year, albeit with a few caveats in place. The feedback gathered as part of that early effort clearly bore fruit as the team is back with freshly ripened beta candidate for fans of the service to try.

    1Password is a popular, cross-platform password manager. Official apps are available for Android and iOS, all major web browser, and Windows and macOS. The service isn’t free (though plans start at a low $2.99/m) but it packs in some pretty decent credential management features.

    The 1Password Linux app backend is written in Rust and leverages the ring crypto library for its end-to-end encryption.

    Integration with the Ubuntu desktop is also on offer. The app can detect when you’re using a dark GTK theme; uses descriptive window titles (handy if you tile windows); has support for biometric unlocking; and shows a good ol’ system tray icon for easy access.

  • How to Install 1Password Beta On Linux?

    The beta version of 1Password is now available on Linux. for starters, it is a beautiful, user-friendly, and cross-platform password manager app which is already available on various other platforms like Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS.

    The app is now available for Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, CentOS, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Apart from that, an App Image is also available. Here’s how you can install 1Password on Linux —

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Switching Xorg keyboard layout on OpenBSD

    Here’s a few minimalistic options to switch keyboard layout on OpenBSD.

  • Update all Docker Images
  • The Baseline

    Writing your technical documentation so it is easy to understand is good. This does not mean you have to remove information or “dumb down” your text. Often it just means moving things around, changing the focus of a few sentences, or expanding a couple of paragraphs. The content remains the same. What changes is the way you present it.

    But if you still need convincing on why you should bother going that extra mile, let’s run through some of the reasons.

    The truth is you never really know who your audience is going to be or how much they know. Internal documentation, aimed initially at a very specific group of people, is often pushed out elsewhere because “it is good enough”, or “we don’t have time (or money) to change it”, or someone found it on the Internet and simply started using it and linking to it.

    Hence, your documentation will most certainly be used in more ways than you originally anticipated. Your technical manual can get recycled into a user manual, for example. Or Darryl, from sales, may need to convince clients of the benefits of the product, and all he has to build his case on is your technical manual.

    [...]

    You could’ve written that paragraph more formally and it would’ve still been easier to understand than the original. Note also how the re-written version contains essentially the same information as the original. The original is just obtuse.

    Dig out a baseline to kick off your text, yes, but also every time you are about to begin a new section, any time you introduce a new topic, or simply have a tricky paragraph you are not sure how to approach.

    The baseline will help you focus your text, making the usefulness of what you are describing clearer to the reader throughout. The aim is that your reader, regardless of their level of technical knowledge, can always come away with a broad idea of what you are talking about.

    If you start by listing features or the libraries used, stating what the thing is instead of what it is used for, or forgetting about your audience entirely (and all these things happen waaaaaaaaaaaaaay more often than you think), the chances of you never getting through but to a small number of readers is virtually guaranteed.

  • 12 Tips to improve GNU/Linux server security | LibreByte

    Any server or device with a public IP address becomes a target for attackers. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to harden the security in order to neutralize any malicious activity, here are 12 tips that will help you improve the security of your server.

  • Create Windows 10 Install Media (USB flash drive) on Linux
  • How to install Teamviewer on Ubuntu 20.04 via command line - Linux Shout

    Here are the commands to install TeamViewer on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux using the official repository of this free remote desktop software

  • How To Install Apache Subversion on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Apache Subversion on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required package by Apache

  • Install Bacula Backup Server on Ubuntu 20.04

    Bacula is an open-source backup tool that can be used to backup and restore data across the network. It is simple and easy to use tool, and offers many advanced storage management features that help you to backup and recover your lost files easily. It supports Linux, Windows and macOS backup client and also supports a wide range of backup devices. Bacula is made from several components including, Bacula directory, Bacula, console, Bacula storage, Bacula file and Bacula catalog. Each components are responsible for managing specific jobs.

  • How to Run Android on Linux Using Virtual Machine | Beebom

    Learn how to run Android on Linux using Virtual Machine. You can install Android apps and games on Linux and the performance will be better than emulators.

  • How to Use AppImage on Linux (Beginner Guide) – TecAdmin

    The Linux system uses a package manager tool with central repositories like Apt, Yum etc. Which is the traditional way for the applications installation on any Linux system.

    Some of the application comes with extension .appimage. It may be, you are not much aware about these files.

    In this tutorial you will learn about the AppImage file. Also you will found details to how to install and use AppImage files on a Linux machine.

  • How to Change Color Schemes in Vim

    Vim is a text editor that can be used to edit all kinds of plain text, especially useful for writing and editing programs. It is also one of the customizable text editors heavily used in Linux operating system.

