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Wednesday, 28 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Raspberry Pi based audio streamer features 5-inch touchscreen Rianne Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 6:28pm
Story Ubuntu 21.04 Is The "Hirsute Hippo", Releasing On 22 April Rianne Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 6:24pm
Story What the growing OEM support means for the future of Linux Rianne Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 6:00pm
Story NixOS 20.09 released Roy Schestowitz 1 28/10/2020 - 5:57pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 4:50pm
Story Programmable Boards, Windows Marketed as "Linux", and Open Hardware (Arduino) Roy Schestowitz 3 28/10/2020 - 4:44pm
Story Games: Caesar III, Moonshell Island, The Last Relic Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 4:28pm
Story 10 Things to Do After Installing Fedora 33 arindam1989 28/10/2020 - 2:21pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 11:24am
Story IBM/Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2020 - 11:17am

Flatkill and Latest Security Patches

Filed under
Security

  • Confronting Flatkill: The Case Against Flatpaks - YouTube

    Flatpaks are are very useful tool however, they're not perfect and some people have taken it upon themselves to show off the problems that exist with them in this case this author discusses some of the security problems but they make a few very simple mistakes along the way.

  • Security updates for Tuesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (thunderbird), Fedora (createrepo_c, dnf-plugins-core, dnf-plugins-extras, librepo, livecd-tools, and pdns-recursor), openSUSE (firefox and mailman), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (chromium-browser, java-1.8.0-openjdk, and Satellite 6.8), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk), SUSE (libvirt), and Ubuntu (blueman, firefox, mysql-5.7, mysql-8.0, php7.4, and ruby-kramdown).

NixOS 20.09 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Stabilization of the NixOS happens a month before planned release. The goal is to have as little as possible continuous integration (Hydra) jobs failing before the release is cut. While we would like to release on time, a high quality release is more important.

Individuals who contributed to stabilizing this release: volth, Robert Scott, Tim Steinbach, WORLDofPEACE, Maximilian Bosch, Thomas Tuegel, Doron Behar, Vladimír Čunát, Jonathan Ringer, Maciej Krüger, and 190 others!

Read more

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Equality vs Identity

    You're probably already familiar with equality: that's the == operator. identity uses the is operator.

  • Creating a Binary Search in Python – Real Python

    Binary search is a classic algorithm in computer science. It often comes up in programming contests and technical interviews. Implementing binary search turns out to be a challenging task, even when you understand the concept. Unless you’re curious or have a specific assignment, you should always leverage existing libraries to do a binary search in Python or any other language.

  • How to Set Axis Range (xlim, ylim) in Matplotlib

    Matplotlib is one of the most widely used data visualization libraries in Python. Much of Matplotlib's popularity comes from its customization options - you can tweak just about any element from its hierarchy of objects.

    In this tutorial, we'll take a look at how to set the axis range (xlim, ylim) in Matplotlib, to truncate or expand the view to specific limits.

  • On code isolation in Python | Artem Golubin

    I started learning Python in 2009, and I had a pretty challenging task and somewhat unusual use of Python. I was working on a desktop application that used PyQT for GUI and Python as the main language.

    To hide the code, I embedded Python interpreter into a standalone Windows executable. There are a lot of solutions to do so (e.g. pyinstaller, pyexe), and they all work similarly. They compile your Python scripts to bytecode files and bundle them with an interpreter into an executable. Compiling scripts down to bytecode makes it harder for people with bad intentions to get the source code and crack or hack your software. Bytecode has to be extracted from the executable and decompiled. It can also produce obfuscated code that is much harder to understand.

  • Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q3 2020

    It's that time of year! Let us welcome the new PSF Fellows for Q3! T

Chemtool: Open-source Chemical Structure drawing program

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Chemtool is a lightweight application for drawing chemical structures like organic molecules. It's originally written by Thomas Volk from Germany. Later on, more developers came to aid for development and code maintenance.

[...]

The program is created for Linux X systems, it does not work on Windows or macOS.

License

Chemtool is released under GNU General Public License.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Do You Need a Boot Partition in Linux? - Make Tech Easier

    If you fire up a partitioning tool and point it at your hard disk drive, it’s quite probable you will see a small boot partition before everything else. It may only eat up a tiny fraction of your hard disk drive and not appear when actively using the computer. Is that partition essential? Can you delete it? Read on to find the answers to whether you need a dedicated boot partition on your Linux installation.

