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Tuesday, 23 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Great GNU/Linux Division Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 4:03pm
Story The end of Scientific Linux Rianne Schestowitz 1 22/04/2019 - 3:58pm
Story NetworkManager 1.18 Released With Policy Routing Rules, VLAN Filtering For Linux Bridge Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 3:14pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 3:11pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 3:10pm
Story Security: 'Phone' Gimmicks, GNU/Linux Tools and More Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 3:04pm
Story Dropped Linux Kernel Drivers Occasionally See Revival - FDOMAIN Gets Second Chance Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 3:02pm
Story Strawberry: A Fork of Clementine Music Player Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 2:49pm
Story DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 Rolls Out With Two Dozen Fixes Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 2:42pm
Story Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released Roy Schestowitz 4 22/04/2019 - 2:34pm

KMyMoney 5.0.4 released

Filed under
KDE
Software

It took us a while, and now it is ready: KMyMoney 5.0.4 comes with updated documentation. As usual, problems have been reported by our users and the development team worked hard to fix them in the meantime. Besides that, one or the other long standing bug has been fixed. The result of this effort is the brand new KMyMoney 5.0.4 release.

Despite even more testing we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org.

From here, we will continue to fix reported bugs, and working to add many requested additions and enhancements, as well as further improving performance.

Please feel free to visit our overview page of the CI builds at https://kmymoney.org/build.php and maybe try out the lastest and greatest by using a daily crafted AppImage version build from the stable branch.

Read more

Also: Color Picker Snap For Linux

Excellent Utilities: lnav – the log file navigator

This is the second in a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’ll be covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For this article, we’ll put lnav under the spotlight.

lnav is a curses-based utility for viewing and analyzing log files. The software is designed to extract useful information from log files, making it easy to perform advanced queries. Think of lnav as an enhanced log file viewer.

For many years system and kernel logs were handled by a utility called syslogd. Most Linux-based operating systems have since moved to systemd, which has a journal. That’s a giant log file for the whole system. Various software and services write their log entries into systemd’s journalctl. lnav can consume the JSON version of journalctl’s output. And it supports a wide range of other log formats. For systems running systemd-journald, you can also use lnav as the pager.

We included a couple of log analyzers in our Essential System Tools feature. And lnav wouldn’t be totally out of place in that feature. lnav is optimized for small-scale deployments.

Read more

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software.

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?

    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.

  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9

    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news.

    For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.

  • Linux Action News 102

    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser.

    Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.

  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more

    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.

Programming: epub, OpenJDK, GNU Parallel and GStreamer

Filed under
Development
  • Yet another man to epub converter Smile

    Initial search seemed successful, but actually, none of the things I found worked correctly, or at least were not working for me. More precisely, I wanted something to generate a “book” with consistent internal links, so that I can jump from one page to another correctly. See the README for what I tried and gave up on.

    In Debian, there is of course the online manpages service, and there’s also The Linux man-pages project which do this very well. However, the UI and style for these seem to be designed for interactive browsing, whereas a simple output is better for offline browsing.

    So, after a bit of playing around with man -T html, mandoc and man2html, I settled on the later to write my tiny wrapper script. It’s a v0.0.1 release, but nevertheless works, so here it is: https://github.com/iustin/man2ebook.

  • Red Hat to maintain OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11

    Red Hat is taking over maintenance responsibilities for OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 from Oracle. Red Hat will now oversee bug fixes and security patches for the two older releases, which serve as the basis for two long-term support releases of Java.

    Red Hat’s updates will feed into releases of Java from Oracle, Red Hat, and other providers. Oracle released JDK (Java Development Kit) 8, based on OpenJDK 8, in March 2014 while JDK 11, based on OpenJDK 11, arrived in September 2018. Previously, Red Hat led the OpenJDK 6 and OpenJDK 7 projects. Red Hat is not taking over OpenJDK 9 or OpenJDK 10, which were short-term releases with a six-month support window.

  • Red Hat Takes Over Maintenance of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 From Oracle
  • parallel @ Savannah: GNU Parallel 20190422 ('Invitation') released [stable]

    GNU Parallel 20190422 ('Invitation') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/
    No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.

  • GStreamer's Meson and Visual Studio Journey

    Almost 3 years ago, I wrote about how we at Centricular had been working on an experimental port of GStreamer from Autotools to the Meson build system for faster builds on all platforms, and to allow building with Visual Studio on Windows.

    At the time, the response was mixed, and for good reason—Meson was a very new build system, and it needed to work well on all the targets that GStreamer supports, which was all major operating systems. Meson did aim to support all of those, but a lot of work was required to bring platform support up to speed with the requirements of a non-trivial project like GStreamer.

NomadBSD 1.2 released!

Filed under
BSD

We are pleased to announce the release of NomadBSD 1.2! We would like to thank all the testers who sent us feedback and bug reports.

Read more

Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

Filed under
Reviews

Alpine Linux is different in some important ways compared to most other distributions. It uses different libraries, it uses a different service manager (than most), it has different command line tools and a custom installer. All of this can, at first, make Alpine feel a bit unfamiliar, a bit alien. But what I found was that, after a little work had been done to get the system up and running (and after a few missteps on my part) I began to greatly appreciate the distribution.

Alpine is unusually small and requires few resources. Even the larger Extended edition I was running required less than 100MB of RAM and less than a gigabyte of disk space after all my services were enabled. I also appreciated that Alpine ships with some security features, like PIE, and does not enable any services it does not need to run.

I believe it is fair to say this distribution requires more work to set up. Installing Alpine is not a point-n-click experience, it's more manual and requires a bit of typing. Not as much as setting up Arch Linux, but still more work than average. Setting up services requires a little more work and, in some cases, reading too since Alpine works a little differently than mainstream Linux projects. I repeatedly found it was a good idea to refer to the project's wiki to learn which steps were different on Alpine.

What I came away thinking at the end of my trial, and I probably sound old (or at least old fashioned), is Alpine Linux reminds me of what got me into running Linux in the first place, about 20 years ago. Alpine is fast, light, and transparent. It offered very few surprises and does almost nothing automatically. This results in a little more effort on our parts, but it means that Alpine does not do things unless we ask it to perform an action. It is lean, efficient and does not go around changing things or trying to guess what we want to do. These are characteristics I sometimes miss these days in the Linux ecosystem.

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Linux v5.1-rc6

Filed under
Linux

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random
major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The
occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating
traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so
much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch
because nobody eats that stuff in the US.

Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me
go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that
unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0.

So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of
pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the
networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes
being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking).

Read more

Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How OBS Is Helping Expand Broadcasting of Esports

    They dig into how big the team is that work on growing the open source software that is used for video recording and live streaming as well as the challenges of working on this type of project.

  • Assessment of Open Networking, Bare Metal Switches, White Boxes, and NFVi

    A new networking software industry, including open network operating systems (NOS’s) and open source software of all types, was expected to emerge to create options and choices in the type of network infrastructures which all service providers and IT enterprise customers could put together.

  • Open source virtualization expands VM hardware and OS options

    You don't have to use proprietary virtualization software to run virtual machines. The open source community boasts offerings for all different virtualization needs, so you can assemble a program that has exactly the features you want without high upfront costs or tricky service-level agreements.

    Open source virtualization software can help you avoid the costs that come with proprietary software from vendors such as VMware. It also enables you to get updates more frequently, and you can change the source code when necessary.

  • Open-source vs. build-your-own: What to choose? [Ed: Contains plenty of the classic FUD, typically spread by Microsoft and its wings, against FOSS (things that apply equally or are worse in proprietary software).]
  • OpenStack Follows The Datacenter Out To The Edge

    It is difficult not to be impressed with the rapid adoption of OpenStack since the open source cloud infrastructure software platform was first released.

  • Paris’ open source platform for city services is being introduced at a West Baltimore community center

    A tech tool built for cities is going neighborhood level in Baltimore.

    Lutèce, developed by the City of Paris, is an open source platform designed to house city services and offers a base platform on which to develop web and mobile applications. For Paris, it’s the digital home for the 200 various functions city government performs.

  • Puppet CTO: an open source mindset is more than just a code dump

    The Computer Weekly Open Source Insider team spoke to Deepak Giridharagopal this week in his role as CTO at Puppet in an attempt to examine the true nature of open source openness.

    As defined in clear terms here, Puppet is an open source systems management tool for centralising and automating configuration management tasks relating to both hardware and software.

    Giridharagopal argues that the ‘open’ part of open source doesn’t just refer to making the code physically available to the masses.

  • Open-Source Software Making Museums More Accessible

    Oftentimes, the process of visiting a museum begins at an institution’s website, and not all of them are accessible to people with disabilities. In fact, several notable NYC institutions’ websites are not readable by visitors with loss of vision. Those museums should take a tip from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art whose open-source software—a tool that can be added to any website—”seamlessly integrates image descriptions into its online platform.” One feature is the “image description” option, which explains an artwork or artifact to the user. For example, “A work by Doris Salcedo is described as: ‘Four murky sepia-toned images of shoes embedded on a white wall by what appears to be surgical stitching.'” These descriptions can then be read aloud. Read more at Artsy.

  • This Open Source Software Could Make Museum Websites More Accessible

    A program developed by the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago helps people with vision loss navigate art organizations' websites.

  • Why the US Government Just Made Its Own Font

    'Public Sans,' a sharp new typeface for interface design has been made freely available, courtesy of a somewhat unusual source: the United States federal government.

  • What to expect from DataStax Accelerate

    The Computer Weekly Developer Network and Open Source Insider team are off the nation’s capitol (we said capitol, not capital… it’s Washington DC) to witness the goings on at DataStax Accelerate.

    But before we get to the event, let’s sit back and remind ourselves who and what DataStax actually is.

    In the past, we have called DataStax a data platform provider — the company would no doubt more expansively refer to itself as: a provider of a hybrid cloud database built on Apache Cassandra.

    In more granular terms, DataStax technologies exist to provide an always-on active-everywhere distributed hybrid cloud database built on Apache Cassandra for real-time applications at scale.

  • Sole scientist uses open-source AI software to unlock protein folding

    A Harvard Medical school research fellow has used deep learning to predict the structure of any given protein based solely on its amino acid sequence.

    The advance—made using open-source software in the public domain—has the potential to transform virtually all facets of biomedical research, according to a study published online April 17 in Cell Systems.

    In coverage of the development by Harvard’s news division, the researcher, Mohammed AlQuraishi, PhD, said protein folding—the process by which a protein structure assumes its functional shape—has preoccupied biochemists over the last half century.

  • Sydney start-up Q-CTRL launches open source quantum error suppression library

    Sydney start-up Q-CTRL is releasing an open source library of error suppression controls for quantum computers.
    The library of controls integrates with IBM’s Qiskit programming framework for quantum computers and can be run on any quantum machine.
    “We’re removing barriers to the community’s use of these powerful techniques as we help bring the first commercially relevant quantum computers to reality,” said Q-CTRL CEO and founder Professor Michael Biercuk.

  • Making digital tissue imaging better

    The application is "open source" -- or free for anyone to use, modify and extend.

  • Keeping the lights on when the grid takes a hit

    The open-source Severe Contingency Solver software can help government agencies better plan for power outages caused by extreme events.

  • HiveMQ Launches New Open Source MQTT Community

    HiveMQ, developers of the enterprise MQTT platform, today announced a new open source community to accelerate the adoption of MQTT and HiveMQ. The new open source community will initially host two open source projects: HiveMQ Community Edition (CE), a Java-based MQTT broker, and HiveMQ MQTT Client, a Java-based MQTT client. The community will provide high quality, professionally managed open source implementations of the MQTT standards to make it easier for IoT developers to experiment and innovate with MQTT and HiveMQ.

  • Banks can address Brexit uncertainty by choosing open source IT solutions

    As Brexit uncertainty continues to linger, EnterpriseDB's Matt Peachey makes the case for open source banking software to solve IT professionals' woes

  • CWI's DIS group Releases Open Source Software Platform for Object-Based Broadcasting Production

    MMERSE, of which CWI’s Distributed and Interactive Systems (DIS) group is a member had, a successful final review meeting with the reviewers from the EU commission. The goal of the 2-IMMERSE project was to allow TV service providers to break free from the constraints of rendering a broadcast stream onto a single 16x9 frame. The final objective was to enable professionals to develop and deploy customizable interactive and multi-screen experiences that can adapt to the context of use. The results have been successfully demonstrated across multiple number of screens, multiple content genres (sports and drama), and multiple situations (home, schools and in public venues).

    In order to create new opportunities and sustain the project results, the core 2-IMMERSE platform and components are recently released under an open source license. In particular, the DIS group at CWI has contributed with several core platform components related to media synchronization and with a set of production tools for professionals that enable them to create new multi-screen and customizable experiences.

