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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 myths busted: Using open source in higher education Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:41am
Story Kernel and Graphics News Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:39am
Story Games and Software Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:38am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:36am
Story GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:31am
Story Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:28am
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:25am
Story Security: Samba and WannaCry Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 7:17am
Story Mainframes, Servers, and Containers Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 4:35am
Story Linux Foundation Events: Automotive Linux Summit, Xen, OPNFV Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2017 - 4:32am

5 myths busted: Using open source in higher education

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Have you ever heard someone say, "It's impossible to do X with Linux"? Me too. This is the story of how I busted the myths about open source in my own head and used Linux to finish my PhD in fine arts.

Read more

Kernel and Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Games and Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows

    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.

  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan

    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.

  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released

    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.

  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser

    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.

  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux

    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.

  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms

    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

Filed under
GNOME
  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work

    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release.

    Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.

  • gresg – an XML resources generator

    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.

  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI

    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

Filed under
Debian
SUSE

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security: Samba and WannaCry

Filed under
Security

Mainframes, Servers, and Containers

Filed under
Server
  • The Mainframe vs. the Server Farm: A Comparison

    Google, Facebook, and Twitter own giant data centers all over the planet, and they are built with racks of commodity hardware. If thousands upon thousands of small servers networked together are good enough for Google, Facebook, and Twitter, then shouldn’t they be good enough for you? Perhaps you remember IBM’s famous commercial The servers, they stole all our servers!

  • A Brief Look at the Roots of Linux Containers

    In previous excerpts of the new, self-paced Containers Fundamentals course from The Linux Foundation, we discussed what containers are and are not. Here, we’ll take a brief look at the history of containers, which includes chroot, FreeBSD jails, Solaris zones, and systemd-nspawn.

  • Containers Are Not Lightweight VMs

    This series provides a preview of the new, self-paced Containers Fundamentals course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. The course covers container building blocks, container runtimes, container storage and networking, Dockerfiles, Docker APIs, and more. In the first excerpt, we defined what containers are, and in this installment, we’ll explain a bit further. You can also sign up to access all the free sample chapter videos now.

  • Chef automation makes Linux container pitch

    Enterprises that use Chef automation for infrastructure aren't yet sold on the company's Habitat project for application management.

    In Habitat, Chef has a novel way to package applications that the company claims will allow users to get the most out of Linux containers. But IT pros say they still must sort out how Chef Habitat overlaps with Docker, and whether Habitat is worth the additional time investment to learn.

Linux Foundation Events: Automotive Linux Summit, Xen, OPNFV

Filed under
Linux

Feren OS Could Be the Best-Looking Desktop on the Market

Filed under
Reviews

Imagine taking Linux Mint, placing the Cinnamon desktop on it and then theming it to not only to serve as a perfect drop-in replacement for Windows 7 but to be one of the most beautiful Linux desktops you’ve seen in a long while. That’s what Feren OS has managed -- and has done so with aplomb.

Feren OS first arrived in 2015 and recently unleashed their 2017 iteration of the platform...with stunning results. This is truly one of those instances that, upon installation, you’ll find yourself doing a double (or triple) take, asking, “Is this really Linux?” Not that the state of the Linux desktop is behind the competition, in fact, I consider many of the Linux desktops to be light years ahead of other desktops. But, Feren OS has achieved something special; they’ve created a Linux distribution that anyone could use, for nearly any purpose, with zero learning curve.

Let’s take a look at this new(ish) distro to see exactly what makes it special. We’ll also dig deep to see what kind of caveats lay under the polish (if any).

Read more

Debian Installer "Stretch" and Debian 9.0 "Stretch" Nearly Ready

Filed under
Debian

Tizen News: Smart TVs, Wallpapers, and Games

Filed under
Linux

KDevelop 5.1.1 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

Together with the source code, we again provide a prebuilt one-file-executable for 64-bit Linux (AppImage), as well as binary installers for 32- and 64-bit Microsoft Windows. You can find them on our download page.

Read more

Linux Devices: FriendlyElec, NComputing, CubieTech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • That Nasty Samba Vulnerability Is Now Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases

    You might have read the news this morning about a wormable code-execution bug discovered in the Samba free software re-implementation of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol, which existed in Samba for more than 7 years.

  • Why Is Linux More Secure Than Windows?

    When choosing an operating system, there are many different factors that are taken into consideration. However, security is becoming increasingly important. You only need to look at the news to see the increasing number of data breaches that are occurring around the world at present. Choosing an operating system with care is your first step when defending your personal data. With that in mind, read on to discover the reasons why Linux is more secure than Windows.

  • CloudLinux 7 Stable Kernel Security Update Patches Multiple Issues, Update Now

    CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi has announced today the availability of a new stable kernel update for users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid operating systems, addressing multiple security issues and bugs.

    This new CloudLinux 7 stable kernel comes less than 24 hours after the release of the Beta kernel with the same version number, specifically 3.10.0-614.10.2.lve1.4.50, which replaces kernel-3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.47 and is available for download as we speak from the production repository of CloudLinux 7 operating system series.

  • [Older] E-Health Cyber-DOOOOOOM.

    We know the Australian government has one of the worst record of data breaches in the world. So naturally, rather than addressing their incompetencies, the Australian government has decided to roll out an e-health record for every Australian citizen. And it's opt-out only.

  • Chipotle says 'most' of its restaurants were infected with credit card stealing malware

    We browsed through the tool and found that every state Chipotle operates in had restaurants that were breached, including most major cities. The restaurants were vulnerable in various time frames between March 24th and April 18th, 2017. Chipotle also operates another chain called Pizzeria Locale, which was affected by the hack as well.

  • 'Thousands' of known bugs found in pacemaker code

    The other study of the broader device market found only 17% of manufacturers had taken steps to secure gadgets.

  • Kaspersky says no idea why company targeted by US govt [iophk: "dared to show vista7 in an unfavorable light"]
  • Any website can crash your Windows 7 or 8 PC with these four characters

    Here's how the bug works. All a naughty website has to do is use the character string '$MFT' in the directory name where a website keeps its images. Windows expects to see the four characters $MFT only in a special metadate file on your PC. When it sees those characters as a directory name, however, it causes enough problems that an affected PC will begin to slow down and eventually hang. At that point your only recourse is to reboot the machine. In some cases, the problem may even trigger the dreaded blue screen of death (BSOD).

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

First LXQt-Based Lubuntu 17.10 Daily Builds Surface, Here's What It Looks Like

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Lubuntu maintainer Simon Quigley was kind enough to inform us today about the availability of the first daily build ISO images of the upcoming Lubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, with the LXQt desktop environment.

The development cycle of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system started two months ago when Canonical's Adam Conrad gave the green light to all maintainers and developers involved in the project, and the first Alpha milestone is now approaching fast.

Read more

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today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers