Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 30 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu publisher, Samsung, Huawei join major open-source security initiative Rianne Schestowitz 3 30/10/2020 - 7:28am
Story Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 1 30/10/2020 - 7:24am
Story Daniel Pocock: Nomination for Fedora Council Election 2020 Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2020 - 6:44am
Story FreeBSD 12.2 Roy Schestowitz 3 30/10/2020 - 1:25am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2020 - 1:22am
Story AdGuard Home: Another Brick in the Ad-Blocking Wall Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2020 - 1:07am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2020 - 12:59am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2020 - 9:56pm
Story Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4 Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2020 - 9:51pm
Story 8 Tools to Easily Create a Custom Linux Distro Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2020 - 9:41pm

Daniel Pocock: Nomination for Fedora Council Election 2020

Filed under
Red Hat

I've decided to nominate. More details about my platform will appear soon.

Anybody meeting the eligibility criteria is free to nominate. Only one of us will be elected but every election is an opportunity to put forward new ideas and challenge existing practices. The quality of the debate depends a lot on the number and quality of candidates.

The biggest evidence of the power of democracy is the effort that some free software organizations have made to eliminate democracy. When the FSFE community elected me as Fellowship Representative in 2017, FSFE incumbents didn't just seek to remove me, they changed the constitution so that Fellows could not vote again. This wasn't so much an insult to me as it was an insult to every volunteer who voted. If this was about something I had done personally, they never would have made such a permanent change to the constitution. If democracy scares certain people so much then you can be sure you are not wasting your time if you have a go at it.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Rmmod Command in Linux | Linuxize

    The core component of each Linux operating system is the Linux kernel. It manages the system’s resources, and acts as an intermediary between the computer’s hardware and software.

    The Linux kernel is a software that has a modular design. A kernel module, or often referred to as a driver, is a piece of code that extends the kernel’s functionality. Modules can be compiled as loadable modules or built into the kernel. Loadable modules can be dynamically loaded and unloaded in the running kernel on request, without the need to reboot the system.

    In this article, we’ll talk about how to use the rmmod command to remove modules from the Linux Kernel.

  • Bastion host in AWS - Kernel Talks

    Everything you need to know about Bastion host in AWS infrastructure.

  • How to forward SSH key in Putty - Kernel Talks

    A quick post on how to forward SSH key in Putty on Windows.

  • AWS VPC Creation along with screenshots - Kernel Talks

    A quick article on AWS VPC creation along with screenshots.

  • How to install Fedora 33 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Fedora 33.

  • How to install IntelliJ Idea, community edition, on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install IntelliJ Idea, community edition, on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install Zoom Desktop in Ubuntu 20.04 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Zoom Desktop in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to play World of Tanks Blitz on Linux

    World of Tanks Blitz is an action-packed PvP MMO game where players battle against each other in military tanks. In this guide, we’ll go over how you can get World of Tanks Blitz to work on the Linux platform.

  • How to update CentOS - LinuxConfig.org

    In this tutorial, we take you through the process of updating CentOS Linux, including the entire system or on a per package basis.

  • How to upgrade to Pop_OS 20.10

    Pop_OS, the operating system developed and maintained by Linux computer manufacturer System76 has a new release. It is Pop_OS 20.10, which is based on the new Ubuntu 20.10. Pop_OS 20.10 is the best update yet, packed with lots of improvements and new features!

  • How to use Unison to sync files on Linux machines across a network - TechRepublic

    With Linux there are so many ways to synchronize and/or backup files over a network. For many, rsync and scp are the de facto standard. There is, of course, another option--one you've likely never heard of. That option is Unison, a free, open source, cross-platform bi-directional file sync tool. Unison is used to store two replicas that are modified separately and brought up-to-date by propagating changes to each store.

    Unison is capable of synching directories on a local system or across a network. I want to show you how to use this tool and SSH to sync a directory on one Linux server to another. It's incredibly simple to use and even has a GUI that can also be installed, for those who prefer graphical tools over the command line. I'll be illustrating the command line version of Unison on two instances of Ubuntu Server.

