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Red Hat

Oracle/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Open Source Defies Conflicts of Interest: Red Hat Tells All

    Only two parts of the guidelines state any sort of limit on company associates, she clarified. The first is that projects use an Open Source Initiative-approved license. The second is that if an associate is asked to sign a third-party contributor agreement, they should check with Red Hat’s legal team.

  • Red Hat’s Paul Cormier On How Partners Win The Hybrid Cloud
  • ANZ moves internet banking to Red Hat OpenShift

    The Australia and New Zealand Banking Corporation (ANZ) in October last year turned to Red Hat for help to bring its internet banking proof of concept to life.

    The bank wanted to modernise its internet banking platform that had passed its end of life and required extended support for some years. Deciding on a Red Hat OpenShift platform, tech area lead for ANZ's digital arm Raghavendra Bhat said the bank wanted to not constrain itself to a cloud-only solution.

    ANZ has now migrated 30% of its traffic to the platform and within the first hour of go-live, it processed around AU$2.9 billion worth of payments.

    Speaking with media on Wednesday, Bhat said the bank's expectation is to complete about 80% of the traffic transition onto the new platform by November, with complete transition by March. He said there has been no "cookie-cutter approach" for how it has lifted and shifted the old system onto the new one.

  • Juggling Ansible, OpenShift and K8s? This is for you: Red Hat couples automation to cluster management

    Red Hat is integrating its Ansible automation platform and Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes.

    “We've known people use Ansible and OpenShift and Kubernetes together for years,” Red Hat senior manager Richard Henshall told The Register. “But here we get a bona fide integration between the two.” Typical uses would be to automate deploying system updates, configuring load balancers, or scaling server resources.

    The integration is in technical preview. “We’ve got the initial plumbing working, so it’s exposed through Advanced Cluster Management (ACM),” said Henshall, referring to the company’s tool for controlling OpenShift clusters and applications.

  • About me and my life ...: Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 016.

    Today I tested the Unity 3D version 2020 on Linux Fedora 32.Maybe it would be better to integrate Unity 3D or Unity Hub in Fedora repo just like other useful software like Blender 3D, GIMP.It will improve the user experience and attract new users and developers for this distro.I download the AppImage from Unity website and I run with these commands...

  • Why it's important to keep the cloud open | Opensource.com

    There's a famous sticker featured on many laptop lids; it goes something like this: "the 'cloud' is just somebody else's computer."

    There's a lot of truth to that sentiment, but it's not exactly technically accurate. In fact, cloud computing isn't just somebody else's computer; it's somebody else's hundreds and thousands of computers.

    Years ago, "the cloud" did indeed just refer to the simplified graphic in a flowchart, so the illustrator didn't have to try to accurately depict the multiple networks that comprise the World Wide Web. Now, however, the cloud isn't just describing traffic or small-time remote file storage offers. The cloud of today is a platform of interconnected computational nodes working together to keep containerized Linux images, each running a distinct service (or "microservice" in developer lingo), functioning as applications distributed over the whole world.

  • Red Hat talks and workshops at NodeConf Remote 2020 - Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat is heading to NodeConf Remote 2020 with IBM to demonstrate a few of our favorite production-quality tools and solutions, all designed to help developers maintain their productivity while successfully navigating the vast and rapidly-changing cloud-native landscape.

    Attend our conference talks and workshops, or talk with an expert during the virtual booth crawl and get a look at our latest workflows for building cloud-native JavaScript solutions on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. Our open source experts can show you how to integrate JavaScript and Node.js with other technologies like authentication, distributed data caching and streaming, or business automation.

Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

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Red Hat

Fedora 33 will manage to ship on-time per its back-up target date of next week Tuesday.

While Fedora 33 wasn't ready to ship this Tuesday per its "preferred" target date, Fedora 33 has been cleared by to ship next week on its "Final Target date #1" for this major update to the Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat: LinuxONE, OpenShift, Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) and More

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Linux
Red Hat
  • IBM integrates Linux One with R3 Corda Enterprise

    It’s an exciting time for IBM LinuxONE. Over the past several months, we’ve been doubling down on new hardware, Red Hat OpenShift and new Cloud Paks for LinuxONE, and new confidential computing capabilities.

    More than ever, our clients of all sizes looking to win in the era of hybrid cloud are focused on key areas: resiliency, performance demands, security, flexibility and modernization.

