Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Thunderbird & no email associated to perform action error

Filed under
Moz/FF

A new weird little problem has landed into my lap. On one of me Windows boxes, I upgraded Thunderbird, the mail client program, to the new release. I went from 78.x to 91.x, and in the process, I also received a gratis error message.

It would pop up on every program startup, and it reads: There is no email program associated to perform the requested action. Please install an email program or, if one is already installed, create an association in the Default Programs control panel. Clunky language aside, Control Panel is sadly no longer the goto place for default apps in Windows 10/11. Plus, the error shows up during Thunderbird startup. Every time. Let's fix this.

Read more

Firefox on EGL and PPC

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Brings The Fire: Shifting From GLX To EGL | Hackaday

    You may (or may not) have heard that Firefox is moving from GLX to EGL for the Linux graphics stack. It’s an indicator of which way the tides are moving in the software world. Let’s look at what it means, why it matters, and why it’s cool.

    A graphics stack is a complex system with many layers. But on Linux, there needs to be an interface between something like OpenGL and a windowing system like X11. X11 provides a fundamental framework for drawing and moving windows around a display, capturing user input, and determining focus, but little else. An X11 server is just a program that manages all the windows (clients). Each window in X11 is considered a client. A client connects to the server over a Unix process socket or the internet.

    OpenGL focuses on what to draw within the confines of the screen space given by the window system. GLX (which stands for OpenGL Extension to the X window system) was originally developed by Silicon Graphics. It has changed over the years, gaining hardware acceleration support and DRI (Direct Rendering Interface). DRI is a way for OpenGL to talk directly to the graphical hardware if the server and the client are on the same computer. At its core, GLX provides OpenGL functions to X11, adds to the X protocol by allowing 3d rendering commands to be sent, and an extension that reads rendering commands and passes them to OpenGL.

  • Do you run Void on your Power Mac?

    If so, heads up, because builds for your configuration may be ending soon (along with Void PPC on big-endian platforms generally). If you want this to continue, and you've got the interest, chops or gumption, you can help by becoming a maintainer -- take a look at the Void PPC Github. Most of you are probably running the glibc variant, which will end by January 2023, but if you are running musl-based packages those repos will be taken down by the end of 2021. Don't whine to the maintainer, please: the current matrix is four different repos which all require their own maintenance and builds. Even just 32-bit glibc would probably benefit a whole lot of people and yourself. If this is important to you, there's no time like the present to step up.

Microsoft Keeps Clobbering and Attacking Firefox and Mozilla

Filed under
Microsoft
Moz/FF
Security
  • Thousands of Firefox users accidentally commit login cookies on GitHub [Ed: Microsoft just doesn't care about security and the media is paid to blame the victims for Microsoft's own problems]

    Thousands of Firefox cookie databases containing sensitive data are available on request from GitHub repositories, data potentially usable for hijacking authenticated sessions.

    These cookies.sqlite databases normally reside in the Firefox profiles folder. They're used to store cookies between browsing sessions. And they're findable by searching GitHub with specific query parameters, what's known as a search "dork."

    Aidan Marlin, a security engineer at London-based rail travel service Trainline, alerted The Register to the public availability of these files after reporting his findings through HackerOne and being told by a GitHub representative that "credentials exposed by our users are not in scope for our Bug Bounty program."

    [...]

    "I'm frustrated that GitHub isn't taking its users' security and privacy seriously," Marlin told The Register in an email. "The least it could do is prevent results coming up for this GitHub dork. If the individuals who uploaded these cookie databases were made aware of what they'd done, they'd s*** their pants."

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Upgrading Page Load Tests to Use Mitmproxy 7

    mitmproxy is a third-party tool that we use to record and play back page loads in Firefox to detect performance regressions.

    The page load is “recorded” to a file: the page is loaded while mitmproxy is running, and the proxy logs all requests and responses made and saves them to a file.

    The page load can then be played back from this file; each response and request (referred to as a “flow”) made during the recording is played back without accessing the live site.

    Recorded page load tests are valuable for detecting performance regressions in Firefox because they are not dependent on changes to the site we are testing. If we tested using only live sites, it would be much more difficult to tell if a regression was caused by changes in Firefox or changes in the site being tested.

    So, as we run these tests over time, we have a history of how Firefox performs when replaying the same recording again and again, helping us to detect performance regressions that may be caused by recent changes to our code base.

  • When you use Bing to search for Chrome or Firefox, this is what happens instead.

    Microsoft can’t just put on their big boy pants and admit that people don’t like Edge and don’t want to use Edge.

    This reeks of desperation. But then, we didn’t suspect it would end with the paid shitposting about Edge on GNU/Linux or with the million ways you can accidentally launch Edge in Windows Vista SP11. Did we?

GNOME Web, Firefox, and DRM

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
GNOME
  • On (hopefully) taming Webkit and getting better privacy in GNOME Web with Privoxy.

    Really, it would be nicer if Apple would just double the amount of filter rules allowed in Content Blockers, but it seems they really can’t do much about users who take Privacy matters into their own hands, even on Mac OS, as Privoxy apparently works on Mac OS too!

    Privoxy has been around for 20 years or so and previously went under the name Internet Junkbuster. In fact, it was one of my ad blocking Hosts files that was used as the basis for the early Junkbuster list.

    I got fed up with ads and Windows adware in the late 90s and felt like I could take on the problem of blocking it, and for a while I was correct. However, HOSTS files are no answer for today’s problems on the Web, and Windows will try to revert any changes you make to it with “Defender” anyway if you use Windows.

    And if you successfully make it ignore that and allow the modifications, Windows Telemetry spyware is IMPOSSIBLE to block with the HOSTS file because it will ignore you if you ad their telemetry sites to it!

    You really should not use Windows….

    Back to Privoxy…. It will not interfere with your VPN software, or at least it shouldn’t (it doesn’t with my setup, using NordVPN), because it is a local proxy. It should enhance the privacy your VPN gives you. In fact, it used to be part of the Tor Browser Bundle.

  • Mozilla loading full page ads for their VPN (they just resell Mulvad VPN).

    This behavior is beyond annoying and not at all welcome on the part of the user. Not only does Mozilla do this over and over again (I had it happen more than once), but they load it in your private windows too.

    This time, there’s two more checkboxes to find (good luck). Hint: “recommend extensions as you browse” and “recommend features as you browse”. But this shouldn’t be necessary and using Mozilla software is becoming the literal….Look, next year Webster’s English Dictionary is going to have to put the Firefox logo as the definition of “annoying”.

    Brave, a competing web browser, has a regular “private” window which just means no history logging on your device, but also Private Windows with Tor. It also works atop your VPN if you want to access Tor hidden services.

  • Ring doorbells no longer support Firefox for live view. Recommend Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge.

    Mozilla could probably hack their way around this one with a UA quirk, but will just let company after company keep destroying what’s left of their browser business while they send “Web Compat” emails that go right into the trash to outfits like Facebook, Microsoft Skype, and now Amazon.

  • Windows Store causes errors in Firefox, makes Accessibility unusable.

    They shilled Microsoft’s new DRM store, and all they got were more bugs to fix, Edge using nasty tricks to steal their users from them, and this lousy T-shirt.

  • Apple’s Self Service Repair Program Must Live Up To Its Promises

    This is a major shift for the company, which has fought for years against movements to expand people’s right to repair their Apple products. Right-to-repair advocates have not only pushed the company to move on this issue, but also to get regulators and lawmakers to acknowledge the need to protect the right to repair in law. Apple’s announcement is only one illustration of how far the advocacy on the right to repair has come; in just the past two years, advocates have won at the ballot box in Massachusetts, received a supportive directive from the Biden Administration, changed policy at Microsoft, and made some gains at the Library of Congress to expand repair permissions.

    The Self Service Repair Program could be another feather in that cap. But now that Apple has announced the program, we urge them to roll it out in ways that truly expand their customers’ access and choice.

    It’s important that Apple’s program, or any program, does not come with strings attached that make it unworkably difficult or too expensive for a normal person to use. In the past, Apple has done both—as YouTuber and professional repairer Louis Rossman pointed out.

