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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDevelop 5.1.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 11:19pm
Story Linux Devices: FriendlyElec, NComputing, CubieTech Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 11:13pm
Story Security Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 10:51pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 10:47pm
Story The Past Week in Techrights (Still on Holiday) Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 8:07pm
Story First LXQt-Based Lubuntu 17.10 Daily Builds Surface, Here's What It Looks Like Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 7:05am
Story Mageia 6 RC Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 6:33am
Story Fedora and Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 6:16am
Story Debian and Devuan News Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 6:04am
Story Gaming News Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2017 - 5:54am

SteamVR for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Wine 2.9

Filed under
Software

Stacer An Alternative To CCleaner And Bleachbit On Linux

Filed under
Linux

​See what I stumbled upon, a good looking open-source system optimizer for Linux called Stacer. And after using it for a while, it's become one of my must-have apps on all my Linux desktops. So Stacer is like CCleaner for Linux. Previously, I have used Bleachbit on Ubuntu but then I found Stacer and I am not looking back. Stacer is developed on electron and once again it's just pretty. The app is organized into 5 sections; the Dashboard, System Cleaner, Startup Apps, Services and Uninstaller. Let's look at them one by one.

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more

Alpine Linux 3.6.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.6.0, the first in the v3.6 stable series.

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15 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus"

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Well, last month Canonical released a new version of Ubuntu which is version 17.04. This will be the last version with unity and canonical will be switch back to GNOME. If you are that kind of person that likes to have everything updated to the latest version you should consider upgrading. If you are LTS kind of person, just keep using your LTS version and wait for 18.04 LTS. Below are some tips to do after installing Ubuntu 17.04.

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more

Linux-based gizmo offers remote 3D printer control and sharing

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The $70 “Waggle” remote controller device for 3D printers offers a mobile app with a video feed and temp controls, plus a cloud-based slicing service.

A Seoul-based startup called Ateam Ventures is closing in on its $10,000 Kickstarter goal for a Waggle 3D printer controller equipped with WiFi and a 720p video camera. The early bird packages are gone, but you can pre-order a Waggle for $70, discounted from the $99 retail price. The campaign runs through June 15, with shipments due in September.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software Letovers

Filed under
Software
  • fman – A Present Day File Manager for Power Usesr

    fman, is a smart console-driven, an alternative file manager with an eye candy UI, a swift performance, a responsive app window, and support for extensibility using plugins. Its modern design and speedy operation have arguably earned it the right to be referred to as a “present day file manager for power users”.

  • MPV – A Cross-Platform CLI-Based VLC Alternative

    MPV Video Player is a free, open-source and cross-platform media player with tons of features including support for frame timing, MKV chapters and subtitles. It boats a responsive video player application with minimal design-based layout that is easily customizable with themes.

  • MKVToolNix 12.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Improves MPEG TS Reader, GUI

    While not a major milestone, MKVToolNix 12.0.0 is a recommended update for all users running MKVToolNix 11.0.0 or a previous version because it includes an important bug fix in the HEVC/H.265 code to avoid generating invalid files. Additionally, the new release comes with an important warning for Windows users.

  • Weblate 2.14.1
  • Activities Activities Activities

    Several weeks ago, my colleague Bruce posted an article on KDE/Plasma Activities, and this got me thinking again about this rather interesting and often overlooked functionality. On paper, it is supposed to be a killer feature; make your desktop fully customized to your specific needs. In reality, most people have no idea it exists, and Plasma makes it even more difficult to discover and use than in KDE4.

    Emboldened, my curiosity piqued, I decided to run my own test and see how useful and practical Activities really are, compared to the classic – and static – setup featuring an interactive desktop with icons and widgets, a multi-purpose panel, and a live search menu. Shall we?

Debian and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!

    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.

  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch

    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):

  • Getting ready for Stretch

    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)

  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)

    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you!

    Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.

  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9

    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC

    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows.

    I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.

  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land

    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things.

    Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain.

    Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.

  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes

    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Filed under
Linux

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Check Point Discovers Media Subtitle Vulnerability Impacting Millions
  • How does Rakos malware attack embedded Linux systems?

    Rakos attacks embedded Linux systems using methods similar to those used by the Moose worm, where it tries to brute force the login credentials via SSH on vulnerable devices. When a vulnerable device is found, the malware transfers the malicious binary to the target system and downloads the configuration file that lists the command-and-control (C&C) servers. The malicious binary starts a web server to accept commands from remote systems. The C&C connection can be used to update the malicious binary and the configuration file.

  • Congressional Rep Pushes His 'Hack Back' Bill By Claiming It Would Have Prevented The WannaCry Ransomware Attack
  • Best password management tool.
  • Top hacker conference to target voting machines

    When over 25,000 of them descend on Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas at the end of July for DEFCON, the world's largest hacking conference, organizers are planning to have waiting what they call "a village" of different opportunities to test how easily voting machines can be manipulated.

  • A wormable code-execution bug has lurked in Samba for 7 years. Patch now!

    The seven-year-old flaw, indexed as CVE-2017-7494, can be reliably exploited with just one line of code to execute malicious code, as long as a few conditions are met. Those requirements include vulnerable computers that (a) make file- and printer-sharing port 445 reachable on the Internet, (Cool configure shared files to have write privileges, and (c) use known or guessable server paths for those files. When those conditions are satisfied, remote attackers can upload any code of their choosing and cause the server to execute it, possibly with unfettered root privileges, depending on the vulnerable platform.

  • Dated Linux bug might be key to lesser Wanna Cry

    Linux, the widely used free operating system, uses a module called Samba to share files in the same way Windows does. Older versions of Samba — 3.5 through 4.4 — are vulnerable to an attack that is similar to, but smaller than, the one behind Wanna Cry, the ransomware that caused a worldwide panic earlier this month.

Linux Foundation Grows So Much it Hires a Chief of Staff

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation hired Sheryl Chamberlain to fill the newly-created position of chief of staff. She’ll oversee operational activities for the foundation and be the point of contact between executive management and stakeholders in its numerous open source projects.

Previously, Chamberlain was a partner VP at the consulting company Capgemini where she led activities to assist Dell Technologies. Prior to joining Capgemini, she worked at EMC in a variety of roles, including chief operations officer in the corporate office of the CTO.

Read more

Also:

  • Container Network Interface Project Joins CNCF

    CNI is now the tenth official project that is part of the CNCF. At the Cloud Native Computing Foundation / Kubecon event in March 2017, the CNCF added Dockers' Containerd and CoreOS' rkt container runtimes as the seventh and eighth projects.

    CNCF itself is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project and is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration and management platform.

    In a video interview conducted at Kubecon, Chris Aniszczyk, COO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation discussed the importance of CNI and why it would likely become part of the CNCF.

  • Linux Kernels 4.9.29, 4.4.69 and 3.18.54 Released Networking Changes, Many Fixes

Gaming News

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The development of Global Scale

    The architecture of Nextcloud is a classic Web Application architecture. I picked this architecture 7.5 years ago because it is very well known and is proven to be scaled relatively easily. This usually works with off the shelf technologies like http load balancers, clusters of Linux webservers and clustered databases.

  • Rubicon Project CEO: ‘Open source will be the gold standard’

    The discussion covers: how the dominance of the duopoly is arguably the company’s biggest life-line; how open source code will lead to a more equitable system; plus potential future acquisitions in his turn around plan.

  • Broad releases open source version of genomic analysis software
  • Sprint executive: Chaos in open source indicative of startup culture, and that’s just fine

    Mobile operators are embracing open source like never before, and there’s a lot of confusion around the myriad projects and efforts that are underway, but that doesn’t worry Sprint’s vice president of technology, Ron Marquardt.

    As a rough analogy, he says the normative standards bodies that have been around for a long time are sort of like Fortune 500 companies. They have a purpose, they’re big in scale and scope, and you know very clearly who to go to for mobile standards. It’s not a question of which of many organizations to go to.

  • How open source software will drive the future of auto innovations

    Automotive companies are shifting from bending metal to bending bits. Soon they will be offering software and services to complement their manufactured metal.

  • Open source for hybrid cloud success: Is it an open and shut case?

    The FOSS acronym – standing for free, open source software – has been a clarion call for many since the open source movement started, despite being nominally based on a misinterpretation of what open source is all about.

  • IoT and the Move to Open Source GIS

    In my 15 years in the geospatial industry, I’ve seen our industry respond to certain trends and take the lead in others. As with most industries, we regarded the Cloud with a certain amount of suspicion and trepidation – after all, many companies’ geospatial data is their “ace in the hole” and they initially felt better and safer keeping it on premise, on their desktops or on servers. Eventually they realized that this led to siloed data and limited access; this, and the cost factor, led to the migration to the Cloud. Data has moved from the back office to the front office. The Cloud is not only used to deliver content, but also to provide an elastic infrastructure to host, analyze, and deliver value to a global set of users.

  • Hortonworks And Red Hat: Cloud IaaS Focus Pays Off
  • Google, IBM, and Lyft launch open source project Istio

    Google, IBM, and Lyft on Wednesday announced the first public release of Istio, an open source service that gives developers a vendor-neutral way to connect, secure, manage and monitor networks of different microservices on cloud platforms.

  • Which technologies are poised to take over in open source?

    When you think of open source technologies, you probably think of the stalwarts, the technologies that have been around for years and years. It makes sense: According to a survey conducted in Q4 of 2016 by my company, Greythorn, 30%+ of participants said established technologies are among the top ten they primarily use.

    [...]

    When we examine the top 10 technologies, eight out of the 10 are 15+ years old, and nine out of 10 are 10+ years old (Docker is the only younger technology represented). However, looking to the next 20 top technologies, we see an onslaught of new arrivals to the industry: 16% of people surveyed are using Apache Cassandra (released in 2008, 1.0 release in 2011), 15% are using Spark (open sourced in 2012, 1.0 release in 2014), 14% are using NGINX (1.0 release in 2011), and 11% are using Kafka (released in early 2011, not at 1.0 release).

  • How I used open source tools to build a theater lighting system

    The things we do for family, eh? Sometimes I wonder why I do it to myself, this not being the first time my perfectionism has led me to do far more work than a task originally required.

  • How to avoid technical debt in open source communities

    "Every engineer nowadays should be spending a couple of hours a week working on open source projects that their company relies on," he said.

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More in Tux Machines

FreeBSD News: 64-bit Inodes and KDE

  • FreeBSD Lands Support For 64-bit Inodes (ino64 Project)
    While Linux and other operating systems (including DragonFlyBSD) have supported 64-bit inodes for data structures on file-systems, FreeBSD has been limited to 32-bit. But thanks to the work of many on the ino64 project, FreeBSD now has support for 64-bit inodes while retaining backwards compatibility.
  • KDE FreeBSD CI (2)
    The KDE Continuous Integration system builds KDE software from scratch, straight from the git repositories, and usually from master (or whatever is considered the development branch). It’s been building for Linux for a long time, and has recently been expanded with FreeBSD servers as well. KDE sysadmin has been kind enough to provide two more VMs (with some more compiling “oomph”) so that we can keep up better, and the CI has just been expanded with all of the Plasma products. That means we’re now building KDE Frameworks, and the Plasma desktop.

Enlightenment 0.21.8

  • Enlightenment DR 0.21.8 Release
    This is another bugfix and stability release for the Enlightenment 21 Release series.
  • Enlightenment 0.21.8 Released
    Enlightenment 0.21.8 was released this week as the latest stable point release to the E21 series. Enlightenment 0.21.8 has a number of fixes, including some display fixes, avoid starting XWayland repeatedly, X11 and Wayland specific alterations, and other routine work.

Void Linux - the Strangely Overlooked Distribution

Ahh, Void Linux. You may or may not have heard of it. If you have, more than likely it was by word of mouth, so to speak, from internet comments on a forum, YouTube video or in passing on Reddit. But this little distro rarely gets any press or recognition otherwise. Perhaps it's time that changes, as Void Linux is an interesting distro in its own right and a good alternative to something like Arch Linux. It also has a no-systemd approach. Read more

5 myths busted: Using open source in higher education

Have you ever heard someone say, "It's impossible to do X with Linux"? Me too. This is the story of how I busted the myths about open source in my own head and used Linux to finish my PhD in fine arts. Read more