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Tuesday, 23 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2019 - 1:27am
Story Ubuntu Studio 18.04 Extended Support Roy Schestowitz 1 22/04/2019 - 1:26am
Story Kernel: Linux 5.1 and Linux 5.2 Roy Schestowitz 1 22/04/2019 - 1:14am
Story KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 67 Roy Schestowitz 1 22/04/2019 - 1:07am
Story Linux v5.1-rc6 Rianne Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 8:53pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 5:15pm
Story today's leftovers (mostly howtos and programming) Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 4:31pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 4:26pm
Story Using Ksplice To Detect Exploit Attempts Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 3:42pm
Story A Set Of Obscure Drivers Out-Of-Tree Since Linux 2.x Will See Mainline For Linux 5.2 Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 3:34pm

COBOL, C, C++ all due for updates in early 2020s

Filed under
Development

You have never heard of Chris Tandy, a Toronto-based programmer for IBM since 1985, but his work in standardizing computer programming languages is vital to everything you do as a software developer.

Tandy chairs the American INCITS PL22 group and is an officer in the global ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 22 committee, which are the primary standards bodies responsible not only for pivotal languages such as COBOL, C, and C++, but also for historic ones like Ada, APL (famously named as "A Programming Language"), and Fortran. They also deal in esoterica—try your hand at coding in PL/1 or REXX.

Future versions of the COBOL standard are now entirely in ISO hands, while before it was mostly an American project, Tandy explained. The ISO working group members intend to have the next version, known as an FDIS (final draft international standard), done in 2020.

Read more

Also: GNU patch another_hunk Function Double-Free Vulnerability [CVE-2018-6952]

Kdenlive Video Editor 19.04 Arrives with Major Changes in Tow

Filed under
KDE
Software
Movies

A major update to the Kdenlive video editor is now available for download.

Kdenlive 19.04 ships as part of KDE Applications 19.04, released on April 19.

This is the vaunted “refactoring” release we’ve written lots about, as the release announcement explains further:

“Kdenlive has gone through an extensive re-write of its core code as more than 60% of its internals has changed, improving its overall architecture.”

Read more

Security Leftovers

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Security

10 Best Linux Password Managers

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GNU
Linux
Security

Password managers are applications created to enable users to keep their passwords in a single place and absolve themselves of the need to remember every single one of their passwords.

They, in turn, encourage clients to use passwords that are as complex as possible and remember a single master password. Modern password managers even go an extra mile to keep other information such as card details, files, receipts, etc. safely locked away from prying eyes.

You might be wondering which password manager app will work best on your Linux machine and I am here to answer your question with my list of the 10 best Linux password managers.

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Qt 6 Might Drop Their Short-Lived Universal Windows Platform Support

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Development
Microsoft

While the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) is needed for targeting the Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens, and IoT, The Qt Company is thinking about gutting out their UWP support in the big Qt 6 tool-kit update.

The Qt Company is busy brainstorming changes for Qt 6, which is expected to see its maiden release in late 2020 barring any delays. One of those fundamental changes being tossed around is eliminating the Universal Windows Platform coverage with Qt 6.0.

Read more

Direct: Qt 6 Planning: Consideration of dropping support for UWP applications

Graphics and Hardware: NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, Mesa, VirGL and Xeon Platinum

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction

    Let me introduce the brand new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which is basically a quad-core 64bit ARM Cortex-A57 CPU with 128 GPU cores - suitable for all kinds of maker ideas: AI, Robotics, and of course for running Docker Containers…

  • Mesa's Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

    Mesa 19.1 is due to be released at the end of May and for that to be the feature freeze is in two weeks followed by the weekly release candidates. With the feature development ending soon for this next quarterly Mesa release, the Radeon "RADV" and Intel "ANV" Vulkan driver developers in particular have been quite busy on their remaining feature work.

    On the RADV front, this morning brought VK_EXT_inline_uniform_block support. This is the Vulkan extension to let uniform blocks be backed directly with descriptor sets.

  • VIRTIO 1.1 Released With 2D Graphics Support, Evdev Input Device

    The Virtual I/O Device standard has christened its VIRTIO 1.1 specification this month. This is the virtualization standard around network/storage/graphics/other-hardware in mind for cross-hypervisor compatibility.

    VIRTIO 1.1 brings a GPU device type at this stage providing 2D acceleration that pairs with the VirGL efforts.

  • Running Intel MKL-DNN On 2 x Xeon Platinum 8280 CPUs With GCC 9 "Cascadelake" Tuning

    On the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 server built on a Gigabyte Xeon Scalable barebones setup while running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I did some quick tests of this initial MKL-DNN profile while using the current GCC 9.0.1 compiler. The GCC9 compiler will debut as stable in the next few weeks in the form of "GCC 9.1" as the first stable release and with this annual GNU compiler update is the initial "cascadelake" target that includes enabling AVX-512 VNNI support over the existing "skylake-avx512" target that is used for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable CPUs. I ran MKL-DNN benchmarks both when built by GCC9's skylake-avx512 target and then again with cascadelake while "-O3" was also part of the CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS. 

WWW: Indie Web Server, Administrating Nextcloud and Project Spotlight on Drupal

Filed under
Web
  • Indie Web Server 8.1.1: Reverse proxy (local mode)
  • This site now runs on Indie Web Server

    In the interests of eating my own hamster food1, I just switched this site from nginx to Indie Web Server.

    The only complication in the process was that I had to update the hostname of the server to match the domain name.

  • Administrating Nextcloud as a Snap

    As I’ve described in both my Linux in Action book and Linux in Motion course, Nextcloud is a powerful way to build a file sharing and collaboration service using only open source software running on your own secure infrastructure. It’s DropBox, Skype, and Google Docs all rolled into one, but without the vendor lock-in, security, and privacy fears.
    While the platform is certainly well-designed and polished, the initial installation can be tricky. Looking for proof? Try manually installing Nextcloud on an Ubuntu 18.04 server using any one of the detailed instructions available around the internet. Sometimes everything goes smoothly, but not always. You might encounter packages no longer supported by the official upstream repositories or changed dependencies. Don’t blame the people who wrote those guides: blame the pace of change in official Linux software repositories.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Drupal

    Drupal is a content management framework, and it's used to make many of the websites and applications you use every day. Drupal has great standard features, easy content authoring, reliable performance and excellent security. What sets Drupal apart is its flexibility; modularity is one of its core principles. Its tools help you build the versatile, structured content that ambitious web experiences need. With Drupal, you can build almost any integrated experience you can imagine.

  • Carlos Soriano: DrupalCon

    Last week I went to DrupalCon in the lovely city of Seattle invited by Tim, the executive director of Drupal.

    Our plan was to have a panel discussion about the tooling we use in FOSS organization such as GNOME, Debian, Drupal, etc. Specially since we recently transitioned to GitLab. The panel discussion was between Tim himself, Alex Wirt from Debian, Eliran Mesika and Tina Sturgis from GitLab and me. We were 5 out of 9 featured speakers!

BSD: FreeBSD Development News and BSD Now 294

Filed under
BSD
  • CFT for FreeBSD + ZoL

    We're pleased to make available images allowing testing of FreeBSD using ZFS on Linux. During this development cycle, the ZoL code has been made portable, and available in the ports tree as sysutils/zol and sysutils/zol-kmod, for userland/kernel bits respectively. While some have used these for testing, we felt it necessary to generate some installation images which are an easier method of getting up and started using ZoL. These images are built against FreeBSD 12-stable and 13-HEAD and will install a world / kernel with the base system ZFS disabled and the sysutils/zol ports pre-installed.

    It is possible to these with both UFS or ZFS on root, and we're looking for feedback on any stability issues or other regressions that you see vs the legacy ZFS in base.

  • FreeBSD Images Reworked With ZFS On Linux Code Up For Testing

    Last year FreeBSD developers decided to re-base their ZFS file-system code based on the "ZFS On Linux" port rather than the Illumos source tree where they originally had been acquiring the support for this BSD. There's now FreeBSD 12 and FreeBSD 13/Head images available for testing of this re-worked ZFS file-system support.

    Kris Moore of iXsystems has been involved in this large undertaking to get the FreeBSD ZFS code re-based over ZoL. They are still working on this big effort but have now spun some FreeBSD 12-STABLE and 13-HEAD installation images for those easily wanting to test out this ZoL'ed FreeBSD.

  • The SSH Tarpit | BSD Now 294

    A PI-powered Plan 9 cluster, an SSH tarpit, rdist for when Ansible is too much, falling in love with OpenBSD again, how I created my first FreeBSD port, the Tilde Institute of OpenBSD education and more.

Kipi Plugins 5.9.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

Kipi Plugins is a set of app plugins for manipulating images. They use libkipi which is released as part of KDE Applications. It used to get standalone releases and was then moved to be part of Digikam releases. Since Digikam 6 they have been deprecated by Digikam in favour of their new plugin framework DPlugins. While in KDE Frameworks the Purpose Framework is another newer project covering similar features.

However Kipi Plugins are still supported by KDE apps KPhotoAlbum, Gwenview, Spectacle so they shouldn’t disappear yet.

I’ve made a new release available for download now.

Read more

Debian: Dirk Eddelbuettel's Code, Molly de Blanc Becomes Debian Developer, Iustin Pop on Debian DPL Election and Debian Bug Squashing Party

Filed under
Debian
  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tint 0.1.2: Some cleanups

    A new version 0.1.2 of the tint package is arriving at CRAN as I write this. It follows the recent 0.1.1 release which included two fabulous new vignettes featuring new font choices. The package name expands from tint is not tufte as the package offers a fresher take on the Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

    However, with the new vignettes in 0.1.1 we now had four full-length vignettes which made the package somewhat bulky. So for this release I reorganized things a little, added two new shorter vignettes with links to the full-length vignettes but keeping the size more constrained.

  • Molly de Blanc: developer

    I became a Debian Developer towards the end of 2018. I started the process in August 2017 at DebConf in Montreal. Over the course of 17 months I wrote emails, searched the Debian wiki, and learned a lot about the project.

  • Iustin Pop: Debian DPL election 2019

    As planned for this long weekend (in Switzerland), I went and re-read the platforms, and cast my vote. Which made me very happy, because I voted in the elections for the first time in a long while…

    But it didn’t start like that. The first call for nominations ended up with no (valid) nominations, and the follow-up thread was a bit depressing (high load for the DPL role, unclear expectations, etc.) For a time, it looked like the project is drifting, and some of the trolling on the list definitely didn’t help. I managed to prod a bit the thread and there was a nice reply from Lucas which seems to open the gates—the discussion livened up, and after many more meaningful mails, we ended up with 4 candidates. That’s, in my memory, a very good result.

  • Paris BSP and this blog

    I've never had a blog up to today, and apparently now I do. Why? Well, it happened that there was a Debian Bug Squashing Party in Paris a few weeks ago, and I thought that it might be nice to go, meet some nice people and humbly help releasing Buster. Great news is that the Debian project is willing to reimbourse its members some of the expenses for taking part to a BSP, asking in return to communicate publicly about what you do during a BSP so that others are motivated to participate as well.

    So I guessed that might be the occasion for me to start a blog, and start writing something about what I do in Debian. Here it goes!

    It was my first BSP ever, and I am very happy of it. We met for a couple of days at very nice Mozilla's office in Paris (I think they are moving and we were at the old one, though). We were probably around 15 people, mostly from France, Belgium, the Netherlands and UK (which is not surprising if you look at the high-speed rail map in Europe; or any map of Europe, as a matter of facts).

    The great thing of a BSP is that you have a very short loop to other developers. Since a BSP is all about getting RC bugs closed, it is useful to talk directly to Release Team members, and discuss whether they would unblock your fix or not when you are not sure. This saves a lot in terms of human bandwidth and context-switching. Also, I had the occasion to watch more experienced developers in action and learn how to tackle issues I haven't dealt with ever before, like bumping up a library SONAME.

Admin/Programming: GStreamer, Django, OpenJDK and Ansible

Filed under
Development
  • GStreamer 1.16.0 new major stable release

    The GStreamer team is excited to announce a new major feature release of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

    The 1.16 release series adds new features on top of the previous 1.14 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

  • Why Django Is The Popular Python Framework Among Web Developers?

    Nowadays, a lot of backend web development programs are developed and run with Python. Python has been one of the most popular programming languages for web development and its agility and versatility are strong reasons for its growing success. From developing simple codes to data analytics and machine learning, Python has become the go-to language for many developers.

    There are a lot of frameworks that work with Python and these frameworks basically allow the developers to choose a platform on which they can customize their website and test it freely according to their preferences. Among all the frameworks of Python, Django seems to be the most popular option. In fact, in the Stack Overflow Survey of 2018, Django was included as one of the most loved frameworks with 58% of the developers voting for it.

