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Wednesday, 27 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Demise of Chromium as Free Software Roy Schestowitz 3 26/01/2021 - 9:19pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 8:41pm
Story Plasma Browser Integration 1.8 Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:51pm
Story RHEL no-cost* vs openSUSE Leap Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:49pm
Story 10 of the Best Linux Debuggers for Software Engineers Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:42pm
Story Snapcraft GNOME Extension Update Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:30pm
Story Konsole Re-Flow Lines Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:13pm
Story Is Oracle Linux a valid replacement for CentOS? Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 7:09pm
Story Games: Siralim Ultimate, Maia and Much More Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 5:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2021 - 5:43pm

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • An Introduction to Bash Brace Expansion - Putorius

    The Borne Again Shell (BASH) has a lot of great features that it borrows from other shells and even from some programming languages. It was created in the late 1980s in a response to a lacking in the current available shells on Berkley Distributions (BSD), and the predecessor to Linux, GNU. BASH features numerous in-built features such as in-line scripting capabilities like brace expansion, which we are going to examine today.

  • How to Convert PDF to Image in Linux

    For many reasons, you often need to convert PDF documents to different image formats. You can find many online sites that easily convert PDF to images, but there is no guarantee your file will be secure always. You can easily do it in your own Linux system.

    This article is going to show you to convert pdf to other image formats (jpg, png, gif, tif) using the following two popular methods.

  • How to Install Gitea on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Gitea with Nginx as a reverse proxy on an Ubuntu 20.04 VPS.

  • How to Search, Install, Remove Snap Apps in Command Line | UbuntuHandbook

    This simple tutorial shows how to search for, install, remove, and list installed Snap applications in Ubuntu from command line.

    Snap is an universal Linux package format developed by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu. Though many users hate the Snap apps, it’s hard to keep away from it since many popular applications (e.g., VLC, Spotify, VS Code, Android Studio) offer official Ubuntu binaries through Snap rather than classic deb package.

    As Ubuntu Software still sucks and does not load application pages quite often, you can run followings command instead to search for & install snap applications.

  • How to install Jellyfin Media Server on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - Linux Shout

    When it comes to creating your own Medis server, the first name would be Kodi or Plex, however, these are not only out there. Jellyfin is another popular open-source project that lets us create quickly a modern media server with an interactive web user interface to manage videos, images, and music from any device.

    We can browser media content using Jellyfin on various devices such as computers, apps on your Roku, Android, iOS (including AirPlay), Android TV, or Fire TV device, or via your Chromecast or existing Kodi. Whereas when it comes to installing the Jellyfin server platform it doesn’t limit to Linux only, we can set it up on machines running Microsoft Windows, macOS, or in a Docker container.

  • Why you need to drop ifconfig for ip | Opensource.com

    For a long time, the ifconfig command was the default method for configuring a network interface. It served Linux users well, but networking is complex, and the commands to configure it must be robust. The ip command is the new default networking command for modern systems, and in this article, I'll show you how to use it.

    The ip command is functionally organized on two layers of the OSI networking stack: Layer 2 (data link layer) and Layer 3 (network or IP layer). It does all the work in the old net-tools package.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenBSD KDE Status Report

    But today we can be happy about an up-to-date KDE stack in OpenBSD. Currently - at the end of January - our stack is very up-to-date: [...]

  • Beneath the code: SUSE Enterprise Linux construction mechanics - Open Source Insider

    As every good developer knows, when you want to learn more about what a platform or tools provider is bringing through the release pipeline: ignore the news, delete the press releases, don’t look at the advertisements… read the coder blogs instead.

    Microsoft’s MSDN has adopted this approach for most of the last decade and it is – very arguably – where the real meat (or plant-based protein substitutes with soya-enrichment) is.

    Also well versed in this practice is German open source operating system softwarehaus SUSE.

    [...]

    Last but not least, Moutoussamy talks about the openSUSE community and how SUSE wants to share more than just code.

    “So next we will talk about some of the underlying processes glueing everything together but also about the great tool we are using: Open Build Service (build) and openQA (test),” he concludes.

    Can we imagine that one day, all technology vendors will talk about the way they actually build code and perform rollout cadence and express the need to balance open source community and commercial requirements in a product that still, ultimately, progresses forward year-on-year? We can dream, surely.

  • Easy Version Control rollback device-tree files

    It is still a mystery to me how they work, but they are needed by the Raspberry Pi, and, as I discovered, getting the latest is important.
    However, with Easy Version Control, if we roll back to an older version of Easy, we should really roll back the device-tree also. Ditto when roll forward.
    The current device-tree files are in /boot/device-tree, which you can view in a running Easy. These are actually located inside easy.sfs. So, if roll back or forward to a different easy.sfs, then extract the device-tree files out of easy.sfs and copy them to the boot partition.
    That is what Easy Version Control now does. The modified scripts are /usr/local/easy_version/easy-update and easy-version-control.

  • Iustin Pop: Raspbian/Raspberry PI OS with initrd

    While Raspbian, ahem, Raspberry PI OS is mostly Debian, the biggest difference is the kernel, both in terms of code and packaging.

    The packaging is weird since it needs to deal with the fact that there’s no bootloader per se, the firmware parses /boot/config.txt and depending on the setting of 64bit and/or kernel line, it loads a specific file. Normally, one of kernel7.img, kernel7l.img or kernel8.img. While this configuration file supports an initrd, it doesn’t have a clean way to associate an initrd with a kernel, but rather you have to (like for the actual kernel) settle on a hard-coded initrd name.

  • Open-Source Apache CloudStack 4.15 Gets New Look

    The mature open-source cloud infrastructure platform project gets a major update, boasting a new user interface and improved storage subsystem features.

  • Perceived Relations Between Gopher Gemini and HTTP

    This piece is written with the expectation that it will attract:

    * Those who are Gopher and Gemini enthusiasts,
    * Those who are the above and have the opinion I'm wrong,
    * Or those who have heard the two and want to know a bit more about them and their relation to the current web.

  • 3 stress-free steps to tackling your task list

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 14 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

    [...]

    Even then, I had to break these tasks down into smaller pieces—download the software, configure NGINX, validate the installs…you get the idea. And that's OK. A plan, or set of tasks, is not set in stone and can be changed as needed.

  • Taking The Full Measure Of Power Servers - IT Jungle

    It is with that in mind that we turn to IBM’s server sales in the fourth quarter of 2020, which were reported on late last week. IBM’s overall revenues continue to slide as it shrinks and it divests itself of businesses, and even as it adds Red Hat to the mix. Sales across all product lines and geographies were off 6.5 percent to $20.37 billion, and after a $2.04 billion restructuring writeoff, net income was down by 63.1 percent to $1.36 billion. By the time IBM has spun off its NewCo managed infrastructure services business, which has about $19 billion in sales later this year, it will pare down to about $59 billion in sales for the remaining company.

    Overall sales of servers, storage, switching to IBM’s direct end user customers and its channel were $2.5 billion, down 17.8 percent, and internal sales of this stuff to other IBM divisions accounted for another $196 million. Total System group sales, therefore, were just under $2.7 billion, down 16.8 percent, with the hardware being $2.09 billion and operating systems being $408 million. The System group had a pre-tax income of $455 million, off 43.3 percent year on year. Not a great quarter, but there was a tough compare to the System z15 launch at the end of 2019 for one thing and a global pandemic for another. Neither Arvind Krishna, IBM’s chief executive officer, nor James Kavanaugh, the company’s chief financial officer, had much to say about the Power Systems line, although as usual they did chat a bit about the System z mainframe. Power Systems sales were off 16 percent at constant currency, and System z sales were down 24 percent, with storage down 17 percent.

  • Dissecting the Apple M1 GPU, part II

    Less than a month ago, I began investigating the Apple M1 GPU in hopes of developing a free and open-source driver. This week, I’ve reached a second milestone: drawing a triangle with my own open-source code. The vertex and fragment shaders are handwritten in machine code, and I interface with the hardware via the IOKit kernel driver in an identical fashion to the system’s Metal userspace driver.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Period, Duration and Instant in Java

    Period, Duration and Instant are three different classes introduced since Java 8 to help us deal better with time.

  • Pyston 2.1 Is Blowing Past Python 3.8/3.9 Performance

    With this past week's release of Pyston 2.1 as an alternative Python interpreter I was curious to see how the performance compared to that of upstream Python... So here are some weekend benchmarks with a Ryzen 9 5900X system.

    On a Ryzen 9 5900X system running Ubuntu 20.10, I ran a few Python benchmarks using its stock Python 3.8.6 installation, Python 3.9.1 as the latest upstream and built from source in an optimized mode, and then the Pyston 2.1 x86_64 Linux binary. Pyston 2.x still is (sadly) binary-only for now.

  • gfldex: Chain calling

    When working with IO::Path we have to take platform dependent directory separator into account. To alleviate the problem .add was added. Surprisingly there is no candidate that takes a list. So we have to chain method calls as if we would use an inferior language.

  • A Beginner’s Guide to R Programming | EC-Council Blog

    R is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It is used for complex analysis such as correlation, clustering, and data reduction. Learn everything about the fundamental programming concepts in R and more.

Proprietary Software, Insecurity and DRM

Filed under
Security
  • Microsoft and SAP Extend Partnership

    Microsoft and SAP have announced an extension of their existing partnership, one that will see Microsoft Teams integrated into SAP’s suite of products.

  • PoC exploit available for SAP Solution Manager flaw

    A serious vulnerability in SAP Solution Manager would allow an attacker can authenticate to vulnerable systems by simply trying to connect, a local researcher has warned, adding that a proof-of-concept exploit is circulating.

  • Ransomware Attackers Publish 4K Private Scottish Gov Agency Files

    On the heels of a ransomware attack against the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA), attackers have now reportedly published more than 4,000 files stolen from the agency – including contracts and strategy documents.

    After hitting SEPA on Christmas Eve with the attack, cybercriminals encrypted 1.2GB of information. The attack has affected SEPA’s email systems, which remain offline as of Thursday, according to the agency. However, SEPA, which Scotland’s environmental regulator, stressed on Thursday that it will not “engage” with the cybercriminals.

  • Discord-Stealing Malware Invades npm Packages

    The CursedGrabber Discord malware family, discovered in November, targets Windows hosts. It contains two .exe files which are invoked and executed via ‘postinstall’ scripts from the manifest file, ‘package.json’. One of the .exe files scans user profiles from multiple web browsers along with Discord leveldb files, steals Discord tokens, steals credit-card information, and sends user data via a webhook to the attacker. The second unpacks additional code with multiple capabilities, including privilege escalation, keylogging, taking screenshots, planting backdoors, accessing webcams and so on.

    In the case of the three npm packages, these “contain variations of Discord token-stealing code from the Discord malware discovered by Sonatype on numerous occasions,” said Sonatype security researcher Ax Sharma, in a Friday blog posting.

  • DreamBus botnet targets enterprise apps running on Linux servers [Ed: Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt (FUD) site ZDNet continues to blame on "Linux" unpatched software that has nothing to do with Linux (and is being neglected, not patched by the system's maintainers)]
  • ESPN Plus apologizes for ‘technical issue’ during UFC pay-per-view event [Ed: Digital Restrictions (DRM) at work]

    A spokesperson for Disney, which owns ESPN, said in an email to The Verge on Sunday that the company was “aware that a technical issue prevented a portion of users from accessing the early part of the ESPN+ pay-per-view event, and we apologize for that experience. We worked as quickly as possible to identify and resolve the issue.”