  • How To Install SQLite on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install SQLite on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required package by SQLite

  • How to Quickly Set Up a Mail Server on Ubuntu 20.04 with Modoboa

    Quickly set up your own email server on Ubuntu 20.04 with Modoboa, which is a free and open-source mail hosting and management platform designed to work with Postfix SMTP server and Dovecot IMAP/POP3 server.

  • How to install the Kubernetes dashboard > Tux-Techie

    The Kubernetes dashboard provides a way to manage your Kubernetes cluster from your browser. You can easily check CPU usage, memory usage, and overall health of your cluster with the dashboard. You can also deploy applications from the dashboard and much more. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install the Kubernetes dashboard on a cluster running in Ubuntu 20.04. We will also set up an admin account and log in to the dashboard with a token. Check out this article to learn how to set up a Kubernetes cluster.

  • Beginner's guide to NGINX SSL CONFIGURATION - The Linux GURUS

    Security is one of the main concerns that needs to be addressed on priority for all applications or websites. All websites are required to have a valid SSL certificate installed in order to encrypt the data packets/traffic between users & websites. Even web browsers show a warning when we visit a website that does not have SSL certificate installed.

    In this tutorial, we will discuss how we can perform Nginx SSL configuration to configure a SSL certificate to secure our websites hosted on Nginx. So start the complete process for Nginx SSL configuration but let’s discuss the prerequisites first.

  • Pandora Client Pithos 1.5.1 Released [Ubuntu PPA] | UbuntuHandbook

    Pithos, native Pandora Radio client for Linux, released version 1.5.1 a day ago with minor bug-fixes and improvements.

    [...]

    If you’re OK with the containerized flatpak package. Pithos 1.5.1 has been made into flathub.org for most Linux systems.

    For those prefer .deb package, the unofficial PPA is available for Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Mint 20, Ubuntu 20.10.

Cosmo Communicator’s Linux OS gains new cover screen features

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

The Cosmo Communicator is what you’d get if you crossed a smartphone with a pocket-sized laptop computer. Unfolded it looks like a tiny laptop with a keyboard inspired by the design of the classic Psion Revo PDA. Fold it and you’ve got a smaller cover screen that you can use for phone calls, notifications, or other simple tasks.

Aside from the clamshell design, the phone has another unusual feature: it typically ships with Android, but can also support alternate operating systems including Debian Linux and Sailfish OS.

Developed by Planet Computers, the Cosmo Communicator went up for pre-order through a crowdfunding campaign in late 2018 and began shipping to backers in mid-2019. Now Planet Computers has announced an update for the Debian Linux software that runs on its phone, bringing support for a bunch of new cover screen features.

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Snap speed improvements with new compression algorithm!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Security and performance are often mutually exclusive concepts. A great user experience is one that manages to blend the two in a way that does not compromise on robust, solid foundations of security on one hand, and a fast, responsive software interaction on the other.

Snaps are self-contained applications, with layered security, and as a result, sometimes, they may have reduced perceived performance compared to those same applications offered via traditional Linux packaging mechanisms. We are well aware of this phenomenon, and we have invested significant effort and time in resolving any speed gaps, while keeping security in mind. Last year, we talked about improved snap startup times following fontconfig cache optimization. Now, we want to tell you about another major milestone – the use of a new compression algorithm for snaps offers 2-3x improvement in application startup times!

LZO and XZ algorithms

By default, snaps are packaged as a compressed, read-only squashfs filesystem using the XZ algorithm. This results in a high level of compression but consequently requires more processing power to uncompress and expand the filesystem for use. On the desktops, users may perceive this as a “slowness” – the time it takes for the application to launch. This is also far more noticeable on first launch only, before the application data is cached in memory. Subsequent launches are fast and typically, there’s little to no difference compared to traditionally packaged applications.

To improve startup times, we decided to test a different algorithm – LZO – which offers lesser compression, but needs less processing power to complete the action.

As a test case, we chose the Chromium browser (stable build, 85.X). We believe this is a highly representative case, for several reasons. One, the browser is a ubiquitous (and popular) application, with frequent usage, so any potential slowness is likely to be noticeable. Two, Chromium is a relatively large and complex application. Three, it is not part of any specific Linux desktop environment, which makes the testing independent and accurate.

For comparison, the XZ-compressed snap weighs ~150 MB, whereas the one using the LZO compression is ~250 MB in size.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 654

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 654 for the week of October 18 – 24, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Apache HTTP Server

    The Apache HTTP server (or simply Apache) was launched in 1995 as an outgrowth of a public domain httpd project from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). According to the Apache website, development of that project stalled, so a group of webmasters got together to coordinate their own changes, extensions, and bug fixes in the form of patches. These developers, including Brian Behlendorf, Cliff Skolnick, and others, formed the basis of the original Apache Group, which in turn became The Apache Software Foundation.

