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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 6:00pm
Story GAFAM and 'Cloud': Google, Microsoft, Amazon and GitHub Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 5:58pm
Story Kernel: Linux Changes, Certifications, Graphics, PCI Express 6.0 and Bug Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 5:55pm
Story Infographic: Linux Mint Challenges Windows 10 In Small Business Productivity Speed Tests Roy Schestowitz 2 19/06/2019 - 5:27pm
Story rga: Search Text In PDF, Ebooks, Office Documents, Archives And More (ripgrep Wrapper) Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:59pm
Story Security: Updates, Containers, Compilers and More Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:56pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:53pm
Story 9 Best Free Linux Biology Tools Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:45pm
Story Fedora 30 test on laptop with Nvidia - Back in 2010 Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:41pm
Story Kali Linux Roadmap (2019/2020) Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2019 - 4:32pm

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

Filed under
Misc
  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It

    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.

  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam

    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.

  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage

    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs.
    Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?

GAFAM and 'Cloud': Google, Microsoft, Amazon and GitHub

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Daniel Stenberg: Google to reimplement curl in libcrurl

    By throwing a lot of man power on it. As the primary author and developer of the libcurl API and the libcurl code, I assume that Cronet works quite differently than libcurl so there’s going to be quite a lot of wrestling of data and code flow to make this API work on that code.

    The libcurl API is also very versatile and is an API that has developed over a period of almost 20 years so there’s a lot of functionality, a lot of options and a lot of subtle behavior that may or may not be easy or straight forward to mimic.

    The initial commit imported the headers and examples from the curl 7.65.1 release.

  • Microsoft, you should look away now: Google's cloud second only to AWS in dev survey [Ed: Longtime Microsoft booster Tim Anderson  on Azure being a failure after so many entryism attempts and underhanded tactics]

    Coders use Google Cloud Platform (GCP) more than Microsoft Azure, though Amazon Web Services (AWS) has a comfortable lead, according to a Developer Ecosystem survey conducted by tools vendor JetBrains.

    Developer usage is 67 per cent AWS versus 28 per cent GCP and 21 per cent Azure, according to the new survey. Unfortunately, the question was posed in a different way in the 2018 survey, adding on-premises into the mix, but last year Azure and GCP had equal share after AWS.

    The survey had 19,000 participants invited via "Twitter ads, Facebook ads, Google Adwords and JetBrains' own communication channels," the tools vendor said, though "only the responses of 6,993 respondents were included in the report." Responses were removed to reduce bias, yet it warned "some bias may be present as JetBrains users may have been more willing on average to compete the survey".

  • Get your coat, you've pulled a Pull Panda: GitHub goes home with code collab specialists [Ed: Notice how Microsoft only takes GitHub in more of a proprietary software direction. That says a lot – they have plans and they’re really detrimental to FOSS]

Kernel: Linux Changes, Certifications, Graphics, PCI Express 6.0 and Bug

Filed under
Linux
  • PowerCap/RAPL Code To Support Icelake Desktop / X / Xeon D With Linux 5.3

    While as of Linux 5.2 the support for Intel's Icelake CPUs appear production ready with all of the bits in place from new IDs to the much enhanced "Gen 11" graphics, there are a few stragglers of items to land with the upcoming Linux 5.3 merge window though could be back-ported to current series. Fortunately, we haven't found anything major to be missing.

    One of the latest bits of Icelake Linux support is handling of these next-generation processors within the PowerCap / RAPL (Running Average Power Limit) driver code. In particular, the desktop/workstation Icelake parts. This is the code for reading the estimated CPU package power consumption based on hardware performance counters and the ability to artificially limit the power draw of the processor via software.

  • Six Niche Linux Certifications
  • AMD Navi GPU stack bares all in Linux graphics driver update

    Eight Navi GPU variants have been spotted in Linux driver code. AMD’s next-gen RDNA graphics chips are set for launch on July 7, 2019 within the RX 5700 XT and RX 5700, but the red team has plenty of silicon in store for a range of applications. Including console, laptops, desktop, and mobile phones.

