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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:30pm
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:29pm
Story The State of Plasma Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:01pm
Story Wine 2.2 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 9:45pm
Story Development News:/Trools Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:02pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:58pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:57pm
Story Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS Out Now for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 with MATE 1.16.1 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 4:06pm

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation and the National Center for Women & Information Technology Release Inclusive Speaker Orientation Course for Events
  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Rapid Growth

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

    “We saw a 60% membership growth in 2016, and we expect that momentum to continue in 2017,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux. “Our new members represent a wide group of skills and expertise, from location-based services to digital storage, which will be valuable as we continue to enhance our UCB infotainment platform and expand into other automotive applications like telematics and instrument cluster.”

  • QXL DRM Driver Picks Up Atomic Mode-Setting Support

    Gabriel Krisman Bertazi of Collabora has published a set of 14 patches today for implementing atomic mode-setting support within the QXL DRM driver.

    The QXL DRM driver as a reminder is for Red Hat's SPICE with guest virtual machines on QEMU. QXL -- presumably with Linux 4.12 -- will join Nouveau, Intel, and other DRM drivers in supporting atomic mode-setting.

  • Intel Goes Ahead & Drops i915 Driver From OpenGL 2.1 To 1.4 By Defaultv

    Intel Linux developers have partially reverted Mesa work done years ago to drop the default OpenGL behavior with the older i915 driver from exposing OpenGL 2.0+ support to now only having OpenGL 1.4 out-of-the-box.

Wickr Liberated

Filed under
OSS
  • Wickr Releases Crypto Protocol on GitHub

    Secure messaging service Wickr is opening its core cryptographic protocol to review by making the code available on GitHub. The move is a first for the company, which until now had kept its efforts proprietary.

  • Encrypted chat app Wickr opens code for public review

    Security researchers have wanted a peek at Wickr’s code since the secure messaging app launched in 2012, and now they’re finally getting that chance. Wickr is publishing its code for Wickr Professional, the subscription-based enterprise version of its free messaging app, today for public review.

  • Wickr, the encrypted messaging app, finally goes open source

    Finally, Wickr has released its core crypto code to the open source community.

    The end-to-end encrypted messaging service launched in 2012, long before Signal took off and WhatsApp rolled out encryption of its own.Yet Wickr became one of the last to publish its code to the open source community.

    The service's use of encrypted and disappearing messaging, à la Snapchat, helped to gain users' trust that their messages wouldn't be stolen, leaked, or exposed to either hackers or federal agents.

    But the company's choice to restrict access to its crypto code made it impossible for anyone to be sure that the service was free from vulnerabilities or backdoors, except for a very few select cryptographers and security auditors.

Why enterprises should embrace open source

Filed under
OSS

The techie cold war did eventually thaw with projects like MIT’s Project Athena and Stallman’s work with Emacs and GPL leading a transformation in the way people worked. Project Athena allowed all the disparate corporate systems to work together through common protocols, ultimately enabling businesses and home users the freedom to mix and match their hardware and software as they pleased.

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Open Source First: A manifesto for private companies

Filed under
OSS

This is a manifesto that any private organization can use to frame their collaboration transformation. Take a read and let me know what you think.

I presented a talk at the Linux TODO group using this article as my material. For those of you who are not familiar with the TODO group, they support open source leadership at commercial companies. It is important to lean on each other because legal, security, and other shared knowledge is so important for the open source community to move forward. This is especially true because we need to represent both the commercial and public community best interests.

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Transit Routing in GNOME Maps

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Maps 3.24 To Support Transit Routing

    GNOME Maps has become a much more viable piece of software with transit routing support having landed in Git master.

    Following some work at FOSDEM, GNOME Maps 3.24 will have support for transit routing so you can enter two points and get turn-by-turn directions. GNOME Maps is making use of OpenTripPlanner and they are still finalizing their deployment for transit routing but it appears all will be set for next month's GNOME 3.24 release.

  • Transit Routing and Reverse Routes Could Come to GNOME 3.24 Desktop's Maps App

    GNOME Foundation member Marcus Lundblad is announcing today, February 15, the upcoming availability of new transit routing and reverse routes functionality for the GNOME Maps application.

