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Wednesday, 01 Apr 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 10:14am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 10:13am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 10:13am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 10:11am
Story Google announces Drive for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:56am
Story First distro tests on Lenovo G50 - Ubuntu and Netrunner Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:41am
Story Debian 8.0 Release Date & New Gentoo Website Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:37am
Story Google's Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chrome PC for Under $100 Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:35am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 8:37am
Story Ubuntu Security Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 8:36am

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Obnam 4.1 released

    It is with great pleasure and satisfaction that I release version 4.1 of Obnam, my backup program. This version includes a radically innovative approaches to data compression and de-duplication, as well as some other changes and bug fixes.

  • man-pages-3.82 is released

    I've released man-pages-3.82. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

  • GnuCash Accounting App Gets Updated with Latest US Income Tax Data

    GnuCash is a personal and small-business financial/accounting application that's been freely licensed and distributed under the GNU GPL license for a long time. A new update that brings numerous bug fixes has been released and is now ready for download.

  • Audacity 2.1.0 Released
  • CrossOver for Linux Available with a 40% Discount for Less than a Day

    CrossOver Linux is an application based on Wine that permits users to install and run software that was designed for Windows operating systems. It's more than just front-end for Wine, and it comes with some interesting features, so the fact that you can buy it at a big discount should catch your eye.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Google announces Drive for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google just announced a slew of Chrome OS powered devices, including a Flip Chromebook from ASUS and a Chromebit device which is a complete Chrome OS device on a stick.

Buried under these announcements where the arrival of Google Drive for Linux. For some reason Google doesn’t have Linux on their priority list anymore this Drive for Linux didn’t even get their own press release.

Katie Roberts-Hoffman, Engineer and ARM Wrestler at Google wrote in a blog post announcing the new Chrome OS devices, “Google Drive for Linux brings the much requested service to those enterprise customers who run their businesses on Linux.”

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First distro tests on Lenovo G50 - Ubuntu and Netrunner

Filed under
Reviews

We may deride Ubuntu for being modern and newb-friendly and not pure Linux or whatever. But that's nonsense. This splendid distribution, especially in its LTS form, eats hardware platforms for breakfast. I have not yet found a single machine that it didn't support, and didn't support almost 100%. Nigh perfect. This last case is yet another example.

I guess the path for future testing has been laid out. I may have to play a bit with setting UEFI on and off, and definitely use Ubuntu bootloader to get things going, but from now, other distributions ought to be able to install. Or not. Either way, I shall copiously rant about it to your uttermost delight. Summing up what we saw today, Netrunner works fine, with numerous limitations and heavy memory consumption. Trusty is a perky little beast with no faults or problems, it's lithe and lean and cool, and purrs like a happy kitten no matter where placed or tested. Draw your own conclusions, dear readers. More distro testing coming soon. Mint, Kubuntu, for sure. Some others, too.

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Debian 8.0 Release Date & New Gentoo Website

Filed under
-s

Niels Thykier today posted that Debian 8.0 now has a "target release date." This isn't written in stone, but it would take something "really critical" to postpone the release. Elsewhere, the Gentoo Linux project today announced the launch of their "totally revamped and more inclusive website." The announcement stated that the old site wasn't "as inclusive as we would have liked."

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Google's Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chrome PC for Under $100

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google just introduced a whole new kind of Chrome OS computer—a dongle that plugs into any HDMI-equipped display. It’s called a Chromebit, and it isn’t your run-of-the-mill streaming stick. For under $100, you’re looking at a full computer that plugs right into your TV.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why The Red Hat Story Can Only Get Better

    But, it turns out that I was a bit conservative with my estimates. And it also turns out that I did not give the OpenShift platform the respect it deserves. OpenShift is an open-source PaaS platform by Red Hat. Red Hat released fourth quarter and full year fiscal 2014 results that nicely beat analysts' top and bottom line expectations, powered by strong adoption of OpenStack and OpenShift.

  • CentOS 7 Updates

    The CentOS Project is happy to announce the availability of CentOS 7 (1503). This release includes a number of new features including a major update to IPA, which adds support for two-factor authentication. Other enhancements include the addition of OpenJDK 8, the return of Thunderbird, and improved container support.

  • Red Hat brings big Data integration to JBoss Middleware Portfolio

    Red Hat has become a role model for open source aspirants. They make more than a billion dollars per year from open source software; no secret sauce. Red Hat’s solution powers companies and organizations around the globe.

Ubuntu Security

Filed under
Ubuntu

Open Source Router Aims to Transform Data Center Networks

Filed under
Server
OSS

An industry syndicate has launched a Linux distribution optimized to support deployment of routing software and software defined networks (SDN) on x86 servers.

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Initial Intel Braxton Support Might Come To Linux 4.1

Filed under
Linux

Daniel Vetter of Intel today sent in more code for DRM-Next that in turn will be merged for the Linux 4.1 kernel. It was also signaled that the initial hardware enablement of the graphics processor on Intel's upcoming "Braxton" SoC might happen for this next version of the Linux kernel.