    The GPU codenames were spotted within Linux display drivers after the additional code was submitted and signed off by two AMD employees. The code adds support for Display Core Next, or DCN2, which “is the display block for Navi10.” Each entry following adds the necessary ASIC IDs for each Navi chip in the stack, starting with Navi 10 and down to Navi 21 LITE.

  • Nouveau Driver Picking Up NVIDIA TU116 GPU Support For Linux 5.3

    Building off the initial Turing mode-setting bits that were in place since Linux 5.0 and have continued stepping along to support newer variants on successive kernel releases, the Linux 5.3 kernel is slated to add support for the TU116 graphics processor.

  • PCI-SIG® Announces Upcoming PCI Express® 6.0 Specification to Reach 64 GT/s
  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced With 4-Times The Bandwidth Of PCIe 4.0

    With the increasing demand for bandwidth across a wide range of devices used in consumer and enterprise domains, PCI Express, the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard has also evolved over the years.

    PCI Special Interest Group, a body that sets standards for PCIe, has announced PCI Express 6 that promises four times the bandwidth offered by PCIe 4.0 and twice of PCIe 5.0.

  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced For Release In 2021 With 64 GT/s Transfer Rates

    While PCI Express 4.0 up to this point has only been found in a few systems like Talos' POWER9 platforms and coming soon with the new AMD graphics cards and chipsets, the PCI SIG today announced PCI Express 6.0.

    PCI Express 5.0 was only announced last month with 32GT/s transfer rates while already the PCI SIG announced PCI Express 6.0.

  • Netflix researcher spots TCP SACK flaws in Linux and FreeBSD
  • TCP SACK Panic Flaw Could Compromise Production Linux Machines

rga: Search Text In PDF, Ebooks, Office Documents, Archives And More (ripgrep Wrapper)

Filed under
Software

rga (or ripgrep-all) is a command line tool to recursively search all files in a directory for a regex pattern, that runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. It's a wrapper for ripgrep, the line-oriented recursive search program, on top of which it enables search in a multitude of file types like PDF, DOCX, ODT, EPUB, SQLite databases, movies subtitles embedded in MKV or MP4 files, archives like ZIP or GZ, and more.

rga is great when you want to search for some text from a file available in a folder with many documents of various file types, even if some of them are available in archives.

Read more

Security: Updates, Containers, Compilers and More

Filed under
Security

9 Best Free Linux Biology Tools

Filed under
Software

Biology is a natural science concerned with the study of living things, ranging from microscopic organisms up to the largest known animal, the blue whale. It is divided into many specialized fields including evolution, ecology, zoology, botany, genetics, microbiology and molecular biology. This science examines function, structure, origin, growth, evolution, distribution and taxonomy.

Biology is extremely relevant to our daily lives, as it helps us to understand how living things work, including the human body. Furthermore, the study of biology is crucial in the development of new food products, to protect the environmental quality of our world, and improving human health e.g. through the discovery of new medical treatments and tests for diseases.

Modern biology is founded on four main components: cell theory, evolution, gene theory, and homeostasis. Schools recognize the importance of biology to society, regarding it as one of the three most important branches of sciences, alongside physics and chemistry. We covered the best open source Linux software available for these disciplines in the following articles: Physics, Chemistry.

Biology is at the cutting edge of scientific research and development. In the past 40 years, biology has advanced enormously revealing a wealth of information about the millions of different organisms inhabiting our planet, including, of course, ourselves. Biology continues to grab the headlines with much excitement being generated in the fields of synthetic biology (combining science and engineering) and genomics (the study of the genomes of organisms).

A good range of open source biology software is available for Linux. This article focuses on selecting our favorite tools which are extremely useful for biologists. We hope this feature offers a useful resource for biologists and students alike. With the diverse range of software, there should be something of interest here for all budding biologists. Here’s our legendary rating chart showing our top recommendations.

Read more

Also: Vorta BorgBackup GUI Now Available For Install On Linux From Flathub

Fedora 30 test on laptop with Nvidia - Back in 2010

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
Reviews

I think the results are obvious, and they speak for themselves. Alas, it would seem that if you want to use Fedora with a setup like the above, then you'll be either very lucky or you're going to face a torrent of problems. But then, Linux has always been, to use a somewhat stupid analogy, like saying you should only drive your car on Mondays on roads that have green sidewalks, and then you will be fine. The whole not-our-problem, use hardware that's "friendly" is nonsense, because people don't have infinite money, choice or expertise, especially since alternative operating systems offer all they need, plus a full range of hardware freedom.

My Fedora 30 test on the G50 was decent - that's a simple Intel graphics box - but even that one used to have millions of problems with Linux - Fedora wouldn't boot until I'd done a BIOS update, and for three years, almost every distro had network disconnect problems. On this box, we're seeing more of what I showed you in the Fedora 29 test. Fedora and Nvidia graphics are not a good fit. Add to that my home dir import woes, the performance woes, the Wireless woes, you get the picture. Feels like we've gone back many years into the past. I'd actually prefer if distros WARNED that the device is not certified or approved or expected to work and refuse to install, than install and then throw a whole bucket of hissy. I will still run an in-vivo upgrade on the Lenovo machine, because that's what I promised to do, but this is a big, big disappointment.

Read more

Kali Linux Roadmap (2019/2020)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Now that our 2019.2 release is out, we thought we would take this opportunity to cover some of the changes and new features we have coming to Kali Linux in the following year. Normally, we only really announce things when they are ready to go public, but a number of these changes are going to impact users pretty extensively so we wanted to share them early.

As you read through this post, what you will see is that we are really trying to balance our efforts between changes that are user facing and those that are applicable to the backend. The backend changes don’t seem as exciting at first, but the fact is that the easier it is for us to work on Kali, the easier it is for us to get to user facing features. Plus, some of these changes are focused on tweaking the development process to make it easier for others to get involved in the project.

We are not ready to announce dates on any of these changes just yet. When they are ready, they will drop.

Read more

Qt 5.13 Released!

Filed under
Development

Today, we have released Qt 5.13 and I’m really proud of all the work that everyone has put into it. As always, our releases come with new features, updates, bug fixes, and improvements. For Qt 5.13, we have also been focused on our tooling that makes designing, developing and deploying software with Qt more efficient for designers and developers alike. Let’s take a look at some of the highlights of Qt 5.13 as well as some of the updates on the tooling side.

I will also be holding a webinar summarizing all the news around Qt 5.13 together with our Head of R&D Tuukka Turunen on July 2. Please sign up and ask us your questions.

Read more

Also: Qt 5.13 Released With glTF 2.0 Importing, Wayland Improvements, Lottie Animation Support

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.16.1 is now available only one week after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment series, a major version that adds numerous new features and improvements, including a totally revamped notifications system, new look and feel for the login, lock, and logout screens, better Wayland support, as well as numerous other desktop enhancements.

Consisting of a total of 21 bug fixes, the KDE Plasma 5.16.1 maintenance update is here to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable by addressing various issues reported by users lately, including an issue that broke the Sleep/Suspend command, and the ability for the Plasma Discover package manager to show when Flatpak updates are fetched.

Read more

Benchmarks Of OpenMandriva's AMD Zen Optimized Linux Distribution Against Ubuntu, openSUSE, Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Released this week was OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 as the latest major release for this Linux distribution of Mandriva/Mandrake heritage and continues on the interesting trend of innovations. In addition to continuing to use the LLVM Clang compiler by default rather than GCC, among other changes that position it more uniquely than many other Linux distributions out there, their 4.0 release has a "znver1" spin that is optimized for AMD Ryzen/Threadripper/EPYC processors. Here are benchmarks comparing not only OpenMandriva 4.0's x86-64 and Znver1 options but also how that performance compares to the likes of Ubuntu 19.04, openSUSE Tumbleweed, and Intel's Clear Linux.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is the first distribution in recent times that is catering towards AMD platform optimizations. The primary difference is all of OpenMandriva's packages have been re-built when enabling the "znver1" compiler optimizations to cater towards the AMD Zen microarchitecture along with other tweaks they hope lead to better AMD performance. But this approach isn't nearly as much as what's employed by Clear Linux as part of Intel's open-source group where they relentlessly optimize all levels of the stack in trying to seek maximum performance out of modern x86-64 hardware, primarily their own microarchitectures. Obviously OpenMandriva doesn't have as many resources as Clear Linux but still an interesting foray for this Linux distribution with AMD currently not backing their own Linux distribution.

Read more

Study the Elements with KDE's Kalzium

Filed under
KDE

I've written about a number of chemistry packages in the past and all of the computational chemistry that you can do in a Linux environment. But, what is fundamental to chemistry? Why, the elements, of course. So in this article, I focus on how you can learn more about the elements that make up everything around you with Kalzium. KDE's Kalzium is kind of like a periodic table on steroids. Not only does it have information on each of the elements, it also has extra functionality to do other types of calculations.

Kalzium should be available within the package repositories for most distributions. In Debian-based distributions, you can install it with the command...

Read more

Games: QUICKTEQUILA, Valve, Counter-Strike, Mordhau and Snaps of Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • Lovely Planet 2: April Skies is an FPS with a sweet style for those who like to go fast

    Lovely Planet 2: April Skies from QUICKTEQUILA and tinyBuild has released, with Linux support just like the first game. Are you reading to run, jump and shoot? There's a lot of that.

  • Valve have given out some more details on the Index VR HMD with a "Deep Dive" about the Field of View

    As the first in a series of posts giving out more detail on what Valve wanted to achieve with the Valve Index, a new Deep Dive post is up starting with information about the Field of View. Future posts will also be covering Extensibility and Mod-ability as well as Optics and Clarity so we will keep an eye out for those and let you know when they're up.

    VR is something that's completely new to me, I've never owned one and the most I've ever tested is about 30 minutes of a Vive in a local GAME store and it was…weird. I want to be convinced, so perhaps the Valve Index will truly sway me over.

    As for the FOV post, Valve said their goal with the Index was to "improve the overall fidelity of the VR experience, including visuals, audio, ergonomics, tracking quality, and more". Interestingly, I wasn't actually aware until this post that you could tweak the HMD's lenses distance to your eyes which is pretty handy and that's on top of the slider on top of the unit to adjust the spacing between the lenses. It certainly seems like Valve have made some interesting design choices, to make it as comfortable as possible for many people.

  • Valve are doing a small celebration for 20 years of Counter-Strike

    Has it really been 20 years? Madness. Counter-Strike started off life as a Half-Life mod in 1999 and the series is still going strong. Pretty amazing really, to think something that started off as a modification in 1999 for another game by two people has later spawned four games: Counter-Strike (2000), Counter-Strike: Condition Zero (2004), Counter-Strike: Source (2004) and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (2012).

  • Mordhau | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Mordhau running through Steam play.

  • Fresh snaps for May 2019

    Got a potato gaming computer? You can still ‘game’ on #linux with Vitetris right in your terminal! Featuring configurable keys, high-score table, multi (2) player mode and joystick support! Get your Pentomino on today!

Stable kernels 5.1.12, 4.19.53, and 4.14.128

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.12

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.12 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.53
  • Linux 4.14.128

Events: Red Hat EMEA Partner Conference, Fedora Release Parties, SUSECON, Linux Plumbers Conference, GNOME Events and GSoC

Filed under
OSS
  • Red Hat EMEA Partner Conference 2019: Envision the future and create it now

    A recent survey sponsored by Red Hat among 950 IT leaders from around the world found that 69 percent consider open source very or extremely important to their organization’s overall enterprise infrastructure software strategy.

