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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 GNOME and display server changes

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Red Hat
GNOME

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 contains some important changes regarding the GNOME graphical interface and the default display server. If you are using a graphical desktop in RHEL 8, the most visible change will be that, by default, the GNOME Shell interface is used. This interface has a different appearance and operation compared to GNOME Classic, the default graphical interface in RHEL 7.

Here, we will cover an overview of the GNOME Shell interface in RHEL 8, and also how to switch to the GNOME Classic interface that is similar to the default interface on RHEL 7. We will also cover the new default display server, Wayland, and how to switch the display server to X.org X11 if needed. Another notable change in RHEL 8 is that the KDE Plasma interface has been removed.

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GNOME 3.34’s Sleek New Desktop Background

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GNOME

The upcoming GNOME 3.34 release is sure to ship with a stack of improvements, new features and core app updates — but it will also come with a brand new default wallpaper!

GNOME designer Jakub Steiner is, once again, diligently designing a new desktop drape for the revered free desktop to use by default.

And although the intended design is not final-final, it’s almost done! So here’s your first look at the brand new GNOME 3.34 wallpaper...

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Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

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KDE and GNOME: Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo, KDE GSoC Projects, Kate & C++ Developer Survey and Sumaid Syed's GSoC Work on GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo

    With the completion of my first milestone for my GSoC project: Nextcloud Integration on Plasma Mobile, plasma mobile accounts settings now enables the users to add their nextcloud accounts via webview.

    Well! didn’t accounts setting already provide the method to add nextcloud/owncloud accounts? Yes, this functionality was already implemented by the owncloud plugin in kaccounts-providers project. Then, why did I re-implement the same thing?

    As I mentioned, now accounts can be added via webview.

  • First week of GSOC, Piece Table Implement

    Hi! Last week was start of the GSOC coding period. So I started my project. Also I opened my code on the KDE git. https://cgit.kde.org/scratch/songeon/kmarkdownparser.git/

    If you are interested in my project feel free to look and give me some advices.

  • KIOFuse: 32-bit Support

    The first two weeks of the GSoC coding period are now over.

    Firstly, a mapping between KIO errors and FUSE errors has now been established. Previously all KIO Job errors were simply sent back to FUSE as EIO, which isn’t entirely accurate. The mapping now provides more accurate error replies.

    A major new addition is 32-bit support. KIOFuse did not compile on 32-bit but these compilation errors have now been alleviated. They mostly stemmed from the fact that size_t has a different size on different architectures, and that file sizes should always be represented as off_t anyway.

  • Kate & C++ Developer Survey

    While browsing the ISO C++ homepage I stumbled over the results PDF of the Second Annual C++ Foundation Developer Survey “Lite”.

    I was astonished that Kate made it into the “Which development environments (IDEs) or editors do you use for C++ development?” results.

    ;=) Seems not only I use it as my normal editor for working on C++ code.

  • Sumaid Syed: First Two Weeks

    Jean Felder ( My mentor for GSoC project) and Marinus Schraal (GNOME Music Maintainer) suggested that I propose a plan of the whole project. Now trust me! This is the much more difficult than actual coding!
    I usually work on my personal projects and start working from scratch, but here the project involves so many different libraries, so I really struggled with making a plan with a proper timeline.

  • What is my Project?

    In this case, all we need to do is extract those mbids and store them in tracker. Tracker is a file indexing and search framework, which GNOME Music relies on. Hence it’s necessary to extract and index mbids in tracker from file.

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Dashes and Gnome-gitg Split View

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GNOME
  • Okay Dash to Panel, That Does Looks Super Slick…

    I haven’t used a Windows desktop “properly” for around 8 years or so (and can’t say I miss it, either).

    Back when I first started this blog I had a multi-boot set up on my PC that married a (seemingly endless) stack of Linux distros with a version (I forget which) of Windows 7.

    — Why am I talking about Windows 7?

    Well, because one of the things I really remember being quite “cool” about it — please note: I use the term loosely — was a feature called Aero Peek.