    The new features could land as soon as the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is out, which will happen in about five weeks from the moment of writing this article, on March 22, 2017, but early adopters can take it for a test drive right now if they clone the latest Git master repository of GNOME Maps.

  • Transit routing has landed!

    So, at FOSDEM a bit over a week ago, me, Jonas Danielsson, Mattias Bengtsson, and Andreas Nilsson talked about plans for landing the transit routing feature and we started doing some patch reviewing over some beers on Saturday evening.

    Thanks to a lot of awesome reviewing work done by Jonas, this work has finally landed in master!

Container-Oriented RancherOS 0.8.0 Brings Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Docker 1.12.6

Filed under
GNU
Linux

RancherOS developer Sven Dowideit announced the availability of version 0.8.0 of the open-source, container-oriented GNU/Linux operating system built around the popular Docker application container engine.

RancherOS 0.8.0 is here three and a half months after the release of version 0.7.0, and it ships with some of the latest Linux and Docker technologies, including an untouched Linux 4.9.9 kernel, the long-term supported Linux 4.4.43-hypriot-v7 kernel for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, and Docker 1.12.6 installed by default.

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Munich to Assess Cost of Vista 10 (Spyware). But Not Leaving GNU/Linux Yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux's Munich crisis: Crunch vote locks city on course for Windows return

    However, Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe said: "They have now stepped back a little bit because so many people were watching, but on the other hand it's very clear what they want."

  • Why Munich made the switch from Windows to Linux—and may be reversing course
  • The Document Foundation: Munich Returning to Windows and Office a Step Backwards

    The City of Munich, which has long been considered a pioneer of the transition from Windows to Linux, is now exploring ways to return to Microsoft’s solutions, with a proposal to move all computers to Windows 10 and Microsoft Office to be discussed today.

  • Linux Pioneer Munich Makes Huge Step Towards Returning to Windows [Ed: Microsoft's propagandist Bogdan Popa still lobbying against GNU/Linux in Munich]

    The City of Munich will explore ways to move to Windows 10 by 2020, as part of a historic vote that could represent a major step towards the demise of its own Linux-based LiMux.

  • Munich City Government to Dump Linux Desktop [Ed: This headline is a lie, it's anything but confirmed]
  • Microsoft does not love Linux in Munich

    The city of Munich, which moved its systems to Linux many years ago, is now thinking of moving back to Windows 10, following the arrival of a mayor who got Microsoft to move its German corporate headquarters to Munich.

    The city council voted on Wednesday to create a draft plan outlining the costs involved in moving back to Windows. If the plan gets the green light, then the return to Windows could take place by the end of 2020.

  • Linux champion Munich takes decisive step towards returning to Windows

    At the time Munich began the move to LiMux in 2004, it was one of the largest organizations to reject Windows, and Microsoft took the city's leaving so seriously that its then CEO Steve Ballmer flew to Munich, but the mayor at the time, Christian Ude, stood firm.

    More recently, Microsoft last year moved its German company headquarters to Munich, and now, less than four years after the migration of some 15,000 staff to LiMux was completed, the city has taken a decisive step towards swapping the Linux-based OS for Windows—whose use has been reduced to a minimum in the city.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Wednesday's security updates
  • 10 Week Progress Update for PGP Clean Room

    This Valentine’s Day I’m giving everyone the gift of GIFs! Because who wants to stare at a bunch of code? Or read words?! I’ll make this short and snappy since I’m sure you’re looking forward to a romantic night with your terminal.

  • And hackers didn't have much luck either with other flaws in the mobe OS

    Despite shrill wailings by computer security experts over vulnerabilities in Android, Google claims very, very few of people have ever suffered at the hands of its bugs.

    Speaking at the RSA security conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, Adrian Ludwig, director of Android security, said the Stagefright hole – which prompted the Chocolate Factory to start emitting low-level security patches on a monthly basis – did put 95 per cent of Android devices at risk of attack. However, there have been no “confirmed” cases of infections via the bug, Ludwig claimed.

  • This Android Trojan pretends to be Flash security update but downloads additional malware
  • Pwnd Android conference phone exposes risk of spies in the boardroom

    Security researchers have uncovered a flaw in conference phone systems from Mitel that create a means for hackers to listen in on board meetings.

    Boffins at Context Information Security managed to gain root access and take full control of a Mitel MiVoice Conference and Video Phone, potentially enabling them to listen to meetings without alerting the room's occupants. The flaws also created a way to plant a remote backdoor on to an enterprise network.

  • Why do hackers focus so much on Android? It’s simple, really

    It seems that, despite what many thought was a supply and demand issue, Android is by far the most appealing, accessible and, essentially, antiquated arena for cyber-criminals to flourish in.

  • Google Touts Progress in Android Security in 2016

    Google has a daunting task of scanning 750 million Android devices daily for threats and checking 6 billion apps for malware each day as part of its management of 1.6 billion active Android devices. The numbers are staggering for Adrian Ludwig, director of Android Security; six years ago, when he joined Google, he said being responsible for the security of what would eventually be billions of Android devices seemed overwhelming.

Best Windows Like Linux Distributions For New Linux Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Hey new Linux users, you may be wondering that which Linux distro to choose after seeing so many distros based on Linux. Most of you might be switching from windows to Linux and want those distros which are easy and simple, resemble like windows. So today I will cover those Linux distros whose Desktop Environment is much similar to windows, so let’s start.

Read more

What Is NVM (Non-Volatile Memory)?

Filed under
Linux

So Photoshop is the industry standard for photo editing but it is going to cost you as high as $600 a year. If you are looking for something arguably as good but cheaper as free, then you’ve got to go with GIMP. GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is a cross-platform image editor available for GNU/Linux, OS X, Windows and more operating systems. So how good is GIMP? Can it effectively replace Photoshop? How far Let’s take a look.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Munich's great Linux desktop initiative may end [Ed: Misleading summary - if not altogether factually incorrect - from Microsoft Peter and now Andy Patrizio. Is Microsoft giving them marching orders? Longtime Microsoft propagandist Patrizio helps his bosses with Munich FUD.]
  • Munich May Ditch Linux Desktops For Windows [Ed: "End of an era," it says. No. It's not. It hasn't even been decided yet. Old tactics again...]
  • Chromium OS – Exton Build 170212 – with YouTube and Spotify working fast and responsive

    The difference between Chromium OS and Google Chrome OS
    Chromium OS is the open source project, used primarily by developers, with code that is available for anyone to checkout, modify, and build. Google Chrome OS is the Google product that OEMs ship on Chromebooks for general consumer use.

  • Should you run Linux without a desktop environment?

    One of the best things about Linux is that there is a wide variety of desktop environments available to choose from for your computer. But not everybody uses a desktop environment like GNOME, Unity, etc. Some folks prefer to skip them entirely, for various reasons.

    A redditor recently asked about Linux users who skip desktop environments, and he got some interesting answers.

  • Ukuu Makes it Easy to Install Mainline Kernel on Ubuntu

    Ever wondered how to install new kernel releases on Ubuntu? Using Ukuu (which stands for ‘Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility’) is one way to do it. This straightforward desktop app help you install a new kernel in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and other Ubuntu-based distributions, using the “mainline” kernels published by Canonical.

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Flatpak 0.8.3 Released, Can Now Work With NVIDIA's Linux Driver

    With the release of Flatpak 0.8.3, this open-source sandboxing tech is a bit more suited for Linux gaming.

  • Video calls for Signal now in public beta

    This represents an entirely new calling infrastructure for Signal, and should increase voice call quality as well. We think it's a big improvement, but we're rolling it out in stages to collect feedback from people with different devices, networks, and regions in order to ensure there are no surprises when it's enabled for everyone by default.

  • Vivaldi 1.8 Browser Enters Development, Lets You Create Notes with Drag and Drop

    While some of you are enjoying their new Vivaldi 1.7 web browser with its built-in screenshot tool, it looks like the Vivaldi developers have started working on the next major update, Vivaldi 1.8.