    Other areas of growth for LinuxONE are emerging workloads and industries like blockchain and digital asset custody. While the importance of safeguarding business and customer data is well known, the nature of blockchain use cases often include the initiation, transfer and custody of financial assets for your business and your customers—which further increases the importance of building applications with security and privacy first.
    News from R3’s CordaCon

  • Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift's persistent volume framework - Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides a number of different models you can use to deploy an application. OpenShift 4.x uses Operators to deploy Kubernetes-native applications. It also supports Helm and traditional template-based deployments. Whatever deployment method you choose, it will be deployed as a wrapper to one or more existing OpenShift resources. Examples include BuildConfig, DeploymentConfig, and ImageStream.

    In this article, I introduce you to OpenShift’s Kubernetes-based persistent volume framework for persistent cluster storage. You will learn how to use OpenShift’s PersistentVolume (PV) and PersistentVolumeClaim (PVC) objects to provision and request storage resources.

  • How to use the Linux kernel's Integrity Measurement Architecture

    The kernel integrity sub-system can be used to detect if a file has been altered (accidently or maliciously), both remotely and/or locally. It does that by appraising a file's measurement (its hash value) against a "good" value stored previously as an extended attribute (on file systems which support extended attributes like ext3, ext4. etc.). Similar, but complementary, mechanisms are provided by other security technologies like SELinux which depending on policy can attempt to protect file integrity.

    The Linux IMA (Integrity Measurement Architecture) subsystem introduces hooks within the Linux kernel to support creating and collecting hashes of files when opened, before their contents are accessed for read or execute. The IMA measurement subsystem was added in linux-2.6.30 and is supported by Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

    The kernel integrity subsystem consists of two major components. The Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) is responsible for collecting file hashes, placing them in kernel memory (where userland applications cannot access/modify it) and allows local and remote parties to verify the measured values. The Extended Verification Module (EVM) detects offline tampering (this could help mitigate evil-maid attacks) of the security extended attributes.

    IMA maintains a runtime measurement list and, if anchored in a hardware Trusted Platform Module(TPM), an aggregate integrity value over this list. The benefit of anchoring the aggregate integrity value in the TPM is that the measurement list is difficult to compromise by a software attack, without it being detectable. Hence, on a trusted boot system, IMA-measurement can be used to attest to the system's runtime integrity.

  • Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company, and _VOIS Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India. Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance Company, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company Limited and _VOIS were honored at the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Thoughts of Dev: One piece of advice to a new developer – IBM Developer

    We all have to start someplace in our careers and as a developer, you have a LOT of options and decisions to make. From your first job and industry, programming language to learn, training, soft skills and more. The choices are endless and each right decision (and sometimes wrong decision) helps bring you to where you are today in your career. Looking back, if you could give an important piece of advice to a junior developer, what would you tell them?

  • How Red Hat celebrated Hispanic Heritage month

    We’ve always maintained that a diverse and inclusive organization thrives when people from different backgrounds feel comfortable being their full self when they’re at work. This includes sharing and celebrating holidays and traditions with colleagues that are important to their culture or heritage. At Red Hat, Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) communities are a rich source for associates to have new experiences and learn from others with different backgrounds. Our D&I communities are global, associate-led groups focused on fostering diversity and inclusion, knowledge sharing, learning and development, and relationship building.

    Unidos, our Latinx and Hispanic D&I community, recently led its first formal recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month. The team organized virtual events for associates including a live cooking session of traditional hispanic cuisine (arepas con carne or a patacon/jibaritos sandwich anyone?) and a panel discussion featuring Red Hatters from Unidos discussing different aspects of Latinx and Hispanic culture including language, traditional family dynamics and the experience of being an immigrant.

  • Multi-stack deployments for the edge with Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16.1

    In past releases, Red Hat OpenStack Platform director has used a single Heat stack for the overcloud deployment. With the Train release, it’s now possible to use multiple stacks for a single cloud deployment. Multiple stacks is advantageous to edge deployments as it allows for each distributed edge site to be managed and scaled independently, minimizing operational complexity. First, let’s review the concept of a "stack" in director, as the term can often have overloaded meanings in software engineering.

  • Build custom Ansible modules using Python's Pexpect

    When developing automation you may be faced with challenges that are simply too complicated or tedious to accomplish with Ansible alone. There may even be cases where you are told that "it can’t be automated." However, when you combine the abilities of Ansible and custom Python using the Pexpect module, then you are able to automate practically anything you can do on the command line. In this post we will discuss the basics of creating a custom Ansible module in Python.

    [...]