Chrome 97 Beta, Firefox Add-ons, and Firefox Nightly

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

  • Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 97 to the Beta channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 97.0.4692.20 contains our usual under-the-hood performance and stability tweaks, but there are also some cool new features to explore - please head to the Chromium blog to learn more!

  • Chrome 97 Beta Released With WebTransport API, HDR Media Queries - Phoronix

    Most notable with today's Chrome 97 beta release is initial support for WebTransport. WebTransport is a protocol framework similar to WebRTC data channels but principally for clients constrained by the web security model to communicate with a remote server using a secure, multi-plexed transport. WebTransport uses the HTTP/3 protocol for bidirectional transport. Unlike WebSockets that is TCP-based, WebTransport relies on UDP-like datagrams and cancellable streams. Learn more about WebTransport via the W3C working draft at W3.org.

  • The magic of mouse gestures - Firefox Add-ons Blog

    Mouse gestures are mouse movement and key combinations that give you the power to customize the way you maneuver around web pages. If your online work requires a fair amount of distinct, repetitive activity—things like rapid page scrolling, opening links in background tabs, closing batches of open tabs, etc.—the right mouse gesture can make a major impact on your task efficiency. Here are a few browser extensions that provide excellent mouse gesture features…

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 104

    A big thank you to all the Outreachy applicants who applied for this cycle.

Safeguard Your Email Address from Spam Using Firefox Relay. Here's How.

Filed under
News
Moz/FF

You can now protect your email addresses from spammers using Firefox Relay with premium service + unlimited aliases. Everything you need to know.
Read more

Mozilla Wants Your Data and Your E-mails

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Karl Dubost: Browser regression and tools

    In simplified terms, there is a regression when a code used to work and is not working properly after a specific release. For websites, a webpage would stop having the right behavior after updating to a new version of the browser.

  • Firefox Relay is Now Out of Beta & Adds New Premium Plan to Help Protect Your Real Email Address - It's FOSS News

    Firefox Relay aims to help you protect your real email address by providing email aliases.

    While good options like Simplelogin, and AnonAddy already exists, Mozilla’s Firefox Relay can encourage more users to use email aliases.

    For a while, it was in the beta phase with limited access to features. Now, as per the official announcement, it is available for all users, out of beta, and introduces a premium plan to unlock all features.

  • Support.Mozilla.Org: Introducing Firefox Relay Premium

    If you’re a fan of Firefox Relay, you may have been waiting for the day when you can add more aliases. After a long wait, you can now celebrate because we’re launching Firefox Relay Premium today.

    As a refresher, Firefox Relay is a free service available at relay.firefox.com where you’ll get five email aliases to use whenever you sign-up for an online account. Today, Firefox Relay is launching as a premium subscription where you can unlock unlimited aliases and additional features.

Mozilla: Performance, Voice and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Tools Newsletter (Q3 2021)

    As the Perf-Tools team, we are responsible for the Firefox Profiler. This newsletter gives an overview of the new features and improvements we’ve done in Q3 2021.

    This is our second newsletter and you can find the first one here which was about the H1 2021. With this newsletter, we wanted to focus on only Q3, so it would be less crowded and you can see the new features and improvements easily. I hope you enjoy the work that we’ve done this quarter.

  • Eitan Isaacson: speechSynthesis.getVoices()

    Half of the DOM Web Speech API deals with speech synthesis. There is a method called speechSynthesis.getVoices that returns a list of all the supported voices in the given browser. Your website can use it to choose a nice voice to use, or present a menu to the user for them to choose.

    The one tricky thing about the getVoices() method is that the underlying implementation will usually not have a list of voices ready when first called. Since speech synthesis is not a commonly used API, most browsers will initialize their speech synthesis lazily in the background when a speechSynthesis method is first called. If that method is getVoices() the first time it is called it will return an empty list. So what will conventional wisdom have you do?