  • Gnome-gitg Split View feature progress. [GSoC]

    Introducing split view in gitg is comprised of small small tasks just like any other software feature requires.

    One such task is:- Gitg should be able to detect binaries and images diffs if these are in the diffs then split-view simply does not makes sense.

    [...]

    Dash to Panel is one of the best GNOME extensions available IMO. In one stroke it changes the GNOME Shell desktop experience in to a more traditional layout.

    Both the Dash to Panel and code-cousin Dash to Dock GNOME extensions offer a window preview feature similar to Aero Peek. It’s an optional setting, but it’s there; it’s not new.

GNOME: Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Picks GNOME MPV, GTK 3 Frame Profiler, and Ubuntu's Reason for Staying Behind GNOME's Latest

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Why Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Is Ditching VLC for GNOME MPV

    GNOME MPV (now known as Celluloid) will be the default media player in Ubuntu MATE 19.10.

    The app supplants the versatile VLC meda player, which the MATE-desktop-toting distro has shipped with since a community poll back in 2017.

    So why the change now?

    Better desktop integration. That’s according to Ubuntu MATE’s Martin Wimpress who revealed news of the swap in the latest Ubuntu MATE monthly update on Patreon:

    “We will be dropping VLC from the pre-installed applications and shipping GNOME MPV instead. GNOME MPV will soon be renamed to Celluloid. The reasons for switching to GNOME MPV are similar to swapping out Thunderbird for Evolution; better desktop integration.”

    Size is another factor. GNOME MPV takes up a comparatively svelte 27MB on the ISO image, whereas Qt5-based VLC requires closer to 70MB.

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Is Ditching VLC for GNOME MPV
  •  

  • GTK 3 Frame Profiler

    I back-ported the GTK 4 frame-profiler by Matthias to GTK 3 today. Here is an example of a JavaScript application using GJS and GTK 3. The data contains mixed native and JS stack-traces along with compositor frame information from gnome-shell.

  • Ubuntu keeping up with GNOME stable updates

    Recently Michael blogged about epiphany being outdated in Ubuntu. While I don’t think that a blog ranting was the best way to handle the problem (several of the Ubuntu Desktop members are on #gnome-hackers for example, it would have been easy to talk to us there) he was right that the Ubuntu package for epiphany was outdated.

    [...]

    Again the reality is a bit more complex. Snaps don’t have depends like debs do, so by nature they don’t have problems like being blocked by missing depends. To limit duplication we do provide a gnome platform snap though and most of our GNOME snaps use it. That platform snap is built from our LTS archive which is on GTK 3.22 and our snaps are built on a similar infrastructure.

    [...]

    And as a conclusion, if as an upstream or user you have an issue with a component that is still outdated in Ubuntu feel free to get in touch with us (IRC/email/launchpad) and we will do out best to fix the situation.

  •  

KDE and GNOME: Digital Atelier/Krita, Akademy 2019 and GNOME/Mutter Accessibility

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KDE
GNOME
  • Digital Atelier: Painter Brushes and Video Tutorials Now 50% Off

    To celebrate the new release, we’re doing a 50% off sale of Digital Atelier, Ramon Miranda’s painterly brushes and tutorials pack for the rest of this month! Get Digital Atelier in the Krita shop!

  • Akademy 2019 registration now open

    Once you have registered, take a look at our guide on how to travel to Milan and check out the accommodation we have arranged and recommend for attendees. We also have a guide on how to get from different locations within Milan to Akademy. This guide also includes information on how to move around the city in general -- useful for sightseeing!

    IMPORTANT: All attendees are expected to read and required to follow Akademy's Code of Conduct.

  • GNOME 3.34's Mutter Adds Mouse Accessibility Support For X11/Wayland

    Up to now the GNOME desktop has offered mouse accessibility support using the long-standing Mousetweaks program that allows for different actions to take place all from the lone input device for those that may be limited to manipulating only one button or other limitations around this primary input device. But GNOME's Mousetweaks only works with X11 so now Mutter has picked up mouse accessibility support itself that works on both X11 and Wayland sessions.

GNOME and KDE: Argos, Konsole and ask.krita.org

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Argos Is Like BitBar For Gnome Shell: It Shows Scripts Output On The Panel (Top Bar)

    Searching for a way to show a script output on the Gnome Shell panel (top bar), I came across Argos. This Gnome Shell extension does only one thing: it adds a new item with a dropdown menu to the panel, showing the output from a script and exposing functionality.

    The extension is inspired by BitBar, a popular program to put the output from any script on the macOS menu bar, and it's even compatible with most BitBar scripts.

  • Hello new Konsole

    Konsole has been ready for many many years, and got almost 10 years without anything really exciting being added, mostly because the software is ready, why should we modify something that works to add experimental features?

    But then the reality kicked in, konsole missed some features that are quite nice and existed in Terminator, Tilix and other new terminals, but Tilix now lacks a developer, and Terminator is also not being actively developed (with the last release being it in 26 of February of 2017)

  • Retiring ask.krita.org

    About a year ago, we created the ask.krita.org website. We wanted to have a stack-exchange like place, where people could report problems, after searching whether their problems had already been discussed, where people could help each other.

    Maybe it was the platform we were using, maybe it’s that people who are using Krita have a different mindset from people for whom stack-exchange like sites work, but we came to realize that ask.krita.org did not work out.

  • Chrome 75 Released, ask.krita.org Website Retiring, LinuxGizmos Publishes Its Spring 2019 SBC Catalog, LibreOffice 6.3 Beta 1 Is Ready for Testing and Happy 15th to Phoronix

    The ask.krita.org website, a stack-exchange-like place for people to report problems and help each other, is being retired. According to the post, the problems were "Nobody seemed to be searching whether their problems had already been discussed and maybe solved, so the same questions were being asked again and again. Nobody seemed to stay around and engage with the people who were trying to help them, and nobody seemed to stay around to help other people." The team is looking for a replacement, but isn't sure quite what that will be yet.

How to stream music with GNOME Internet Radio

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

Internet radio is a great way to listen to stations from all over the world. Like many developers, I like to turn on a station as I code. You can listen to internet radio with a media player for the terminal like MPlayer or mpv, which is what I use to listen via the Linux command line. However, if you prefer using a graphical user interface (GUI), you may want to try GNOME Internet Radio, a nifty plugin for the GNOME desktop. You can find it in the package manager.

Listening to internet radio with a graphical desktop operating system generally requires you to launch an application such as Audacious or Rhythmbox. They have nice interfaces, plenty of options, and cool audio visualizers. But if you want a simple, straightforward interface that gets your streams playing, GNOME Internet Radio is for you.

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Running NVIDIA On GNOME's X.Org Session May Get A Lot Smoother

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Canonical's Daniel van Vugt continues doing a lot of interesting performance investigations and optimizations around improving the experience of GNOME not only for Ubuntu but the upstream components. His latest focus has been on NVIDIA enhancements and now for the X.Org session there is a merge request pending to provide for a smoother experience.

This week Van Vugt opened up a pull request that provides a "significant improvement" to the frame-rate smoothness for NVIDIA's proprietary Linux graphics driver running on GNOME under the X.Org session (this MR doesn't affect the Wayland session).

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today's howtos

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It
    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.
  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam
    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.
  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage
    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs. Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?