    If these tools also provided a non-interactive mode or config/script input we would not need to do this. To overcome this situation we need to use Python with Pexpect. The native Ansible expect module provides a simple interface to this functionality and should be evaluated before writing a custom module. However, when you need more complex interactions, want specific data returned or want to provide a re-usable and simpler interface to an underlying program for others to consume, then custom development is warranted.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Deconstructing an Ansible playbook | Enable Sysadmin

    A straightforward explanation of the sections of an Ansible playbook, including packages, modules, and variables.

  • Kubernetes basics for sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    Learn when Kubernetes can be effectively used and how the containers it manages might be better than virtual machines.

  • Start your Red Hat training and certification journey with a skills path that's right for you

    When we talk to our customers they are often engaged in digital transformation projects where they have trouble finding employees with the right skills to drive the projects to success. If you want to prove you have the knowledge needed to lead these projects, a skills path can guide you through the right training and certification programs to develop and demonstrate those abilities.

    The Red Hat Training and Certification team has restructured its curriculum around 23 new skills paths to prepare you and your team to complete digital transformation projects successfully. Each new skills path provides a curated guide for learning industry leading, open hybrid cloud technologies, whether you’re in the beginning of your journey to becoming a Red Hat Certified Professional or you’re already an expert in your discipline. We offer skills paths that help prepare for the future of open hybrid cloud for administrators, developers, engineers, or architects.

  • How IBM's Massive POWER9 UNIX Servers Benefit from InfluxDB and Grafana Technology

    IBM has been innovating to create new products for its clients and the world for over a century. Customers look to IBM Power Systems to address their hybrid multicloud infrastructure needs. Larger POWER9 servers can have up to 192 CPU cores, 64 TB of memory, dozens of PB of SAN storage and typically run a mixture of AIX (UNIX) and Enterprise Linux (RHEL or SLES) workloads. As part of its sales process, IBM is always benchmarking its new hardware and software which clients use to monitor their systems.

  • National Information Resources Service Daegu Center and Orange Life Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for Korea

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for South Korea. The National Information Resources Service (NIRS) Daegu Center and Orange Life were honored at the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

  • ANZ Named Winner of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for Australia and New Zealand Region

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winner of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for the Australia and New Zealand region. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) was honored at the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific 2020 today for its exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

  • IBM Launches Call For Code For Racial Justice [Ed: IBM trying to flip reality on its head]

    These include Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability; Diverse Representation; and Policy & Legislation Reform.

  • Node.js 15 release: Updated handling of rejections, npm 7, N-API Version 7, and more – IBM Developer

    Users can plan for a new release every April and October, with the latest even-numbered release (14.x, in this instance) being promoted to LTS in October. Since the 15.x release is an odd-numbered release, it won’t be promoted to LTS. The predictable timetable for quality releases has increased adoption of the next LTS release over time. In general we recommend that only LTS releases be used for production deployments.

    Today, the Node.js community is releasing Node.js 15 with new features that are important to Node.js users and customers. While it won’t be promoted to long-term support (LTS), we need our customers and the greater ecosystem to try it out and give us feedback to help pave the way for the Node.js 16 release.

  • Key findings from IDC Red Hat Quarkus Lab Validation

    Recently, Arnal Dayaratna, a research director and analystocused on Software Development at IDC, explored Quarkus in an IDC Lab Validation report, sponsored by Red Hat. The report quantifies performance metrics forQuarkus to another widely used Java framework for cloud-native development, referred to throughout as Framework A. The comparison is based on attributes that are important for developers and the developer experience, as well as those that are important for containers, Kubernetes and cloud deployments.

  • Accelerated development cycle enables Macquarie deployments in near real time, addressing business and technical challenges

    As companies continue their quest for digital transformation and face uncertainty in the business environment, especially in current times, the ability to react in an agile manner to address customers’ needs is increasingly apparent. It is a proven strategy cited by industry research and consulting firms, and has delivered results for Macquarie’s Banking and Financial Services Group (BFS), as it modernizes its legacy banking systems.

IBM/Red Hat and Oracle

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Red Hat
  • Get started with Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift - Red Hat Developer

    In April, the Node.js development team released Node.js 14. This major version release, code-named Fermium, will become a long-term support (LTS) release in October 2020.

    Node.js 14 incorporates improvements and new features from the V8 8.1 JavaScript engine. I’ll introduce two of them: Optional chaining and the nullish coalescing operator. I will also show you how to deploy Node.js 14 on Red Hat OpenShift. See the end of the article for a list of resources for learning more about improvements and new features in Node.js 14.

  • Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) IP address changing on October 30, 2020

    Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) will be undergoing planned maintenance beginning on October 30th 2020 starting at 6pm Pacific time. This planned maintenance event is scheduled to be completed by 10pm Pacific time on the same date. During this planned maintenance event, the content delivery component of the Unbreakable Linux Network will move to a new IP address.

  • IBM, ServiceNow Join Hands For New Integrated Solution
  • Join IBM and Red Hat at NodeConf – IBM Developer

    NodeConf remote is coming November 2-6. While the conference will be a bit different this year with everyone remote, it will continue to be a premier showcase and reunion of the Node community.

    IBM is excited to return as a sponsor and to work with Red Hat as our partner in order to provide updates through speaking sessions and workshops. In this blog post, you will find a detailed list of sessions and workshops where you can learn from and interact with Node.js developers and community leaders from Red Hat and IBM.

    We also look forward to talking to you at the Red Hat and IBM booths which are a great opportunity to catch up on what our Node.js team is up to as well as how Red Hat and IBM can help you succeed in your Node.js deployments.

    Make sure to join our community members and leaders through these talks and workshops.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Insights feature highlights: Exploring historical system profiles in Drift for easier RHEL configuration troubleshooting

    Managing and troubleshooting issues on a number of systems is made easier with the use of Drift, a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) configuration analysis tool within Red Hat Insights, freely available as part of your RHEL subscription. In this post, we would like to explore a new feature recently added to the Drift service, the historical system profile.

    In case you missed it, check out our previous post for an introduction to creating system baselines and using them to analyze systems’ configuration drift.

  • Introducing Red Hat's Open Source Participation Guidelines

    When your whole business revolves around open source, community participation, and upstream-first development, it's a reasonable assumption that you’re going to get asked about how all of that works.

    Oh, do we ever.

    And it’s not like we’re secretive about it. My colleagues in the Open Source Program Office have posted guides, FAQs, and white papers. We’ve had then Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst do TED talks. He even wrote a book! Yet still, there are a lot of individuals and organizations who will come up to us and ask us how Red Hat makes this all work.

  • How open source leads to open doors [Ed: Well, it’s a good thing they don’t know what racist IBM did at the beginning]

    In today’s climate, racial equality and equity is top of mind. The tech industry has a renewed focus on giving girls in underrepresented communities access and exposure to STEM, particularly in the pre-teen and teen years that are critical to keeping girls interested in STEM subjects. Giving adolescent girls access to skills like coding and introducing them to open source prepares them for college and career and opens new doors and opportunities

    [...]

    As part of our continuing social justice efforts and commitment to racially equality, IBM is awarding our next open source community grant to Black Girls CODE. Launched in 2011, Black Girls CODE (BGC), with 15 chapter cities in the U.S. and abroad, is a transformative global movement that hosts technology-focused weekend workshops, hackathons, summer camps, and many other enrichment opportunities for more than 20,000 low-income, Black girls — or as they call themselves, Tech Divas.

    Additionally, IBM has partnered with Black Girls CODE as a National Alumnae Ambassador Program Sponsor to help cultivate the next generation of STEM developers. This partnership allows Black Girls CODE and their Tech Divas to participate in two initial opportunities with IBM — one with IBM’s Call for Code for Racial Justice program and another with IBM offerings for workshops on STEM topics like quantum, artificial intelligence, and hybrid cloud.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

  • About me and my life ...: Fedora 32 : About positive and negative lookahead with Bash commands.

    Today I will talk about something more complex in Linux commands called: positive and negative lookahead.
    This solution can be found in several programming languages including Bash
    The lookahead process is part of regular expressions.
    The lookahead process looks ahead in the string and sees if it matches the given pattern, but then disregard it and move on.
    It is very useful when we want to go through the strings.
    The lookahead process can be both positive and negative depending on the purpose.

  •   

  • When the best ideas win, do we recognize everyone who shaped them? | Opensource.com

    A closer look at the nature of innovation might cause us to rethink how we participate in meritocracies.

  •   

  • Red Hat expands Ansible ready to run cloud programs

    DevOps, like the name says, is all about making it easier to integrate development and operations. Red Hat's take on DevOps, Ansible, is all about making it easier to run cloud-native and hybrid-cloud platforms on the cloud. At 2020's AnsibleFest, Red Hat announced that Ansible would connect traditional server and hybrid cloud with Ansible Automation Platform and Red Hat OpenShift, its Kubernetes platform, with Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management (ACM). At the same, time Ansible now comes with over 55 ready-to-run programs via its Ansible Content Collections.

  •  

  • After Years of Promise and Hype, Is AI Once More Failing to Deliver? [Ed: IBM still leaning on mindless hype wave called after its racist founder]

    The June 13 issue of The Economist included an in-depth look at the limits of AI, with seven articles on the subject.  “There is no question that AI - or, to be precise, machine learning, one of its sub-fields - has made much progress,” notes The Economist in the issue’s overview article.  “Computers have become dramatically better at many things they previously struggled with…  Yet lately doubts have been creeping in about whether today’s AI technology is really as world-changing as it seems.  It is running up against limits of one kind or another, and has failed to deliver on some of its proponents’ more grandiose promises.”

    Transformative technologies, - remember the dot-com bubble, - are prone to hype cycles, when all the excitement and publicity accompanying their early achievements often lead to inflated expectations, followed by disillusionment if the technology fails to deliver.  But AI is in a class by itself, as the notion of machines achieving or surpassing human levels of intelligence has led to feelings of both wonder and fear over the past several decades.

    The article reminds us that AI has gone through two such major hype cycles since the field began in the mid-1950s.  Early achievements, - like beating humans at checkers and proving logic theorems, - led researchers to conclude that machines would achieve human-level intelligence within a couple of decades.  This early optimism collapsed leading to the first so-called AI winter from 1974-1980.  The field was revived in the 1980s with the advent of commercial expert systems and Japan’s Fifth Generation project, but it didn’t last long, leading to the second AI winter from 1987-1993.

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More in Tux Machines

Wine 5.20 Released

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read more Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab

When the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition smartphone began shipping to customers in September it came with a version of the operating system with one important feature missing: HDMI output. So when my phone arrived a few weeks ago I was able to spend some time familiarizing myself with the operating system and I could plug in the included Convergence Dock to use USB accessories including a keyboard, mouse, and storage. But I wasn’t able to connect an external display. Now I can. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP. Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS. NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients. NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs. I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi. Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.

Leftovers: Debian, Graphics and Audiocasts

  • Integer Scaling To Come With Linux 5.11 For Intel Graphics Driver - Phoronix

    Going back more than a year there have been Intel "i915" kernel graphics driver patches implementing integer mode scaling support while finally for Linux 5.11 in early 2021 the support will have landed. Intel added integer mode scaling to their Windows graphics driver back in 2019 to provide better clarity when upscaling games (particularly pixel art type content) and other software. The Linux patches materialized in September 2019 for nearest-neighbor integer mode scaling and then seemingly forgotten about. The capability works with Gen11 / Ice Lake and newer.

  • Linux Support for Variable Refresh Rates On Gen12+ Intel GPUs Is On The Way - LinuxReviews

    Intel developer Manasi Navare has submitted a series of patches for the Linux kernel that brings support for variable refresh rates on Intel's latest graphics chips to the Linux kernels i915 driver. The feature is only enabled on Tiger Lake, Sapphire Rapids and newer Intel graphics chips. [...] You do not need a special "Freesync" monitor to use adaptive vertical synchronization, Freesync is just a marketing term used by AMD. The DisplayPort specification has included variable refresh rate (VRR) as an option feature since DP 1.4 and there are many monitors with support for it that are not marketed as "Freesync" or "gaming" monitors. Monitors that are marketed as "Freesync" support the standard DisplayPort VRR protocol so you don't need to use a AMD graphics card to get the benefits of a Freesync monitor. You will soon be able to use one of the very latest Intel CPU's with integrated graphics or one of Intel's upcoming dedicated graphics cards with Freesync monitors on Linux.

  • Salsa updated to GitLab 13.5

    Today, GitLab released the version 13.5 with several new features. Also Salsa got some changes applied to it. [...] It's been way over two years since we started to use Google Compute Engine (GCE) for Salsa. Since then, all the jobs running on the shared runners run within a n1-standard-1 instance, providing a fresh set of one vCPU and 3.75GB of RAM for each and every build. GCE supports several new instance types, featuring better and faster CPUs, including current AMD EPICs. However, as it turns out, GCE does not support any single vCPU instances for any of those types. So jobs in the future will use n2d-standard-2 for the time being, provinding two vCPUs and 8GB of RAM..

  • Social Media Regulation and Journalism

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk social media regulation and its relationship to journalism and the threat to Section 230.

  • Automation Entropy Factor | Self-Hosted 30

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