  • Not all OpenJDK 12 builds include Shenandoah: Here’s why

    A little history: Shenandoah, a high-performance low-pause-time garbage collector, is a Red Hat-led project. When we first proposed to contribute Shenandoah to OpenJDK, Oracle made it clear that they didn’t want to support it. That’s fair enough: OpenJDK is free software, so you don’t have to support anything you don’t want. We told Oracle that we’d work with them to design a really clean pluggable garbage-collector interface that allows anyone easily to select the garbage collectors to include in their builds. We did that together, and Shenandoah went in to JDK 12.

    Evidently Oracle has chosen not to build Shenandoah. They aren’t doing anything strictly wrong by excluding it, but something doesn’t feel right to me. These builds aren’t supported by Oracle—you need their commercial binaries to get support—so why exclude Shenandoah? It might simply be that they used their standard build scripts to build their open source binaries. However, in a rather feature-light OpenJDK release, I find it odd for open source builds to exclude one of the most significant contributions. I really appreciate Oracle providing GPL-licensed OpenJDK builds, but I wish they’d build all of it.

  • Announcing OpenJDK 11 packages in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    OpenJDK 11 is now the default Java package in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, replacing OpenJDK 10, the previously supported rapid release version and original package default for Ubuntu 18.04. This OpenJDK package is covered by the standard, LTS upstream security support and will also be the default package for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.04 release.

    Version 11 is the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the open-source implementation of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE). It incorporates key security improvements, including an update to the latest Transport Layer Security (TLS) version, TLS 1.3, and the implementation of ChaCha20-Poly1305 cryptographic algorithms, a new stream cipher that can replace the less secure RC4.

  • Learn Ansible By Doing With These Courses And Hands-On Labs

    Infrastructure as code has changed the way that we plan, deploy, and maintain infrastructure. One of the technologies that made this transformation possible is Ansible. Ansible is a popular orchestration tool used by many individuals and small to large scale organizations, so knowing how to use it can provide a lot of opportunities.

    Even if you end up needing to learn other tools in the future such as Puppet, Chef, Salt, or Terraform (read: Ansible vs. Terraform), understanding Ansible and how it works will make it much easier to then learn how to use these other technologies. So don’t worry about the “which tool should I learn first?!” question. Just pick one, learn it, and you’ll be setup for the future.

Linux Foundation: Zend/Laminas Project, CHIPS Alliance, and Hyperledger Project (HLP)

Filed under
Linux
  • Zend Framework Headed to the Linux Foundation as Open Source Laminas Project

    Core framework used by enterprise application developers for PHP is moving to an open governance model.

    Nearly 14 years after Zend started its effort to build a PHP competitor to the .NET and JavaEE development frameworks, the company is gearing up to contribute the Zend Framework to seed the new Luminas open-source project at the Linux Foundation.

    Zend Framework as an idea was first discussed back in October 2005. The 1.0 release debuted nearly two years late in July 2007 and has been steadily improved over the last dozen years. In 2015, however, Zend was acquired by software development firm Rogue Wave, which has now decided to transition the Zend Framework.

    "Over the years, Zend Framework has seen wide adoption across the PHP ecosystem, with an emphasis on the Enterprise market," Matthew Weier O'Phinny, principal engineer at Zend by Rogue Wave Software wrote in a blog. "It has formed the basis of numerous business application and services including eCommerce platforms, content management, healthcare systems, entertainment platforms and portals, messaging services, APIs, and many others."

  • Open Hardware Group – CHIPS Alliance – Building Momentum and Community with Newest Member Antmicro

    CHIPS Alliance, the leading consortium advancing common, open hardware for interfaces, processors and systems, today announced Antmicro is joining the organization. Antmicro is a software-driven technology company focused on introducing open source into strategic areas of industry, especially edge AI. Announced just last month, the CHIPS Alliance welcomes Antmicro among its initial members Esperanto Technologies, Google, SiFive, and Western Digital.

    CHIPS Alliance is a project hosted by the Linux Foundation to foster a collaborative environment to accelerate the creation and deployment of more efficient and flexible CPUs, SoCs, and peripherals for use in mobile, computing, consumer electronics, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. The CHIPS Alliance project hosts and curates high-quality open source Register Transfer Level (RTL) code relevant to the design of open source CPUs, RISC-V-based SoCs, and complex peripherals for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and custom silicon. Members are committed to both open source hardware and continued momentum behind the free and open RISC-V architecture.