    The suitable color in the editor helps you to categorize, analyze and identify bug in the code. You can change color schemes that come with the software package or install vim themes.

    We are going to use and set Vim color schemes in centos 7 or 8. Though the tutorial is prepared on centos 8, the procedure is same for all the Linux distribution.

  • How to check TLS/SSL certificate expiration date from command-line - nixCraft

    Explains how to check the TLS/SSL certificate expiration date from Linux or Unix CLI and send an email alert using a simple script.

  • How to develop Gstreamer-based video conferencing apps for RDK & Linux set-top boxes

    CNXSoft: This is a guest post by Promwad that explains the basic steps to develop a video conferencing app with Gstreamer on TV boxes running Linux.

  • GStreamer 1.16.3 old-stable bug fix release

    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the third and likely last bug fix release in the stable 1.16 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

    This release contains important security fixes. We suggest you upgrade at your earliest convenience, either to 1.16.3 or 1.18.

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, The Linux Link Tech Show, Talk Python and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Leaping Lizard People | Coder Radio 384

    It's confession hour on the podcast, and your hosts surprise each other with several twists and turns.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 876

    repairing 3ds, power issues, ubuntu 20.10, games

  • Episode #287 Testing without dependencies, mocking in Python - [Talk Python To Me Podcast]

    We know our unit tests should be relatively independent from other parts of the system. For example, running a test shouldn't generally call a credit card possessing API and talk to a database when your goal is just to test the argument validation.

    And yet, your method does all three of those and more. What do you do? Some languages use elaborate dependency passing frameworks that go under the banner of inversion of control (IoC) and dependency injections (DI). In Python, the most common fix is to temporarily redefine what those two functions do using patching and mocking.

    On this episode, we welcome back Anna-Lena Pokes to talk us through the whole spectrum of test doubles, dummies, mocks, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 601: Open Source Creative - Blender, Gimp, Audacity

    Looking at open source software from a creative lens and discussing the importance and ease of using open-source software to make art, graphics, video, and more. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Jason van Gumster a creator, engineer, and host of the podcast, Open Source Creative. They talk about the positive side of customizing your workplace with open source software such as Blender, Gimp, Hydrogen, and Audacity. They also discuss the simplicity of open source creative software support and the great community surrounding open source creative software.

Ubuntu 20.10 Arrives Today! Here are 11 New Features in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.10 releases today. An Ubuntu fan may get excited about the new features it brings.

Ubuntu 20.10 codenamed Groovy Gorilla is a non-LTS release with nine months of life cycle. You cannot expect drastic changes between subsequent releases.

It doesn’t mean you won’t find new things in Ubuntu 20.10. There are some performance improvements, new Linux kernel and visual changes thanks to the latest release of GNOME 3.38 (and other desktop environments in various other Ubuntu flavors).

Let’s see what new features Ubuntu 20.10 brings.

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How to influence people to join open source

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OSS

If you are reading Opensource.com, you might be able to code, and you are probably reading this on an open source browser on some elusive Linux distro. You probably have not seen a browser ad in years because you are running an open source ad blocker. You feel warm and fuzzy when you think about penguins.

Simply, you know the power of the force of open source and have made it part of your life. Sadly, not everyone has found the open source way yet. Their computers are painfully slow; they see more ads than content when they surf the web; they spend their money on patented and copyrighted junk. Some of these people may even be related to you—take your nieces and nephews, for example.

Read more

Unleashing the Best Open Source Social Networking Software

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OSS

Social networking is only going in one direction – up. The huge social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn have become a necessity for businesses. They increasingly recognise the importance of incorporating social networking features with their content strategy. The benefits are broad and wide. Social networking helps to increase brand awareness, improve social signals, offers word-of-mouth advertising, and boosts audience reach and influence.

Social networking’s appeal is even more notable among consumers. Social media helps individuals follow breaking news, keep up with family, friends, or colleagues, as well as contributing to online debates, and learning from others. Social networking sites have been rapidly adopted by children and, especially, teenagers and young people worldwide. 98% of 18-24 year old use social media in the UK.

Read more

Kernel: CPU Undervolting, Nvidia Problems and Embedded Linux Conference Europe

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Developers Discussing Possible Kernel Driver For Intel CPU Undervolting

    While the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) on Windows allows for undervolting laptop processors, currently on Linux there isn't any Intel-endorsed way for undervolting your CPU should you be interested in better thermal/power efficiency and other factors. But a hypothetical Linux kernel driver could be coming for filling such void.

    There does exist the intel-undervolt program that is unofficial and developed by an independent developer for undervolting Intel CPUs from Haswell and newer on Linux. Besides dropping the CPU voltage, it also allows manipulating the throttling power/thermal limits for Intel processors. That intel-undervolt functionality relies on reverse-engineering and discoveries made by the community for the support. That program in turn is touching the CPU MSRs directly for manipulating the behavior.

  • The Closed-Source NVIDIA Linux Driver Is Incompatible With Linux 5.9 And Support Won't Come Until Mid-November

    The latest Nvidia graphics driver for Linux, v455.28, won't work with the latest Linux kernel. This may be due to an intentional change on the Linux kernel side that blocks third party shims from using GPL-only symbols. Regardless of the root cause, anyone using Nvidia on Linux should stick with Linux 5.8 for now. Nvidia has promised that an updated driver compatible with Linux 5.9 will arrive mid-November.

    [...]

    Using the closed-source proprietary software driver from Nvidia used to be a total nightmare on Linux. It would only work with Xorg version X and kernel version Y and if you were screwed if you upgraded either of those. That's been less of a problem in recent years. now we're once again back to Nvidia's driver dictating what kernel versions those who own their hardware can and can't use.

  • Live Embedded Event: a new online conference - Bootlin's blog

    In these times of COVID19, pretty much all of the existing conferences have moved to an online format. For example, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe is going to take place next week, online, and Bootlin will significantly contribute to the event with no less than 7 talks on a wide range of topics.

    But this trend for online conferences has also spurred the creation of new events. And specifically, we’re happy to announce the creation of a new conference oriented towards our favorite topic of embedded systems: Live Embedded Event. It will take place online on December 3 and will have a broader range of topics covered than ELC typically has, as Live Embedded Event is open to non-Linux embedded topics, hardware platform and interfaces discussions, and more.

Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix brings together Linux Mint’s Cinnamon desktop with the Ubuntu Core. While some users are welcoming the new flavor of Ubuntu with open arms, others are scratching their heads, wondering where it fits in.

The main confusion arises when you consider that Cinnamon is the official desktop for Linux Mint, based on Ubuntu. This begs the questions – what is the need for Ubuntu Cinnamon? Why not use Linux Mint, to begin with?

Even though Mint is based on Ubuntu, there are still many significant differences between the two distros. You can go through our in-depth read on Linux Mint vs. Ubuntu to learn about this.

Since Ubuntu Cinnamon uses Ubuntu as its core, it works and feels more like Ubuntu rather than Mint, except for the obvious fact that the GNOME shell is replaced with the Cinnamon desktop.

Furthermore, the developers behind Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix has done an excellent job in translating the Ubuntu aesthetics over to the Cinnamon desktop. You get to see identical icons, the iconic orange color scheme, and the same wallpapers, which helps to retain the same charm.Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix Review

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PineCube camera kit arrives for $30

Pine64’s $30 PineCube camera dev kit runs Linux on an Allwinner S3 and offers a 5MP, OmniVision OV5640 based M12 camera with IR night-vision plus audio I/O, WiFi, 10/100 LAN with PoE, USB, 26-pin GPIO, and optional battery and display. The open-spec PineCube was first revealed by Pine64 in early 2019 as a device called The CUBE with an 8-megapixel Sony iMX179 CMOS sensor. By early this year, it was recast as the CUBE IP Camera, which was promised for a delayed 2Q release due to issues with the Sony camera implementation. Since then, Pine64 switched to a 5MP OmniVision OV5640 sensor and a new PineCube name. The camera dev kit has now shipped for $30. Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Official Flavors Released, Here’s What’s New

As part of the today’s Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) release, all the official Ubuntu flavors have been updated and I want you to be the first to read about their new features and improvements. The official flavors released as part of Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) include Kubuntu 20.10, Xubuntu 20.10, Lubuntu 20.10, Ubuntu Studio 20.10, Ubuntu MATE 20.10, Ubuntu Budgie 20.10, and Ubuntu Kylin 20.10. As expected, they come with all the core features of Ubuntu 20.10, as well as… Kubuntu 20.04 LTS ships with the KDE Plasma 5.19.5 desktop environment, KDE Frameworks 5.74 and KDE Applications 20.08 software suites, as well as Qt 5.14.2. Among the included apps, there’s Elisa 20.08.1 as default music player instead of Cantata, LibreOffice 7.0 office suite, Mozilla Firefox 81 web browser, Latte Dock 0.9.10, KDE Connect 20.08.1, Krita 4.3.0, and KDevelop 5.5.2. Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is Now Available for Download, this is What's New

The latest Ubuntu 20.10 code-named "Groovy Gorilla" is available for download after a bit of delay due to last-minute bugs. The final announcement is due shortly today October 22 2020 from Canonical. Check out what's new. Read more