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GNOME

Matthias Clasen: Adventures in graphics APIs

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Various people are working on porting desktop virtualization UIs to GTK4. This typically involves virgl, and the GTK3 solution was to use GtkGLArea.

With GTK4, rendering is happening in GL anyway, so it should be enough to just wrap your content in a GdkTexture and hand it to GTK, either by using it as a paintable with GtkPicture, or with a GskTextureNode in your own snapshot() implementation.

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Also: NVIDIA Adding Experimental Vulkan Support For Executing CUDA Binaries - Phoronix

My Little Contribution to GNOME 40

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 40 is finally out and I'm happy to say a small contribution of mine made it into the release. My contribution adds a new feature to GNOME System Monitor version 40. Few articles about GNOME 40 mention it, but some power users might find my contribution useful.

This new feature essentially turns GNOME System Monitor into a graphical user interface for GNU Taskset, allowing you to set or adjust the CPU affinity of any process using a simple check box dialog window similar to how it's done in the Windows Task Manager.

To use this new feature all you need to do is right click any process and then click the "Set Affinity" menu item, this will bring up the CPU affinity dialog with check boxes for each processor core. These check boxes will be prefilled/auto-checked based on the process' current CPU affinity. Check or uncheck specific cores, then hit apply and you've successfully adjusted which CPU cores the process is allowed to run on.

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Julian Sparber: The internals of Fractal-next

Filed under
Software
GNOME

As you probably know already we are in the process of rewriting Fractal. Since my previous blogpost about Fractal-Next a lot has happened. We are now at the point where the bare minimum is working, including login, the sidebar, and the room history. These things are not totally complete yet, but it’s already possible to run Fractal-Next, and read and send messages.

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System76 is about to re-define the Linux desktop experience with COSMIC

Filed under
GNOME

It should come as no surprise that System76, the company always finding new ground in the intersection of open source software and OEM hardware, has embarked upon refining and retooling the Pop!_OS Linux desktop experience.

COSMIC is System76's way of taking the GNOME desktop environment and tweaking it to better suit the user experience, as defined by their user base. The company polled Pop!_OS users to find out how they work with the desktop. The results of that survey helped guide the company in developing COSMIC.

What is COSMIC? Simply put, it's a honed user experience for the GNOME desktop. From what I've seen, it looks to be superior in just about every way.

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GNOME 3.38.6 Desktop Environment Released with Various Bug Fixes

Filed under
GNOME

Coming one and a half months after GNOME 3.38.5, the GNOME 3.38.6 point release is here to update the Epiphany web browser with the ability to allow launching of external URLs when triggered by user action, as well as to update the File Roller archive manager to skip files with symlinks in parents.

It also fixes a huge CPU consumption bug in the Gedit text editor, which occurred when a folder with content is deleted in the filebrower plugin. In addition, Gedit now uses the current document path when opening a new file to address a regression introduced in a previous version.

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Customize GNOME 40 Desktop to Look Like macOS [Guide]

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Ubuntu
HowTos

A quick guide for you to help you customizing the GNOME 40 desktop to look like macOS.
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GNOME 40 Looks Even Better with a Bit of Blur

Filed under
GNOME

I dig GNOME 40 and its rejigged layout, and while its horizontal app switcher and use of border radius isn’t to everyone’s tastes —sharp intake of understatement breath— it certainly pleases mine!

But do you know what would make me love the GNOME 40 UI even more?

Okay, yes: proper Dash to Dock support — but other than that?

A bit more blur.

And whaddya know: there’s a GNOME Shell extension that offers it!

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GNOME Internet Radio Locator 5.0.0 with BBC (United Kingdom) on Fedora Core 34

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 5.0.0 with BBC (United Kingdom) features English and Asian language translation, a new, improved map marker palette with 188 other radio stations from around the world and live audio streaming from BBC implemented through GStreamer.

[...]

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Comparison of File Chooser Dialogs

Filed under
OS
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

Hello, convenience lovers! We are all using GNU/Linux technologies. Ever dissatisfied when doing open/save in your application? Perhaps you want it to show you thumbnails preview but not, allows modes other than list view but not, provide search but not, display recent files but not, or you expect it puts all storage disks right at the front but not. I will help you choose a technology you can see below between KDE, GNOME, Elementary OS, Deepin, and LXDE so you can decide which distro you will use or even share with family later.
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GNOME’s GUADEC 2021 Conference Will Take Place July 21–25 to Future-Proof FOSS

Filed under
GNOME

GUADEC 2021 will be GNOME Foundation’s second virtual conference, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and will last five days, from July 21st to July 25th. The best part about online conferences is that anyone can attend, saving money on travel costs, accommodation, etc.

GUADEC is the place where GNOME users and developers from all over the world gather together to share knowledge and discuss the new features and changes of the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment, in this case we’re talking about the upcoming GNOME 41 release, and this year is now different.

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More in Tux Machines

Videos/Shows: Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 21.04, Coder Radio, and KDE Breeze Redesign and Blue Ocean

NetBSD: aiomixer, X/Open Curses and ncurses, and other news

aiomixer is an application that I've been maintaining outside of NetBSD for a few years. It was available as a package, and was a "graphical" (curses, terminal-based) mixer for NetBSD's audio API, inspired by programs like alsamixer. For some time I've thought that it should be integrated into the NetBSD base system - it's small and simple, very useful, and many developers and users had it installed (some told me that they would install it on all of their machines that needed audio output). For my particular use case, as well as my NetBSD laptop, I have some small NetBSD machines around the house plugged into speakers that I play music from. Sometimes I like to SSH into them to adjust the playback volume, and it's often easier to do visually than with mixerctl(1). However, there was one problem: when I first wrote aiomixer 2 years ago, I was intimidated by the curses API, so opted to use the Curses Development Kit instead. This turned out to be a mistake, as not only was CDK inflexible for an application like aiomixer, it introduced a hard dependency on ncurses. Read more

Core Scheduling Looks Like It Will Be Ready For Linux 5.14 To Avoid Disabling SMT/HT

It looks like the years-long effort around CPU core scheduling that's been worked on by multiple vendors in light of CPU security vulnerabilities threatening SMT/HT security will see mainline later this summer with Linux 5.14. Linux core scheduling has been worked on by pretty much all of the hyperscalers and public cloud providers to improve security without disabling Hyper Threading. Core scheduling is ultimately about what resources can share a CPU core and ensuring potentially unsafe tasks don't run on a sibling thread of a trusted task. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Automating RHEL for Edge image rollback with GreenBoot

    With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3, Red Hat announced an rpm-ostree version of RHEL targeted for Edge use cases called RHEL for Edge. One of the unique features of rpm-ostree is that when you update the operating system, a new deployment is created, and the previous deployment is also retained. This means that if there are issues on the updated version of the operating system, you can roll back to the previous deployment with a single rpm-ostree command, or by selecting the previous deployment in the GRUB boot loader. While this ability to manually roll back is very useful, it still requires manual intervention. Edge computing use case scenarios might be up in the tens or hundreds of thousands of nodes, and with this number of systems, automation is critical. In addition, in Edge deployments, these systems might be across the country or across the world, and it might not be practical to access a console on them in the event of issues with an updated image. This is why RHEL for Edge includes GreenBoot, which can automate RHEL for Edge operating system rollbacks. This post will cover an overview of how to get started with GreenBoot and will walk through an example of using GreenBoot.

  • Using Ansible to configure Podman containers

    In complex IT infrastructure, there are many repetitive tasks. Running those tasks successfully is not easy. Human error always presents a chance of failure. With help of Ansible, you perform all of the tasks through a remote host and, as the tasks are executed with playbooks, and those playbooks can be reused as many times as you need. In this article you will learn how to install and configure Ansible on Fedora Linux and describe how to use it to manage and configure Podman containers. Ansible Ansible is an open source infrastructure automation tool sponsored by Red Hat. It can deal with all the problems that come with large infrastructure, like installing & updating packages, taking backups, ensuring specific services are always running, and much more. You do this with a playbook which is written in YAML. Ansible playbooks can be used again and again, making the system administrator’s job less complex. Playbooks also eliminate repetitive tasks and can be easily modified. But we have many automation tools like Ansible, why use it? Unlike some other configuration management tools, Ansible is agentless: you don’t have to install anything on managed nodes. For more information about Ansible, see the Ansible tag in Fedora Magazine.

  • Getting better at counting rpm-ostree based systems

    Since the release of Fedora 32, a new mechanism has been in place to better count the number of Fedora users while respecting their privacy. This system is explicitly designed to make sure that no personally identifiable information is sent from counted systems. It also insures that the Fedora infrastructure does not collect any personal data. The nickname for this new counting mechanism is “Count Me”, from the option name. Details are available in DNF Better Counting change request for Fedora 32. In short, the Count Me mechanism works by telling Fedora servers how old your system is (with a very large approximation). This occurs randomly during a metadata refresh request performed by DNF.

  • Cockpit 244

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 244 and Cockpit Machines 244.

  • A brief introduction to Ansible Vault

    Ansible Vault is an Ansible feature that helps you encrypt confidential information without compromising security.