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Tuesday, 02 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The state of Android updates: Who’s fast, who’s slow, and why Roy Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 8:19pm
Story Akademy 2014: Navigating the tracks Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 6:41pm
Story Low-Spec Hardware? Try these Desktop Environments Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 6:34pm
Story OpenELEC 4.2 Beta 5 Is Now Out with New Linux Kernel and NVIDIA Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 6:12pm
Story MSI Motherboard BIOS Updating Remains A Pain For Linux Users Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 5:28pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.12.27 LTS Now Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 5:02pm
Story Chromebook Pixel revisited: 18 months with Google's luxury laptop Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 4:48pm
Story Why I Hate Non-Free Software Roy Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 1:06pm
Story 10 tips for easier collaboration between office suites Roy Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 7:30am
Story Outsourcing your webapp maintenance to Debian Rianne Schestowitz 31/08/2014 - 7:07am

Testing For The Latest Linux Kernel Power Regression

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Frame-buffer compression (FBC) support was disabled by default in the Linux 3.15 stable series for Haswell hardware and newer since the support wasn't mature and there were Intel HD Graphics users reporting issues with this feature being turned on, so it was disabled by default and hidden behind a kernel module parameter. After an Arch Linux user experienced a 4+ Watt increase in power draw for his Apple laptop, he bisected it to this FBC feature, but Intel Linux developers weren't expecting FBC to make such a huge difference in power draw. The matter is still being investigated but FBC simply can't be flipped back on by default since the code is incomplete and there's still some unmerged patches under review that won't make it until at least the Linux 3.18 kernel.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Preview, Wallen Walkback, and the Pantheon

Filed under
-s

Resistance to the Linux Desktop Is Futile – Get Over It

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You see, I was out in the world for more than a decade teaching in many different communities all over Canada. At first it was rare to meet anyone who had ever heard of GNU/Linux. After a few years, about 2004, if I recall correctly, I began to visit random communities where one or more people actually had used GNU/Linux. These were communities from about 1K to 4K people in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, so one person in 1K is tiny but definitely far beyond, “many average computer users have no idea that they exist”. I can promise you that all of the high school and many of the younger students in those communities did learn about it so the proportion abruptly changed to about 1 in 10.

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Chrome 38 Beta: New primitives for the next-generation web

Filed under
Google
Software
Web

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes a ton of new primitives and APIs to simplify development and give developers more control over their web applications. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

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Switch to Linux part 1 – preparation

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft would make you think it’s the only alternative, however that ignores the shining beacon of Linux just beyond the horizon. Once thought to be the malformed operating system of only the most hardcore tech nerds, speaking in riddles and snake languages such as ‘Python’, the Linux landscape has changed to be more welcoming to everyone.

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Kids aren't the only ones learning to share

Filed under
OSS

The Four Freedoms

The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).
The freedom to study how the program works and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1).
The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).
The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Linux on the desktop isn't dead

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At LinuxCon this year, the creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was asked what he wanted for Linux. His response? "The desktop." For years, the call to Linux action was "World Domination." In certain markets, this has happened (think Linux helping to power Android and Chrome OS). On the desktop, however, Linux still has a long, long way to go.

Wait... that came out wrong. I don't mean "Linux has a long, long way to go before it's ready for the desktop." What I meant to say is something more akin to "Linux is, in fact, desktop ready... it just hasn't found an inroad to the average consumer desktop."

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KDE Mover-Sizer brings handy Linux desktop tricks to the PC

Filed under
KDE

Resizing and repositioning windows on the PC desktop is such a fundamental task that you’ll almost do it without thinking. Move the mouse to the title bar/ border, click, drag, release. Very basic, very simple -- but there might still be room for improvement.

KDE Mover-Sizer is an open source, portable tool which brings a common Linux desktop trick to Windows. Instead of having to move your mouse cursor to the title bar or border, you just hold down the Alt key, then left-click anywhere inside a window and drag to move it, right-click and drag to resize it.

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2014 Kernel Internship Report (OPW)

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The main goal of the OPW internship program is to create a long-term relationship between the mentee, the mentor, and their open source community, in order encourage minorities to continue to contribute to open source. How are we progressing towards the goal of creating more women kernel developers? Are the women who complete OPW kernel internships continuing to work on open source projects after their internship ends? Do they find jobs where they can be paid to work on open source?

In order to measure this, I created a longitudinal study to measure open source contributions of OPW alumni. I’ll send out the survey every 6 to 12 months, and compare the results of the program over time. The most recent survey results from our eleven Linux Kernel OPW alumni shows the program is successful at encouraging women to continue to participate in open source.

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Watch: "JavaScript: If you love it, set it free"

Filed under
Development
GNU

FSF executive director John Sullivan spoke at this year's FOSDEM, a volunteer-organized conference held in Belgium that highlights the development of free software.

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) beta-1 released!

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first beta of the Utopic Unicorn (to become 14.10) has now been
released!

This beta features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME,
UbuntuKylin, Xubuntu and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Pre-releases of the Utopic Unicorn are *not* encouraged for anyone
needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into
occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for
Ubuntu flavor developers and those who want to help in testing,
reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release ready.

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Device Tree Overlay Support Lands Upstream

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Pantelis Antoniou originated device tree overlay support for the purpose of enabling dynamic hardware configuration under Linux on devices like BeagleBone that use device tree for hardware configuration. Device tree was introduced to Linux for the purpose of putting the description of hardware into data structures, rather than building it up programmatically, greatly reducing the amount of code required to be maintained within the Linux kernel sources. Until now, the device tree data structure was only processed at boot time and that simply can't work for devices that might change hardware configurations after boot. While many BeagleBone capes can be probed by the bootloader, a common use-case is hardware that is reconfigurable. The most obvious example is a cape with an FPGA on it.

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It’s All Linux Under the Hood

Filed under
Linux

The user friendly distros have done a great job of accommodating this new set of Linux users. It’s now entirely possible for a new Linux user running something like Ubuntu or one of its derivatives to never once open a terminal and still have a pretty decent experience. Some of these new users, who might have initially come to Linux only to breath new life into an old computer until they can afford a new Windows box, might be curious enough to delve under the hood enough to discover that what they’re using isn’t merely a free OS that works on obsolete hardware, but a powerful and highly configurable operating system that puts Windows to shame on almost every level.

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Another Intel Linux Power Regression Is Being Investigated

Filed under
Linux

Power regressions are still easy to come by with the Linux kernel and other areas of the open-source stack... Multiple users have been reporting of a recent power increase on newer versions of the Linux kernel, which seem to track down to the Intel i915 DRM driver.

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Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 14.08

Filed under
OS

The overall theme of version 14.08 is the introduction of a new scalable GUI architecture that takes security as the most fundamental premise. It is unique in the way that the security of graphical applications and thereby the privacy of the user depends on only a few components of very little complexity. We strive for low complexity to reduce the likelihood for bugs and thereby the attack surface of the system. When using a secure microkernel such as NOVA, Genode's trusted computing base for graphical applications is orders of magnitude less complex compared to contemporary operating systems. To illustrate the rigidity of this claim, the security-sensitive parts of the GUI stack do not even depend on a C runtime. With the current release, we maintain our focus on security while taking the scalability of the GUI architecture to a level that meets the expectations of general-purpose OSes. Thanks to its component-based design, the new GUI stack provides a great deal of flexibility with respect to its behaviour and style. Section New GUI architecture provides the rationale behind the development, the big picture of the architecture, and details about the current implementation.

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DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

DNF 0.6.1 was released today and this updated open-source package manager picked up a few more features as it's still in pursuit of replacing Yum on Fedora systems.

The DNF 0.6.1 release adds full support for the history redo command with integration for the repository-packages commands. DNF 0.6.1 also adds new configuration options pertaining to GPG keys/checking and there's many bug-fixes.

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New Vault Conference to Promote Open Source Cloud Storage

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation, a non-profit consortium that promotes Linux and open source software, announced Vault on Thursday. The purpose of the conference, according to the group, is to help guide the direction of open source storage development as organizations increasingly move data to the cloud, creating new types of security and privacy challenges.

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