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Friday, 18 Aug 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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5 Best Vector Graphics Editors for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Here's a list of the best vector graphics software for Linux that can be used as Adobe Illustrator alternative for Linux.
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Oracle changes heart on Java EE

Filed under
Development
  • Oracle opens up Java EE

    Oracle continues to make progress Java EE 8, the enterprise edition for the Java platform, and moving forward it would like to advance Java EE within a more open and collaborative community. Specifications are nearly complete and the Java team expects to deliver the Java EE 8 reference implementation this summer.

    As the delivery of Java EE 8 approaches, Oracle believes they have the ability to rethink how Java EE is developed in order to “make it more agile and responsive to changing industry and technology demands.”

  • Oracle considers moving Java EE to an open source foundation

    With the finalization of the Java EE 8 platform on the horizon, Oracle on Thursday said it's considering moving Java Enterprise Edition technologies to an open source foundation.

    The move, Oracle said in a blog post, "may be the right next step, in order to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing, and change the governance process."

  • Oracle doesn't want Java EE any more

    Oracle wants to end its leadership in the development of enterprise Java and is looking for an open source foundation to take on the role.

    The company said today that the upcoming Java EE (Enterprise Edition) 8 presents an opportunity to rethink how the platform is developed. Although development is done via open source with community participation, the current Oracle-led process is not seen agile, flexible, or open enough. ”We believe that moving Java EE technologies to an open source foundation may be the right next step, to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing and change the governance process,” Oracle said in a statement.

Security: Trezor, Kaspersky and Secure [sic] Enclave Processor

Filed under
Security

Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

Filed under
Linux

ON-CALL Friday means a few things at El Reg: a new BOFH. A couple of beers. And another instalment of On-Call, our weekly column in which we take reader-contributed tales of being asked to do horrible things for horrible people, scrub them up and hope you click.

This week, meet “Newt” who a dozen or more years ago worked at a College that “decided to migrate from a Linux system to Microsoft Outlook with an Exchange back end.”

Read more

Looks Like Debian GNU/Linux Runs on Quite a Few Mobile Devices, Including Pyra

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Debian Project's W. Martin Borgert reports today that work on making the famous and widely-used Debian GNU/Linux operating system run on various mobile devices continues these days.

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Canonical Invites You to Test Out the Chromium Web Browser Snap on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Canonical's Olivier Tilloy has put out a call for testing for what it would appear to be the very first Chromium Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snappy-enabled distros.

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Automotive Grade Linux moving beyond infotainment with a hypervisor architecture

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The open-source AGL platform — comprising of Linux-based operating system and application framework — shares software stack for connected cars among its member companies like Toyota, which is using Renesas' R-Car system-on-chip (SoC) in Camry's infotainment system. AGL's Unified Code Base (UCB) 4.0 encompasses 70 percent to 80 percent of work needed to build an in-vehicle infotainment system, and Renesas has incorporated the AGL-based software in its R-Car chipsets and R-Car Starter Kit. Likewise, TI’s Jacinto automotive processors support the latest UCB software distribution, and all the required code is committed back to AGL repositories.

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Plasma 5.11 Wallpaper

Filed under
KDE

Well, it’s that time of the year again where I talk about wallpapers!

For those who watched the livestream of the beach wallpaper, you’ll notice this isn’t what I had been working on. Truth be told after the stream I hit a few artistic blocks which brought progress to a grinding halt. I plan to finish that wallpaper, but for this release I created something entirely different while I decide what to do with it. I enjoyed this “wireframe” effect, and will probably experiment with it again.

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Under $15 open spec SBC offers Allwinner H5, GbE, and WiFi

Filed under
Android
Linux

The Orange Pi Zero Plus is a quad -A53 version of the Zero that advances to Gigabit Ethernet. You also get WiFi, USB host and OTG, and Linux/Android images.

Shenzhen Xunlong is clearly trying to mess with our minds. The 48 x 46mm Orange Pi Zero that arrived last November with a quad-core Cortex-A7 Allwinner H2 was followed by two similarly sized versions of the Orange Pi Zero Plus 2: a model called the Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 with a quad -A7, 4K-ready Allwinner H3 SoC, and an Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 model with a 64-bit, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5. So with two Plus 2’s where was the Orange Pi Zero Plus? Here it is at last, now with a 48 x 45mm footprint, a quad -A53 H5 SoC, and a $14.90 price instead of $18.90 and $19.90 for the earlier Plus 2 H3 and H5 models.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • NVIDIA Working On A New OpenGL Memory Usage Extension

    NVIDIA is working on a new OpenGL memory usage reporting extension, NV_query_resource. Before anyone jumps though to bash NVIDIA over coming up with yet-another-memory-reporting extension for OpenGL, this one is aimed at reporting the usage at an object-level rather than just overall amounts.

  • Fun to Play Open Source Real-Time Strategy Games – Fight for Glory

    A Real-Time Strategy (RTS) game is a time-based game which typically focuses on finding resources, managing resources, and building an empire. You can engage other players and make alliances, and find different ways to conquer foes. This type of game puts you in control of a personal army. There are no turns to take, everything takes place continuously, with players issuing commands at any time.

    RTS games have a large fan base since their inception. This game genre requires cunning, creativity, and the ability to devise innovative strategies to usurp your opponents. Some of the best known proprietary RTS series are Warcraft, Starcraft, Command & Conquer, and Age of Empires.

  • Window Maker Live 0.95.7-3 is available [Ed: 0.95.7-4 has just been made available too]

    This is an updated build mainly to address the recently fixed glibc getaddrinfo stack-based buffer overflow as described at security-tracker.debian.org/tracker/CVE-2015-7547 in more detail. Also includes all official updates released for Debian/Jessie at the time of building these ISO images. As an additional benefit, the included 3rd party programs have been updated to their most current release versions.

  • Running Remote Desktop Manager On Linux
  • Correctness in Rust: building string
  • Canonical Invites You to Test Out the Chromium Web Browser Snap on Ubuntu Linux

    Canonical's Olivier Tilloy has put out a call for testing for what it would appear to be the very first Chromium Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snappy-enabled distros.

    Snap is a universal binary format created by Canonical to allow for easy distribution of third-party, proprietary apps across all supported Ubuntu releases, as well as other GNU/Linux distributions. It also enables users to have the latest version of an app installed on their computers.

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

CoreOS Tectonic 1.7

Filed under
Server
  • CoreOS Tectonic 1.7 Improves Container Orchestration Platform

    Container management vendor CoreOS today released the latest update of its Tectonic platform, bringing the open-source Kubernetes based system to Microsoft's Azure cloud. The Tectonic 1.7 release is based on the upstream Kubernetes 1.7 project update that debuted at the end of June.

    Kubernetes started off as a Google open-source effort and became the cornerstone project of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. Kubernetes like other container technologies initially started off as a Linux-only platform but is now finding its way to Microsoft Azure thanks to the efforts of organizations like CoreOS. Microsoft's own Azure Container Service (ACS) added support for Kubernetes in February.

  • CoreOS extends Kubernetes to Microsoft Azure

GNOME: 20 Years and GUADEC 2017

Filed under
GNOME
  • 20 years strong
  • The ups and downs of 20 years with the GNOME desktop

    Way back in 1999 I did the unthinkable, I migrated away from my favorite window manager, AfterStep, to begin a journey with GNOME, a desktop that was born two years prior and was finally ready for the public. That was GNOME 1 and it was something special. I remember the excitement at having a desktop that could, finally, stand toe to toe with Windows. Yes, I had grown accustomed to the highly flexible AfterStep interface. I loved being able to have window transparencies across the board and special effects that blew away the minds of every Windows user I knew. However, all of those window managers I'd worked with to that point were missing something—a level of professionalism that would allow others to take the desktop seriously.

  • GUADEC 2017

    I arrived to Manchester on July 27 at 12:20 p.m. and the weather surprised me with a strong rain. It may be more surprising when you live in a city were it does not rain. Then I had to go to the Manchester Metropolitan University where many of the GNOME contributors would be hosted. When the bus stopped on the Manchester Metropolitan University I went to the first building of it I see and asked how to get to the Birley Fields, our accomodations. A man told me the directions and gave me a map. After some minutes walking I got the office that assigns the rooms to the new residents. I met there Mario, a guy from GNOME who is involved in Flatpak. It was interesting to talk with him in English when at the end we realized that we both could speak in Spanish. After leaving my stuff on my room, I left the room to walk outside and I found David King. It was incredible because it was almost three years we didn’t see to each other. In that day, I also met hadess (Bastien Nocera). He helped me to get a traveler adapter. This was also the day of pre-registration in a bar called KROBAR. I got joined to the GStreamer folks who I met before in GUADEC 2014. Some of the guys came up with the idea that the GNOME logo needs a new design. I talked about it before on the #gnome-design channel. I also met ystreet00 (Matthew Waters) who helped once to create a GStreamer plugin with OpenGL.