  • How to Upgrade Ubuntu 20.04 to Ubuntu 20.10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to upgrade Ubuntu 20.04 to Ubuntu 20.10. For those of you who didn’t know, Ubuntu 20.10 released, codenamed “Groovy Gorilla”; bringing yet another version of a remarkable operating system in the Ubuntu ecosystem, with the latest and some of the greatest open source technologies in a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.

    Note that Ubuntu 20.04 is a long term support (LTS) release, which will be supported for 5 years. Ubuntu 20.10 is a non-LTS release, which means it will be supported for 9 months only, until July 2021. If you prefer stability over bleeding edge, then stick with Ubuntu 20.04.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step upgrade from Ubuntu 20.04 (focal Fossa) to Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla).

  • How To Use pulseaudio-dlna To Stream Audio From Ubuntu 20.10 To Chromecast Devices - Linux Uprising Blog

    This article explains how to install and get pulseaudio-dlna to stream audio from Ubuntu 20.10 or Pop_OS! 20.10, to Chromecast devices.

  • [Quick Tip] One Command to Get A Collection of Gnome Shell Extensions in Ubuntu | UbuntuHandbook

    This is a beginner’s guide shows how to easily extend functionality of GNOME Shell in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 20.10.

    Ubuntu by default includes three extensions: Desktop Icons, Ubuntu AppIndicators, and Ubuntu Dock.

    Besides installing more from Gnome Shell extension website, you can run a single command to get a collection of extensions that provide additional and optional functionality.

AdGuard Home: Another Brick in the Ad-Blocking Wall

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

At the core of the emerging foundation that is Ubuntu Appliances is the aptly named Ubuntu Core, a slimmed-down Ubuntu operating system crafted with the IoT use case in mind. What distinguishes Ubuntu Core, which users can run as a standalone, and Ubuntu Appliances, is that each appliance comes preloaded with a featured service, and all the necessary programs are installed and managed via the Snaps containerized installation mechanism.

With this structure, appliances are designed to just work “out of the box,” if we borrow that brick-and-mortar paradigm in the sense of post-flashing, post-booting, and post-configuration. Users will need to boot the appliance device and perform a token amount of local administration, provide it with an Internet connection with a static LAN IP address, and set up an Ubuntu One account if they don’t have one. A few web GUI prompts later, and the user is up and running.

Ubuntu then does the rest, and that encompasses a lot of heavy lifting. Appliances will update themselves for a 10-year lifespan as long as they have Internet access. If all goes according to plan, users shouldn’t have to give a second thought to their appliance unless they want to change its configuration. Even then, all they have to do is enter the Web administration GUI, toggle a few switches, and close the tab.

Read more

Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4

StereoPi is going to Crowd Supply to pitch an open-spec “StereoPi v2” stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi CM4. The v2 adds a Type-C port and advances to GbE and 802.11ac.

In Dec. 2019, Russia-based Virt2real found Crowd Supply success with a StereoPi stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3). Now operating under the StereoPi name, the company has posted a Crowd Supply page for a second-gen model that uses the new Raspberry Pi CM4.

Read more

8 Tools to Easily Create a Custom Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

When there are so many Linux distros out there, you are probably wondering why someone would want to create their own distro instead of getting a readymade one. While in most cases a readymade distro is fine, if you want to have a distro that is 100 percent tailored to your needs (or your mum or dad’s needs), you may have to create your own custom Linux distro.

With the right tools, creating your own Linux distro isn’t as hard as it seems, though it takes time for sure. There are many tools for the purpose – some of them are universal, and some of them are distro-specific. Here are eight of them.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • 7 Halloween-themed Retro-Games for RetroPie - YouTube

    Halloween is my favorite holiday! And to celebrate, here are 7 great retro games that are perfect for the occasion. These are some great spooky-fun games to add to your RetroPie.