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Full Circle Weekly News and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #389: Jailbird Jamboree

    Welcome to Episode 389 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss illegal activity on the air, the purpose of amateur radio, a remote head unit for the Icom IC-7100, Linux on the Apple M1 chip, a new frontier for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, ethical open-source licenses and much more. Thank you for tuning in and have a great week!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #197

    Ubuntu Making Home Folders Private in 21.04
    https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/private-home-directories-for-ubuntu-21-04-onwards/19533/2
    Ubuntu 21.04 Makes Phased Updates a Reality
    https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/phased-updates-in-apt-in-21-04/20345/3
    Tails Has a Focus in 2021
    https://tails.boum.org/news/plans_for_2021/index.en.html
    Project Lenix from CloudLinux Gets a Name
    https://almalinux.org/
    Valve Will Continue Their Linux Investment
    https://store.steampowered.com/news/group/4145017/view/2961646623386540826
    Fedora Kinoite, a New Immutable OS
    https://fedoramagazine.org/discover-fedora-kinoite/
    Microsoft Defender for Linux Servers Now Generally Available
    https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/microsoft-defender-for-endpoint/edr-for-linux-is-now-generally-available/ba-p/2048539
    Alpine Linux 3.13.0 Out
    https://www.alpinelinux.org/posts/Alpine-3.13.0-released.html
    KaOS 2021.01 Out
    https://kaosx.us/news/2021/kaos01/

    Raspberry Pi OS 2011-01-11 Out
    https://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspios_full_armhf/release_notes.txt

    Flatpak 1.10.0 Out
    https://github.com/flatpak/flatpak/releases/tag/1.10.0

    Wine 6.0 Out
    https://www.winehq.org/announce/6.0
    https://www.gamingonlinux.com/2021/01/wine-compatibility-layer-version-6-released

    Proton 5.13-5 Out
    https://github.com/ValveSoftware/Proton/releases/tag/proton-5.13-5

    Mobian Community Edition PinePhone Out
    https://blog.mobian-project.org/posts/2021/01/15/mobian-community-edition/

  • The MUDDY ethics of Free Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Xrdp on Ubuntu 20.04

    Xrdp is an open-source equivalent of Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). With xrdp installed on a Linux system, users can remotely access the Linux desktop using an RDP client as we shall demonstrate later in this article. It’s completely free to download and use.

    Without much further ado, let’s see how you can install Xrdp on Ubuntu Desktop 20.04 and 18.04.

  • How to Symlink a File in Linux

    A symbolic link, also known as ‘Symlink‘ is a special type of file in Linux, which is used for the purpose of pointing to another file. The symlink does not contain any other data apart from the disk address of the file to which the symlink is pointing to.

    Symlinks are particularly useful as shortcut files; where you can have the symlink of a program/application on your desktop/home folder, instead of the program file and its dependencies.

  • How to Install Wine 5.0 on Debian, Ubuntu and Linux Mint

    Wine is an open-source, free and easy-to-use program that enables Linux users to run Windows-based applications on Unix-like operating systems. Wine is a compatibility layer for installing almost all versions of Windows programs.

    Wine 6.0 is finally released and it comes with an array of numerous enhancements and a total of 40 bug fixes. You can find out all the new features and changelog of this new release on the Wine announcement project page.

  • How to Install Wine 6.0 in Ubuntu

    Wine is a nifty utility that allows users to run Windows applications inside a Linux environment. Wine 6.0 is finally out, and it ships with an array of numerous improvements and a total of 40 bug fixes.

  • How to Change Open File Limit in Linux

    In Linux, there are limits defined by the system for anything that consumes resources. For example, there are limits on how many arguments can be passed to a certain command, how many threads can run at the same time, etc.

    Similarly, there is a limit on the number of open files. As you might know, an open file is actively being used in some of the other programs and hence consumes memory.
    You can view and modify the open file limit with the command ‘ulimit‘.

  • How to Install GVM Vulnerability Scanner on Ubuntu 20.04

    GVM (Greenbone Vulnerability Management) is an open-source solution for vulnerability scanning and vulnerability management. GVM was previously known as OpenVAS.

    Greenbone Vulnerability Manager and OpenVAS are widely used by a number of people in the World including security experts and common users alike who used this all in one suite of tools that works together to run the tests against client computers using its own database of known weaknesses and exploits.

    In this article, we will show How to install and setup GVM on Ubuntu 20.04 to make sure that your servers are protected against attacks.