  • Niko Matsakis: CTCFT 2021-11-22 Agenda

    The next “Cross Team Collaboration Fun Times” (CTCFT) meeting will take place next Monday, on 2021-11-22 at 11am US Eastern Time (click to see in your time zone). Note that this is a new time: we are experimenting with rotating in an earlier time that occurs during the European workday. This post covers the agenda. You’ll find the full details (along with a calendar event, zoom details, etc) on the CTCFT website.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Firefox Relay now available with more email aliases with Premium service, protecting your identity and email addresses from spammers

    Today, Firefox Relay, a privacy-first and free product that hides your real email address to help protect your identity, is available with a new paid Premium service offering. The release comes just in time for the holiday season to help spare your inbox from being inundated with emails from e-commerce sites, especially those sites where you may shop or visit a few times a year.

    In real life you have a phone number where family and friends can call and reach out to you directly. You likely have it memorized by heart and it’s something you’ve had for years. In your online life your email address is like your phone number, it’s a personal and unique identifier. Your email address has become the way we login and access almost every website, app, newsletter, and hundreds of other interactions we have online every single day. That means your email address is in the hands of hundreds, if not thousands, of third parties. As you think more about your email address and the places it’s being used, Firefox Relay can help protect and limit where it’s being shared.

    Firefox Relay is a free service available at relay.firefox.com where you’ll get five email aliases to use whenever you sign-up for an online account. Over the last year, the team has been experimenting with Firefox Relay, a smart, easy solution that can preserve the privacy of your email address. Firefox Relay was initially rolled out to a beta phase for early adopters who like to test new products. We heard back from beta testers who provided feedback where we improved the free service and added a new paid Premium service that we’re introducing today.

Browsers: Microsoft Plays Dirty and Mozilla Distracts From the Spying

Filed under
Microsoft
Moz/FF
Web
  • Windows 11 blocks Edge browser competitors from opening links

    Something changed between Windows 11 builds 22483 and 22494 (both Windows Insider Preview builds.) The build changelog makes a few mentions of changes to the protocol and file associations/default apps system. However, it omitted the headline news: You can no longer bypass Microsoft Edge using apps like EdgeDeflector.

    [...]

    Before discussing the changes in the latest Windows builds, I’d like to refresh your memory on Microsoft’s earlier escapades with antitrust regulators. I’m not a lawyer, but some case law is common knowledge in the tech field. I’m, of course, thinking of United States versus Microsoft (2001) and Microsoft versus European Commission (2009). In both cases, regulators found that Microsoft was abusing its market-leading operating system to unfairly promote its Internet Explorer (now called Edge) browser; disadvantaging competing web browsers.

    While the US decided not to take action against Microsoft on this point, the EU didn’t hold back. Microsoft agreed to hide shortcuts to Internet Explorer and show customers in the EU the infamous browser ballot screen. The dialog listed Internet Explorer among competitors and asked them to choose what browser they wanted to one-click install.

  • Firefox’s Private Browsing mode upleveled for you

    There are plenty of reasons why you might want to keep something you are doing on the web to yourself. You might be looking for a ring for your soon-to-be fiance, looking up what those mysterious skin rashes could be, or reading a salacious celebrity gossip blog. That’s where Private Browsing mode comes in handy. This year, we upleveled and added new advanced features to our Private Browsing mode. Before we share more about these new features we wanted to share some of the misconceptions about Private Browsing.

    One of the top common myths about Private Browsing (in any major web browser) is that it makes you anonymous on the Internet. The Private Browsing mode on Chrome, Safari, Edge and Firefox are primarily designed to keep your activity private from other users on the same computer, but websites and Internet service providers can still gather information about your visit, even if you are not signed in. To learn more about other Common Myths, visit our site. You should know though, that Firefox offers something that other browsers don’t, which is advanced privacy protections. Read on to learn more about our unique tracking protections.

  • Mozilla submits comments to the California Privacy Protection Agency - Open Policy & Advocacy

    This week, Mozilla submitted comments in response to the California Privacy Protection Agency’s Invitation for Preliminary Comments on Proposed Rulemaking Under the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA).

    Mozilla has long been a supporter of data privacy laws that empower people, including the trailblazing California privacy laws, California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). We welcome the opportunity to offer feedback as California considers how to best evolve its privacy protections, and we support the progress made thus far, particularly as federal efforts languish — but there’s more to do.