    Open source not only provides access to the latest innovation, it is also a platform for imagination - a catalyst for people and ideas to come together. Red Hat and our partners will explore these ideas together at the Red Hat EMEA Partner Conference 2019 on June 25-27, 2019 in Prague.

  • F30 release parties in Prague and Brno

    We’ve prepared 5 talks for visitors. I started with news in Fedora Workstation and also added a pack of news in Fedora Silverblue. We try to make the release parties as informal as possible, so the talks should not be lectures where one is talking and the rest is listening in silence. My talk was again mixed with a lot of discussion and instead of 30-40 min, it took 1h20m.

    Then Petr Hráček introduced the project he’s working on Packit. As someone who maintains packages in Fedora I find the idea interesting because in package maintenance there is a lot of work that can be automated and if there is a tool that can help you with that, great! The only thing that limits my enthusiasm about Packit is that it relies on having YAML files in the upstream repo. And you know how some upstream projects are dismissive to hosting any downstream-specific files…

    The next two talks were delivered by Fedora QA guys – František Zatloukal and Lukáš Růžička. František talked on how they test Fedora, what tools they use and how you can help them. Lukáš talked on how to report bugs the useful way.

    The 5th talk that was supposed to be on GNOME Builder was cancelled because we were considerably over time, but its author – Ondřej Kolín – promised that he’d change it into an article on mojefedora.cz.

  • Cloud native infrastructure, patterns, and technology

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Andreas Jaeger from SUSE discussed and demonstrated how cloud native technologies drive more and more applications – both in public cloud and in customer’s data centers. Andreas looked at what “Cloud Native” is, what patterns are used to build and run cloud native applications, and how it can be implemented. The presentation gave a broad overview of the area to help you understand the concepts behind cloud native and start your own journey. Andreas also introduces SUSE CaaS Platform and SUSE Cloud Application Platform.

  • Testing and Fuzzing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    Last year’s microconference brought about a number of discussions; for example, syzkaller evolved as syzbot, which keeps track of fuzzing efforts and the resulting fixes. The closing ceremony pointed out all the work that still has to be done: There are a number of overlapping efforts, and those need to be consolidated. The use of KASAN should be increased. Where is fuzzing going next? With real-time moving forward from “if” to “when” in the mainline, how does RT test coverage increase? The unit-testing frameworks may need some unification. Also, KernelCI will be announced as an LF project this time around. Stay around for the KernelCI hackathon after the conference to help further those efforts.

  • GNOME ED Update – April/May

    At the end of April, Molly de Blanc and Sri Ramkrishna were at Linux Fest North West. Additionally, Molly delivered a talk related to community guideline enforcement, which was featured on the LFNW web page.

    We also had a couple of hackfests in may – Rust+GNOME Hackfest #5 in Berlin at the start of the month, and the GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2019 in Oslo at the end of May.

    Coming up in July, we’ll be attending OSCON and having a West Coast Hackfest – a combined 3-in-1 hackfest bringing in GTK, Documentation and Engagement teams!

  • Ravgeet Dhillon: First Two Weeks at GSoC

    The landing page is the centerstage for this website and will provide routes to various other resources. I am working on some new sections and may remove/alter some of the existing ones. I looking for someone to draw some artworks/illustrations that I need in this website. If you can help with this thing, please file an issue and we will have a healthy conversation. A wiki has also been made. All the important information about the porject is present here. I have forked the original project for GTK website into my workspace. The website is hosted by gitlab pages for now and can be surfed here.

Infographic: Linux Mint Challenges Windows 10 In Small Business Productivity Speed Tests

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is typically less resource-hungry than Microsoft's Windows 10, and that gives it a distinct advantage on under-powered desktops and laptops. Linux is constantly celebrated for reviving older hardware (think low-powered Atom processors and a scant 1GB or 2GB of RAM) that struggles to run smoothly under Windows. It's an advantage I haven't (yet) had the opportunity to test in the real world, though. Thankfully, community member James Dawson who owns and operates Melbournes's DXM Tech Support did some testing and published a fantastic infographic illustrating the speeds of various productivity and business tasks using a "cheap and cheerful" HP laptop.

Read more

UNIX/BSD: ADGS and "Unix-Based Environment", HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 Benchmarks (DragonFlyBSD)

Filed under
BSD
  • QF RDI's ‘Innovation Coupon’ funding initiative to support private sector

    Qatar Foundation Research, Development, and Innovation (QF RDI) has marked the launch of its new funding initiative, ‘Innovation Coupon’, by signing an agreement with its first beneficiary, ADGS – a local private sector SME that sells a suite of products that utilise artificial intelligence (AI), behavioural biometrics, and emergent behaviour.

    [...]

    ADGS is working to port its security solution from a Windows to a Unix-based environment. The ADGS team will use QF RDI’s award to employ external support in order to allow the company to continue its expansion.

  • HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 Benchmarks On DragonFlyBSD 5.6

    With the newly released DragonFlyBSD 5.6 there are improvements to its original HAMMER2 file-system to the extent that it's now selected by its installer as the default file-system choice for new installations. Curious how the performance now compares between HAMMER and HAMMER2, here are some initial benchmarks on an NVMe solid-state drive using DragonFlyBSD 5.6.0.

Games: Dead Mage, Slime Rancher and HyperRogue

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

rga: Search Text In PDF, Ebooks, Office Documents, Archives And More (ripgrep Wrapper)

rga (or ripgrep-all) is a command line tool to recursively search all files in a directory for a regex pattern, that runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. It's a wrapper for ripgrep, the line-oriented recursive search program, on top of which it enables search in a multitude of file types like PDF, DOCX, ODT, EPUB, SQLite databases, movies subtitles embedded in MKV or MP4 files, archives like ZIP or GZ, and more. rga is great when you want to search for some text from a file available in a folder with many documents of various file types, even if some of them are available in archives. Read more

Security: Updates, Containers, Compilers and More

today's howtos

9 Best Free Linux Biology Tools

Biology is a natural science concerned with the study of living things, ranging from microscopic organisms up to the largest known animal, the blue whale. It is divided into many specialized fields including evolution, ecology, zoology, botany, genetics, microbiology and molecular biology. This science examines function, structure, origin, growth, evolution, distribution and taxonomy. Biology is extremely relevant to our daily lives, as it helps us to understand how living things work, including the human body. Furthermore, the study of biology is crucial in the development of new food products, to protect the environmental quality of our world, and improving human health e.g. through the discovery of new medical treatments and tests for diseases. Modern biology is founded on four main components: cell theory, evolution, gene theory, and homeostasis. Schools recognize the importance of biology to society, regarding it as one of the three most important branches of sciences, alongside physics and chemistry. We covered the best open source Linux software available for these disciplines in the following articles: Physics, Chemistry. Biology is at the cutting edge of scientific research and development. In the past 40 years, biology has advanced enormously revealing a wealth of information about the millions of different organisms inhabiting our planet, including, of course, ourselves. Biology continues to grab the headlines with much excitement being generated in the fields of synthetic biology (combining science and engineering) and genomics (the study of the genomes of organisms). A good range of open source biology software is available for Linux. This article focuses on selecting our favorite tools which are extremely useful for biologists. We hope this feature offers a useful resource for biologists and students alike. With the diverse range of software, there should be something of interest here for all budding biologists. Here’s our legendary rating chart showing our top recommendations. Read more Also: Vorta BorgBackup GUI Now Available For Install On Linux From Flathub