  • How To Install Wine on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wine on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, Wine is a free and open-source use that allows users to run Microsoft Windows applications in a Linux environment. In the present day, Wine is a must-have tool to get Linux users who don’t want to be able to let go of Windows native software especially gamers.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Wine on a Debian 10 (Buster).

  • How to boot multiple ISO images from one USB drive on Linux

    A bootable USB drive allows you to instantly run a full-fledged OS from the file system on the USB drive, rather than from the host computer's hard drive. Such capability is quite useful in various scenarios, for example, when you need to diagnose and repair a corrupted file system of a host computer, or when you want to test drive an alternative OS or the latest release of your favorite Linux distro before installing it. You can easily create a bootable USB by burning an ISO image on a USB drive with tools like Gparted or UNetbootin. There is nothing fancy.

    However, for people like me who would like to try out all sorts of Linux distros and different releases of each distro for testing purposes, as part of writing tutorials, what would be nice is the ability to boot multiple ISO images from a single USB drive. However, a typical bootable USB drive or memory stick can only boot from a single ISO file stored on the drive. It is not only inconvenient as I need to re-format the USB drive with a new ISO file every time I need to boot from a different ISO file, but also quite wasteful as a typical USB drive has much bigger space than a single ISO image. Although it's possible to boot ISO files using GRUB, it's rather cumbersome to modify GRUB configuration each time you want to add a new ISO file to try. Also, the GRUB-based approache does not provide the portability of a USB drive.

  • How to compress PDF files on Linux | FOSS Linux

    PDFs offer us one of the most convenient ways of sharing images. However, by stuffing tons of data such as images and graphics, the PDF file size can get too big to share via emails. If you are also suffering from this issue, you have come to the right place. Here, we will show you how to compress a PDF file in Linux to reduce its size drastically. And don’t worry, we have included both GUI and Terminal methods in this tutorial.

  • How to fix error : Conda command not found

    If you have already installed Miniconda and cannot run the commands in the terminal while using zsh, you may find the following helpful.

    In case you have already added the appropriate path environment variable to bashrc and bash_profile files, you would need to add the Miniconda folder directory to the PATH environment variable of zsh shell.

  • How to set up SSH dynamic port forwarding on Linux | Enable Sysadmin

    Dynamic port forwarding allows for a great deal of flexibility and secure remote connections. See how to configure and use this SSH feature.

  • Introduction to ContainerJFR: JDK Flight Recorder for containers

    OpenJDK has long been a top pick for real-world applications and workloads, chosen for its blend of performance, compatibility, reliability, and observability. For many years, JDK Flight Recorder (JFR) and JDK Mission Control (JMC) have contributed to OpenJDK’s success. Until recently, both were commercial features, however, available only for certain users and workloads.

    In 2018, JDK Mission Control and JDK Flight Recorder were open-sourced. JDK Flight Recorder is now built into the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) for later releases of OpenJDK 8 and all versions from OpenJDK 11 onward. Open-sourcing these tools brings their power—always-on, near-zero overhead production profiling and monitoring, application-specific custom events, and unified-core JDK analytical tooling—to all JDK users. On the downside, JDK Mission Control and JDK Flight Recorder have emerged into a world rapidly moving toward containerization, which is not the paradigm that they were designed for.

    The desktop-only JDK Mission Control application requires developers and administrators to access flight recordings on the local disk. Otherwise, one resorts to a complex and potentially insecure setup to connect directly to applications over Java Management Extensions (JMX) in the cloud. Similarly, the bare-metal-focused JDK Flight Recorder allows JVMs to dump recordings into the local filesystem, but not when the application runs inside a container. In that case, the filesystem is not easily accessible from the outside world, and it isn’t possible to retrieve and analyze recordings.

Games: Lutris, Critters, Scarlet Hood and the Wicked Wood, Bittersweet Birthday, Arcane Fortune, Rising World

Filed under
Google
  • Lutris game manager v0.5.8.3 out, requires contributors to agree to a CLA

    For regular Linux gamers, Lutris is pretty much a household name by now. For those that aren't - Lutris is a game manager allowing you to sort through all your games from various stores.

    Not only that it also allows you to manage emulators for your favourite classics, Windows games using the Wine compatibility layer and quite a lot more. It's very useful and they continue polishing up the overall experience after a huge update went out late last year.

  • Critters for Sale is super weird, first episode out free and the rest this year | GamingOnLinux

    Love you wild adventures? Critters for Sale is one you should take a look at because this is the second time I've played it and I still have no idea what the hell is going on.

    Originally released on itch.io back in 2019 which I mentioned here, and a contributor also took a look later, it's now seen a first episode release on Steam with Critters for Sale: SNAKE. It's so bizarre! A point and click visual novel adventure, one that's black and white with a bunch of animated scenes in the middle of the screen.

  • Scarlet Hood and the Wicked Wood from The Coma devs launches February 10

    Scarlet Hood and the Wicked Wood is going to take you on an adventure that loops over with twists and turns, featuring a narrative time-loop like some kind of Groundhog Day. Developed by Devespresso (The Coma & The Coma 2) and published by Headup, it sounds pretty Oz-esque and amusing with the recognizable Devespresso Games manhwa-style.

    Initially starting off in Early Access, they've now announced it will begin on February 10. The roadmap to release suggests the final version will be live in March with one third of the story chapters already available. They're using Early Access mainly to ensure the full release is nice and smooth.

  • Try the demo for Bittersweet Birthday, a creepy action game with you being hunted

    Bittersweet Birthday is an upcoming action game set inside a mysterious building. You wake up dazed and confused, there's people after you but someone is trying to help you escape. An interesting setting full of intrigue, with each fight being a unique combat encounter.

    "Bittersweet Birthday is an action game where every combat encounter is a challenging and unique fight. You can also explore different areas and help many of the NPC populating them with their everyday struggles while learning more about the world and its history."

  • Empire building terminal game Arcane Fortune adds trade, nobility, assassination | GamingOnLinux

    Inspired by the likes of Dwarf Fortress, Civilization, SimCity and more we have the free and open source Arcane Fortune which continues to expanding in features. Played in your favourite command-line terminal application, or just use the pre-made launch script it comes with that sorts out everything for you.

    Seems like it has some genuinely great ideas, and considering how ridiculously popular Dwarf Fortress is, we know that shiny graphics are not a key to success. Perhaps Arcane Fortune will be able to carve out a nice niche.

  • Open-world voxel sandbox game Rising World is going through a rewrite | GamingOnLinux

    After entering Early Access in 2014, JIW-Games have been rewriting their open world sandbox game Rising World to move away from Java and instead use the Unity game engine.

    They actually announced this back in 2019, as part of a post mentioning how changes to the Valve algorithm for showing games had dropped off their store page traffic dramatically. They said about wanting to rework a lot of it and Unity would help them achieve this.

    Back in December they finally showed off the result of their efforts, with a massive overhaul available in Beta that's now using Unity and they're continuing to support Linux.

Pikasso, a simple drawing application in QtQuick with Rust

Filed under
KDE

Following my last blog post about using Rust and Lyon to create custom shapes. I’m happy to announce the creation of Pikasso, a very simple drawing program intended to be used on Plasma Mobile.

Pikasso is very basic and only supports drawing with the mouse/finger and adding rectangles and circles to the scene. An undo feature is also available as well as the possibility to export your beautiful artworks to SVGs. As you can see, Pikasso is not intended to be replacements for Krita. If you want a powerful drawing application just use Krita, it’s awesome. The scope of Pikasso is more similar to Kolourpaint or Paint.exe and intended for children to play a bit with it on Plasma Mobile.

Read more

Free and open source modern level editor LDtk has a huge new release

Filed under
OSS

LDtk (prev called LEd) is an in-development free and open source level editor, one that's modern and designed to be as user-friendly as possible designed by a former dev on Dead Cells.

A big release just went out out with the 0.7.0 version, which the developer explained has "many important changes to make LDtk production ready and future proof. These changes will allow better support for large projects, better API creation and maintenance, and smoother user adoption".

Read more

What does “open source” mean in 2021?

Filed under
OSS

The licensing discourse in the last few weeks has highlighted a difference between what “open source” means and what we’re talking about when we use the term. Strictly speaking, open source software is software released under a license approved by the Open Source Initiative. In most practical usage, we’re talking about software developed in a particular way. When we talk about open source, we talk about the communities of users and developers, (generally) not the license. “Open source” has come to define an ethos that was all have our own definition of.

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Mozilla Firefox 85 Is Now Available for Download, This Is What’s New

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 85 is the first release of the popular open-source and cross-platform web browser to drop support for the Adobe Flash Player plugin. This means that you won’t be able to re-enable Flash support, especially because the Flash plugin has stopped loading Flash content since January 12th, 2021.

Now that Flash is gone, let’s take a look at the new features as Firefox 85 comes with a major privacy feature called “Network partitioning,” which promises to improve your privacy while surfing the Web by partitioning the network resources instead of sharing them to eliminate cross-site tracking.

Read more

Out of Loss and Disappointment

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I know, many of you are very disappointed with what happened in recent events. I understand the feeling. However, that isn't what this post is about. My reason for this post is about something good.

Recently, much evil has been exposed, and that's a good thing. We now know the real truth about Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, and so forth. We now know not to use services provided by these companies. Will I still by somethings from Amazon or Whole Foods? Yes, But not as my first choice. Also, I will not be using any of Amazon's technology such as AWS.

[...]

My laptop runs on GNU/Linux. There is more to come. This is a start of something new. The future awaits us all. Let's make it better!

Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 on the Raspberry Pi 4 Rocks: A Review

Filed under
Reviews

Canonical released Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) at the end of October 2020, and it’s the first release of the popular GNU/Linux distribution to offer an Ubuntu Desktop image for Raspberry Pi computers, supporting only Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspberry Pi 400 models.

Ubuntu was already available for the Raspberry Pi, but only as a server, supporting Raspberry Pi 2 and later models. Now, Canonical gives us the opportunity to turn our tiny devices into versatile office or home office computers that can do pretty much anything you throw at them.

Read more

Explore binaries using this full-featured Linux tool

Filed under
Linux

In 10 ways to analyze binary files on Linux, I explained how to use Linux's rich set of native tools to analyze binaries. But if you want to explore your binary further, you need a tool that is custom-made for binary analysis. If you are new to binary analysis and have mostly worked with scripting languages, 9 essential GNU binutils tools will help you get started learning the compilation process and what constitutes a binary.

It's natural to ask why you need yet another tool if existing Linux-native tools do similar things. Well, it's for the same reasons you use your cellphone as your alarm clock, to take notes, as a camera, to listen to music, to surf the internet, and occasionally to make and receive calls. Previously, separate devices and tools handled these functions — like a physical camera for taking pictures, a small notepad for taking notes, a bedside alarm clock to wake up, and so on. Having one device to do multiple (but related) things is convenient for the user. Also, the killer feature is interoperability between the separate functions.

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7 ways open source was essential to business in 2020

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OSS

The COVID-19 pandemic created many new challenges for businesses in 2020 as they rapidly moved non-essential workers to remote operations. However, it also created tremendous opportunities for innovation as people searched for effective ways to work and collaborate virtually.

Opensource.com responded to the need by publishing a variety of articles in 2020 on working better with open source. Since it appears working remotely is here to stay for the foreseeable future, make sure you're doing everything you can to adapt by reading the top seven articles about open source business from 2020.

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Ubuntu 21.04 Release Date & Planned Features

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Ubuntu

While development on Ubuntu 21.04 is still (somewhat) early, rumours are already circling about what to expect from the release that Ubuntu developers have dubbed the “Hirsute Hippo”.

In this post we rundown everything we know so far, including when Ubuntu 21.04 will be released, how long it’ll be supported for, and what kind of new features and key changes its likely to include.