  • Friends of GNOME Update – October 2020

    We’re working with our friends at KDE on the Linux Application Summit (LAS). This event takes place November 12 – 14. It will be online this year. The event will cover all things to do with apps in a Linux environment. Registration is open! LAS is also looking for volunteers, so if you’d like to get involved, please fill out this form.

    Registration for GNOME.Asia is open! The GNOME.Asia Summit 2020 will be taking place online on November 24 – 26. While the conference is centered around the GNOME Project, there will be talks, workshops, and Birds of a Feather sessions for everyone interested in free and open source software. You can register online.

  • Collabora developers mentor successful GSoC Projects

    Autumn is just around the corner. For many participants in the GSoC 2020, a busy and instructive summer full of hacking on open source projects came to an end a few weeks ago. Commits have been contributed and final reports have been written. This year experienced Collabora Productivity developers were again mentors for various projects of the Google Summer of Code for the LibreOffice project. Here are some examples of projects our team helped to succeed!

  • OpenBehavior: A Rich Directory for Open-source Behavioral Neuroscience Projects

    OpenBehavior is an open-source repository for tools, software, projects and scripts that are dedicated for behavioral neuroscience research.

    The main goal is to promote and accelerate the collaboration of open-source neuroscience projects, neuroscience researchers and developers.

    Currently, OpenBehavior has 145 projects and active community of developers and research who are supporting this project. The project is founded and maintained by a group of researchers and professors. It started 2016 by Mark Lubach (PhD) and Alexxai Karvitz (PhD).

    The project is funded by NASA DC Space Grant Consortium to ML, Summer 2017. However, It's still looking for more support as it's 100% volunteer work.

  • Taskcluster's DB (Part 1) - Azure to Postgres [Ed: Mozilla flirtations with Microsoft again]

    This is a deep-dive into some of the implementation details of Taskcluster. Taskcluster is a platform for building continuous integration, continuous deployment, and software-release processes. It’s an open source project that began life at Mozilla, supporting the Firefox build, test, and release systems.

    The Taskcluster “services” are a collection of microservices that handle distinct tasks: the queue coordinates tasks; the worker-manager creates and manages workers to execute tasks; the auth service authenticates API requests; and so on.

  • Open Source Drive-Thru Contributors [Ed: Openwashing agenda by VM Brasseur or how to 'farm' a community for 'free labour']

    VM Brasseur explains open source “drive-thru contributions” and explores how the process can be improved.

    In the ongoing efforts to create a sustainable free and open source software ecosystem—one where projects receive the attention they need without burning out their maintainers in the process—a lot of attention has justifiably fallen on increasing the number of FOSS contributors.

    Much of the discussion around increasing contributors assumes that the primary goal is to get contributors who will stick around and become community members and maintainers. It's certainly true that many hands make light work, and the more maintainers a project has the less likely it is that any one of them will bear the brunt of the work and burn out. But, this isn't the only way to support project sustainability through contributions. Another approach is to optimize your project for drive-thru contributors.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (linux-4.19), Fedora (tcpreplay, xen, and yubihsm-shell), SUSE (pacemaker), and Ubuntu (gosa and pam-python).

  • Set up CUPS Print Server in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    The job of a print server is to accept print requests from multiple machines, process those requests, and then send them to the specified printer for serving those requests. CUPS is a utility designed for Linux operating systems that can turn a regular computer system into a print server. This article provides a method for setting up the CUPS print server in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Ubuntu Unity Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains how to switch Ubuntu 20.10 user interface back to Unity rather than GNOME. This is for computer users who prefer Ubuntu with its innovative Unity appearance that found in version 10.04 LTS and 16.10. Now let's have fun!

