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GNOME

GNU: FS Directory, GNOME Builder and GtkSourceView Moving to Meson

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Development
GNU
GNOME
  • The Free Software Directory needs you! IRC meetups every Friday

    The Free Software Directory is an essential catalog of free software online. The Directory is maintained by countless volunteers dedicated to the promotion of software that respects your personal liberty. As with any group composed of volunteers, the informal Directory team has people who come and go, and right now, it could really use some fresh new members to kick our efforts into high gear.

    Tens of thousands of people visit the Directory every month to discover free software and explore information about version control, documentation, and licensing. All of this information is also exported in machine-readable formats, making it a valuable source of data for the study of trends in free software. The Directory is powered by MediaWiki, the same software used by Wikipedia.

  • Builder 3.33.1

    Our first 3.33 release has landed as we move towards 3.34. There is a lot to do this cycle in case you’re interested in contributing. The best way to get started is to dive into the code. We can help you with that on IRC.

    Lots of this release is code behind the scenes, so screenshots won’t do them justice. But there are some visible goodies too.

    We got a DBus Inspector inspired by D-feet. The long term goal is to merge that new code into D-feet itself.

  • GtkSourceView moved to Meson

    The master branch of GtkSourceView (what will become 4.4) has moved to meson for development. I branched gtksourceview-4-2 for patch releases of 4.2.x which will remain autotools. Today’s release of gtksourceview-4.3.1 contains both autotools and meson. However 4.3.2 will remove autotools entirely.

KDE Discover, Debian 10 With KDE Plasma, and GNOME Themes

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KDE
GNOME
  • Bundle Up, It's Time To Discover Some Apps

    I absolutely did, and here you go! The culmination of ten years of scheming and plotting has come to fruition, and we finally have a way to deliver software in a more social fashion. Now, I realise you are going to scream at us all and say distributions are great at this. They totally are, and that's not the point here, and i would like if we could aim that discussion elsewhere (you will notice how Discover still very much has all the distribution packages up front and centre, particularly in the last screenshot).

  • Debian 10 Weekly Hybrid Builds KDE Plasma Run Through

    In this video, we look at Debian 10 Weekly Hybrid Builds KDE Plasma.

  • Stilo Is A Pack Of Clean, Minimalistic GTK Themes

    Stilo is a pack of clean, minimalistic, yet stylish GTK themes for the GNOME desktop. It consists on 2 main themes, Stilo and Stiloetto, each with light and dark variations. A GNOME Shell theme is also available.

    Both Stilo and Stiloetto use gray with bits of blue, the difference being that Stilo is completely flat and square, while Stiloetto uses a slight gradient for header bars, and slightly rounded corners for application windows, and elements like buttons and drop-downs.

GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.32.1 Released With Many Fixes

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GNOME

While missing the GNOME 3.32.1 point release that shipped last week, GNOME Shell and Mutter today experienced their 3.32.1 updates with a variety of fixes.

GNOME Shell 3.32.1 fixes avatar scaling on the login screen, fixes the Alt+Esc switcher, multiple desktop zoom fixes, supporting stick-to-finger workspace switch overview gestures, and a variety of other fixes and clean-ups.

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Direct:

GStreamer 1.16 Approaching Release

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Development
GNOME

GNOME Desktop and KDE: ash to Dock Extension on GNOME 3.32, New Review of KDE Neon and Kate History of KDE 4 Porting

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KDE
GNOME
  • The Beauty of Dash to Dock Extension on GNOME 3.32

    You may find many articles on the net guiding you to install Dash To Dock extension on GNOME. But there are very few ones to speak more about experimenting with it. This article explores the features of this one Extension to show you possibilities it can give to your GNOME 3 desktop environment. You can enable click to raise/minimize window, change the icon size, color the dock or make it transparent, make the dock to mimic Unity Launcher, reposition it to any edge of your screen, etc. You will find my experiments below, like, make everything looks larger to help friends with vision impairments, using GNOME 3.32 desktop on GNU/Linux. Finally, happy tweaking!

  • Review: KDE Neon
  • Kate History - KDE 4 Porting

    During my web site upgrade, I reviewed the old stuff I had hosted on my long gone web sites but still archived here locally. An interesting thing I stumbled on are the KDE 3 -> 4 porting screenshots of Kate I saved in 2005.

    They actually show pretty nicely how far we have gone since 2005 with our development stack.

    The KDE 3 -> 4 transition was a large hassle. It did take weeks of work just to get Kate back into an usable state.

Desktop Environments, KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Desktop Workspaces In Linux

    Desktop workspaces on Linux are like having a multi-monitor system on your single computer. Developers, artist, audio engineers, etc. would call this "workstation" because they prefer working on individual task concurrently through two or more display monitors, set up on their system.

    However, desktop workspaces quite vary with the "workstation" bit because all multiple displays are virtual and not physical. The desktops are simulated with software, usually your desktop environment.

    So you must be wondering how they might be beneficial for any ordinary user who is not familiar with it. OK, here's my opinion. Desktop workspaces are useful for multi-tasking purpose. Let me run it down with an example, suppose you are interacting with virtual friends on a social media platform and sometime later you decide to upload an image to update your status. But the image isn't quite right to your taste so you launch multiple image editing software on another workspace. You try them out by efficiently switching between windows while the social application is running on another workspace. Once you are done, you close all those image editing programs and finally upload the image to your social feed.

  • Giving KDE developer docs some TLC

    Last month, I had the privilege of coming on board as a documentation specialist to take a closer look at KDE’s developer documentation and to later come up with strategies to make them better than ever. I have talked with some of the community’s developers to get their feedback on some of the areas that need updating or fixing when it comes to technical documentation. But that’s only one part of the story.

    Our dev docs are also meant for new developers. That applies to both new contributors in the KDE community as well as external developers who want to use our software, particularly our excellent KDE Frameworks. In that regard, we’re also looking for feedback on the areas where interested budding rockstar coders and passionate KDE contributors are having trouble getting into the community.

    Having clear, up-to-date, and relevant documentation goes a long way in encouraging and helping new developers get involved with the community with as little friction as possible. It even helps those already manning the ship become familiar with other parts of our software they may not have used before. I would love to hear some thoughts and suggestions, especially from interested KDE hackers, so let me know in the comments below.

  • [Krita] April Development Update

    It’s April already… We’re long overdue for a development update, especially since we haven’t had a new release for quite some time.

    The reason for both those facts is that our maintainer has had some health issues since December that seriously slowed down not just his part of the development work, but also made it really hard to create new releases — all releases are still prepared by one person, and if that person temporarily loses the use of one arm, things that should happen, don’t happen. The arm is back in action, but that wasn’t the only issue, and things are still a bit slowed down.

    Apart from that, we’re making quite good progress towards our next release, which should happen next month.

    In the first place, we’ve got a new full-time developer! Tiar, who is well known in Krita’s Reddit community, graduated from university just when the increased income from Steam made it possible to hire someone to help out with this year’s big goal: bug fixing! Tiar started March 1st, and has already fixed more than a dozen or so tough bugs. Krita now finally has a real Nearest Neighbour scaling method, for instance.

  • New features in Elisa

    I have been quiet for some months but during those months, Elisa has seen many improvements by existing and new contributors and a new stable version is planned in the coming weeks.

    I will publish some blog posts about the many new features implemented in the master branch.

  • Red Hat Certified Engineer Program Changes, OpenStack v19 Released, XFCE Back in openSUSE Installer, GNOME 3.32.1 Marks First Point Release of 3.32

    Now available, GNOME 3.32.1 marks the first point release of GNOME 3.32. And it boasts four weeks worth of bugs fixes.

GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

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GNOME

Released a month ago on March 13th, GNOME 3.32 brings numerous improvements over previous versions of the open-source desktop environment used by numerous GNU/Linux distributions. Today, the first point release, GNOME 3.32.1, is here to add a stability and reliability layer by fixing bugs and updating translations.

"GNOME 3.32.1 is now available. This is a stable release containing four weeks' worth of bugfixes since the 3.32.0 release. Since it only contains bugfixes, all distributions shipping 3.32.0 should upgrade," said Michael Catanzaro on behalf of the GNOME Release Team.

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Best GNOME Desktops For 2019

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GNOME

Have you stumbled over here looking across the Internet, for the 2019 list of best GNOME desktops? Lucky you then, I'm glad you are at the right place and hopeful that you'll find this article helpful in case you are considering trying out a new Linux distro. Or just reading this article for fun. Alright, below are the list of Linux distros that I think are the best of 2019's GNOME desktops.

[...]

Ubuntu is a Debian-based Linux distro that is very popular among the Linux community. It's the first distro that is usually recommended to newbies wanting to try out Linux. One greatest advantage for using Ubuntu is that soon there'll be professional apps from big companies like Adobe, Microsoft, etc (made possible with snap) So eliminating the divide between FOSS users and prosumers.

​Ubuntu started featuring GNOME desktop last year but with some slight modification from the original one. The customized desktop looks similar to the abandoned Unity desktop to ease the migration for old users. Still, the desktop looks refreshing considering the developers have done a great job with themes and icons.

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GNOME: Rewarding our Friends of GNOME, Updates on GNOME Builder, GStreamer and GNOME’s Tracker

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GNOME
  • Rewarding our Friends of GNOME

    After my somewhat dark post about being a Free Software maintainer, a very significant number of people got in touch and asked how can they help me, and GNOME, more actively than saying “keep up the good work, we love y’all”. And so I thought that maybe we are not advertising well enough the various ways to contribute to GNOME beyond actually getting involved with the daily activities of the project.

    The potentially most effective way to help GNOME is by donating to the GNOME Foundation and spreading the word. GNOME Foundation has two donation programs: one-time donations, and Friend of GNOME.

    Becoming a Friend of GNOME is my favorite. The Friends of GNOME donation program is a monthly subscription where you can select a community member. The selected member will send you a thank you post card. Did you know that I can be adopted as a hacker through Friends of GNOME? Not only me but various other great community members!

    I’m happy to say that many Friends of GNOME adopted me already! Naturally, I’m supposed to send thank you postcards.

  • Podman Support in Builder

    For years now, Builder has had rich abstractions for containers built right into the core of the IDE. Builder even knows the difference between build and runtime containers which naturally maps with Flatpak SDKs like org.gnome.Sdk vs org.gnome.Platform.

    With the advent of operating systems focused on immutability, like Fedora Silverblue, developers are going to be increasingly developing in containers.

    The technology underlying projects like Toolbox is podman. It provides a command-line tool to manage containers without a daemon by using the various container APIs afforded to us in modern Linux.

    Bridging Builder’s container APIs to support podman was pretty painless on my part. A couple hours to choose the right abstractions and implementing them led me to a missing piece in podman; passing FDs to the container.

    The reason that Builder requires this is that we often need to communicate across containers. An easy way to do that is over a pair of pipe() since it is anonymous. By anonymous, I mean we don’t need to share any file-system hierarchy, IPC or network namespaces, or even PTY namespace.

    The most important piece that requires this in Builder is our GDB-based debugger. We use GDB inside the container so it has native access to things like build sources, libraries, symbols, and more. This is all orchestrated using GDB’s mi2 interface over a PTY, with a second PTY for the target process. When GDB lands on a breakpoint, we know how to translate paths between Builder’s container (usually Flatpak) and the target container (in this case, podman). Doing so ensures that we open the right file and line number to the user. Fundamentals, of course.

  • Nirbheek Chauhan: GStreamer and Meson: A New Hope

    Anyone who has written a non-trivial project using Autotools has realized that (and wondered why) it requires you to be aware of 5 different languages. Once you spend enough time with the innards of the system, you begin to realize that it is nothing short of an astonishing feat of engineering. Engineering that belongs in a museum. Not as part of critical infrastructure.

    Autotools was created in the 1980s and caters to the needs of an entirely different world of software from what we have at present. Worse yet, it carries over accumulated cruft from the past 40 years — ostensibly for better “cross-platform support” but that “support” is mostly for extinct platforms that five people in the whole world remember.

    We've learned how to make it work for most cases that concern FOSS developers on Linux, and it can be made to limp along on other platforms that the majority of people use, but it does not inspire confidence or really anything except frustration. People will not like your project or contribute to it if the build system takes 10x longer to compile on their platform of choice, does not integrate with the preferred IDE, and requires knowledge arcane enough to be indistinguishable from cargo-cult programming.

  • Sam Thursfield: The Lesson Planalyzer

    I’ve now been working as a teacher for 8 months. There are a lot of things I like about the job. One thing I like is that every day brings a new deadline. That sounds bad right? It’s not: one day I prepare a class, the next day I deliver the class one or more times and I get instant feedback on it right there and then from the students. I’ve seen enough of the software industry, and the music industry, to know that such a quick feedback loop is a real privilege!

    Creating a lesson plan can be a slow and sometimes frustrating process, but the more plans I write the more I can draw on things I’ve done before. I’ve planned and delivered over 175 different lessons already. It’s sometimes hard to know if I’m repeating myself or not, or if I could be reusing an activity from a past lesson, so I’ve been looking for easy ways to look back at all my old lesson plans.

    Search

    GNOME’s Tracker search engine provides a good starting point for searching a setof lesson plans: I can put the plans in my ~/Documents folder, open the folder in Nautilus, and then I type a term like "present perfect" into the search bar

Rewarding our Friends of GNOME

Filed under
GNOME

After my somewhat dark post about being a Free Software maintainer, a very significant number of people got in touch and asked how can they help me, and GNOME, more actively than saying “keep up the good work, we love y’all”. And so I thought that maybe we are not advertising well enough the various ways to contribute to GNOME beyond actually getting involved with the daily activities of the project.

The potentially most effective way to help GNOME is by donating to the GNOME Foundation and spreading the word. GNOME Foundation has two donation programs: one-time donations, and Friend of GNOME.

Becoming a Friend of GNOME is my favorite. The Friends of GNOME donation program is a monthly subscription where you can select a community member. The selected member will send you a thank you post card. Did you know that I can be adopted as a hacker through Friends of GNOME? Not only me but various other great community members!

Read more

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