GAFAM and 'Cloud': Google, Microsoft, Amazon and GitHub

  • Daniel Stenberg: Google to reimplement curl in libcrurl
    By throwing a lot of man power on it. As the primary author and developer of the libcurl API and the libcurl code, I assume that Cronet works quite differently than libcurl so there’s going to be quite a lot of wrestling of data and code flow to make this API work on that code. The libcurl API is also very versatile and is an API that has developed over a period of almost 20 years so there’s a lot of functionality, a lot of options and a lot of subtle behavior that may or may not be easy or straight forward to mimic. The initial commit imported the headers and examples from the curl 7.65.1 release.
  • Microsoft, you should look away now: Google's cloud second only to AWS in dev survey [Ed: Longtime Microsoft booster Tim Anderson  on Azure being a failure after so many entryism attempts and underhanded tactics]
    Coders use Google Cloud Platform (GCP) more than Microsoft Azure, though Amazon Web Services (AWS) has a comfortable lead, according to a Developer Ecosystem survey conducted by tools vendor JetBrains. Developer usage is 67 per cent AWS versus 28 per cent GCP and 21 per cent Azure, according to the new survey. Unfortunately, the question was posed in a different way in the 2018 survey, adding on-premises into the mix, but last year Azure and GCP had equal share after AWS. The survey had 19,000 participants invited via "Twitter ads, Facebook ads, Google Adwords and JetBrains' own communication channels," the tools vendor said, though "only the responses of 6,993 respondents were included in the report." Responses were removed to reduce bias, yet it warned "some bias may be present as JetBrains users may have been more willing on average to compete the survey".
  • Get your coat, you've pulled a Pull Panda: GitHub goes home with code collab specialists [Ed: Notice how Microsoft only takes GitHub in more of a proprietary software direction. That says a lot – they have plans and they’re really detrimental to FOSS]

Kernel: Linux Changes, Certifications, Graphics, PCI Express 6.0 and Bug

  • PowerCap/RAPL Code To Support Icelake Desktop / X / Xeon D With Linux 5.3
    While as of Linux 5.2 the support for Intel's Icelake CPUs appear production ready with all of the bits in place from new IDs to the much enhanced "Gen 11" graphics, there are a few stragglers of items to land with the upcoming Linux 5.3 merge window though could be back-ported to current series. Fortunately, we haven't found anything major to be missing. One of the latest bits of Icelake Linux support is handling of these next-generation processors within the PowerCap / RAPL (Running Average Power Limit) driver code. In particular, the desktop/workstation Icelake parts. This is the code for reading the estimated CPU package power consumption based on hardware performance counters and the ability to artificially limit the power draw of the processor via software.
  • Six Niche Linux Certifications
  • AMD Navi GPU stack bares all in Linux graphics driver update
    Eight Navi GPU variants have been spotted in Linux driver code. AMD’s next-gen RDNA graphics chips are set for launch on July 7, 2019 within the RX 5700 XT and RX 5700, but the red team has plenty of silicon in store for a range of applications. Including console, laptops, desktop, and mobile phones. The GPU codenames were spotted within Linux display drivers after the additional code was submitted and signed off by two AMD employees. The code adds support for Display Core Next, or DCN2, which “is the display block for Navi10.” Each entry following adds the necessary ASIC IDs for each Navi chip in the stack, starting with Navi 10 and down to Navi 21 LITE.
  • Nouveau Driver Picking Up NVIDIA TU116 GPU Support For Linux 5.3
    Building off the initial Turing mode-setting bits that were in place since Linux 5.0 and have continued stepping along to support newer variants on successive kernel releases, the Linux 5.3 kernel is slated to add support for the TU116 graphics processor.
  • PCI-SIG® Announces Upcoming PCI Express® 6.0 Specification to Reach 64 GT/s
  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced With 4-Times The Bandwidth Of PCIe 4.0
    With the increasing demand for bandwidth across a wide range of devices used in consumer and enterprise domains, PCI Express, the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard has also evolved over the years. PCI Special Interest Group, a body that sets standards for PCIe, has announced PCI Express 6 that promises four times the bandwidth offered by PCIe 4.0 and twice of PCIe 5.0.
  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced For Release In 2021 With 64 GT/s Transfer Rates
    While PCI Express 4.0 up to this point has only been found in a few systems like Talos' POWER9 platforms and coming soon with the new AMD graphics cards and chipsets, the PCI SIG today announced PCI Express 6.0. PCI Express 5.0 was only announced last month with 32GT/s transfer rates while already the PCI SIG announced PCI Express 6.0.
  • Netflix researcher spots TCP SACK flaws in Linux and FreeBSD
  • TCP SACK Panic Flaw Could Compromise Production Linux Machines