Hardware: Purism and More

Filed under
Hardware
  • Foreshadowing, Why the Purism Logo is a Rectangle

    When I started Purism in 2014 I knew I wanted to build secure computing hardware bundled with a privacy-respecting operating system that had freedom-respecting applications and services. I also knew that a computer could be a server, desktop, laptop, tablet, phone, watch, among many other form factors, and most of these have screens or at least a screen used to interact with (until we get to read/write electrical signals in our brains–what I call brain embeddables, sci-fi terminology sometimes calls “beddies”–we will continue to see devices with screens).

    In early 2005 (when I started the first online cable company) I presented that the movie and television industry needed to look at all computers as TVs, since a TV is just a computing device showing videos on a screen, and the only difference was size of screen, distance to viewing, and user interaction. A “TV” in that sense was remote controlled from a couch, a laptop was keyboard and mouse controlled from close-up, a tablet and phone (realize this was 2005 so pre-smartphone) could also become a video device. All of these are “just screens” from my point of view.

    Forming Purism, I knew we would iterate from laptop toward phone; but also could include servers (with monitor), desktops (with monitor), tablets, watches, routers, and all sorts of brainstorm-worthy products–nearly all containing a screen or access via a screen. It was very easy for me to “just use a screen” as a logo, and in what is probably a very rare story, I drew the first logo which was the only logo and remains our logo to this day. A simple rectangle to reference that all these screen based devices are just computers and with them we can do anything we desire.

  • InferX X1 SDK, PCIe and M.2 Boards for edge inference acceleration

    YOLOv3 is out now through the compiler framework and we can expect it to be demonstrated in the coming weeks. By Q1 2021, it will support popular customer models and initial support for Linux-based operating system Ubuntu and CentOS.

  • STMicro unveils VL53L5 multi-zone ToF ranging sensor

    We’ve previously covered or even tested STMicro Time-of-Flight (ToF) ranging sensors with devices like VL53L0X with up to 2-meter range or VL53L1X extending the range to a maximum of 4 meters to measure the distance to one object aka region of interest (ROI).

  • NuMaker-IoT-M263A board is the Swiss army knife of IoT development

Real-Time Patches Updated For Linux 5.9/5.10 With The Code Not Yet Mainlined

Filed under
Linux

There was talk earlier this year of mainlining the real-time Linux kernel patches after similar discussions last year didn't result in it happening. Merging the RT code didn't happen for the recent Linux 5.10 merge window but at least the out-of-tree patches were quickly re-based for Linux 5.9 stable and 5.10-rc1.

Sebastian Andrzej Siewior announced today 5.9.1-rt20 and 5.10-rc1-rt1 as the latest real-time patches for the current stable and development kernels.

Read more

Also: [ANNOUNCE] v5.9.1-rt20

Also see: Real-time operating system

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The OpenShift opportunity for the partner ecosystem

    Red Hat's Ernest Jones reflects on recent OpenShift momentum and what it means for the partner ecosystem.

  • Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 10 Beta now available

    The latest versions of Red Hat Software Collections and Red Hat Developer Toolset are available now in beta. Red Hat Software Collections 3.6 delivers the latest stable versions of many popular open source runtime languages, web servers and databases natively to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. These components are supported for up to five years, helping to enable a more consistent, efficient, and reliable developer experience.

  • Red Hat Insights dashboard provides automatic discovery, health and security assessment for SAP HANA on Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3? Enhanced container tools, more system roles and new cloud admin tools just for starters

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3 will be available in the coming weeks. In this post we'll take a look at some of the highlights and important new features that are planned for RHEL subscribers.

    A RHEL release has many constituencies. RHEL has to meet the needs of system administrators who crave system stability and predictability, and developers who want flexibility and new language and software choices. With new system roles, a major RHEL container tools update, cloud administration updates and more, RHEL 8.3 delivers for those who depend on enterprise open source to run today's businesses.

    The third update since RHEL 8's release in early 2019, RHEL 8.3 continues the six-month cadence of minor releases. By offering a predictable, time-based release cycle we help drive new features in a timely fashion without compromising the reliability of RHEL that our users and customers depend on.