    “The RISC-V Foundation directs the standards and promotes the adoption of the open and free Instruction Set Architecture. This enables organizations to innovate for the next generation of hardware development. CHIPS Alliance is a natural extension for companies and universities who want to collaborate and create RTL based on RISC-V and related peripherals,” said Calista Redmond, CEO of the RISC-V Foundation.

  • Blockchain 2.0 – What Is Ethereum [Part 9]

    In the previous guide of this series, we discussed about Hyperledger Project (HLP), a fastest growing product developed by Linux Foundation. In this guide, we are going to discuss about what is Ethereum and its features in detail. Many researchers opine that the future of the internet will be based on principles of decentralized computing. Decentralized computing was in fact among one of the broader objectives of having the internet in the first place. However, the internet took another turn owing to differences in computing capabilities available. While modern server capabilities make the case for server-side processing and execution, lack of decent mobile networks in large parts of the world make the case for the same on the client side. Modern smartphones now have SoCs (system on a chip or system on chip) capable of handling many such operations on the client side itself, however, limitations owing to retrieving and storing data securely still pushes developers to have server-side computing and data management. Hence, a bottleneck in regards to data transfer capabilities is currently observed.

4 of the Best Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

There are plenty of web browsers for Linux these days, but not all of them support all distros. This makes it a little bit difficult to choose, but there are some viable options that still work with the ecosystem. The choice isn’t just dependent on your Linux distribution, but also on your preferred use cases.

While Linux desktops offer most of the web browsers you’d use on Windows and Mac, there are some lesser-known browsers that aren’t available for the latter two operating systems.

Our top four picks for the best browsers you can use on Linux support the majority of most top distros, but your distro’s performance may vary for each of these browsers.

Here are four of the best web browsers for Linux.

Read more

today's howtos

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HowTos

Fedora: Fedora Program Management, New PHP RCs and Thoughts on DBUS

Filed under
Red Hat

9 Essential Linux Classroom Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Educators face a constant variety of challenges that can impact classroom management and the learning process. An inattentive audience, mobile phone texting, disruption by unruly students, absenteeism, time constraints, students forced to take a course they would rather have avoided, and regular changes to the curriculum are just a few examples of the difficulties faced by teachers. Fortunately, there are many different ways for those involved in education, whether in teaching, training, or leadership, to help to improve student’s learning in the classroom, and overcome the obstacles that are encountered.

Information and communications technology (ICT) plays an important role in the planning, delivery, assessment and recording of classroom lessons. The software featured in this software offers indispensable ways to help manage a computer-based classroom, and provide the freedom to offer an exciting, creative, and challenging environment.

With this software, educators can create, administer, and grade tests, help manage a computer-based classroom, create an interactive whiteboard, and produce modular courses. All of the software featured in this article is released under a freely distributable license and can be downloaded without charge. With even tighter constraints facing the public sector, cost is an important consideration for any ICT solution.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 9 of the finest classroom tools covering a wide variety of different ways to effectively integrate ICT into the classroom. Here’s our verdict.

Read more

Also: Linux survival guide: These 21 applications let you move easily between Linux and Windows

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Mozilla Announces Pyodide – Python in the Browser

    Mozilla announced a new project called Pyodide earlier this week. The aim of Pyodide is to bring Python’s scientific stack into the browser.

    The Pyodide project will give you a full, standard Python interpreter that runs in your browser and also give you access to the browsers Web APIs. Currently, Pyodide does not support threading or networking sockets. Python is also quite a bit slower to run in the browser, although it is usable for interactive exploration.

    The article mentions other projects, such as Brython and Skulpt. These projects are rewrites of Python’s interpreter in Javascript. Their disadvantage to Pyodide is that they cannot use Python extensions that were written in C, such as Numpy or Pandas. Pyodide overcomes this issue.

  • Creating a GUI Application for NASA’s API with wxPython

    Growing up, I have always found the universe and space in general to be exciting. It is fun to dream about what worlds remain unexplored. I also enjoy seeing photos from other worlds or thinking about the vastness of space. What does this have to do with Python though? Well, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a web API that allows you to search their image library.

    You can read all about it on their website.

    The NASA website recommends getting an Application Programming Interface (API) key. If you go to that website, the form that you will fill out is nice and short.

