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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 1:18pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 11:37am
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 11:34am
Story Microsoft Still at It Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 10:42am
Story 5 open source RSS feed readers Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 10:00am
Story Leftovers: Software and OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:55am
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:53am
Story Docker/Kubernetes/Containers Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:53am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:52am
Story Leftover: Development (Linux) Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2017 - 6:52am

Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]

    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.

  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution

    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.

  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project

    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).

  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services

    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.

  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Microsoft Still at It

Filed under
Microsoft

5 open source RSS feed readers

Filed under
OSS

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds.

And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too.

Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

Filed under
Software
OSS
  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use

    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive.

    In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat!

    Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.

  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity

    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.

  • Gammu 1.38.2

    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations.

    The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.

  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics

    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow.

    In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.

  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn

    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.

  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?

    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time.

    Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.

  • Open Source for Science + Innovation

    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.

  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners

    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

Filed under
Server
  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface

    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.

  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6

    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]

    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.

  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response

    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal.

    Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

Filed under
Development
Linux
  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows

    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.

  • Lint for Shell Scripters

    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.

  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics

    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is.

    The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.

  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack

    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android.

    The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

Vivaldi 1.8

Filed under
OSS
Web

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • This App Lets You Reset Ubuntu to Default
  • New Ubuntu Kernel Update Patches a Single Vulnerability Affecting All Versions

    A few hours ago, Canonical published several Ubuntu security notices to inform users about the availability of new Linux kernel versions for all supported Ubuntu releases.

    The latest update is small but important, and appears to fix a recent security issue that could allow a local attacker to crash the vulnerable system or run programs as an administrator (root). Affecting Ubuntu releases include Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.10.

  • Linux 4.11 brings improvements for Intel Atom PCs (Bay Trail and Cherry Trail)

    Since Ubuntu 17.10 and other operating systems set to launch later this year will probably use the new kernel, that means there’s a better chance that you’ll be able to use the official install images to get Ubuntu (or other Linux-based operating systems) up and running with minimal fuss. Until then, Morrison has a workaround.

Linux Foundation News

Filed under
Linux

Cloud Foundry Aims to Close Cloud Skills Gap

Filed under
Linux
Server

The Cloud Foundry Foundation on Wednesday announced the launch of a worldwide cloud-native developer certification initiative.

The foundation created the cloud developer certification program to fill the widening gap of trained programmers for cloud apps and services. The Linux Foundation -- which has trained and certified more developers on open source software than any organization in the world -- will provide the instruction.

More than a dozen leading technology, education and systems integration organizations around the world will participate in the cloud certification program. Companies involved in the initial training and certification rollout include Engineer Better, IBM, Pivotal, Resilient Scale, SAP, Stark and Wayne, and Swisscom.

Read more

AMD Ryzen DDR4 Memory Scaling Tests On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This week MSI finally released an updated BIOS for the X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM that we've been using for a majority of our Ryzen Linux benchmarks. With that motherboard improving memory compatibility and allowing us to finally run the board at higher DDR4 memory clock frequencies, I've run some fresh AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks at various memory frequencies.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Still at It

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.