  • GUADEC 2017 Notes

    With GUADEC 2017 and the unconference days over, I wanted to share a few conference and post-conference notes with a broader audience.

    First of all, as others have reported, at this year’s GUADEC, it was great to see an actual increase in numbers of attendees compared to previous years. This shows us that 20 years later, the community as a whole is still healthy and doing well.

  • GUADEC 2017

    This year is my second one attending GUADEC, this time around, in Manchester. It was a great experience this time too, because I got to meet again with the friends I made last year, but also I got to make new friends as well.

    During the core days I attended a lot of great talks and I got to learn cool new things. Among these, I could mention learning about technologies that I didn’t know they existed, like Emeus, improve my view about how a good design should look like or discover more about the history of GNOME. Since this year I am a GSoC student again, I also had a lightning talk and I’m happy to say that this year I was slightly less nervous about talking in front of a lot of people.

  • GUADEC 2017, part 3: unconference days
  • GUADEC 2017, part 4: Manchester, United Kingdom

Debian and Derivatives: Debian on Devices and Raspbian OS

Filed under
Debian
  • Looks Like Debian GNU/Linux Runs on Quite a Few Mobile Devices, Including Pyra

    Debian Project's W. Martin Borgert reports today that work on making the famous and widely-used Debian GNU/Linux operating system run on various mobile devices continues these days.

    During the DebConf17 Debian Conference event that took place from August 6 to August 12, 2017, in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 Debian contributors and developers gathered to discuss the future of the open source operating system on mobile devices, such as smartphones, tablets, and even handheld computers.

    "Work on Debian for mobile devices, i.e. telephones, tablets, and handheld computers, continues. During the recent DebConf17 in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 people had a meeting to reconsider opportunities and challenges for Debian on mobile devices," said W. Martin Borgert in a blog post published earlier today.

  • Work on Debian for mobile devices continues

    Work on Debian for mobile devices, i.e. telephones, tablets, and handheld computers, continues. During the recent DebConf17 in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 people had a meeting to reconsider opportunities and challenges for Debian on mobile devices.

  • Raspberry Pi OS refresh: Raspbian's update to Debian Stretch is out now

    On the heels of the Debian 9 Stretch release, Raspberry Pi's Debian-based Raspbian OS has been updated and is now available for download.

Devices: Automotive Grade Linux, OSNEXUS, Arbor

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Openwashing and FUD

Filed under
OSS
  • Open core, open perimeter, and the future of enterprise software [Ed: So openwashing is the "future of enterprise software"?]

    Today, software development is built around APIs. Instead of embedding a vendor's product into their application, developers can call an API to consume services from a vendor. The developers don't need to know what's responding to their calls on the backend; they simply need to know what the vendor's API expects from their code and what they can expect to receive back from the API. It is, in many senses, wonderfully non-intimate.

    This is an inversion of the traditional open core model behind many commercial open source strategies for enterprise application layer products. In open core, the product's core is open source, and in the enterprise edition, vendors provide and support proprietary enhancements. Using the API approach, the product's core is often not visible in the cloud, and the only way in and out of the product is through the API.

    Because of APIs, we are seeing the differentiation, enhancement, and value in enterprise editions migrating to the perimeter via tools, widgets, and components. These can be closed source and/or open source, but we should see more open source in the perimeter, because many vendors can make money by supporting their core and charging for API calls or transactions. The two best examples of this are Twilio and Stripe.

  • After Cybersecurity Shift, Black Duck Is Growing Fast & Eyeing Deals [Ed: Anti-FOSS company finds that by attacking FOSS it can make money]
  • Understanding the Hows and Whys of Open Source Audits [Ed: Black Duck threw some money at the Linux Foundation and got its anti-FOSS agenda included in the site]
  • Black Duck Streamlines DevSecOps with New Hub Detect Capability [Ed: Here they are selling purely proprietary software]
  • Here's Why We Need More Open Source Software For Buttplugs
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Financial News

Security: Trezor, Kaspersky and Secure [sic] Enclave Processor

Android Leftovers

Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

ON-CALL Friday means a few things at El Reg: a new BOFH. A couple of beers. And another instalment of On-Call, our weekly column in which we take reader-contributed tales of being asked to do horrible things for horrible people, scrub them up and hope you click. This week, meet “Newt” who a dozen or more years ago worked at a College that “decided to migrate from a Linux system to Microsoft Outlook with an Exchange back end.” Read more