  • Custom Home Automation System source release

    I am happy to announce the release of my generation 1 home automation system source code. I will be releasing Generation 2, the code which is currently in-use in the next couple of days to a week. If you would like to be informed of the Generation 2 code drop, please watch the BitBucket repo to be informed.

    First, a little bit of history. I originally started writing this code back in 2015 to run exclusively on my Raspberry Pi connected to an external speaker. It was controlled using HTTP URL endpoints, which can be hit using various NFC tags throughout my home. Eventually I bought a 7" touch-screen and an additional Raspberry Pi. This is when my automation system began to grow and mature more into what it is today. The first external display was placed in my bedroom, and ran PyCARS, another project I wrote for my home automation system. As a result, the original Raspberry Pi running the home automation system no longer needed an attached speaker, and instead a UDP broadcast packet was sent on my home network to notify any listening HUD(a PyCars device).

  • Wing Tips: Using Anaconda with Wing Python IDE

    Anaconda's key advantage is its easy-to-use package management system. Anaconda comes with a large collection of third party packages that are not in an installation of Python from python.org. Many additional packages can be installed quickly and easily as needed, from the command line with conda install.

    Anaconda's marketing focuses on data science and machine learning applications, but its extensive packages library makes it a good option also for other types of desktop and web development.

    There is much ongoing work in the world of Python packaging but, at least for now, Anaconda seems to fail less often than other solutions for resolving dependencies and installing necessary packages automatically.

  • Python's dynamic nature: sticking an attribute onto an object
  • PyCharm at PyCon 2019: The Big Tent

    Last week we announced our “big tent” at PyCon 2019 with the blog post PyCharm Hosts Python Content Creators at Expanded PyCon Booth. Next week we’ll announce more on each individual piece.

Games: Danger Gazers, Sid Meier's Civilization VI and Steam

Filed under
Gaming
  • Post-apocalyptic roguelite shooter 'Danger Gazers' enters Early Access next week, early thoughts

    I'm honestly not quite sure what to make of Danger Gazers, a top-down roguelite shooter that mixes Nuclear Throne style gameplay with node-based level picking.

  • Sid Meier's Civilization VI updated again, Linux client back in sync for cross-platform play

    Aspyr Media managed to get the latest update to Sid Meier's Civilization VI for Linux approved and it's out now.

    While it was again not ideal that Linux (and Mac) gamers were left waiting, this time wasn't so bad. The Great Works and Trade Update was released on April 11th "addressing issues that have emerged in the community following the release of the Antarctic Late Summer Game Update" and we now have it.

    Thankfully, this means the Linux version is once again able to play online cross-platform with both Windows and Mac.

  • Valve's Proton 4.2-3 Released With Wine-Mono Integration Plus DXVK 1.0.3, Updated FAudio

    Following last month's Proton 4.2 for Steam Play that is derived from Wine 4.2 with many patches applied, Proton 4.2-3 has been released for the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience ahead of any Easter weekend gaming time.

    Proton 4.2-3 was just released by Valve as the newest update to their fork of Wine that bundles in DXVK, FAudio, and many other patches for improving the experience of running Windows games on Linux under Steam.

  • Valve released a stable Steam Client update yesterday, some nice fixes in for Linux and Steam Play

    Valve are continuing their polishing effort to make the Steam Client work better, with a load of work from the recent Beta releases now out for everyone.

    This Steam Client update includes an updated version of their embedded Chromium build, it adds in a Big Picture Mode library filter for local multiplayer games, multiple changes to Steam Input including a new "Controller Connected" notification (which can be turned off), the ability to blacklist individual DirectInput and Xinput devices in the controller settings menu, improvements to in-home streaming, Vulkan pipeline dumping and collection if Shader Pre-Caching is enabled and more.

    As I understand it, the Vulkan part above is so the shader cache for a Vulkan game can be uploaded to Steam and shared, so we would hopefully see less stuttering which would be a big improvement.

  • Steam Play just got two updates with 4.2-3 and 3.16-9, some great stuff included

    Valve and CodeWeavers are doing some great work for Linux gaming, with Steam Play seeing two updates in a single day.

    Firstly, the older Proton series got updated to 3.16-9 which includes mostly minor changes like an updated DXVK to 1.0.2, a fix for some games failing or crashing in certain locales and fixes to minor xaudio2 and winhttp bugs.

    Onto the real goodies now, as Proton 4.2-3 is also available today with some major changes included!

    The first one is the inclusion of wine-mono, which they said should enable "many XNA games, Unreal Engine 3 games, game launchers, and more" to work. That's pretty big by itself, so it will be very interesting to see just how many more games become playable with Steam Play thanks to this.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Radiant Software, ASRock and Microsoft

  • Radiant 1.1 Lattice FPGA Design Tools Release Accelerates Design Reuse
    In addition to supporting Windows, Radiant Software 1.1 adds support for the popular Ubuntu LTS 16.4 distribution of Linux. Radiant Software 1.1 is now available for download from Lattices website and currently can be used with a free license.
  • ASRock spins Whiskey Lake-U in thin Mini-ITX, 3.5-inch, and NUC formats
    ASRock announced four products based on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U: a thin Mini-ITX “IMB-1216” board, a 3.5-inch “SBC-350,” and a NUC 4×4 form-factor “iBox-8365U” mini-PC and NUC-8365U mainboard. ASRock Industrial has been busy lately tapping the latest embedded-oriented x86 chips in products such as the Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U based iBox-8265U mini-PC, as well as the iBox-R1000 industrial PC and NUC-R1000 mainboard built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000. Now it has announced four more Whiskey Lake-U products aimed at the embedded market.
  • Making Sense of Microsoft’s Acquisition of Express Logic [Ed: Windows is worthless, so Microsoft is buying the competition. Microsoft also bought Danger, Sidekick etc. and it never ended well. Anything Microsoft touches turns to dust. When it bought Skype it was (back then) near-monopoly, but not anymore. Microsoft sometimes announces financial losses.]
    Even the Linux Foundation, home of the Linux kernel, hosts a project called Zephyr, which is an RTOS designed for use-cases, beyond the reach of Linux.

Events: Richard Stallman in Zurich (Switzerland), OpenStack Summit, Linux Fest Northwest

  • Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • SUSE CaaS Platform at Open Infrastructure Summit
    If you’re attending Open Infrastructure Summit this year and have in previous years as well, you might be noticing something a bit different; this year it’s not called OpenStack Summit. While we expect much of the talk will still be about OpenStack, we thought it might be a good idea to include other related technologies as well, like SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Cloud Application Platform – the two offerings that combine to form SUSE’s Application Delivery solution – and SUSE Enterprise Storage
  • Gearing Up for Linux Fest Northwest 2019!
    This next weekend (April 26-28th, 2019) I will be in Bellingham at Bellingham Technical College for Linux Fest Northwest to help at the Ubuntu table! I will be demonstrating Ubuntu Studio and my au…
  • Ubuntu Studio at Linux Fest Northwest 2019
    Council Chair Erich Eickmeyer will be in Bellingham, WA, USA this weekend for Linux Fest Northwest 2019, and will be bringing his audio setup to demonstrate Ubuntu Studio at the Ubuntu table. Check out the post on his personal blog!

today's howtos

Put the internet back under your control with the FreedomBox

On today's internet, most of us find ourselves locked into one service provider or the other. We find ourselves tied down to Apple, Facebook, Google, or Microsoft for our e-mail, social networking, calendering -- you name it. It doesn't have to be that way. The FreedomBox Foundation has just released its first commercially available FreedomBox: The Pioneer Edition FreedomBox Home Server Kit. With it, you -- not some company -- control over your internet-based services. The Olimex Pioneer FreedomBox costs less than $100 and is powered by a single-board computer (SBC), the open source hardware-based Olimex A20-OLinuXino-LIME2 board. This SBC is powered by a 1GHz A20/T2 dual core Cortex-A7 processor and dual-core Mali 400 GPU. It also comes with a Gigabyte of RAM, a high-speed 32GB micro SD card for storage with the FreedomBox software pre-installed, two USB ports, SATA-drive support, a Gigabit Ethernet port, and a backup battery. Doesn't sounds like much does it? But, here's the thing: You don't need much to run a personal server. Sure, some of us have been running our own servers at home, the office, or at a hosting site for ages. I'm one of those people. But, it's hard to do. What the FreedomBox brings to the table is the power to let almost anyone run their own server without being a Linux expert. The supplied FreedomBox software is based on Debian Linux. It's designed from the ground-up to make it as hard as possible for anyone to exploit your data. It does this by putting you in control of your own corner of the internet at home. Its simple user interface lets you host your own internet services with little expertise. Read more