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Friday, 09 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AsteroidOS is an open source project that wants to save your smartwatch from obsolescence Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 1:40am
Story Kodi-Based LibreELEC 8.0 "Krypton" Sees New Alpha Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.12 Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 1:36am
Story Second Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Preview Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4.35 LTS Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 1:00am
Story AMD/ATI Catalyst fglrx rpms, end of an era! Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:56am
Story Intel GPU Tools 1.17 Released for Linux with Kaby Lake Support, Many New Tests Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:51am
Story New CloudLinux 7 Kernel Released, Rebased to Red Hat's OpenVZ Linux 3.10 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:49am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:32am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:32am
Story Office Suites Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:26am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 12:25am

WordPress 4.7 “Vaughan”

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OSS

Version 4.7 of WordPress, named “Vaughan” in honor of legendary jazz vocalist Sarah “Sassy” Vaughan, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.7 help you get your site set up the way you want it.

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ASUS ZenPad 3S 10 review: The iPad Air running Android

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Android
Reviews

The history of Android on tablets is complicated. Just as Apple had done in 2007 with the first iPhone, the iPad's release in 2010 set a very high standard for the rest of the market. The next year, Google released Android 3.0 Honeycomb on the Motorola Xoom, designed specifically with tablets in mind. The Xoom wasn't the iPad killer that Motorola had hoped for, and there have been very few Android tablets that could stack up to Apple's iPad line.

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Development News

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Development

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • The most in demand skills you need for an open source job

    With coding and software development in serious need of talent, it’s essentially a graduate’s market, but you still need the right combination of skills and attributes to beat the competition. When it comes to open source and DevOps, a deeper understanding is essential.

  • Why the Open Source Cloud Is Important

    To this end, foundations such as the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Open Container Initiative (OCI) at The Linux Foundation are actively bringing in new open source projects and engaging member companies to create industry standards for new cloud-native technologies. The goal is to help improve interoperability and create a stable base for container operations on which companies can safely build commercial dependencies.

  • AI Platforms Welcome Devs With Open Arms

    Two leaders in the field of artificial intelligence have announced that they're open-sourcing their AI platforms.

    After investing in building rich simulated environments to serve as laboratories for AI research, Google's DeepMind Lab on Saturday said it would open the platform for the broader research community's use.

    DeepMind has been using its AI lab for some time, and it has "only barely scratched the surface of what is possible" in it, noted team members Charlie Beattie, Joel Leibo, Stig Petersen and Shane Legg in an online post.

  • The Linux Foundation Seeks Technical and Business Speakers for Open Networking Summit 2017
  • Pencils down: Why open source is the future of standardized testing

    Administering standardized tests online is trickier than it sounds. Underneath the facade of simple multiple choice forms, any workable platform needs a complex web of features to ensure that databases don’t buckle under the pressure of tens of thousands of test takers at once. On top of that, it also needs to ensure that responses are scored correctly and that it’s impossible for students to cheat.

  • LLVM 4.0 Planned For Release At End Of February, Will Move To New Versioning Scheme

    Hans Wennborg has laid out plans to release the LLVM 4.0 (and Clang 4.0, along with other LLVM sub-projects) toward the end of February.

    The proposal by continuing LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg puts the 4.0 branching followed by RC1 at 12 January, RC2 at 1 February, and the official release around 21 February.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Linux Devices

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Linux
  • This week in vc4 (2016-12-05): SDTV, 3DMMES, HDMI audio, DSI

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation recently started contracting with Free Electrons to give me some support on the display side of the stack. Last week I got to review and release their first big piece of work: Boris Brezillon's code for SDTV support. I had suggested that we use this as the first project because it should have been small and self contained. It ended up that we had some clock bugs Boris had to fix, and a bug in my core VC4 CRTC code, but he got a working patch series together shockingly quickly. He did one respin for a couple more fixes once I had tested it, and it's now out on the list waiting for devicetree maintainer review. If nothing goes wrong, we should have composite out support in 4.11 (we're probably a week late for 4.10).

  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Driver Work On SDTV, HDMI Audio & More

    Eric Anholt's latest weekly blog post on the VC4 development highlights SDTV support coming together, the Raspberry Pi Foundation contracting Free Electrons to provide more development help on the display stack, HDMI audio support for VC4 DRM driver continuing to inch along, DSI fixes, some code generation improvements for VC4 Gallium3D, and other work.

  • Rugged Skylake embedded PC has wide range power

    Axiomtek’s “eBOX565-500-FL” computer runs Linux or Windows on dual-core Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offers four USB 3.0 ports and wide-range power.

    The eBOX565-500-FL updates the two-year-old eBOX560-880-FL embedded PC, which provides dual-core Intel 4th Gen “Haswell” Core and Celeron CPUs. The very similar eBOX565-500-FL instead taps the 14nm Intel 6th Gen “Skylake” ULT processors, once again offering two dual-core options: the 2.4GHz Core i5-6300U and the 2.0GHz Celeron 3955U.

Servers/Networks

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Server
  • Docker acquires file syncing and sharing app Infinit, will open-source the software

    Docker, the startup that pushes open source software for packaging up code into containers that can be deployed on many machines, today announced its latest acquisition: file transfer app Infinit.

    Yes, that’s right, Docker bought a company with a consumer-friendly app. It lets you sync files to your other devices or send them to others.

  • How Virtualized Networks Will Save Us From Dropped Calls

    We’ve all been the victim of a dropped mobile phone call and know how frustrating it can be. However, virtualized networks provide network operators with powerful tools to detect and recover from network disruptions, or “faults,” that can drop calls for thousands of subscribers simultaneously. The Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) project together with OpenStack have developed features in software that add resiliency to mobile networks and enable them to recover from network and other outages.

  • It’s Brexploitation! Microsoft punishes UK for Brexit with cloud price-gouging

    “My own story would not have been possible but for the democratizing force of Microsoft technology reaching me where I was growing up,” CEO Satya Nadella told shareholders this week.

    But the price of that “democratizing force” is about to go up, with Britons uniquely singled out. Microsoft has reiterated to Azure customers that prices will go up by 22 per cent from January 1st.

    The problem? The price rise is far greater than any exchange rate post-Brexit fluctuations might justify. Microsoft’s biggest European data centre is in Dublin, a member of the Euro currency. The Euro hovered around €1.28 to one pound for the first six months of the year, before crashing after Brexit. It’s now €1.19, a depreciation of just 9 cents, or 7 per cent.

    The value of the British pound has weakened more dramatically against the US dollar, dropping by 18.9 per cent since 24 June - the day after Brits voted to leave the EU.

    For new Office or Azure cloud customers in the UK, no exchange rate can justify any price rise at all. In September, Microsoft made Azure available in UK data centres.

FOSS CMS News

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OSS
Drupal
Web
  • WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, More: Keeping Up With Open Source CMS

    Due to its organic nature, the world of open source software is in constant flux, which makes it difficult to keep tabs on.

    To keep you in the loop, I’m kicking off a monthly roundup of open source CMS news, starting today.

    Here are your latest open source CMS highlights.

  • 4 open source peer-to-peer marketplaces

    What happens if your startup can't afford one of these proprietary solutions or you need customized features? You go look for an open source alternative that could open the space for new solutions and modules. Here are four peer-to-peer marketplaces that are working to become the Wordpress or Prestashop of their kind.

Security News

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Security

Open Hardware

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Hardware
  • Accelerating Innovation: Michigan Tech patent database/app promotes open-source hardware

    Open-source innovation is making the traditional patent system obsolete. Michigan Technological University associate professor Joshua Pearce and his team work with what is called open-source hardware development.

    “What that means is sort of developing technologies that don’t rely on patents,” Pearce said. “We work collaboratively with engineers and scientists all over the world, and (it’s) fairly successful. And the reason it’s successful is because if you have thousands of people working on something, it tends to get pretty good pretty fast.”

    Pearce said the concept began some time ago with open-source software.

  • Non-profit creates open-source drinking water filter for 1/10th of the cost

    The high-tech vision of open-source software meets low-tech design at non-profit organization OHorizons, an international coalition of innovators working to solve persistent global challenges. The team’s most recent invention is the open-source Wood Mold, designed to allow even the least experienced person to create a BioSand Filter that can deliver clean water at 1/10th of the cost of the traditional method. The Wood Mold is designed to be accessible by anyone who has the DIY, open-source construction manual that OHorizons offers for free online.

Databases and GNU/Linux

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Microsoft
OSS

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Status of Embedded Linux: Tim Bird Warns of Slow Progress on Linux Shrinkage

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Linux

As Chair of the Architecture Group of The Linux Foundation’s CE Working Group, Tim Bird has long been the amiable public face of the Embedded Linux Conferences, which he has run for over a decade. At the recent ELC Europe event in Berlin, Bird gave a “Status of Embedded Linux” keynote in which he discussed the good news in areas like GPU support and virtually mapped kernel stacks, as well as the slow progress in boot time, system size, and other areas that might help Linux compete with RTOSes in IoT leaf nodes.

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Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

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Ubuntu

T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C.

T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, both of which are based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, has advanced to a more powerful Rockchip SoC for its new open spec Firefly-RK3399. The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 features two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz. This appears to be the first RK3399 SBC and the first SBC to include Cortex-A72 cores.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Manuskript is a Promising Open-Source Scrivener Alternative

    Whether you plan to work on a book, a screenplay, or better structure your dissertation, you’ll probably see apps like Scrivener recommended. If you’re running Windows, macOS or even Android then you’re spoilt for choice, with various competing proprietary apps at varying price points readily available. On Linux the choices are somewhat limited.

  • Tor 0.2.9 Is Just Around the Corner As 0.2.8.10 Fixes Memory Leak in OpenSSL 1.1

    The past weekend brought us new stable and development builds of the Tor anonymity network project, versioned 0.2.8.10, as the most advanced version out there, and 0.2.9.6 RC (Release Candidate).

  • Pitivi 0.98 Linux Video Editor Adds Customizable Keyboard Shortcuts

    Version 0.98 of the GNOME-aligned GStreamer-powered Pitivi non-linear video editor was tagged today as the newest development milestone.

    The main feature addition of Pitivi 0.98 is now supporting customizable keyboard supports! Aside from finally supporting customizable keyboard shortcuts for this open-source video editor, a lot of warnings were fixed from GTK 3.22, and there has been a lot of other bug fixing. Bugs around Pitivi's timeline were primarily targeted by this release.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana Officially Released

    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8.0 is now available as the latest version of our open-source, fully-automated, reproducible benchmarking software for Linux, BSD, Solaris, macOS, Windows, and other operating systems.

    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 is the latest stable release now of our GPL-licensed benchmarking software updated on its regular quarterly release cadence. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 development focused on a number of low-level improvements to particularly benefit Phoromatic and the Phodevi (Phoronix Device Interface) software/hardware library abstraction layer.

  • iPerf As Another Network Benchmark Is Now Available Via The Phoronix Test Suite
  • Chromium-Based Vivaldi 1.6 Browser Enters Development, Brings Tab Stack Renaming

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard informs us about the availability of a new snapshot for the cross-platform, Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser, which promises to let users name tab stacks.

    Vivaldi Snapshot 1.6.682.3 marks the beginning of the development of Vivaldi 1.6, the next major version of the popular web browser, and it looks like it has been rebased on Chromium 55.0.2883.64. Besides fixing a bunch of regressions, the new development release implements an option under Settings -> Tabs -> Tab Features -> Tab stacking -> Allow Tab Stack Renaming, which lets you rename or name tab stacks.

Security News

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Security
  • HP shutting down default FTP, Telnet access to network printers

    Security experts consider the aging FTP and Telnet protocols unsafe, and HP has decided to clamp down on access to networked printers through the remote-access tools.

    Some of HP's new business printers will, by default, be closed to remote access via protocols like FTP and Telnet. However, customers can activate remote printing access through those protocols if needed.

  • Google Chrome 55 Fixes Flaws, Blocks Flash
  • Cyberattacks are going to get a lot worse, former NSA official says

    The face of cybercrime is changing. Healthcare has gone from a declared mission of stealing personal data to much more disruptive issues. In fact, healthcare has seen the largest jump in ransomware attacks than in any other industry.

    When Joel Brenner opened the HIMSS Privacy & Security Forum in Boston Monday morning, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research fellow - who focuses on cybersecurity, privacy and intelligence policy - and former senior counsel at the National Security Agency, didn’t sugarcoat the state of healthcare security.

    The government isn’t going to sort out that problem until we suffer some great losses, Brenner said.

  • Google Debuts Continuous Fuzzer for Open Source Software

    A new Google program aimed at continuously fuzzing open source software has already detected over 150 bugs.

    The program, OSS-Fuzz, currently in beta mode, is designed to help unearth programming errors in open source software via fuzz testing. Fuzz testing, or fuzzing is when bits of randomly generated code is inputted into programs as a means to discover code and security flaws.

  • Chrome 55 Now Blocks Flash, Uses HTML5 by Default

    Chrome 55, released earlier this week, now blocks all Adobe Flash content by default, according to a plan set in motion by Google engineers earlier this year.

    Back in May, Google's staff announced that starting with Q4 2016, Chrome would use HTML5 by default, while Flash would be turned off.

    While some of the initial implementation details of the "HTML5 By Default" plan changed since May, Flash has been phased out in favor of HTML5 as the primary technology for playing multimedia content in Chrome.

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