    After launch, Apache quickly became the most popular web server on the Internet. The project is now developed and maintained, along with hundreds of other projects, by The Apache Software Foundation and is released under the terms of Apache License 2.0.

  • 8 Great Free Photo And Video Editing Software To Use For Beginners

    Blender

    On Linux, Ios, and PCs, Blender is another one of the most outstanding free video editing applications on the marketplace today. Blender is a fully free-to-use open-source platform. Blender was developed as a 3D animation kit, but it comes with a very convenient video editor.

    The video editor for Blender is an appropriate one for much of your video needs. This editor requires simple acts such as video cutting and sequencing to be done. It also helps you to do more difficult tasks, such as camera masking. This software makes it a compelling video editing that caters to beginners as well as experienced users.

    Shotcut

    Shotcut is completely an open-source software, like Blender. This platform suggests that you get linked to all the software without paying the update after installing it. This film editor provides a wide variety of file formats, and there is an excellent selection of instructional videos.

    Although this video editing app has excellent functionality, the interface can seem a little funky to some people. Initially, the platform Linux designed this application, and it sure reflects that. But, it is still a value video editor underneath the covers.

    [...]

    Openshot

    Openshot is a fully open-source, which renders it one of the most available tools for video editing. It’s simple to use drag and drop design and remind some Mac users a little more of iMovie.

    Openshot, though, contains more functionality, including infinite textures and audio mixing, than iMovie. This free editor achieves a good compromise among sophisticated functionality and a primary interface. When you build switches between scenes, it also enables real-time displays.

    GIMP

    GIMP is a popular picture editing app, shortened for GNU Image Processing Program, which features highly advanced and efficient tools. It is not for the faint-hearted or for those who do not understand much about pictures’ processing.

    Due to its software and functionality, it has been widely touted as a better Photoshop substitute. It contains the same resources for editing, blending, paints, text, and more. You can use presets and plugins in an instant, as well, but there is no cataloging feature.

  • Making the Business Case for Contributing to Open Source
  • Sending logs from syslog-ng to Grafana Loki - Blog - syslog-ng Community - syslog-ng Community

    Loki is one of the latest applications that lets you aggregate and query log messages, and of course to visualize logs using Grafana. It does not index the contents of log messages, only the labels associated with logs. This way, processing and storing log messages requires less resources, making Loki more cost-effective. Promtail, the log collector component of Loki, can collect log messages using the new, RFC5424 syslog protocol. This is where syslog-ng can send its log messages.

    From this blog, you can learn a minimal Loki & Promtail setup. We will send logs from syslog-ng, and as a first step, will check them with logcli, a command line utility for Loki. Once it works, we will also install Grafana in a container and query Loki from there.

Tor, Proprietary Software, DRM, and Security

Filed under
Security
  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.0a9 (Android Only)

    Android Tor Browser 10.0a9 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • What Is Google Widevine DRM and Why Do You Need It?

    If you’re streaming content from services like Netflix and Hulu, you may have seen a prompt to install Google Widevine. Depending on your device and browser, it may already be built in by default. Either way, many users want to know exactly what it is and what it does. The good news is it isn’t a virus and it’s safe. It’s also required to view certain streaming content.

  • Nitro PDF maker hit by breach it says is 'isolated', sec firm claims otherwise

    A software firm that had its origins in Melbourne has suffered a data breach that it has described in a notice to the ASX as "an isolated security incident" but which cyber security provider Cyble has claimed is a massive leak that affects companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple, Chase and Citibank.

  • Biden Campaign App '[Crack]' Shows Him Wearing MAGA Hat, Telling People to Vote Trump

    According to a video demonstration published today by experts from Norwegian mobile security company Promon, the software is open to attack via a bug called StrandHogg, which can be abused by malicious hackers to put fake overlay screens over apps and steal sensitive information, including usernames and passwords.

    In a test showing how such an attack could appear in the real world, the team was able to exploit the bug and insert a picture overlay on the Biden campaign app.

  • ENTERPRISES SHOULD FIX THESE 25 FLAWS [Ed: NSA fails to mentions Microsoft Windows as a whole (because it has "good" back doors in it)]

    The United States National Security Agency identified 25 vulnerabilities in software that are most commonly targeted by state-sponsored attackers from China. Setting aside the question of whether or not the enterprise is more likely to be targeted by nation-state attackers or cyber-criminals, the list provides enterprise IT staff with a good starting place on which vulnerabilities to prioritize.

