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GNOME

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available

    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now

    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing.

    After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.

  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?

    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right Sad And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

GNOME Encrypted Home Folder, Mutter Development, GNOME Maps Development and More

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GNOME
  • System76 Developer Works on GNOME Encrypted Home Folder Support for Ubuntu 17.10

    System76's kernel engineer Jeremy Soller announced that he's been working on bringing encrypted Home folder support in the GNOME desktop environment for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    Last month, the Denver-based computer reseller specializing in the sale of laptops, desktops, and servers pre-loaded with the Ubuntu Linux operating system revealed their plans for preparing a consistent GNOME experience for their computers powered by Ubuntu 17.10 later this year when the OS launches officially.

    CEO Carl Richell reported on some of the upcoming changes that the Linux hardware company plans to make in this regard, improving both the look and feel and the under-the-hood functionality of the GNOME desktop environment, which will ship by default with the next major Ubuntu release.

  • Mutter Continues Refining Its Display, HiDPI Support

    GNOME's Mutter 3.25.3 window manager / compositor is now available as the newest release in the path towards GNOME 3.26.

  • Midsommer Maps

    So we just released the third development release of Maps in the 3.25 series (leading up to 3.26.0 in September).

    Some new noteworthy new features and fixes made it in. We gained a couple of new keyboard shortcuts

  • But the control center still crashes..

Software Leftovers and GNOME

Filed under
Software
OSS
GNOME
  • VIM Normalization

    Linux users–including the ones at the Hackaday underground bunker–tend to fall into two groups: those that use vi and those that use emacs. We aren’t going to open that debate up again, but we couldn’t help but notice a new item on GitHub that potentially negates one of the biggest complaints non-vi users have, at least for vim which is the most common variant of vi in use on most modern systems. The vim keybinding makes vim behave like a “normal” editor (and to forestall flames, that’s a quote from the project page).

  • Make Rhythmbox Look Better with this Alternative Toolbar Plugin

    Rhythmbox Alternative Toolbar is a Rhythmbox plugin that improves the look and layout of the music player by rearranging elements and using CSD.

  • Giving Qutebrowser a go - a fantastic keyboard-focused browser

    Years ago, I was introduce to touch typing. I knew immediately that it was a skill I must learn. I remember spending hours playing with gtypist trying to improve my typing efficiency. I'm not too bad nowadays. I can mostly type without looking at the keyboard at all, and with few errors.

  • Mesa Git Should Now Work With Intel/RADV Vulkan For Doom Under Wine

    Running the Doom (2016) game under Wine with Vulkan may now yield better success if using the Intel ANV or Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers due to a fix in Mesa's SPIR-V common code.

    The code commit to Mesa 17.2-dev that was merged just minutes ago explained, "Doom shipped with a broken version of GLSLang which handles samplers as function arguments in a way that isn't spec-compliant. In particular, it creates a temporary local sampler variable and copies the sampler into it. While Dave has had a hack patch out for a while that gets it working, we've never landed it because we've been hoping that a game update would come out with fixed shaders. Unfortunately, no game update appears on to be on the horizon and I've found this issue in yet another application so I think we're stuck working around it. Hopefully, we can delete this code one day."

  • Internationalization, part one

    The first part of internationalizing a Greek application, is, of course, translating all the Greek text to English. I already knew how to open a user interface (.ui) file with Glade and how to translate/save it from there, and mail the result to the developers.

    If only it was that simple! I learned that the code of most open source software is kept on version control systems, which fortunately are a bit similar to Wikis, which I was familiar with, so I didn’t have a lot of trouble understanding the concepts. Thanks to a very brief git crash course from my mentors, I was able to quickly start translating, committing, and even pushing back the updated files.

  • [Old] GNOME (et al): Rotting In Threes

    In the rush for Linux to become ‘popular’ and ‘make it into the desktop market’, maybe there is an unintended consequence. Not only are Windows users moving to Linux, but Windows devs seem to be arriving as well, bringing their diseases with them – corporate ‘kill off the competition’ mentalities that don’t serve Linux, merely exploit it.

Shotwell 0.27.0

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Shotwell 0.27.0
  • GNOME's Shotwell 0.27 Debuts New Features

    GNOME's Shotwell photo manager is out today with a new testing release as it ushers in the v0.27 development series.

    Shotwell 0.27 drops support for the F-Spot importing tool. F-Spot for the forgetful was a GNOME image manager/organizer written in C# but was succeeded by Shotwell since around 2010.

  • Shotwell, GNOME's Open-Source Image Viewer and Organizer, Gets Important Update

    The Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer that is installed by default in various GNU/Linux distributions has been recently updated to version 0.27, a major release that adds numerous improvements and fixes annoying bugs.

    Shotwell 0.27 is now the latest stable release of the application, and some of the best new features included are faster color transformations, a configurable image background, --fullscreen/-f command-line option for the viewer, as well as histogram and thumbnailer improvements.

GNOME: Fedora + GNOME Group Presentation in Peru, Hackfest, and GSoC

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GNOME
  • First Public Presentation of the Fedora + GNOME group

    A group of students from different universities have gathered together to learn Linux in deeply. We have started with the GNOME Peru Challenge on Fedora 25, that basically consists in fixing a bug. To achieve that, we have follow an empiric schedule that includes, installation of Fedora 25, use GNOME apps such as Pomodoro, Clock, Maps, and others such as GIMP, building some modules, working with Python to finally see GTK+.

  • GNOME Fractional (and multi-monitor) Scaling Hackfest, the report

    As previously announced, few days ago I attended the GNOME Fractional Scaling Hackfest that me and Red Hat‘s Jonas Ådahl organized at the Canonical office in Taipei 101.
    Although the location was chosen mostly because it was the one closest to Jonas and near enough to my temporary place, it turned out to be the best we could use, since the huge amount of hardware that was available there, including some 4k monitors and HiDPI laptops.
    Being there also allowed another local Canonical employee (Shih-Yuan Lee) to join our efforts!

    As this being said I’ve to thank my employer, for allowing me to do this and for sponsoring the event in order to help making GNOME a better desktop for Ubuntu (and not only).

  • The first weeks of GSoC

    Over the next 2 weeks I’ll be continuing migrating the cloud providers library to use gdbus-codegen as well as adding support for the cloud providers API to the GtkPlacesSidebar.

GNOME Tweak Tool 3.25.3

Filed under
GNOME

Today I released the second development snapshot (3.25.3) of what will be GNOME Tweak Tool 3.26.

I consider the initial User Interface (UI) rework proposed by the GNOME Design Team to be complete now. Every page in Tweak Tool has been updated, either in this snapshot or the previous development snapshot.

The hard part still remains: making the UI look as good as the mockups. Tweak Tool’s backend makes this a bit more complicated than usual for an app like this.

Read more

GNOME News: Nautilus and T4G-V2

Filed under
GNOME
  • Redoing File Operation Management in Nautilus

    This will serve as a sort of introduction to my project, as well as being a progress update.

    Hi, I’m Ernestas and this summer I’m working on Nautilus as part of Google Summer of Code. The goal of the project is to have all I/O operations (i.e. file management, the cache, thumbnailing, searching) managed under a single entity with a capped worker thread count.

  • Improving the Search of Nautilus

    This summer I’m really glad to be working again on Nautilus as part of Google Summer of Code. This time, the goal of the project is to improve the Search. Currently, it misses some features that would make searching easier and there are also some performance issues.

    So far I worked on Full Text Search. This could be done until now, but from Desktop Search (tracker-needle). Since one of the main functions of Nautilus is searching files, it makes sense for it to include this feature.

  • Are You Using Gnome Desktop? Then Try T4G-V2 Theme And You Will Love It

    Gnome desktop is being accepted again by Ubuntu community after the announcement of Unity-8 is going to be buried. I am not going to talk about this new again since we already did and this post is about theme. T4G-V2 theme is created by a guy from gnome-look named "paulxfce", this theme is heavily modified version of popular Arc theme but with transparency items. This theme is specifically targeting Gnome desktop and do not expect it to work on other desktops, if you are using Gnome 3.20 and up versions then you are lucky to have it on your desktop. It offers bigger header-bars, window-frameless, transparent elements (all gnome-3 window backgrounds have transparency), graphical elements redone (new option/check-buttons; switch-buttons), added shadows beneath the header-bars.

Canonical Works on Fixing GNOME Shell for Ambiance to Look Good on Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
GNOME

Canonical won't drop support for their Ambiance theme for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), so they announced today that they're currently working on making it look just right with the GNOME desktop environment.

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GNOME and GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • gnome-boxes: Introducing shared folders

    Being able to share a directory between the host machine and a guest machine is, needless to say, a very convenient way of accessing files from one another. Thanks to the SPICE developers, an API is available which is capable of doing just that. (the only conditions are that the guest machine must have a SPICE display and the spice-webdavd service installed). Considering this, the decision of further implementing shared folders in gnome-boxes is certainly not one to think about twice.

  • #newinstretch : Latest WebKitGTK+

    Debian 9 “Stretch”, the latest stable version of the venerable Linux distribution, will be released in a few days. I pushed a last-minute change to get the latest security and feature update of WebKitGTK+ (packaged as webkit2gtk 2.16.3) in before release.

  • Debian Stretch ships latest WebKitGTK+

    I’ll keep this update short. Debian has decided to ship the latest version of WebKitGTK+, 2.16.3, in its upcoming Stretch release. Since Debian was the last major distribution holding out on providing WebKit security updates, this is a big deal. Huge thanks to Jeremy Bicha for making this possible.

  • Gtef library renamed to Tepl – Text editor product line

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Using the latest syslog-ng on Turris Omnia

    The release candidate of version 3.7 of Turris OS – the OpenWRT-based operating system of Turris Omnia routers – is now available. Among many other changes, this updates syslog-ng from version 3.0 to 3.9, so it adds about seven years’ worth of new syslog-ng features, including new parsers, filters, formatting options, destinations, and performance enhancements.

  • Ayatana Indicators

    In the near future various upstream projects related to the Ubuntu desktop experience as we have known it so far may become only sporadically maintained or even fully unmaintained. Ubuntu will switch to the Gnome desktop environment with 18.04 LTS as its default desktop, maybe even earlier. The Application Indicators [1] brought into being by Canonical Ltd. will not be needed in Gnome (AFAIK) any more. We can expect the Application Indicator related projects become unmaintained upstream. (In fact I have recently been offered continuation of upstream maintenance of libdbusmenu).

  • Komorebi – A Beautiful Wallpapers Manager with Parallax Effect for Linux

    You might not be tired of seeing still wallpapers on your desktop just yet but maybe it’s time to move on to backgrounds with cooler features anyway – parallax wallpapers.

  • Restoring tabs

    In order to be able to restore a tab in Nautilus, we have to keep a list with the minimum of information to recover the tab. This means that we’ll store the history, the view before search, in case the closed tab is a search, so that we know what was the view type before searching and last but not least, the location which was closed. Storing the location also means that the window will now keep a reference of the closed locations.

  • An Observation in UI Design

    Reading the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines gives a good idea on how to arrange elements and reduce complexity. The HIGs also emphasize on having a clear goal which helps in deciding which elements need to be arranged at all. But I did not grasp the wideness of being purpose-driven for this goal of the application which might then mean to abstract from technical details on the way. So now I try to explain this observation here.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.