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Komikku – manga reader for GNOME

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Software
OSS
GNOME
Reviews

A comic book is a magazine which consists of narrative artwork in the form of sequential images with text that represent individual scenes.

Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. Comics are used to tell a story, and are published in a number of different formats including comic strips, comic books, webcomics, Manga, and graphic novels. Some comics have been published in a tabloid form. The largest comic book market is Japan.

Komikku is a GTK-based manga reader for GNOME. The application is is written in Python.

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Günther Wagner: GNOME Builder 41 Highlights

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GNOME

Builder now maintains a private Flatpak installation to install SDKs and SDK extensions that are not available in the user’s Flatpak installation. This means Builder will no longer add flathub or gnome-nightly to your user’s Flatpak installation.

Builder now uses an out-of-process Flatpak helper (gnome-builder-flatpak) to vastly improve its ability to track and resolve SDK extensions. This will improve the situation for applications requiring Rust, LLVM, and others going forward.

You can update your SDKs and dependencies together using the “Update Dependencies” button in the build popover.

More information can be found in Christian’s blog post.

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GNOME 41 Released. This is What's New.

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News
GNOME

GNOME team announced the release of GNOME 41 with some exceptional changes and updates. We wrap up the release in this post.
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GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Officially Released, This Is What’s New

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GNOME

Six months in development, GNOME 41 is here as a hefty update and the first major release after GNOME 40 with new features like a new power mode setting in the Power settings panel of the GNOME Control Center called Performance, which will be available on hardware that supports this feature. The Performance mode increases CPU performance to allow your apps and activities to run faster.

Also new in the GNOME Control Center is a Multitasking settings panel that gives you control over window management and workspace multitasking options like the Activities hot corner, Active Screen Edges, the ability to show workspaces on all displays, choose between dynamic or fixed workspaces, and restrict app switching to the current workspace when using the Super+Tab keyboard shortcut.

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GNOME 40 comes to Debian 12 “Bookworm” GNU Linux, Download for Testing

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GNOME
Debian

After the freeze and release phase of Debian 11, the developers are back to work, Gnome 40.4 is already in testing (Debian 12 Bookworm). Download and check out.

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This Extension Always Hide GNOME Top Bar (Except in Overview) in Ubuntu

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GNOME

For PC / notebook has a small display, it’s possible to hide the top panel in GNOME desktop to get more spaces and/or focus on your work.

There’s a ‘Hide Top Bar‘ extension that enables ability to auto-hide the top bar, just like the left dock does. However, in this tutorial I’m going to introduce another extension.

It’s a very light extension that the developer promoted it has no options and no bugs! It will ALWAYS hide the top-bar, except only in overview screen. Just like GNOME shows the dock only in overview without Ubuntu Dock (Dash-to-dock) extension.

The extension will also disable the top-left hot-corner, which is used to trigger the ‘Activities‘ overview. It’s designed for those who are accustomed to start overview screen using the Windows (or Super) key, or three-finger touchpad gestures in GNOME 40 (defaults in Ubuntu 21.10).

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Marcus Lundblad: Maps and GNOME 41

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GNOME

It's been a while since my last blog post. And in the meantime GNOME 41 was released. So I thought it would be time for a new post, although there's not been that much news to show in Maps itself since the last update (where I showcased the refreshed icons for search results.

But a few small visual improvements have been done since.

Already in 40.0, we made the display of population numbers for places (such as towns, cities, and similar) locale-aware. So that it now uses localized digits and decimal separators.

[...]

This utilises the localization API from ES (JavaScript) and as can be seen here gives a localized unit suffix and also in the case of Japanese as shown in the last example, the multiple in this case is 10,000, as this is based on traditional Chinese numerals, with denominations 10⁴, 10⁸ and so on. So in this case it would translate to “800 ten-thousands (man)”.

And over in libshumate (the new GTK4-based map rendering library we're working to eventually replace libchamplain, and enable migrating to GTK4), James and Corentin has been busy.

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The Truth they are not telling you about “Themes”

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GNOME

Before we start, let’s get this out of the way because the week long delirium on social media has dragged enough.

Yes, libadwaita “hardcodes” Adwaita. Yes, applications, as is, will not be following a custom system theme. Yes this does improve the default behavior of application for GNOME when run on other platforms like Elementary OS. However, this is was the result of a technical limitation, and not some evil plot as Twitter will keep telling you…

The reason is that in order for High Contrast (and the upcoming Dark Style) to work, libadwaita needs to override the theme name property so it doesn’t fallback to GTK’s “Default” High Contrast style. The “Default” style is an older version of Adwaita, not your system style.

Compared to GTK 3, there isn’t a new way to enforce the “hardcoded” style. The GTK_THEME variable still works, as does gtk.css and probably 3 other ways of doing this. Likewise, if you are developing a distribution, you have control of the end product and can do anything you want with the code. There is a plethora of options available. Apparently complaining on social media and bullying volunteers into submission was one such option…

And I guess this also needs to be stated: this change only affects apps that choose to use libadwaita and adopt the GNOME Design Guidelines, not “every” GTK 4 application.

As usual, the fact that the themes keep working doesn’t mean they are supported. The same issues about restyling applications when they don’t expect it apply and GNOME can not realistically support arbitrary stylesheets that none of the contributors develop against and test.

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Anaconda accessibility improvements

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GNOME

On the Workstation images, accessibility already was at the same level as a finished system would offer. Workstation media run a full Gnome session, with Orca available. The installer does not have to do anything. However, for the Server images the situation is different. The environment is heavily reduced: no sound, no Gnome, no Orca. That also means, no accessibility. Let’s change that!

The latest Fedora 35 beta nightly builds now have the brltty screen reader on Server images. Thus far, brltty is enabled only for the console, which requires Anaconda to be started in text mode. There is also no means to configure the brltty session, so autodetection must work for your braille terminal device.

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Why Many Linux App Developers Don’t Want Distros to Use Themes

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
GNOME

You may associate Linux with the freedom to make your desktop look however you want, but that’s not the case with GNOME. At least, not without knowing which extensions to install or how to read code. By default, GNOME is intended to look and feel a certain way, and many developers would prefer if Linux distributions didn’t change the appearance of their apps by using themes.

Is it an issue when you change the theme on your own personal machine? No, you know what you're getting yourself into. But confusion can arise when the customized experience comes presented as the default.

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  • How to Take a Typing Test on Linux With tt

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  • How to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook

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Security and DRM Leftovers

Linux 5.15-rc3

So after a somewhat rocky merge window and second rc, things are now
actually looking pretty normal for rc3. Knock wood.

There are fixes all over, and the statistics look fairly regular, with
drivers dominating as they should (since they are most of the tree).
And outside of drivers, we have a fairly usual mix of changes -
architecture fixes, networking, filesystems, and tooling (the latter
being mostly kvm selftests).

Shortlog appended, it's not too long and easy to scan through to get a
flavor for the details if you happen to care.

Please do give it a whirl,

             Linus

Read more Also: Linux 5.15-rc3 Released - Looking "Pretty Normal" Plus Performance Fix - Phoronix

Huawei launches OS openEuler, aims to construct 'ecological base of national digital infrastructure'

Chinese tech giant Huawei launched openEuler operating system (OS) on Saturday, another self-developed OS after the HarmonyOS, as it tries to "solve the domestic stranglehold problem of lacking its homegrown OS in basic technology," and build a full-scenario covered ecosystem to prepare for more US bans. The openEuler OS can be widely deployed in various forms of equipment such as servers, cloud computing and edge computing. Its application scenarios cover Information Technology, Communication Technology and Operational Technology to achieve unifying an operating system with multi-device support, according to the company's introduction. In the ICT field, Huawei provides products and solutions such as servers, storage, cloud services, edge computing, base stations, routers, industrial control among others, all of which need to be equipped with an OS. Huawei has therefore been building capabilities to achieve a unified OS architecture, and meet the demands of different application scenarios, the firm said on Saturday. The openEuler program was initially announced back in 2019 as an open source operating system. Today's launch is an updated one. Read more