    The vulnerabilities on NSA’s list can be used to gain initial access to enterprise networks by targeting systems directly accessible from the Internet. Seven of the flaws are in remote access gateways, three are found in networking equipment, and three impact public-facing servers. Once in the network, the attacker can use other vulnerabilities to find other systems to compromise and carry out their activities. Seven flaws on the list involve internal servers, two affect Active Directory, and one exists in mobile device management.

Programming: PHP, Raku and Python

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 7.3.24RC1 and 7.4.12RC1 - Remi's RPM repository - Blog

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.12RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32-33 or remi-php74-test repository for Fedora 31 and Enterprise Linux 7-8.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.24RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 31 or remi-php73-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • PHP - Removing Specific Element from An Array – TecAdmin

    Q. How do I remove a specific element from an array using PHP.

    In this tutorial, you will learn two PHP unset() and array_splice() methods to remove specific array elements.

  • 2020.43 Release And Star

    Quite a number of releases this week(end): Alexander Kiryuhin released the Rakudo 2020.10 compiler release, Claudio Ramirez immediately provided many Linux package versions of that release, and JJ Merelo updated the standard Raku Alpine Docker image, as well as the special Raku Alpine Docker Image for testing modules by module developers.

  • Retrieving Email and Phone No. for a Desktop App from Google Contacts using Python and Gmail API | by Aritra Roy | Analytics Vidhya | Medium | Codementor

    Though python has been created by Guido van Rossum as a hobby project in the 90’s decade, it has become the most popular language now. Due to its ability to work in various fields and easy syntax python is now used in Big-Data Analysis, ML & AI, Deep-learning, image-processing as well as in web development, game development, and so on. Moreover, it has plenty of libraries which one can use to easily and quickly complete the task.

  • Working with Numbers in Python | FOSS Linux

    In this "Working for Python" tutorial, we shall see the various ways to use the Integers, Floating point numbers, and complex numbers with practical examples.

  • New book: Create Graphical User Interfaces with Python

A Look At The Performance Improvements With System76 Pop!_OS 20.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

At the end of last week System76 released Pop!_OS 20.10 as their customized distribution built atop Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla. For those curious here are some benchmarks of System76's Pop!_OS 20.10 versus 20.04 using the Thelio Major with AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X and Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics.

Pop!_OS 20.10 has similar key package versions to Ubuntu 20.10 for which it is based: the Linux 5.8 kernel is at play, GNOME Shell 3.38.1, X.Org Server 1.20.8 by default, Mesa 20.2.1, GCC 10.2, Python 3.8.6, and numerous other package updates.

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Programmable Boards, Windows Marketed as "Linux", and Open Hardware (Arduino)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • AMD to Acquire Xilinx, Creating the Industry’s High Performance Computing Leader

    AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) and Xilinx (NASDAQ: XLNX) today announced they have entered into a definitive agreement for AMD to acquire Xilinx in an all-stock transaction valued at $35 billion. The combination will create the industry’s leading high performance computing company, significantly expanding the breadth of AMD’s product portfolio and customer set across diverse growth markets where Xilinx is an established leader. The transaction is expected to be immediately accretive to AMD margins, EPS and free cash flow generation and deliver industry-leading growth.

  • AMD To Acquire Xilinx In $35 Billion Stock Deal - Phoronix

    Following the rumors earlier this month that AMD was in talks to acquire Xilinx, a deal has been announced this morning.

  • Chuwi LarkBox Pro mini PC gets a faster Celeron J4125 processor, sells for $179 [Ed: Can sites that call themselves "Linux" stop marketing hardware that strictly comes with Microsoft Windows?]

    The mini PC ships with Windows 10 Home, but it can also run Linux distributions.

  • MINISFORUM X35G Review: The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux Experience [Ed: MINISFORUM is now spamming sites with its Windows-only PCs, calling them Linux. It's only Windows that comes out of the box. Only Windows.]

    Linux (Ubuntu 20.04 LTS) works out of the box

  • MINISFORUM EliteMini H31G Coffee Lake Mini PC Review with Windows & Linux

    MINISFORUM have launched their EliteMini H31G which combines a desktop CPU with a discrete graphics card in a mini PC form factor. It supports various Intel 9th and 8th gen desktop processors combined with an NVIDIA Geforce GTX1050 Ti graphics card and targets both gamers and content creators.