  • OpenFin Reaches Critical Mass [Ed: FOSS is in many way 'the' standard now, like it had been before the proprietary software wave of the 70s (ish). It's now a very bad business 'gamble' to go against FOSS, but the proprietary giants merely pretend to like FOSS. Lips service for PR.]

    Adam Toms, chief executive of OpenFin Europe, said the technology has become the standard operating system across capital markets as it is being used across nearly 200,000 desktops in 1,500 banks and buy-side firms.

    [...]

    The OpenFin desktop operating system is similar to the Android or iOS operating platform for mobile phones but was launched to provide standardisation across capital markets desktops so that the industry can deploy new applications more quickly and they will be interoperable.
    “OpenFin is on nearly 200,000 desktops across 1,500 unique firms, including 13 of the 15 largest investment banks, across a number of different areas,” added Toms.
    He continued that desktop numbers are expected to increase as OpenFin has a number of significant projects launching with clients this year.

    [...]

    Last year OpenFin contributed the FCD3 initiative to the Fintech Open Source Foundation. FINOS is an independent nonprofit organization promoting open standards and open source in financial services.

  • DPCI Announces Partnership with OpenKM for Open Source Document Management

    OpenKM is an open source Enterprise Document Management System licensed under the GNU GPL.

  • Open Broadcaster Software Adopts the SRT Streaming Protocol

    OBS Studio is a free open source tool that creators use to broadcast their content to the world through live streams and recordings. OBS Studio allows users to capture video from a variety of sources, such as cameras and computer screens, and composite them into professional productions that are used to entertain, teach, and inspire. It has formed the bedrock for creators to launch entire careers broadcasting to their audiences on platforms like Twitch, YouTube, Mixer, Facebook and more.

  • Shashank Kumar: Event report for DebUtsav Delhi 2019

    The Debian India Community in Delhi along with Mozilla Delhi/NCR community organized DebUtsav Delhi 2019 on 9 and 10 March, 2019.

    For those who are unware, DebUtsav is an Indian style version of a typical Mini Debian Conference.

    This was the first Debian related conference to be organized in the Northern region of India. We have had Mini Debian conferences previously in Mumbai, Pune, Hyderabad and in different cities of state of Kerala. But this was the very first one in the Northern Region.

  • Cloudera: Plenty Of Upside As The Company Turns A New Page

    In light of how cheap Cloudera's stock now is, it's a good time for investors to review the bullish thesis for this stock. Recall that Cloudera's all-stock merger with Hortonworks (HDP) closed earlier in January, and will start reflecting into Cloudera's results next quarter. Aside from creating the most dominant, integrated vendor of Hadoop software in the market, the addition of Hortonworks' revenues will also help mask Cloudera's revenue deceleration into the mid-20s. Looking longer term, as data volumes explode and use cases evolve, complex data processing and management tools like Hadoop will only become more prevalent. In short, a combined Cloudera-Hortonworks has plenty of runway for growth.

  • Open Source Opportunities for OTT 2.0
  • Open Banking: The Goldman Sachs Way [Ed: Headline has been modified since]
  • Azure HDInsight Analytics Platform Now Supports Apache Hadoop 3.0 [Ed: HDInsight on Zzure is just mass surveillance plus the openwashing to make it 'feel' ethical.]
  • Microsoft Expands Hadoop on Azure
  • Spectra open source biomedical imaging system affordable CATSCAN alternative

    Mindseye Biomedical has created a new open source biomedical imaging system called Spectra which is both safe and easy to use now available to preorder via the Crowd Supply website price from $299 for a Spectra Starter Kit. Spectra enables hackers and scientists to experiment with one of the technologies used in medical imaging electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the system that allows anyone to explore the fascinating world of medical physics from their own home, without a multimillion dollar CATSCAN.

    “Would you like to see imagery of your own lungs? Use impedance cardiography to monitor heart activity? Measure the dielectric spectrum of a bone, a tumor, or a strawberry? Are you interested in gesture-based user interfaces? Consider what you would do if you could easily and safely experiment with, and contribute to, the science of biomedical imaging. And what we could all do if there existed a Commons for health care technology.

  • Sage Bionetworks Executive Urges Adoption of Standards to Create 'Open Science'

    At Bio-IT World, Sage Bionetworks' John Wilbanks called on the research community to adopt the OMOP and FHIR standards so data becomes more useful...

