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Red Hat

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Samsung debuts an Artik IoT cloud platform and IDE

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Linux
Red Hat

At the Samsung Developer Conference in San Francisco last week, Samsung was all about the Internet of Things, and its Artik IoT modules got lots of love.

Surprisingly, much of Samsung’s focus at its developer conference did not revolve around Tizen or SmartThings. Instead, the main focus was on its newly shipping Artik embedded modules, which ship with Fedora.

There was some Tizen related news, however, including a new ”Smart View” SDK for improving mobile connectivity with Tizen-based Smart TVs, as well as a promise to bring Knox security support to Tizen. There were also more details on the upcoming, 64-bit capable Tizen 3.0.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1 Betas Now Available

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Red Hat

Today, May 5, 2016, Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, has announced in a press release the availability of Red Hat Software Collection 2.2 Beta and Red Hat Developer Toolset 4.1 Beta.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Want to work in Release Engineering in Europe?

    Red Hat Release Engineering is hiring in Europe.

  • Red Hat targets midmarket with Keating, Tech Data partnerships

    Red Hat Canada has unveiled a new approach to reach the lower end of the enterprise and the upper midmarket in partnership with Keating Technologies and Tech Data Canada.

    Under the program, Keating will work with the vendor to uncover and qualify leads in the $500 million to $1.0 billion market. Once fully developed, those leads will be handed over to existing Red Hat Canada partners to close the deal, and will be fulfilled through Tech Data.

  • Gulf Air creates private cloud to support open-source big data engine

    Bahrain’s national carrier is using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform, and Red Hat Storage as a platform for its Arabic Sentiment Analysis system, which monitors people’s comments through their social media posts.

  • Fedora Pune meetup April 2016

    I actually never even announced the April meetup, but we had in total 13 people showing up for the meet. We moved the meet to my office from our usual space as I wanted to use the white board. At beginning I showed some example code about how to write unittests, and how are we using Python3 unittests in our Fedora Cloud/Atomic images automatically. Anwesha arranged some soft drinks, and snacks for everyone.

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

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Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues

    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.

  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA

    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.

  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA

    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Fedora 25 Release Schedule Published, the Linux OS Could Arrive on November 8

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OS
Red Hat

Fedora 24 is currently in heavy development with the Beta release knocking at the door, and it looks like the Fedora Project developers are already planning on the next major release of the GNU/Linux operating system.

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Red Hat Donates Servers to the GNOME Project

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Red Hat
GNOME

The GNOME Project thanks Red Hat for their recent donation of two new servers. The donation is part of a wider plan aiming to consolidate the location of the various GNOME servers around the globe into one single datacenter. This will help ease day-to-day operations and reduce intervention time in the case of network disruptions or outages.

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Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • Getting Started with Release Validation Testing in Fedora QA
  • F24 Beta Announcement (Technical & End user input sought)
  • Fedora 25 Not Scheduling A Mass Rebuild Is Raising Some Concerns

    With FESCo having decided not to schedule a mass rebuild for Fedora 25 due out at the end of the year, some developers are unhappy and feel its sacrificing quality over trying to push out a release on time.

    It was decided earlier this year not to schedule in a mass rebuild of all packages for Fedora 25 since it's a time consuming process and the developers aim to ship Fedora 25 before the end-of-year holidays without having to drag out the release into the new year. As such, any changes that would necessitate a rebuild of all F25 RPMs should be diverted to Fedora 26.

  • dgplug.org is now using Lektor

    Couple of years back we moved dgplug into a static website. But still there are requirements when we do want to update parts of the site in a timely manner. We also wanted to track the changes. We tried to maintain a sphinx based docs, but somehow we never managed to do well in that case.

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Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.