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KDE Plasma 5.21: Everything You Need to Know

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.21 is out and in a Beta way. Just because we are dealing with a Beta version of this Linux-based desktop environment does not imply we shouldn’t be at the edge of our seats. It is a test, and every test needs a pass mark. That is why the Linux community exists; to approve all running tests. Plasma 5.21 Beta has not lost its pretty UI touch. All its Beta upgrades we will discuss are redirected towards improving the usability index of every Linux user that fancy it.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.10 LTS Status and More Stables Releases of Linux Announced Today

  • Linux 5.10 LTS Will Only Be Maintained Until EOY 2022 Unless More Companies Step Up

    Announced a few years ago was the notion of "extended" LTS kernel versions whereby the long term support cycle would span six years rather than the usual two years for LTS kernels in providing maintenance and bug/security fixes to the codebase. This means Linux 5.4 LTS is supported until the end of 2025, Linux 4.19 until the end of 2024, and even Linux 4.14 until the start of 2024. But with the recently minted Linux 5.10 LTS at least for now it's only being committed to maintenance until the end of next year. There's been differing remarks/indications for how long the Linux 5.10 long-term support cycle would last with many expecting six years given that's what has been happening on recent LTS kernels -- even the Linux 4.4 kernel is being planned for maintenance until February 2022 and Linux 4.9 until 2023. Linux stable maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has now provided a more transparent answer on the Linux kernel mailing list stemming from the talk over how long Linux 5.10 will be maintained.

  • Three stable kernels

    Stable kernels 5.10.11, 5.4.93, and 4.19.171 have been released. They contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

  • 5.10.11
  • 5.4.93
  • 4.19.171

Security and FUD

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (sudo), CentOS (sudo), Debian (sudo), Fedora (kernel, php-pear, and sudo), Gentoo (cacti, mutt, and sudo), Mageia (sudo), openSUSE (sudo), Oracle (sudo), Red Hat (sudo), Scientific Linux (sudo), Slackware (sudo), SUSE (go1.14, go1.15, nodejs8, and sudo), and Ubuntu (libsndfile and sudo).

  • Mimecast admits certificate compromise tied to SolarWinds supply chain attack

    Email security firm Mimecast has admitted that the compromise of a certificate it had issued for some Microsoft services is connected to the SolarWinds supply chain incident.

  • SolarWinds Cyberattack: Layered OT Security Creates Best Defense

    The recent SolarWinds supply chain cyberattacks serve to underscore an age-old cybersecurity tenant, and the reason we need to continue beating the drum as cybersecurity professionals: Use a layered approach to OT security. This incident highlights a rare, specific use case of a nation state threat actor, an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). In this particular case, layers provided somewhat limited value, but helped keep the less skilled attackers – about 99% of those on the playing field – at bay. Technology boundaries can be used to lessen the impact of (but unfortunately not prevent) nation state APTs. They not only offer additional protection, they may also help expose the presence of APTs in your network. Let’s examine how they would have helped in the case of APTs like the Sunburst malware that infected SolarWinds Orion software and was downloaded by 18,000 organizations.

  • Linux malware uses open-source tool to evade detection [Ed: How pro-Microsoft propaganda sites blame for a tool which comes from Microsoft (GitHub) "Open Source" and "Linux" (though it is the fault of neither). Alternative headline: Microsoft malware is being used to attack machines that run GNU/Linux]

    This tool is known as libprocesshider and is an open-source tool available on Github that can be used to hide any Linux process with the help of the ld preloader.

AMD Schedutil vs. Performance Governor Benchmarks On Linux 5.11 Shows More Upside Potential

With a pending patch, the Linux 5.11 AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 performance is looking very good as far as the out-of-the-box performance is concerned when using Schedutil as is becoming the increasingly default CPU frequency scaling governor on more distributions / default kernels. With the previously noted Linux 5.11 regression addressed from when the AMD CPU frequency invariance support was first introduced, the Schedutil performance from small Ryzen systems up through big EPYC hardware is looking quite good. But how much upside is left in relation to the optimal CPU frequency scaling performance with the "performance" governor? Here is a look at those benchmarks on Ryzen and EPYC for Schedutil vs. Performance on a patched Linux 5.11 kernel. Read more

today's howtos

  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions. Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself. But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast! So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective. I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021. OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction. There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20. Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only). Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos. It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software? Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.