Using Ksplice To Detect Exploit Attempts

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Ksplice is a very cool technology. Ksplice allows you to patch important security updates to your system without a reboot. The in-memory code is patched as well as on-disk components, closing all the gaps for a security vulnerability. All the while, your applications keep running.

A new feature of Ksplice is Known Exploit Detection. When you patch your system with Ksplice, not only is the security vulnerability closed, but also tripwires are laid down for privilege escalation vulnerabilities. If an attacker attempts to exploit a CVE you’ve patched, Ksplice notifies you.

Ksplice is both protecting your system and alerting you to suspicious activity. Very cool.

Read more

Also: Oracle's Ksplice Live Kernel Patching Picks Up Known Exploit Detection

A Set Of Obscure Drivers Out-Of-Tree Since Linux 2.x Will See Mainline For Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux

Should you have any Daktronics scoreboards, video displays, or digital billboards, mainline Linux kernel support appears to be in the works.

While shielded off by Kconfig build switches and not enabled by default, what some will surely point to the growing size of the Linux kernel and its laissez faire approach to accepting new drivers, a set of drivers that have been out-of-tree since the Linux 2.x kernel days are now on their way to the kernel's staging area with Linux 5.2. Not only that, but the code quality is admittedly less than stellar, hence the staging route.

Read more

Also: Intel i40e Driver Supporting Dynamic Device Personalization With Linux 5.2

11 Great Free Linux Foreign Language Tools

Filed under
Software

Learning a new language can provide life changing opportunities and enjoyment. There are so many reasons to learn a foreign language whatever your nationality, to improve employment potential, intellectual curiosity, make travel more enjoyable, sharpen cognitive and life skills, make lifelong friends, and many more. While it is widely acknowledged that it is easier to begin learning a second language at a tender age, starting a new language at any age is eminently worthwhile.

There’s a good selection of traditional materials and tools available to assist with language studies, such as language courses, grammar books, dictionaries, phrasebooks, and electronic translators. However, there are real benefits in using the latest technology to quicken the pace of learning. Online lessons and computer software are two popular ways of immersing yourself in learning a foreign language. They are the best alternative to actually staying in a country where the language is spoken by the general population.

There is an extensive amount of open source computer software to help individuals learn a foreign language. We have identified the best of breed open source Linux software to make language acquisition fun, enjoyable, and a stimulating way of learning. These applications offer the opportunity to radically improve your life.

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KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 67

Filed under
KDE

If you’re celebrating Easter, we’ve got a gift for you: week 67 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative!

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Debian Project Leader Election 2019 Results (Sam Hartman Won)

Filed under
Debian

Hi,

The winner of the election is Sam Hartman.

The details of the results are available at:
https://vote.debian.org/2019/vote_001

Stats for the DPL votes:
|------+------+--------+-------+--------+---------+--------+-----------|
|      |  Num |        | Valid | Unique | Rejects |      % |  Multiple |
| Year |  DDs | Quorum | Votes | Voters |         | Voting | of Quorum |
|------+------+--------+-------+--------+---------+--------+-----------|
| 1999 |  347 | 27.942 |       |    208 |         | 59.942 |   7.44399 |
| 2000 |  347 | 27.942 |       |    216 |         | 62.248 |   7.73030 |
| 2001 |   ?? |     ?? |       |    311 |         |        |           |
| 2002 |  939 | 45.965 |   509 |    475 |     122 | 50.586 |  10.33395 |
| 2003 |  831 | 43.241 |   510 |    488 |     200 | 58.724 |  11.28559 |
| 2004 |  908 | 45.200 |   506 |    482 |      52 | 53.084 |  10.66372 |
| 2005 |  965 | 46.597 |   531 |    504 |      69 | 52.228 |  10.81615 |
| 2006 |  972 | 46.765 |   436 |    421 |      41 | 43.313 |   9.00246 |
| 2007 | 1036 | 48.280 |   521 |    482 |     267 | 46.525 |   9.98343 |
| 2008 | 1075 | 49.181 |   425 |    401 |      35 | 37.302 |   8.15356 |
| 2009 | 1013 | 47.741 |   366 |    361 |      43 | 35.636 |   7.56155 |
| 2010 |  886 | 44.648 |   459 |    436 |      88 | 49.210 |   9.76513 |
| 2011 |  911 | 45.274 |   402 |    392 |      93 | 43.030 |   8.65836 |
| 2012 |  948 | 46.184 |   436 |    403 |      72 | 42.511 |   8.72589 |
| 2013 |  988 | 47.149 |   402 |    390 |      73 | 39.474 |   8.27170 |
| 2014 | 1003 | 47.505 |   412 |    401 |      61 | 39.980 |   8.44117 |
| 2015 |  986 | 47.101 |   364 |    353 |      39 | 35.801 |   7.49454 |
| 2016 | 1023 | 47.977 |   286 |    282 |      74 | 27.566 |   5.87787 |
| 2017 | 1062 | 48.882 |   327 |    322 |      57 | 30.320 |   6.58729 |
| 2018 | 1001 | 47.457 |   343 |    333 |      53 | 33.266 |   7.01674 |
| 2019 | 1003 | 47.505 |   389 |    378 |      59 | 37.687 |   7.95701 |
|------+------+--------+-------+--------+---------+--------+-----------|


Kurt Roeckx
Debian Project Secretary

Read more

Also: DPL elections 2019, congratulations Sam Hartman!

Reference: Debian Project Leader Elections 2019

Phoronix: Sam Hartman Is Debian's Newest Project Leader, Aims To "Keep Debian Fun"

Old: People behind Debian: Sam Hartman, Kerberos package maintainer

Ubuntu Studio 18.04 Extended Support

Filed under
Ubuntu

Back in April 2018, Ubuntu Studio 18.04 was released as a non-LTS (Long-Term Support) version, which limited its support cycle to end January 2019. This was due to a number of factors, from the involvement of the team members at the time to the number of team members.

In January 2019, the team came up with the idea for a Backports PPA of certain software to eliminate certain bugs and update the main packages (the ones that make Ubuntu Studio what it is). It was officially announced in February 2019.

As such, the Ubuntu Studio team no longer supports Ubuntu Studio 18.04 unless the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA is added. Adding the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA increases the support length of Ubuntu Studio 18.04 to 3 years total, with support ending in April 2021.

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Games: Capcom's FOSS Anomaly and 'Interrogation' Coming to GNU/Linux

Filed under
OSS
Gaming
  • Capcom Home Arcade is a plug-and-play arcade stick with 16 games

    Capcom is getting in on the “classic” game bandwagon, announcing the Capcom Home Arcade, a €229.99 plug-and-play arcade system featuring support for two players and including 16 classic titles. If that price seems high to you, relative to emulator-based offerings from Nintendo, or even the FPGA-based solutions from Analogue, then ... you’d be right. In exchange for roughly $260, you do get genuine Sanwa joystick parts, and emulation courtesy of the well-respected, open source FB Alpha emulator.

  • The Emulator In Capcom's Home Arcade Is Stirring Controversy

    Its website markets the Capcom Home Arcade as an “authentic gaming” experience, in part because it utilizes the original arcade ROMs for games like Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting and Alien Vs. Predator and runs them with FB Alpha, an arcade emulator known for its snappy response times. As those in the emulation community were quick to point out, however, FB Alpha is open-source, and distributed under a license that strictly forbids people from trying to profit off of it.

  • Interrogation reveals 2019 release for Windows, Mac and Linux

    Getting a criminal suspect to crack under pressure isn't nearly as easy as TV makes it look. In indie Romanian developer Critique Gaming's upcoming Interrogation, players will find that out firsthand, needing all their conversational wiles if they're to bring down a growing terrorist organization.

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Mozilla: VoxelJS, AiC and Mozilla B-Team

  • Mozilla VR Blog: VoxelJS: Chunking Magic
    A couple of weeks ago I relaunched VoxelJS with modern ThreeJS and modules support. Today I'm going to talk a little bit about how VoxelJS works internally, specifically how voxels are represented and drawn. This is the key magic part of a voxel engine and I owe a tremendous debt to Max Ogden, James Halliday and Mikola Lysenko Voxels are represented by numbers in a large three dimensional array. Each number says what type of block goes in that block slot, with 0 representing empty. The challenge is how to represent a potentially infinite set of voxels without slowing the computer to a crawl. The only way to do this is to load just a portion of the world at a time.
  • AiC: Collaborative summary documents
    One of my goals was that we could, at least for a moment, disconnect people from their particular position and turn their attention towards the goal of achieving a shared and complete summary. I didn’t feel that we were very succesful in this goal. For one thing, most participants simply left comments on parts they disagreed with; they didn’t themselves suggest alternate wording. That meant that I personally had to take their complaint and try to find some “middle ground” that accommodated the concern but preserved the original point. This was stressful for me and a lot of work. More importantly, it meant that most people continued to interact with the document as advocates for their point-of-view, rather than trying to step back and advocate for the completeness of the summary. In other words: when you see a sentence you disagree with, it is easy to say that you disagree with it. It is much harder to rephrase it in a way that you do agree with – but which still preserves (what you believe to be) the original intent. Doing so requires you to think about what the other person likely meant, and how you can preserve that. However, one possible reason that people may have been reluctant to offer suggestions is that, often, it was hard to make “small edits” that addressed people’s concerns. Especially early on, I found that, in order to address some comment, I would have to make larger restructurings. For example, taking a small sentence and expanding it to a bullet point of its own. Finally, some people who were active on the thread didn’t participate in the doc. Or, if they did, they did so by leaving comments on the original GitHub thread. This is not surprising: I was asking people to do something new and unfamiliar. Also, this whole process played out relatively quickly, and I suspect some people just didn’t even see the document before it was done. If I were to do this again, I would want to start it earlier in the process. I would also want to consider synchronous meetings, where we could go try to process edits as a group (but I think it would take some thought to figure out how to run such a meeting). In terms of functioning asynchronously, I would probably change to use a Google Doc instead of a Dropbox Paper. Google Docs have a better workflow for suggesting edits, I believe, as well, as a richer permissions model. Finally, I would try to draw a harder line in trying to get people to “own” the document and suggest edits of their own. I think the challenge of trying to neutrally represent someone else’s point of view is pretty powerful.
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
    Bugfixes + enabling the new security feature for API keys.

Programming Leftovers

Devices: Radiant Software, ASRock and Microsoft

  • Radiant 1.1 Lattice FPGA Design Tools Release Accelerates Design Reuse
    In addition to supporting Windows, Radiant Software 1.1 adds support for the popular Ubuntu LTS 16.4 distribution of Linux. Radiant Software 1.1 is now available for download from Lattices website and currently can be used with a free license.
  • ASRock spins Whiskey Lake-U in thin Mini-ITX, 3.5-inch, and NUC formats
    ASRock announced four products based on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U: a thin Mini-ITX “IMB-1216” board, a 3.5-inch “SBC-350,” and a NUC 4×4 form-factor “iBox-8365U” mini-PC and NUC-8365U mainboard. ASRock Industrial has been busy lately tapping the latest embedded-oriented x86 chips in products such as the Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U based iBox-8265U mini-PC, as well as the iBox-R1000 industrial PC and NUC-R1000 mainboard built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000. Now it has announced four more Whiskey Lake-U products aimed at the embedded market.
  • Making Sense of Microsoft’s Acquisition of Express Logic [Ed: Windows is worthless, so Microsoft is buying the competition. Microsoft also bought Danger, Sidekick etc. and it never ended well. Anything Microsoft touches turns to dust. When it bought Skype it was (back then) near-monopoly, but not anymore. Microsoft sometimes announces financial losses.]
    Even the Linux Foundation, home of the Linux kernel, hosts a project called Zephyr, which is an RTOS designed for use-cases, beyond the reach of Linux.

Events: Richard Stallman in Zurich (Switzerland), OpenStack Summit, Linux Fest Northwest

  • Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • SUSE CaaS Platform at Open Infrastructure Summit
    If you’re attending Open Infrastructure Summit this year and have in previous years as well, you might be noticing something a bit different; this year it’s not called OpenStack Summit. While we expect much of the talk will still be about OpenStack, we thought it might be a good idea to include other related technologies as well, like SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Cloud Application Platform – the two offerings that combine to form SUSE’s Application Delivery solution – and SUSE Enterprise Storage
  • Gearing Up for Linux Fest Northwest 2019!
    This next weekend (April 26-28th, 2019) I will be in Bellingham at Bellingham Technical College for Linux Fest Northwest to help at the Ubuntu table! I will be demonstrating Ubuntu Studio and my au…
  • Ubuntu Studio at Linux Fest Northwest 2019
    Council Chair Erich Eickmeyer will be in Bellingham, WA, USA this weekend for Linux Fest Northwest 2019, and will be bringing his audio setup to demonstrate Ubuntu Studio at the Ubuntu table. Check out the post on his personal blog!