    Vivaldi's Pål Andreas Franksson had the pleasure of announcing the availability of Vivaldi Snapshot 1.8.755.3, the first development release in the new series, which implements a bunch of new features and improvements that some of you have requested lately.

  • Unreal Engine 4.15 Brings Nintendo Switch Support, 50% Faster C++ Compile Times

    Epic Games, through Alexander Paschall, proudly announced today the general availability of Unreal Engine 4.15 game engine for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Packed with almost 80 improvements that have been added numerous contributors from all over the world during three months, Unreal Engine 4.15 is adding a lot of exciting new features, starting with support for the Nintendo Switch gaming console and continuing with faster C++ compile times, reduced by 50 percent.

  • Wednesday Madness, a few good Linux gaming deals going on

    Every Wednesday, I shall highlight some deals you might be interested in if you’re running a little low on funds.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source Accessibility Tools Help Streamline Inclusive Development

    IBM is embarking on a new era of open source accessibility by releasing tooling, samples and design patterns to help streamline the development of inclusive web and mobile applications.

    IBM has released two new projects on the developerWorks/open community, AccProbe and Va11yS, to help alleviate accessibility roadblocks during the agile development process, strengthen the user experience by adhering to industry standards, and reduce costs by ensuring accessibility is done right from the beginning.

  • Software-Defined Storage Opens Up: 10 Projects to Know

    Throughout 2016, the SDS (Software-Defined Storage) category achieved many new milestones and became increasingly tied to successful cloud deployments. With SDS, organizations can manage policy-based provisioning and management of data storage independent of the underlying hardware. They can also deploy free and open source SDS solutions. Many people are familiar with Ceph and are leveraging it within their OpenStack deployments, but Ceph is far from the only relevant open source SDS project.

  • What Is Open Source Software?
  • Interview: Cloud Foundry on its 2017 awareness-raising plans for open source PaaS

    The Cloud Foundry was originally developed in-house at VMware before being handed over to EMC/VMware spin-off Pivotal Software, which, in February 2014, put in motion a plan to establish an open governance model for the PaaS. This, in turn, paved the way for the foundation to be established in January 2015.

  • Control Plane Engineering Is Key for Big Kubernetes Deployments

    If you’re interested in running a complex Kubernetes system across several different cloud environments, you should check out what Bob Wise and his team at Samsung SDS call “Control Plane Engineering.”

    Wise, during his keynote at CloudNativeCon last year, explained the concept of building a system that sits on top of the server nodes to ensure better uptime and performance across multiple clouds, creates a deployment that’s easily scaled by the ClusterOps team, and covers long-running cluster requirements.

  • Intro to Control Plane Engineering by Bob Wise, Samsung SDS

    Large, high-performance and reliable Kubernetes clusters require engineering the control plane components for demands beyond the defaults. This talk covers the relationship between the various components that make up the Kubernetes control plane and how to design and size those components.

  • Try out Firefox on Wayland easily

    Today I finally managed to compile and run a Firefox version, which was patched to work on Wayland natively. To achieve this, I used the forked and enhanced Firefox version of the Red Hat developer Martin Stransky.

    For all those who are unaware of the Wayland project, it’s an succesor to the very old, but still common X display server for Linux operating systems. Compared to X, Wayland is a lot smaller in its code base, written from scratch, far more secure and build up on the newest 3D graphic driver stack. Unfortunately not all big Linux applications support it yet. The work on Wayland compatibility for Firefox was already requested some years ago and it was not moving forward very fast. Fortunately, some days ago it looks like the first patches have been merged into master.

  • It's Now Easier Trying Firefox Wayland Support On Arch Linux & Flatpak Distributions

    Jonas Heinrich took to a Firefox branch maintained by Red Hat developer Martin Stransky to getting it working on Arch Linux, getting the Firefox build into an AUR repository, and also producing a Flatpak build of the Wayland-patched Firefox.

    With his firefox-wayland-git package via AUR, Firefox can run without any usage of XWayland. This is as upstream Firefox continues getting closer to landing all of the Wayland support upstream so it will be an out-of-the-box experience in the hopefully not too distant future.

