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Tuesday, 16 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Digia spins off Qt as subsidiary Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:57pm
Story Qubes: The Open Source OS Built for Security Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:52pm
Story KDE Developer Says Community Managers Are a Fraud and a Farce Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:44pm
Story RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst At 4K UHD On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:35pm
Story MINIX 3.3.0 is Available Now Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Red Hat steps up its entrepreneurship support with Silicon Valley 'foxhole' Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:23pm
Story A WAYLAND STATUS UPDATE Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:18pm
Story Six Clicks: An early look at Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:14pm
Story RPM 4.12 Brings New Switches, New Rpm2Archive Utility Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 2:57pm
Story Qt Creator 3.2.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 2:49pm

Digia spins off Qt as subsidiary

Filed under
Development
KDE

Digia has spun off a subsidiary called “The Qt Company” to unify Qt’s commercial and open source efforts, and debuted a low-cost plan for mobile developers.

The Linux-oriented Qt cross-platform development framework has had a tumultuous career, having been passed around Scandinavia over the yearsfrom Trolltech to Nokia and then from Nokia to Digia. Yet, Qt keeps rolling along in both commercial and open source community versions, continually adding support for new platforms and technologies, and gaining extensive support from mobile developers.

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Qubes: The Open Source OS Built for Security

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Security

No matter how good the code review process is, or how high the standards for acceptance, applications will always have bugs, says Joanna Rutkowska, founder and CEO of Invisible Things Lab. So will drivers. And filesystems.

“Nobody, not even Google Security Team, can find and patch all those bugs in all the desktop apps we all use,” Rutkowska says in the Q&A interview, below.

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KDE Developer Says Community Managers Are a Fraud and a Farce

Filed under
KDE

KDE developer Aaron Seigo is a very outspoken person and he is known for his strong opinions. He recently proposed for public debate a very heated and interesting subject about the role of the community managers for the open source project.

He thinks that the community managers' role, as they are working today on various projects, is actually a fraud and a farce. It's unclear what determined him to make this statement, but he knew right from the start that it was going to rile up the community and various community managers.

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RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst At 4K UHD On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The open-source driver stack tested was with the Linux 3.17 Git kernel while using the Oibaf PPA to upgrade to Mesa 10.4-devel for the latest RadeonSI and LLVM AMD GPU code. The closed-source driver was the fglrx 14.20.7 / OpenGL 4.4.12968 Catalyst release. When running the Catalyst binary blob we had to downgrade from Linux 3.17 to Linux 3.16 for kernel compatibility. All tests were done from the Intel Core i7 5960X system running Ubuntu 14.10.

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MINIX 3.3.0 is Available Now

Filed under
OS

In 2008, the European Research Council awarded Prof. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, the designer of MINIX, an Advanced Grant of €2.5 million (about $3.2 million) to produce a reliable operating system. He and his team have been working on it hard since then and they are now proud to release the result as a free and open-source operating system for the PC and ARM. It comes with a BSD license, meaning that individuals and companies can use it in products without paying royalties and without being required to disclose any changes they make to competitors.

MINIX 1 was originally a system aimed at teaching operating systems but after the ERC grant, the focus changed to include producing a solid, commercially viable product as well. The new version, MINIX 3.3.0, has a number of key features.

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Red Hat steps up its entrepreneurship support with Silicon Valley 'foxhole'

Filed under
Red Hat

A newly announced partnership with Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) gives American Underground startups a “foxhole” in Silicon Valley.

The Raleigh-based open source giant is allowing startups in American Underground's three-campus network to share space it already has at its home office in Mountain View.

The space, dubbed the American Underground Foxhole, began with a brief meeting in Red Hat Tower.

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A WAYLAND STATUS UPDATE

Filed under
GNOME

The list of applications that work ‘natively’ (ie with the GTK+ Wayland backend) is looking pretty good, too. The main straggler here is totem, where we are debugging some issues with the use of subsurfaces in clutter-gtk.

We are homing in on ‘day-to-day usable’. I would love to say the Wayland session is “rock-solid”, but I just spent an hour trying to track track down an ugly memory leak that ended my session rather quickly. So, we are not quite there yet, and more work is needed.

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Six Clicks: An early look at Ubuntu 14.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

For now, if Ubuntu 14.10's Unity default page look familiar, well it should. On the surface, Canonical, Ubuntu's parent company, has done little with the Unity interface. While experienced Linux users tend not to like it, I still find it to be a great desktop for new users.

Under the hood, Unity is still using the X.Org display server instead of Mir, Ubuntu's next generation display server. While Mir and Unity 8 are still being worked on, Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth doesn't see Mir becoming the desktop default until Ubuntu 16.04 LTS appears two years from now.

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RPM 4.12 Brings New Switches, New Rpm2Archive Utility

Filed under
Red Hat

RPM 4.12 has been released as the latest version of the RPM Package Manager. This most recent upgrade brings a fair amount of additions, bug-fixes, API changes, binding improvements,a new plug-in system, and more.

First up, RPM 4.12 brings a host of new command-line switches: --nopretrans, --noposttrans, --noplugins, --reinstall, --exportdb, --importdb, --recommends, --suggests, --supplements, and --enhances. RPM 4.12 also brings a rpm2archive utility for converting RPM payloads into tar archives.

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Qt Creator 3.2.1 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce Qt Creator 3.2.1. This release contains a range of bugfixes, including fixes for:

a freeze when using the current project or the all projects locator filters via keyboard shortcut
a deployment error in the OS X packages which led to the Clang code model plugin not loading
a crash when opening the context menu on C++ macro parameters
For a full list of fixes, please see our change log.

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GNOME Control Center 3.14 RC1 Corrects Lots of Potential Crashes

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME Control Center, GNOME's main interface for the configuration of various aspects of your desktop, has been updated to version 3.14 RC1, along with a lot of the packages from the GNOME stack.

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Rust Developers Planning For The Rust 1.0 Language

Filed under
Moz/FF

Rust, the general purpose, safe, and concurrent programming language developed by Mozilla Research, is starting to assemble their vision of Rust 1.0.

A new post on the Rust Programming Language Blog is laying out the path to Rust 1.0. The developers hope to move to Rust 1.0 soon with a beta coming out hopefully by the end of the year and the official release to follow. This Rust 1.0 milestone is to signify the Rust design "feeling right" and a promise to maintain backwards compatibility for future 1.x releases.

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Red Hat Announces General Availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. RHT, +0.07% the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11, the final minor release of the mature Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Platform. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11 reiterates Red Hat’s commitment to a 10-year product lifecycle for all major Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases and offers a a secure, stable, and reliable platform for critical enterprise applications.

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New Code Starts Lining Up For X.Org Server 1.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

X.Org Server 1.17 is planned for release at the start of 2015 and thus puts the closing of the merge window in the middle of October. While some xorg-server 1.17 code has already landed, more is on the way.

X.Org Server 1.17 will continue with refining the in-server GLAMOR code that was merged with 1.16 for 2D acceleration in a generic manner over OpenGL. X.Org Server 1.17 is also looking to integrate the universal KMS mode-setting DDX driver. Keith Packard on Monday also shared several other code branches he's looking at as material for the 1.17 release.

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More Intel DRM Changes Queued For Linux 3.18, Including Old i830M Fixes

Filed under
Linux

With the drm-next merge window for Linux 3.18 closing, Intel's open-source developers have submitted another round of changes for ultimately landing with the Linux 3.18 kernel.

Intel has already sent in multiple pull requests of new DRM graphics driver code to push into drm-next for the Linux 3.18 merge window. Among the changes include various Cherryview improvements for the forthcoming low-power Atom SoC, and code clean-ups and continued Broadwell tweaks. Another Git pull request landed in drm-next over the night.

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Speeding up the Debian installer using eatmydata and dpkg-divert

Filed under
Debian

The Debian installer could be a lot quicker. When we install more than 2000 packages in Skolelinux / Debian Edu using tasksel in the installer, unpacking the binary packages take forever. A part of the slow I/O issue was discussed in bug #613428 about too much file system sync-ing done by dpkg, which is the package responsible for unpacking the binary packages. Other parts (like code executed by postinst scripts) might also sync to disk during installation. All this sync-ing to disk do not really make sense to me. If the machine crash half-way through, I start over, I do not try to salvage the half installed system. So the failure sync-ing is supposed to protect against, hardware or system crash, is not really relevant while the installer is running.

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Samsung's first open-source conference kicks off, with Tizen on its mind

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The inaugural Samsung Open-Source Conference opens Tuesday morning in Seoul, with keynotes from well-known figures in the open source world and a hackathon focused on Tizen, the company’s in-house mobile operating system.

The event kicks off with a speech from Jono Bacon, the former community manager for Ubuntu, who recently moved to the XPrize Foundation, and also includes talks from Linux kernel developer Tejun Heo and Carsten Heitzler, the principal creator of the Enlightenment desktop environment for Linux.

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Also: Samsung Electronics to host first open-source conference

Flockport Rivals Docker with Open Source Container Virtualization

Filed under
Server
OSS

Is there more to container-based open source virtualization than Docker? A startup named Flockport thinks so, and has launched a website for sharing and deploying virtual apps using Linux Containers (LXC), an alternative to Docker.

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OpenDaylight executive director spells out where this open source SDN efforts stand

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

So if I compare it to Linux. Linux is in my computer, in my car, it’s in a million things outside of the server room. In the same way I think a large percentage of OpenDaylight will be used and leveraged that way. You will have a few people who grab the code, compile it themselves and deploy it in their environment, but mostly for a proof of concept (POC). If an end user hears about SDN and thinks it’s great, they might find themselves needing to POC 15 different solutions. Do I need an overlay? Well, you’ve got to look at three or four overlays out there because they all do things differently. And if you want to figure out how to use OpenFlow, well there are different flavors of OpenFlow, so you’re going to pull a couple of different ones.

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

New videos of a "Windows 9" variant have emerged, and to this hack's eyes they look to have brought Windows up to speed with tricks that desktop Linux has been turning for at least half a decade.

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Ed: Microsoft uses fake 'leaks' and vapourware again.

"In the face of strong competition, Evangelism's focus may shift immediately to the next version of the same technology, however. Indeed, Phase 1 (Evangelism Starts) for version x+1 may start as soon as this Final Release of version X."

--Microsoft, internal document [PDF]

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