Mozilla: Firefox in EasyOS, Firefox Nightly, and Firefox Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • How to download the latest version of Firefox

    I am taming Firefox, getting it to run nicely on my Acer Aspire 1 laptop. Over the last couple of days I posted to the blog about issues with Firefox. It even froze the desktop when attempted to do an update.

    I have managed to completely disable updating, will document how that is achieved later.

    A different update strategy: Each release of EasyOS will have the latest version of Firefox. No need for users to use the auto-update feature in Firefox. You can turn it on if you want, but no need. I am bringing out new releases of EasyOS quite frequently.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 101
  • Personalize Firefox with colorways

    Starting with Firefox version 94, you will be able to personalize your browsing experience with 18 exciting new colorways themes. Each limited edition colorway presents its own individual bespoke characteristic. Find a color that better fits you with our palette.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: RenderDoc, Mesa, and Vulkan

  • RenderDoc 1.17 Released For This Leading Open-Source Graphics Debugging Tool - Phoronix

    RenderDoc 1.17 released this week as the newest version of this leading cross-platform, cross-API graphics debugging utility. RendertDoc 1.17 continues to be a gem for developers working with Vulkan and OpenGL along with Direct3D 11/12. RenderDoc as the MIT-licensed frame-capture-based graphics debugger works extremely well for game/engine developers as well as GPU driver developers in working through different issues.

  • DMA-BUF Feedback Support For Wayland Lands In Mesa 22.0's EGL Code - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa on Black Friday was DMA-BUF Feedback support within the EGL code as another important step forward for Wayland. Introduced earlier this week was Wayland Protocols 1.24 and the primary addition to that collection of protocols is DMA-BUF feedback support. The DMA-BUF "feedback" support is important for Wayland multi-GPU systems where needing to know more information about the GPU device used by the compositor and for being able to efficiently exchange buffers between the secondary and primary GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Finally Adds VK_KHR_synchronization2 Support - Phoronix

    The Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has added support for the prominent VK_KHR_synchronization2 extension introduced earlier this year. Added back in February with Vulkan 1.2.170 was VK_KHR_synchronization2 for simplifying the core synchronization APIs of this industry-standard graphics API. VK_KHR_synchronization2 makes Vulkan synchronization handling easier to deal with Those interested in the changes with the "synchronization2" revision can see this Khronos blog post going over the Vulkan synchronization handling in detail along with the changes from this extension.

Kernel: Futex2, Fixes, and Other New Features for Linux 5.16

  • Futex2 Brings Linux Gaming To The Next Level - Invidious

    Futex2 has been a work in progress by Valve and collabora for a very long time and it seems like it's finally going to make it's way into the kernel.

  • Patch out for Alder Lake Linux bug that reminds of the Windows 11 Ryzen CPPC issue - Neowin

    Linux boss Linus Torvalds merged earlier today several important patches for Intel CPU generally related to performance states (P-states) on Linux.

  • Linux 5.16 Merges Fix For One Of The Intel Alder Lake Issues - Phoronix

    Merged this Friday afternoon into the Linux 5.16 development kernel is fixing a performance issue affecting some Intel Alder Lake motherboards. The fix merged a short time ago is the item previously covered within Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems. As explained in that prior article, TurboBoost Max 3.0 / ITMT (Turbo Boost Max Technology) code within the kernel isn't being enabled for some systems, particularly if overclocking or even any memory XMP / optimal settings. The ASUS Z690 board I've been primarily using for the i9-12900K was affected as are numerous other boards. I've also heard reports of some motherboards running purely stock are even having this issue.

  • Intel Preparing USI Stylus Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel open-source driver engineers have been working on USI stylus support for the Linux kernel. The Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) aims to offer interoperability of active styluses across touchscreen devices. The Universal Stylus Initiative has a goal of allowing all styluses that comply with USI to work across devices. USI is backed by the likes of Google who wants to see USI working uniformally across Chromebooks, Dell and other hardware vendors, Intel is also involved and leading the upstream Linux support patches, and peripheral vendors like Logitech are also supporting the standard. Other big names like Wacom, Samsung, and many other players from desktop to laptops to mobile.

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more