  • Oplà IoT Kit is Arduino's first open programmable IoT platform

    Arduino is well-known for its maker boards and shields that are sometimes sold as part of kits to experiment with electronics. Arduino Oplà IoT kit is a little different as it looks more like an actual consumer product once assembled. Powered by an Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 board, it is designed to make getting started with IoT easy for beginners, while still allowing more advanced users to customize and hack their smart home applications.

  • Arduino Blog » This machine dispenses labels, making it easier to peel them off

    Labels are easy enough to take off of a roll, but doing so repeatedly while trying to keep count, could perhaps change one’s mind. If you find yourself having to apply label after label… after label, then an Arduino-based dispenser like Mr Innovative’s could be just the thing you need to streamline the process.

    The automated machine uses a stepper motor to pull labels past a series of rods, separating the sticky-backed “FRAGILE” sign upon encountering an especially abrupt change in direction. An IR sensor beneath detects the presence of the label, keeping the device from advancing further until it’s removed.

Best Linux server distributions of 2020

Filed under
Linux
Server

Let the yearly wrap-ups begin! Thanks to COVID-19, we'll start them out just a wee bit early. And why not? It's not as if the last two months of the year are nearly as productive as the first 10. As we start to wind down the year, let's wind up the lists. This time around, I want to take a look back at what I believe to be the best Linux server distributions of 2020.

Even though it was a tough year, there were still some exciting things to arrive in the tech industry. With Linux continuing to see big gains, especially in the world of enterprise computing, it should come as no surprise that the server world is being absolutely dominated by the open source platform.

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Five-port Arm networking SBC offers LVDS link

Filed under
Linux

Forlinx has a new “OK1028A-C” networking board based on a “FET1028A-C” module that runs Linux on a dual -A72 NXP LS1028A. The SBC features 5x GbE ports with TSN plus an LVDS link for HMI.

Last year, Forlinx launched the headless OK1043A-C and OK1046A networking SBCs, which run Linux on NXP’s quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively. Now, the Chinese company has posted details on a similarly sandwich style OK1028A-C SBC with a FET1028A-C module loaded with a 1.5GHz, dual-core, Cortex-A72 LS1028A. The SBC supplies an LVDS interface to enable HMI (Human-Machine Interface) applications. The boards are supported with Ubuntu 18.04 with Qt 5.9.9.

Read more

Linux Foundation Claims It Supports Diversity

Filed under
Development

RHEL and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Oracle Linux 8 - Installation made easy with free videos

    With “work from home” mandates and less opportunity to go to in-person classes, you might be looking for training opportunities you can start on today. We all need some help to get started on developing our skills. To make it easy for you, we’ve put together a series of blogs where you’ll find free, short videos that you can take at your own pace to get a better at understanding of Oracle Linux 8. You can develop skills to use and administer Oracle Linux 8 on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, on-premises, or in hybrid environments.

    This first blog focuses on the installation and boot process. You can learn step-by-step how to complete an Oracle Linux 8 installation for on-premises deployment and how to create an Oracle Linux 8 instance on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. You can also learn about the boot process and how to configure different services to start at boot time.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.8 is now available with upgrade improvements and IPv6 support

    Red Hat is pleased to announce that Red Hat Satellite 6.8, part of your Red Hat Smart Management Subscription, is now available. This release of Red Hat Satellite Server 6.8 focuses on Satellite Server and Capsule Server upgrade improvements, expanded provisioning options, and IPv6 support.

  • The Sandwich Situation: Ansible Modules for the OpenStack SDK
  • Linux command basics: printf | Enable Sysadmin

    Use printf to format text or numbers.

GStreamer 1.18.1 stable bug fix release

Filed under
Software

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first bug fix release in the stable 1.18 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release contains important security fixes. We suggest you upgrade at your earliest convenience.

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.18.0.

See the GStreamer 1.18.1 release notes for more details.

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Tracker 3.0: How did we get here?

Filed under
GNOME

In 2006 the NEPOMUK project began. The goal was not a search engine but “a freely available open-source framework for social semantic desktops”, put even less simply a “Networked environment for personal ontology-based management of unified knowledge”. The project had €17 million of funding, much of it from the EU. The Semantic Web mindset had reached the free desktop world.

I don’t know where all the money went! But one output was NEPOMUK-KDE, which aimed to consolidate all your data in a single database to enable new ways of browsing and searching. The first commit was late 2006. Some core KDE apps adopted it, and some use cases, ideas and prototypes emerged.

Meanwhile, Nokia were busy contracting everyone in the Free Software world to work on Maemo, an OS for phones and tablets which would mark the start of the smartphone era had a certain fruit-related company not beaten them to it.