The drm-intel-next changes submitted today were some DP link rate refactoring, RPS tuning for Bay Trail and Braswell, more PPGTT PTE work, Valley View DPLL code refactoring, rotated GGTT view support, and other code cleaning. These changes are on top of the Intel DRM changes already queued up for Linux 4.1.

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7 Unikernel Projects to Take On Docker in 2015

Filed under
Linux

Docker and Linux container technologies dominate headlines today as a powerful, easy way to package applications, especially as cloud computing becomes more mainstream. While still a work-in-progress, they offer a simple, clean and lean way to distribute application workloads.

With enthusiasm continuing to grow for container innovations, a related technology called unikernels is also beginning to attract attention. Known also for their ability to cleanly separate functionality at the component level, unikernels are developing a variety of new approaches to deploy cloud services.

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GNOME 3.16 SDK Runtime Now Available

Filed under
GNOME

Following last week's release of GNOME 3.16, the initial builds of the GNOME SDK Runtime are now available for those wishing to experiment with their new fully-sandboxed Linux app tech and other new app runtime abilities.

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SBC runs Linux on new quad-core Cortex-A9 SoC

Filed under
Linux

Actions Technology released a quad-core Cortex-A9 “S500″ SoC, along with an “ActDuino S500″ SBC based on it, plus support for Android 5.0 and Linux.

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Reglue at LibrePlanet

Filed under
GNU
  • LibrePlanet & the Sounds of Silence

    My sponsor for attending LibrePlanet was John Sullivan, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation, and I was surprised that he took the time to get me shown around. I wanted to kiddingly say to John, “Hey, you got people to do this, right?” I didn’t because I was afraid the humor would not have translated well…and I’m not sure it did here either.

  • Have You Decided Yet?

    On March 21st of this year, the Free Software Foundation presented our organization Reglue with the Award for Projects of Social Benefit. We share that announcement link with Sébastien Jodogne for being given the Award for the Advancement of Free Software. We're specifically thankful that people like Sean "NZ17" Robinson spearheaded this nomination campaign and got us into the running.

Hisense And Haier Launch $149 Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

A few weeks ago Google made headlines with the launch of the new Chromebook Pixel, the highest-end Chromebook on the market (and with a price to show for it). Today, the Chrome OS laptop ecosystem is launching two products that are the exact opposite: the Haier Chromebook 11 (now available online at Amazon) and the Hisense Chromebook (now available at Walmart). Both of these 11.6-inch Chromebooks will retail for $149, making them the most affordable Chromebooks yet.

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Also: Hands on: The $149 Hisense Chromebook succeeds at being incredibly affordable

today's leftovers

  • Who is Going to be the Ubuntu of Developer Infrastructure?

    There were many things that made the early Linux desktop candidates difficult to manage. Lacking the vast catalog of drivers that Windows had at its disposal, for example, peripheral device support was a challenge. As was getting functionality like suspend working properly – not that Windows supported it flawlessly, of course. But assuming you could get these early builds up and running, at least, one of the most under-appreciated challenges of navigating the very different user interface was choice.

  • IBM's Spending $3 Billion to Connect Internet of Things to Enterprises

    The Internet of Things (IoT) continues to emerge as one of this year's big tech stories. IBM has announced that it will invest $3 billion across four years to build out an Internet of Things (IoT) unit, and the unit's first job is to build a cloud-based open platform. IBM actually has a lot of tools and experience in the area of sifting and sorting real-time data, and may be able to contribute a lot of momentum to the Internet of Things. Here are details.

  • Why KDE's KWin Doesn't Integrate Weston/QtCompositor For Wayland Support

    KDE developers have been porting their Plasma 5 + KDE Frameworks 5 stack over to Wayland, but at this point it's not nearly as mature as the GNOME Wayland support. As such, KDE developers have to fend off questions from time-to-time why they don't "just integrate QtCompositor" or the Weston library for speeding up their efforts.

  • GNU/Linux By Continent In 2015 So Far

    Europe and North America were the stars. Oceania, Africa and Asia are still lagging but also moving up. It’s interesting that Europe seemed more enthusiastic for GNU/Linux than USA, the home of GNU/Linux, but USA is rapidly catching up.

  • How similar are OS X and Linux?

Tiny, stackable, Linux-based IoT module hits Kickstarter

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter, Onion launched a tiny, Linux-based “Omega” IoT module, along with a dock, stackable expansion modules, a cloud service, and web app tools.

Onion’s Omega joins a growing number of single board computers and computer-on-modules for Internet of Things applications that have tapped Qualcomm’s MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Atheros AR9331 system-on-chip. For a pledge of $25, Onion’s Kickstarter campaign offers the Omega computer-on-module combined with a “dock” that turns it into an sandwich-style single board computer.

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Development activity in LibreOffice and OpenOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

The LibreOffice project was announced with great fanfare in September 2010. Nearly one year later, the OpenOffice.org project (from which LibreOffice was forked) was cut loose from Oracle and found a new home as an Apache project. It is fair to say that the rivalry between the two projects in the time since then has been strong. Predictions that one project or the other would fail have not been borne out, but that does not mean that the two projects are equally successful. A look at the two projects' development communities reveals some interesting differences.

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