  • Collect JDK Flight Recorder events at runtime with JMC Agent - Red Hat Developer

    JDK Flight Recorder, or JFR, is an event-based production environment profiler available from OpenJDK 8u272 forward. Being a HotSpot-native feature, JDK Flight Recorder performs with extremely low overhead in terms of how it uses both space and time.

    While JDK Flight Recorder collects basic Java runtime information by default, it is also possible to use JFR’s Event API to collect custom events. Developers who want to collect application-level events must actively define and instantiate them in their application source code.

    In this article, we’ll show you how to use JMC Agent and the JMC Agent Plugin to instrument your application classes with event-emitting code. When you use JMC Agent with the JDK Flight Recorder Event API, you do not need to shut down the JVM and recompile the application code.

  • New custom metrics and air gapped installation in Red Hat 3scale API Management 2.9 - Red Hat Developer

    We continue to update the Red Hat Integration product portfolio to provide a better operational and development experience for modern cloud– and container-native applications. The Red Hat Integration 2020-Q3 release includes Red Hat 3scale API Management 2.9, which provides new features and capabilities for 3scale. Among other features, we have updated the 3scale API Management and Gateway Operators.

    This article introduces the Red Hat 3scale API Management 2.9 release highlights, including air-gapped installation for 3scale on Red Hat OpenShift and new APIcast policies for custom metrics and upstream mutual Transport Layer Security (TLS).

AMD ROCm 3.9 and AMDVLK 2020.Q4.2 Vulkan Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • AMD ROCm 3.9 Released With AOMP OpenMP Offloading Integrated - Phoronix

    A new version of the AMD Radeon Open eCosystem (ROCm) has been released on the same day as the company announcing the Radeon RX 6800/6900 series. Meet ROCm 3.9.

    While announced on the same day as the Big Navi RX 6800/6900 reveal, ROCm 3.9 has no mention of supporting these GPUs starting to ship in November. In fact, the Radeon RX 5000 "Navi 1" graphics cards are still not listed as supported with ROCm 3.9 with Vega/GFX9 still being listed as the latest hardware support.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.2 Vulkan Driver Released - Phoronix

    As we hit the end of October AMD has issued their second open-source Vulkan driver code drop of the quarter with the AMDVLK 2020.Q4.2 availability.

    Listed with this morning's AMDVLK 2020.Q4.2 update is just updating against Vulkan API 1.2.157 and fixing a GPU hang that can occur with DOOM Eternal running under Steam Play. That's it as far as the listed changes go for today's update.

PostgreSQL 13, Latest Stable Kernel Update in Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE

One of the two major version updates in the latest 20201026 snapshot was a Mozilla Firefox 82.0 update; the new version resolved seven Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures and improved performance with restoring sessions and page loads. Mozilla Thunderbird also had an update to version 78.4.0, which added some mail extension Application Programming Interfaces. The printing update to cups 2.3.3 added a workaround for the scheduler’s systemd support and fixed a warning options support for GNU Compiler Collection 9. A daylight saving time fix for glib2 2.66.2 changed the default format. The 5.9.1 Linux Kernel arrived in the snapshot and fixed a kernel panic bsc#1177973. MariaDB updated to version 10.5.6 from 10.4.14, which implemented new features and made all binaries previously beginning with mysql to begin with mariadb or with symlinks for the corresponding mysql command. The other major version update was to perl-URI 5.05 from version 1.76; the change was made to bump all versions to 5.05 in order to remove various version mismatches, according to the changelog. The snapshot is trending moderately at an 83 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Only two Python packages arrived in snapshot 20201025, which is trending at a 96. A major version update of python-hyperlink 20.0.1, which provide pure-Python implementations of immutable URLs, fixed several bugs related to hidden states; this made all data on a URL object (including rooted and uses_netloc) reflective by and consistent with its textual representation. The update of python-numpy 1.19.2 increased the required memory to avoid test failures and openQA found an issue (boo#1176832) and upgraded older distro versions, which did not package f2py using update-alternatives.

Two more major version updates arrived in snapshot 20201024 and postgresql 13 was one of them. Significant improvements in postgresql 13 include indexing and a lookup system that benefit large databases; this helps with space savings and performance gains for indexes as well as faster response times for queries that use aggregates or partitions. A list of improvements can be found in the project’s news release. The other major version update was to the utility manager ndctl 70.1, which added firmware activation support. A few Advanced Linux Sound Architecture packages updated to version 1.2.4, which lists some configuration changes along with a few new hotplugs for AICA (Dreamcast) Firmware and AudioScience ASIHPI Firmware. Debugging tools in the xfsprogs 5.9.0 package fixed the potential unterminated string problem for libhandle. The snapshot is trending at a 90.

Read more

Also: openSUSE Community To Have Kickoff Session for Leap 15.3 - openSUSE News

UbuntuDDE Remix 20.10 Released With Linux 5.8, Snap Plugin, And More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Earlier this year, we reported about a brand new UbuntuDDE Remix that combines the power of Ubuntu Linux and Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) from Deepin Linux.

After the successful launch of the first-ever UbuntuDDE Remix 20.04 LTS release, its project leader Arun Kumar Pariyar has now announced a new iteration called UbuntuDDE Remix 20.10 codenamed “groovy” (Groovy Gorilla).

Read more

Also: Design and Web team summary – 28th October 2020 | Ubuntu

Freedom-Respecting/Open Hardware: SiFive's PC Project and Blob-free WiFi & Bluetooth Stack

Filed under
Hardware
  • SiFive Is Launching The Most Compelling RISC-V Development Board Yet - Phoronix

    If you've been waiting to port your software to RISC-V until having a decent RISC-V system where you can develop on-host, wanting to experiment with the libre processor architecture or even use it as a daily desktop system, or just wanting a Linux system that's not x86_64 / ARM / POWER, SiFive today is announcing a new board today that is the most promising yet. The SiFive HiFive Unmatched is the best RISC-V development board we've seen to date and the closest to being the first "RISC-V PC" for Linux use.

  • SiFive unveils plan for Linux PCs with RISC-V processors | VentureBeat

    SiFive today announced it is creating a platform for Linux-based personal computers based on RISC-V processors.

    [...]

    SiFive raised $61 million in August from investors that included chip superpowers Intel and Qualcomm. The startup has raised $190 million to date, and former Qualcomm executive Patrick Little recently joined SiFive as CEO. His task will be to establish the company’s RISC-V processors as an alternative to Arm. This move comes in the wake of Nvidia’s $40 billion acquisition of the world’s leading processor architecture.

    If Little is also looking to challenge Intel and AMD in PCs, he’ll have his work cut out for him. For starters, SiFive is currently focused on Linux-based PCs, not Microsoft Windows PCs. Secondly, SiFive wouldn’t build these processors or computers on its own. Its customers — anyone brave enough to take on the PC giants — would have to do that.

  • SiFive's RISC-V PC coming soon for $665 - Liliputing

    As promised, SiFive has unveiled a new computer featuring the company’s SiFive FU740 processor based on RISC-V architecture.

    The company, which has been making RISC-V chips for several years, is positioning its new SiFive HiFive Unmatched computer as a professional development board for those interested in working with RISC-V. But unlike the company’s other HiFive boards, the new Unmatched model is designed so that it can be easily integrated into a standard PC.

  • The quest for a blob-free WiFi & Bluetooth stack for BL602 WiSoC

    I thought I was done writing about Bouffalo Lab BL602 WiFI & Bluetooth RISC-V SoC for a while after first covering the chip itself, and then an inexpensive BL602 development board this weekend. But the BL602 SDK has shown up in various Github repositories, including Bouffalo Lab’s own bl_iot_sdk repository, and as more people are looking into it, there’s now an effort to develop a fully open-source blob-free WiFi & Bluetooth stack for BL602, and other Bouffalo Lab WiFi and/or Bluetooth wireless chips.

Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, Bad Voltage, Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

     

  • BSDNow 374: OpenBSD’s 25th anniversary

    OpenBSD 6.8 has been released, NetBSD 9.1 is out, OpenZFS devsummit report, BastilleBSD’s native container management for FreeBSD, cleaning up old tarsnap backups, Michael W. Lucas’ book sale, and more.

  • Bad Voltage 3×16: Not Fun To Watch

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia present Bad Voltage, in which the utilities question comes up again, we create spin-off show “Sussing Out Stocks With Stuart”, and...

  •  

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E32 – Sleeping northwards

    This week we’ve been escaping from Hell and using Stadia controllers over WiFi. We

    It’s Season 13 Episode 32 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

Intel: Graphics, Hardware and Openwashing (in Proprietary GitHub) Monopoly

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Intel Begins Their Open-Source Driver Support For Vulkan Ray-Tracing With Xe HPG - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source developers have begun publishing their patches enabling their "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver to support Vulkan ray-tracing! This is in preparation for next year's Xe HPG graphics card that will feature hardware-accelerated ray-tracing.

    Jason Ekstrand as the lead developer originally on the Intel ANV driver has posted today the initial ray-tracing code for ANV in order to support VK_KHR_ray_tracing for their forthcoming hardware. Today is the first time Intel has approved of this open-source code being published and more is on the way. The code today isn't enough for Vulkan ray-tracing but more is on the way and based against the latest internal Khronos ray-tracing specification. At the moment they are not focusing on the former NVIDIA-specific ray-tracing extension but may handle it in the future if game vendors continue targeting it rather than the forthcoming finalized KHR version.

  • Intel Reveals Few More Details Regarding 11th Gen "Rocket Lake" Processors - Phoronix

    While 11th Gen "Rocket Lake" desktop processors aren't expected to be released until the end of Q1'2021, given the interest building around AMD Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" processors, Intel revealed a few more details today about their next-generation wares.

    Intel reiterated that Rocket Lake S is on track for Q1'2021 and will combine Cypress Cove cores with Gen12 Xe Graphics. Nothing new and was already expected based on prior Linux patches. Intel says that Rocket Lake will provide "double-digit percentage IPC performance improvements" gen-over-gen and enhanced graphics.

  • Intel's oneDNN Continues Improving Support For Non-Intel Hardware - Phoronix

    Earlier this year was the surprising move of Intel's oneDNN neural network library adding AArch64 support and that was then complemented by adding IBM POWER support to this neural network library that is part of their oneAPI collection. Now with the latest oneDNN 2.0 beta they have furthered the support and performance for non-Intel hardware.

    Not only is there IBM POWER (PowerPC 64) support but IBM z (390x) is also now supported by this library formerly known as MKL-DNN and DNNL. This library is focused on providing the "building blocks" for constructing deep learning applications.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install a free Let's Encrypt SSL certificate on Debian 10 - PragmaticLinux

    This PragmaticLinux article teaches you how to generate a free Let's Encrypt SSL certificate and install it on your Debian based web server.

  • Install Squid Proxy On Ubuntu 20.04 | Itsubuntu.com

    Squid is a caching proxy for the Web. It has support for the HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, and other protocols. It helps to speed up a web server by caching repeated requests, caching web, DNS and access geo-restricted content.

  • How to Install Pandora FMS Monitoring Tool in Ubuntu 20.04

    Pandora FMS also know as "Pandora Flexible Monitoring System" is a monitoring tool used for servers, networks, applications, and virtual infrastructure. It is simple, scalable and suitable for complex and larger environments. It uses several protocols including, TCP, UDP, SNMP, HTTP and agents to collect the different metrics. You can monitor the status and performance of web servers, database servers, applications, routers, and other network devices using the Pandora FMS.

  • Display Git Repository Summary In Terminal Using Onefetch - OSTechNix

    Onefetch is a command line tool to display Git repository summary in terminal. Onefetch is like Neofetch but for Git repositories only.

  • How To Install AnyDesk on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install AnyDesk on CentOS 8, as well as some extra required package by AnyDesk

  • How to Format a USB drive in Debian

    Formatting a USB is a common operation in most computer systems and it comes in handy in a number of ways. For instance, you can format a USB drive if it gets infected with a virus, and data is corrupted or you want to change the file system as it is not compatible with your OS. Similarly, it can be helpful if you want to completely wipe off the old data so that you can fully use the storage space. So whatever the reason, you can easily format your USB device through different methods in a Debian operating system.

    In this article, I will show you different methods to format a USB drive on the command-line and on Debian Desktop. You can use either of them based on your preferences.

    Note that we have run the commands and procedure mentioned in this article on a Debian 10 system.

  • Linux Netstat Command Tutorial for SysAdmins [40 Examples]

    The netstat (network statistics) utility in Linux provides information related to network connections. You can use various netstat commands to display active network connections, interface data, routing tables, and so on. These are essential information for network admins and infosec professionals. That’s why we have prepared this guide with a wide selection of useful netstat examples. After completing this guide, you will be able to inspect all the network-related information for your Linux machine. We also encourage readers to try these examples on their own machine for obtaining a more hands-on experience.

  • Linux Fu: Troubleshooting Incron | Hackaday

    You probably know about cron, a program that lets you schedule programs to run at various times. We’ve also talked about incron, which is very similar but instead of time, it reacts to changes in the file system. If you ever wanted to write a program that, say, detects a change in a file and automatically uploads it to a programmer, backs it up, e-mails it somewhere, or anything else, then incron might be for you. Although we’ve talked about it before, incron has some peculiarities that make it very difficult to debug problems, so I thought I’d share some of the tricks I use when working with incron.

    I was thinking about this because I wanted to set up a simple system where I have a single document directory under git control. Changing a markdown file in that folder would generate Word document and PDF equivalents. Conversely, changing a Word document would produce a markdown version.

    This is easy to do with pandoc — it speaks many different formats. The trick is running it only on changed files and as soon as they change. The task isn’t that hard, but it does take a bit to debug since it’s a bit nontrivial.

PolarFire SoC board has GbE port and 40-pin GPIO

Sundance will soon launch an SBC-like, $995 “PolarBerry” module that runs Linux on Microchip’s FPGA-enabled, RISC-V based PolarFire SoC with 4GB DDR4 and eMMC, dual CAN, a GbE port, and RPi style 40-pin GPIO.

Microchip’s PolarFire SoC, the world’s first SoC to combine a Linux-ready RISC-V architecture CPU with an FPGA, has so far appeared on an Aries M100PFS module and Microchip’s own PolarFire SoC Icicle Kit SBC. Now, UK-based FPGA manufacturer Sundance has announced a Raspberry Pi sized PolarBerry SoM equipped with the hybrid SoC. It will soon launch on Crowd Supply for $995, with shipments due in January.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4

StereoPi is going to Crowd Supply to pitch an open-spec “StereoPi v2” stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi CM4. The v2 adds a Type-C port and advances to GbE and 802.11ac. In Dec. 2019, Russia-based Virt2real found Crowd Supply success with a StereoPi stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3). Now operating under the StereoPi name, the company has posted a Crowd Supply page for a second-gen model that uses the new Raspberry Pi CM4. Read more

8 Tools to Easily Create a Custom Linux Distro

When there are so many Linux distros out there, you are probably wondering why someone would want to create their own distro instead of getting a readymade one. While in most cases a readymade distro is fine, if you want to have a distro that is 100 percent tailored to your needs (or your mum or dad’s needs), you may have to create your own custom Linux distro. With the right tools, creating your own Linux distro isn’t as hard as it seems, though it takes time for sure. There are many tools for the purpose – some of them are universal, and some of them are distro-specific. Here are eight of them. Read more