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Videos and Audiocasts: Pop!_OS 20.10, Fedora 33, Late Night Linux, The Python Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Pop!_OS 20.10 - Full Review - YouTube

    System76 recently released the latest version of their popular Linux distribution, Pop!_OS 20.10. In this review, I go over what you can expect from the latest version and share my thoughts. We'll take a look at the new features (and more).

  • Why Linux Users Should Pay Attention To Fedora 33

    Fedora 33 is a crucial (and awesome) Linux distro release for many reasons, including the new Welcome screen, Wayland stability and GNOME 3.38. Schykle is here to break it all down and explain why this is such an important version to pay attention to.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 101 – Late Night Linux

    Drama with open source office suites, the RIAA attacks open source, a new Ubuntu release complete with Raspberry Pi support, new Arm hardware, and the usual KDE goodness.

  • Power Up Your Java Using Python With JPype - The Python Podcast

    Python and Java are two of the most popular programming languages in the world, and have both been around for over 20 years. In that time there have been numerous attempts to provide interoperability between them, with varying methods and levels of success. One such project is JPype, which allows you to use Java classes in your Python code. In this episode the current maintainer, Karl Nelson, explains why he chose it as his preferred tool for combining these ecosystems, how he and his team are using it, and when and how you might want to use it for your own projects. He also discusses the work he has done to enable use of JPype on Android, and what is in store for the future of the project. If you have ever wanted to use a library or module from Java, but the rest of your project is already in Python, then this episode is definitely worth a listen.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: XFS and WiMAX in Linux

  • Prepare To Re-Format If You Are Using An Older XFS Filesystem - LinuxReviews

    Linux 5.10 brings several new features to the XFS filesystem. It solves the year 2038 problem, it supports metadata checksumming and it has better metadata verification. There's also a new configuration option: CONFIG_XFS_SUPPORT_V4. Older XFS filesystems using the v4 layout are now deprecated and there is no upgrade path beyond "backup and re-format". The Linux kernel will support older XFS v4 filesystems by default until 2025 and optional support will remain available until 2030. A new CONFIG_XFS_SUPPORT_V4 option in Linux 5.10. In case you want to.. still be able to mount existing XFS filesystems if/when you upgrade to Linux 5.10. We previously reported that XFS patches for Linux 5.10 delay the 2038 problem to 2486. That's not the only new feature Linux 5.10 brings to the XFS filesystem when it is released early December: It supports metadata checksumming, it has better built-in metadata verification and there is a new CONFIG_XFS_SUPPORT_V4 configuration option. Make sure you don't accidentally say N to that one if you have an older XFS filesystem you'd like to keep using if/when you upgrade your kernel.

  • The Linux Kernel Looks To Eventually Drop Support For WiMAX

    With the WiMAX 802.16 standard not being widely used outside of the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communication System (AeroMACS) and usage in some developing nations, the Linux kernel may end up dropping its support for WiMAX but first there is a proposal to demote it to staging while seeing if any users remain. Longtime kernel developer Arnd Bergmann is proposing that the WiMAX Linux kernel infrastructure and the lone Intel 2400m driver be demoted from the networking subsystem to staging. In a future kernel release, the WiMAX support would be removed entirely if no active users are expressed. The Linux kernel WiMAX infrastructure is just used by the Intel 2400m driver for hardware with Sandy Bridge and prior, thus of limited relevance these days. That Intel WiMAX implementation doesn't support the frequencies that AeroMACS operates at and there are no other large known WiMAX deployments around the world making use of the frequencies supported by the 2400m implementation or users otherwise of this Linux kernel code.

  • Linux Is Dropping WiMAX Support - LinuxReviews

    It's no loss. There is a reason why you have probably never seen a WiMAX device or heard of it, WiMAX was a wireless last-mile Internet solution mostly used in a few rural areas in a limited number of countries between 2005 and 2010. There is very little use for it today so it is almost natural that Linux is phasing out support for WiMAX and the one WiMAX device it supports. WiMAX is a wireless protocol, much like IP by Avian Carriers except that it has less bandwidth and significantly lower latency. WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is a set of wireless standards that were used to provide last-mile Internet connectivity where DSL and other solutions were unavailable. WiMAX can work over long distances (up to 50 km), something WiFi can't. The initial design could provide around 25 megabit/s downstream, which was competitive when WiMAX base-stations and modems become widely available around 2005. That changed around 2010 when 4G/LTE become widely available. The WiMAX Forum, who maintains the WiMAX standard, tried staying relevant with a updated standard called WiMAX 2 in 2011. Some equipment for it was made, but it never became a thing. WiMAX was pretty much dead by the time WiMAX 2 arrived. The standard NetworkManager utility GNU/Linux distributions come with supported WiMAX until 2015. The Linux kernel still supports it and exactly one WiMAX device from Intel as of Linux 5.9, but that's about to change.

Fedora Elections and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Fedora 33 elections nominations now open

    Candidates may self-nominate. If you nominate someone else, please check with them to ensure that they are willing to be nominated before submitting their name. The steering bodies are currently selecting interview questions for the candidates. Nominees submit their questionnaire answers via a private Pagure issue. The Election Wrangler or their backup will publish the interviews to the Community Blog before the start of the voting period. Fedora Podcast episodes will be recorded and published as well. Please note that the interview is mandatory for all nominees. Nominees not having their interview ready by end of the Interview period (2020-11-19) will be disqualified and removed from the election.

  • 12 Tips for a migration and modernization project

    Sometimes migration/modernization projects are hard to execute because there are many technical challenges, like the structure of legacy code, customer environment, customer bureaucracy, network issues, and the most feared of all, production bugs. In this post I'm going to explain the 12-step migration / modernization procedure I follow as a consultant using a tip-based approach. I have some experience with this kind of situation because I’ve already passed by different kinds of projects with several kinds of problems. Over time you start to recognize patterns and get used to solving the hard problems. So, I thought: Wouldn't it be cool to create a procedure based on my experience, so that I can organize my daily work and give the transparency that the customers and managers want? To test this out, I did this for one customer in my hometown. They were facing a Red Hat JBoss EAP migration/modernization project. The results of the project were outstanding. The customer said they were even more satisfied with the transparency. The project manager seemed really comfortable knowing all about the details through the project and pleased with reducing the risk of unexpected news.

  • Awards roll call: June 2020 to October 2020

    We are nearly at the end of 2020 and while the pace continues to increase, we want to take a moment to acknowledge and celebrate some of the successes of Red Hat's people and their work. In the last four months, several Red Hatters and Red Hat products are being recognized by leading industry publications and organizations for efforts in driving innovation.

  • How developers can build the next generation of AI advertising technology – IBM Developer

    As we look across the most rapidly transforming industries like financial services, healthcare, retail – and now advertising, developers are putting open source technologies to work to deliver next-generation features. Our enterprise clients are looking for AI solutions that will scale with trust and transparency to solve business problems. At IBM®, I have the pleasure of focusing on equipping you, the developers, with the capabilities you need to meet the heightened expectations you face at work each day. We’re empowering open source developers to drive the critical transformation to AI in advertising. For instance, at the IBM Center for Open source Data and AI Technologies (CODAIT), enterprise developers can find open source starting points to tackle some of your thorniest challenges. We’re making it easy for developers to use and create open source AI models that can ultimately help brand marketers go deeper with AI to reach consumers more effectively.

Programming: Qt, PHP, JS and Bash

  • Qt 6 To Ship With Package Manager For Extra Libraries - Phoronix

    Adding to the list of changes coming with the Qt 6 toolkit, The Qt Company has now outlined their initial implementation of a package manager to provide additional Qt6 modules.

  • Qt for MCUs 1.5 released

    A new release of Qt for MCUs is now available in the Qt Installer. If you are new to Qt for MCUs, you can try it out here. Version 1.5 introduces new platform APIs for easy integration of Qt for MCUs on any microcontroller, along with an in-depth porting guide to get you going. Additionally, it includes a set of C++ APIs to load new images at runtime into your QML GUI. As with every release, 1.5 also includes API improvements and bug fixes, enhancing usability and stability.

  • KDDockWidgets v1.1 has been released! - KDAB - KDAB on Qt

    KDDockWidgets v1.1 is now available! Although I just wrote about v1.0 last month, the 1.1 release still managed to get a few big features.

  • KDAB TV celebrates its first year - KDAB

    A year ago KDAB started a YouTube channel dedicated to software development with Qt, C++ and 3D technologies like OpenGL. We talked to Sabine Faure, who is in charge of the program, about how it worked out so far and what we can expect in the future.

  • How to build a responsive contact form with PHP – Linux Hint

    Contact forms are commonly used in web applications because they allow the visitors of the website to communicate with the owner of the website. For most websites, responsive contact forms can be easily accessed from various types of devices such as desktops, laptops, tablets, and mobile phones. In this tutorial, a responsive contact form is implemented, and the submitted data is sent as an email using PHP.

  • Applying JavaScript’s setTimeout Method

    With the evolution of the internet, JavaScript has grown in popularity as a programming language due to its many useful methods. For example, many websites use JavaScript’s built-in setTimeout method to delay tasks. The setTimeout method has many use cases, and it can be used for animations, notifications, and functional execution delays.Because JavaScript is a single-threaded, translative language, we can perform only one task at a time. However, by using call stacks, we can delay the execution of code using the setTimeout method. In this article, we are going to introduce the setTimeout method and discuss how we can use it to improve our code.

  • Removing Characters from String in Bash – Linux Hint

    At times, you may need to remove characters from a string. Whatever the reason is, Linux provides you with various built-in, handy tools that allow you to remove characters from a string in Bash. This article shows you how to use those tools to remove characters from a string. [...] Sed is a powerful and handy utility used for editing streams of text. It is a non-interactive text editor that allows you to perform basic text manipulations on input streams. You can also use sed to remove unwanted characters from strings. For demonstration purposes, we will use a sample string and then pipe it to the sed command.

Python Programming

  • Dissecting a Web stack - The Digital Cat

    Having recently worked with young web developers who were exposed for the first time to proper production infrastructure, I received many questions about the various components that one can find in the architecture of a "Web service". These questions clearly expressed the confusion (and sometimes the frustration) of developers who understand how to create endpoints in a high-level language such as Node.js or Python, but were never introduced to the complexity of what happens between the user's browser and their framework of choice. Most of the times they don't know why the framework itself is there in the first place. The challenge is clear if we just list (in random order), some of the words we use when we discuss (Python) Web development: HTTP, cookies, web server, Websockets, FTP, multi-threaded, reverse proxy, Django, nginx, static files, POST, certificates, framework, Flask, SSL, GET, WSGI, session management, TLS, load balancing, Apache. In this post, I want to review all the words mentioned above (and a couple more) trying to build a production-ready web service from the ground up. I hope this might help young developers to get the whole picture and to make sense of these "obscure" names that senior developers like me tend to drop in everyday conversations (sometimes arguably out of turn). As the focus of the post is the global architecture and the reasons behind the presence of specific components, the example service I will use will be a basic HTML web page. The reference language will be Python but the overall discussion applies to any language or framework. My approach will be that of first stating the rationale and then implementing a possible solution. After this, I will point out missing pieces or unresolved issues and move on with the next layer. At the end of the process, the reader should have a clear picture of why each component has been added to the system.

  • Introducing AutoScraper: A Smart, Fast and Lightweight Web Scraper For Python | Codementor

    In the last few years, web scraping has been one of my day to day and frequently needed tasks. I was wondering if I can make it smart and automatic to save lots of time. So I made AutoScraper!

  • django-render-block 0.8 (and 0.8.1) released!

    A couple of weeks ago I released version 0.8 of django-render-block, this was followed up with a 0.8.1 to fix a regression. django-render-block is a small library that allows you render a specific block from a Django (or Jinja) template, this is frequently used for emails when you want multiple pieces of an email together in a single template (e.g. the subject, HTML body, and text body), but they need to be rendered separately before sending.

  • Pyston v2: 20% faster Python | The Pyston Blog

    We’re very excited to release Pyston v2, a faster and highly compatible implementation of the Python programming language. Version 2 is 20% faster than stock Python 3.8 on our macrobenchmarks. More importantly, it is likely to be faster on your code. Pyston v2 can reduce server costs, reduce user latencies, and improve developer productivity. Pyston v2 is easy to deploy, so if you’re looking for better Python performance, we encourage you to take five minutes and try Pyston. Doing so is one of the easiest ways to speed up your project.

  • Pyston v2 Released As ~20% Faster Than Python 3.8 - Phoronix

    Version 2.0 of Pyston is now available, the Python implementation originally started by Dropbox that builds on LLVM JIT for offering faster Python performance. Pyston developers believe their new release is about 20% faster than the standard Python 3.8 and should be faster for most Python code-bases.

  • Python int to string – Linux Hint

    Python is one of the universal languages that support various types of data types like integer, decimal point number, string, and complex number. We can convert one type of data type to another data type in Python. This data type conversion process is called typecasting. In Python, an integer value can easily be converted into a string by using the str() function. The str() function takes the integer value as a parameter and converts it into the string. The conversion of int to string is not only limited to the str() function. There are various other means of int to string conversion. This article explains the int to string conversion with various methods.

  • Python isinstance() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is one of the best and efficient high-level programming languages. It has a very straightforward and simple syntax. It has very built-in modules and functions that help us to perform the basic tasks efficiently. The Python isinstance() function evaluates either the given object is an instance of the specified class or not.