  • RethinkDB Resurfaces With Linux Foundation

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has bought the source code to the recently mothballed RethinkDB NoSQL JSON database. It relicensed the code under the Apache License, and contributed it to The Linux Foundation.

    As we reported recently, the news was announced in October that after more than seven years of development, the company behind RethinkDB was shutting down, although RethinkDB and Horizon would continue to be available, distributed under open source licenses.

  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Fourth Quarter 2016
  • FreeBSD 12 Looking At Dropping SVR4 Binary Compatibility

    FreeBSD has long had a SVR4 (System V Release 4) compatibility layer, but FreeBSD 12 will likely do away with this support.

    Is anyone still making use of UNIX System V R4 binaries on FreeBSD? The System V Release from the late 80's... The FreeBSD developers have been trying to find out if anyone is still serious about using SVR4 binary compatibility on FreeBSD, but so far they haven't been able to find parties that are still truly caring.

  • How and Why to do Open Source Compliance Training at Your Company

    Education and communication are two essential building blocks in any open source software compliance program. Both help ensure that employees, as well as others outside the organization, possess a good understanding of the organization’s policies governing the use of open source software.

    Employee training serves as a venue to publicize and promote the compliance policy and processes within the organization and to foster a culture of compliance.

  • [Older] Open Standards and Open Source in Telecom

    “Open standards” and “open source” are two terms that can often be confused. While regular readers of this blog are likely able to differentiate, for clarification’s sake, open source is the term used for software when the original source code is freely available and can also be redistributed and modified. But it doesn’t just reference access to the source code – distribution terms of open source software must comply with its own set of criteria.

    When telecommunications was in its infancy, standards were needed and established before any technology was released. As the development of new networks and technology grows, it will mean prototypes in open source, collaborative projects, which are challenges that we’ve discussed in a previous blog post. The development of new internet-enabled mobile devices and internet service providers have brought telecommunications to the forefront, as well as trends towards cooperation between the Open Standards and Open Source communities, as previously highlighted in our blog about the need for collaboration in mobile security.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Using Scripting Languages in IoT: Challenges and Approaches

    Scripting languages (aka Very High-Level Languages or VHLLs), such as Python, PHP, and JavaScript are commonly used in desktop, server, and web development. And, their powerful built-in functionality lets you develop small useful applications with little time and effort, says Paul Sokolovsky, IoT engineer at Linaro. However, using VHLLs for deeply embedded development is a relatively recent twist in IoT.

  • Things Every Hacker Once Knew

    One fine day in January 2017 I was reminded of something I had half-noticed a few times over the previous decade. That is, younger hackers don’t know the bit structure of ASCII and the meaning of the odder control characters in it.

    This is knowledge every fledgling hacker used to absorb through their pores. It’s nobody’s fault this changed; the obsolescence of hardware terminals and the near-obsolescence of the RS-232 protocol is what did it. Tools generate culture; sometimes, when a tool becomes obsolete, a bit of cultural commonality quietly evaporates. It can be difficult to notice that this has happened.

    This document is a collection of facts about ASCII and related technologies, notably hardware serial terminals and RS-232 and modems. This is lore that was at one time near-universal and is no longer. It’s not likely to be directly useful today - until you trip over some piece of still-functioning technology where it’s relevant (like a GPS puck), or it makes sense of some old-fart war story. Even so, it’s good to know anyway, for cultural-literacy reasons.

  • Futhark: A Pure, Functional Language For GPU Computing

    Futhark was presented earlier this month at FOSDEM as a "purely functional array language" with its compiler able to "efficiently generate high-performance GPU code."

    Futhark is a high-level, parallel-focused programming language that aims to compete with the performance of hand-written code targeting particular GPUs. Futhark hopes to be more portable across GPUs while tapping into the full GPU potential if you were writing finely-tuned code targeting a particular graphics processor. Futhark's compiler currently translates this code into OpenCL for GPU execution, but I'm told by one of the attendees at FOSDEM for this event, Futhark is also working on an approach to turn their code into pure-OpenGL for execution on GPUs without OpenCL, CUDA, or Vulkan.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.
  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
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Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos