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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 6:34am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 2:51am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 2:42am
Story Open/Hacker Hardware Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 2:40am
Story 4MLinux 20.1 released. Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:45am
Story Refracta 8.0 Is a Pint-Sized Powerhouse Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:35am
Story Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:30am
Story PTS: PHP 7.1 vs. PHP 7.0 vs. HHVM Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:27am
Story Best Features Of Linux Mint 18.1 ‘Serena’ Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:10pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.4.36 LTS Introduces Minor PA-RISC Changes, Wireless Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 6:50pm

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Mozilla Patches Zero-Day Flaw in Firefox

    Mozilla moves quickly to fix vulnerability that was being actively exploited in attacks against Tor Browser, which is based on Firefox.

    Late afternoon on November 30, Mozilla rushed out an emergency update for its open-source Firefox web browser, fixing a zero-day vulnerability that was being actively exploited by attackers. The vulnerability was used in attacks against the Tor web browser which is based on Firefox.

  • Thursday's security advisories
  • 'Fatal' flaws found in medical implant software

    Security flaws found in 10 different types of medical implants could have "fatal" consequences, warn researchers.

    The flaws were found in the radio-based communications used to update implants, including pacemakers, and read data from them.

    By exploiting the flaws, the researchers were able to adjust settings and even switch off gadgets.

    The attacks were also able to steal confidential data about patients and their health history.

    A software patch has been created to help thwart any real-world attacks.

    The flaws were found by an international team of security researchers based at the University of Leuven in Belgium and the University of Birmingham.

  • Lenovo: If you value your server, block Microsoft's November security update

    Lenovo server admins should disable Windows Update and apply a UEFI fix to avoid Microsoft’s November security patches freezing their systems.

    The world’s third-largest server-maker advised the step after revealing that 19 configurations of its x M5 and M6 rack, as well as its x6 systems are susceptible.

  • Symantec and VMware patches, Linux encryption bug: Security news IT leaders need to know
  • UK homes lose internet access after cyber-attack

    More than 100,000 people in the UK have had their internet access cut after a string of service providers were hit by what is believed to be a coordinated cyber-attack, taking the number affected in Europe up to about a million.

    TalkTalk, one of Britain’s biggest service providers, the Post Office and the Hull-based KCom were all affected by the malware known as the Mirai worm, which is spread via compromised computers.

    The Post Office said 100,000 customers had experienced problems since the attack began on Sunday and KCom put its figure at about 10,000 customers since Saturday. TalkTalk confirmed that it had also been affected but declined to give a precise number of customers involved.

  • New Mirai Worm Knocks 900K Germans Offline

    More than 900,000 customers of German ISP Deutsche Telekom (DT) were knocked offline this week after their Internet routers got infected by a new variant of a computer worm known as Mirai. The malware wriggled inside the routers via a newly discovered vulnerability in a feature that allows ISPs to remotely upgrade the firmware on the devices. But the new Mirai malware turns that feature off once it infests a device, complicating DT’s cleanup and restoration efforts.

Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trisquel GNU/Linux 8 Alpha Is Now Available to Download

    Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 alpha is now available for download and testing. Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Trisquel 8.0 also ships with the MATE 1.12 desktop.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta released

    Well,Just months back Linux Mint 18 got it's release,now it is the time to have the next point release of Linux Mint 18.Just few hours ago Linux Mint team has announced the availability of Linux Mint 18.1 Beta.
    As Linux Mint users , who have already moved to Linux Mint 18, might be loving it for the newly introduced themes,look & feel and features(of course,they didn't go like updating only pre-installed packages Tongue ).So,in this time, coming from rainy to winter season,they have made a good list of new improvements,features and support.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta Is Out with Cinnamon 3.2 & MATE 1.16, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    A few moments ago, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena."

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • November Bug Squash Month: GJS

    During November I finally took the leap and offered to become a maintainer of GJS. My employer Endless has been sponsoring work on bugs 742249 and 751252, porting GJS’s Javascript engine from SpiderMonkey 24 to SpiderMonkey 31. But aside from that I had been getting interested in contributing more to it, and outside of work I did a bunch of maintenance work modernizing the Autotools scripts and getting it to compile without warnings. From there it was a small step to officially volunteering.

  • Core Apps Hackfest afterthoughts

    During last weekend, I was very happy to attend the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. This is effectively the first hackfest I’ve ever been! Thanks Carlos for organizing that, thanks Kinvolk folks for hosting the event, and Collabora for sponsoring the dinner.

    This event was a great chance to meet the maintainers in person and talk directly to the designers about doubts we have. Since Carlos already wrote down the list of tasks we worked on, I’m not going to repeat it. So here, I’ll report what I was able to work on.

  • Contribute to Polari with this one simple trick!

    I’ve been rather quiet recently working on new features for Builder. But we managed to just release Builder 3.22.3 which is full of bug fixes and a really new important feature. You can now meaningfully target flatpak when building your application. Matthew Leeds has done this outstanding work and it is really going to simplify how you contribute to GNOME applications going forward.

    I’m really happy with the quality of this feature because it has shown me where our LibIDE design has done well, and where it has not. Of course, we will address that for 3.24 to help make some of the UI less confusing.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • My Debian Activities in November 2016

    This month I marked 377 packages for accept and rejected 36 packages. I also sent 13 emails to maintainers asking questions.

  • Debian LTS report for November 2016

    Noevember 2016 was my third month as a Debian LTS team member. I was allocated 11 hours and had 1,75 hours left from October. This makes a total of 12,75 hours. In November I spent all 12,75 hours (and even a bit more) preparing security updates for spip, memcached and monit.

  • Free software activities in November 2016

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced — either maliciously or accidentally — during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Ubuntu still isn't free software

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth just blogged about their stance against unofficial Ubuntu images. The assertion is that a cloud hoster is providing unofficial and modified Ubuntu images, and that these images are meaningfully different from upstream Ubuntu in terms of their functionality and security. Users are attempting to make use of these images, are finding that they don't work properly and are assuming that Ubuntu is a shoddy product. This is an entirely legitimate concern, and if Canonical are acting to reduce user confusion then they should be commended for that.

The appropriate means to handle this kind of issue is trademark law. If someone claims that something is Ubuntu when it isn't, that's probably an infringement of the trademark and it's entirely reasonable for the trademark owner to take action to protect the value associated with their trademark. But Canonical's IP policy goes much further than that - it can be interpreted as meaning[1] that you can't distribute works based on Ubuntu without paying Canonical for the privilege, even if you call it something other than Ubuntu.

Read more

Enlightenment 0.21.4 Desktop Release Adds 106 Changes, Improves Wayland Support

Filed under
OSS

The fourth maintenance update to the Enlightenment DR 0.21 stable series of the lightweight, modern, and open-source window manager and desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions has been released on the last day of November 2016.

Read more

Ardour 5.5 DAW Adds Support for Steinberg CC121 and Avid Artist Control Surfaces

Filed under
OSS

One of the world's best open-source and cross-platform DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software, Ardour, has been updated to version 5.5 on the first day of December 2016, as announced by developer Paul Davis.

Read more

Razer is now a member of the consortium responsible for Vulkan-based graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Razer is now a member of the consortium responsible for Vulkan-based graphics

    The Khronos Group made a brief announcement on Thursday, stating popular PC gaming peripheral maker Razer is now a Contributor Member. The Khronos Group is the non-profit consortium behind the new open-source Vulkan Application Programming Interface (API) that is becoming more commonly used in PC gaming. It’s an alternative to the long-used DirectX and OpenGL graphics APIs.

  • Hardware maker 'Razer' has joined The Khronos Group to back open standards
  • Razer Joins The Khronos Group

    Razer joining The Khronos Group looks to be a VR/AR play, but will hopefully help further push Vulkan and other Khronos standards to gamers. The brief announcement at Khronos.org reads in part, "...Razer co-founded OSVR, an open-source platform that integrates VR, AR and mixed reality hardware and software APIs that support a universal VR ecosystem."

Servers/Networks

Filed under
Server

Chrome 55

Filed under
Google

Christmas Gift Ideas For Linux Fans

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Crikey, folks: it’s December, and that means Christmas is shortly to be thrust upon us, whether we’re ready or not!

It can be tricky to come up with gift ideas for Linux users in your life. And since you’ve probably got more than enough turkey on your plate this holiday season — ho, ho, ho — we thought we’d be swell and save you from getting snowed under trying to find something to buy.

Or to put it in a less breathy sentence: we’ve got some top Linux gift ideas to help make festive shopping a little easier this season.

Read more

Also: Apple's 2016 MacBook Pro & Linux Don't Mix

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Software 3.22.3 Lets Users Upgrade Two Fedora Linux Versions at a Time

    A new maintenance version of the GNOME Software package manager has been released on the first day of December 2016, versioned 3.22.3, for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

  • gtkmm 4 started

    We (the gtkmm developers) have started work on an ABI-breaking gtkmm-4.0, as well as an ABI-breaking glibmm, target GTK+ 4, and letting us clean up some cruft that has gathered over the years. These install in parallel with the existing gtkmm-3.0 and glibmm-2.4 APIs/ABIs.

  • Gtkmm Begins Preparing For GTK4, Now Uses C++14

    Gtkmm, the project providing the de facto C++ interface for GTK+, is preparing for the GTK+ 4.0 era.

    Gtkmm 3.89.1 was released today as the first release based against the GTK+ 4.0 development code and can be installed in parallel with gtkmm-3.0. Aside from basing against GTK 4.0, gtkmm now uses C++14, has removed deprecated APIs, and other changes. Gtkmm using C++14 succeeds its C++11 usage.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Why I’m joining Mozilla’s Board, by Julie Hanna

    Today, I’m joining Mozilla’s Board. What attracts me to Mozilla is its people, mission and values. I’ve long admired Mozilla’s noble mission to ensure the internet is free, open and accessible to all. That Mozilla has organized itself in a radically transparent, massively distributed and crucially equitable way is a living example of its values in action and a testament to the integrity with which Mozillians have pursued that mission. They walk the talk. Similarly, having had the privilege of knowing a number of the leaders at Mozilla, their sincerity, character and competence are self-evident.

  • Security Patches for Firefox and Tor Address Key Security Vulnerability
  • Julie Hanna Joins the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors

    Today, we are very pleased to announce the latest addition to the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors – Julie Hanna. Julie is the Executive Chairman for Kiva and a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship and we couldn’t be more excited to have her joining our Board.

  • State of Mozilla 2015 Annual Report

    We just released our State of Mozilla annual report for 2015. This report highlights key activities for Mozilla in 2015 and includes detailed financial documents.

The December 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Arch Linux 2016.12.01 Is Now Available to Download, Includes Linux Kernel 4.8.11

Filed under
Linux

Today is the first day of December 2016, which means that we can now download a new ISO respin image of the popular and lightweight Arch Linux operating system.

Read more

KDevelop 5.0.3 released

Filed under
KDE

Today, we are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.0.3, the third bugfix and stabilization release for KDevelop 5.0. An upgrade to 5.0.3 is strongly recommended to all users of 5.0.0, 5.0.1 or 5.0.2.

Together with the source code, we again provide a prebuilt one-file-executable for 64-bit Linux, as well as binary installers for 32- and 64-bit Microsoft Windows. You can find them on our download page.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.