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GNOME

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC

    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:

  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great

    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45.

    Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.

  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win

    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded.

    Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

GNOME and Other Software

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Software
GNOME
  • Nautilus 3.24 – The changes

    Since Nautilus was created, if a user wanted to open a folder where the user didn’t have permissions, for example a system folder where only root has access, it was required to start Nautilus with sudo.

    However running UI apps under root is strongly discouraged, and to be honest, quite inconvenient. Running any UI app with sudo is actually not even supported in Wayland by design due to the security issues that that conveys.

  • GNOME hackaton in Brno

    Last week, we had a presentation on Google Summer of Code and Outreachy at Brno University of Technology. Around 80 students attended which was a pretty good success considering it was not part of any course. It was a surprise for the uni people as well because the room they booked was only for 60 ppl.

  • Peek Gif Recorder Gets Updated, Now Available from a PPA

    Peek, the nifty animated gif screen capture app for Linux desktops, has been updated.

    Peek 0.9 reduces the size of temporary files, adds a resolution downsampling option (to help the app use fewer resources when rendering your gif), and introduces fallback support for avconf should ffmpeg be unavailable.

  • Cerebro is an Open Source OS X Spotlight Equivalent for Linux

    Billed as an ‘open-source productivity booster with a brain’, Cerebro is an Electron app able to run across multiple platforms. It’s an extendable, open-source alternative to Spotlight and Alfred on macOS, and Synapse, Kupfer, Ulauncher, GNOME Do, and others on Linux.

  • JBoss Fuse 6.3 integration services for Red Hat OpenShift released

    Red Hat announced the latest update to the Red Hat JBoss Fuse-based integration service on Red Hat OpenShift. With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud-based SaaS systems, and new data streams, organizations can face increasing pressure to more quickly deliver innovative new services. Traditional centralized, monolithic ESB-style integration approaches are often ill-suited to support the business in responding to this pressure.

  • Fedora 25: The perf linux tool.
  • Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer [Ed: Used to work for Microsoft and now spreads the GPL ("cancer" according to Microsoft) in the US government]

    The manager of the project, Berg said, really wanted to release MOOSE as open source, but didn't know how to do so. As a result it took 18 months to traverse government bureaucracy and to obtain the necessary permissions. It's now available under the GPL 2.1 license.

GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Vala, and GNOME Shell Extensions

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GNOME
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Will Ship with GNOME 3.24

    For first time in a long time, Ubuntu will ship with the latest GNOME release.

  • Who Maintains That Stuff?

    If you use GNOME or Ubuntu, then GNOME Disks is probably what you rely on if you ever need to do any disk management operations, so it’s a relatively important piece of software for GNOME and Ubuntu users. Now if you’re a command line geek, you might handle disk management via command line, and that’s fine, but most users don’t know how to do that. Or if you’re living in the past like Ubuntu and not yet using Wayland, you might prefer GParted (which does not work under Wayland because it requires root permissions, while we intentionally will not allow applications to run as root in Wayland ). But for anyone else, you’re probably using GNOME Disks. So it would be good for it to work reliably, and for it to be relatively free of bugs.

  • On Problems with Vala

    If you’re going to be writing a new application based on GNOME technologies and targeting the GNOME ecosystem, then you should seriously consider writing it in the Vala programming language.

  • 10 Awesome Gnome Shell Extensions to Improve GNOME 3

    The GNOME desktop environment is loved by many, but it allows for very little out-of-the-box customisation. However, you can extend the features of the desktop by installing third-party extensions which help to fix any weird quirks you might have observed or change the behaviour of your desktop outright.

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

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GNOME

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding.

Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable.

Read more

GNOME 3.24's Mutter and GNOME Shell

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24's Mutter Window Manager to Improve HiDPI and EGLStream Support

    Now that we've told you all about the goodies coming to the GNOME Shell user interface when the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will be released next month on March 22, it's time to see what improvements landed for the Mutter window manager.

    We believe that Mutter is the second most important component of the open-source GNOME desktop environment, and the upcoming major release got a first Beta milestone the other day, bringing us a bunch of interesting improvements. Among these, there's better EGLStream support, along with HiDPI support for the window menu placement.

  • GNOME Shell to Get Night Light Indicator in Status Area for GNOME 3.24 Desktop

    As part of yesterday's GNOME 3.24 Beta desktop environment release, last minute updates for the GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window manager landed as well with numerous improvements.

    In this article, we'd like to tell you about the new features and improvements that have been implemented in the first Beta release of GNOME Shell, which is the most important component of GNOME 3.24 because without it users couldn't even interact with the desktop environment.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Transit Route Planning Is Coming to GNOME Maps
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Up To 3.24 Beta State

    GNOME Shell 3.23.90 and Mutter 3.23.90 are now available for testing, which represents the component's release for the GNOME 3.24 beta.

    With tonight's GNOME Shell 3.23.90 release is handling Ctrl+Q and Ctrl+W in portal windows, reloading of apps when the .desktop file contents change, fixing for sub-surfaces not showing up in previews, kill-switch has been added for user extensions, and a nightlight indicator has been added to the status area. There have also been a number of bug fixes to the GNOME Shell as it gets ready for the GNOME 3.24.0 release in March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Beta Released

    GNOME 3.23.90, a.k.a. the GNOME 3.24 beta, is now available for testing ahead of this big desktop update due out in late March.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Is Coming March 22

    With a one-day delay, the Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is finally here, available for public testers who want to get an early taste of its new features.

    Of course, GNOME 3.24 Beta can't be called a feature-full release, as some things are yet to be implemented, such as the return routes and transit routing planning functionalities of the Maps app that we've discussed earlier, but it comes with enough changes to please the eye.

  • Outreachy Applications Now Open For Their 2017 Summer Internships

    For those eligible, Outreachy is accepting applications for their summer 2017 internship period if you wish to get paid while getting involved with open-source software.

Transit Routing in GNOME Maps

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GNOME
  • GNOME Maps 3.24 To Support Transit Routing

    GNOME Maps has become a much more viable piece of software with transit routing support having landed in Git master.

    Following some work at FOSDEM, GNOME Maps 3.24 will have support for transit routing so you can enter two points and get turn-by-turn directions. GNOME Maps is making use of OpenTripPlanner and they are still finalizing their deployment for transit routing but it appears all will be set for next month's GNOME 3.24 release.

  • Transit Routing and Reverse Routes Could Come to GNOME 3.24 Desktop's Maps App

    GNOME Foundation member Marcus Lundblad is announcing today, February 15, the upcoming availability of new transit routing and reverse routes functionality for the GNOME Maps application.

    The new features could land as soon as the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is out, which will happen in about five weeks from the moment of writing this article, on March 22, 2017, but early adopters can take it for a test drive right now if they clone the latest Git master repository of GNOME Maps.

  • Transit routing has landed!

    So, at FOSDEM a bit over a week ago, me, Jonas Danielsson, Mattias Bengtsson, and Andreas Nilsson talked about plans for landing the transit routing feature and we started doing some patch reviewing over some beers on Saturday evening.

    Thanks to a lot of awesome reviewing work done by Jonas, this work has finally landed in master!

GNOME News: Nautilus 3.24, Calendar, GParted, and GNOME 3.24

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GNOME
  • Nautilus 3.24 File Manager Enters Beta, Adds New Keyboard Shortcuts and Features

    We already told you the other day when we reported the availability of new development releases of GNOME Software and GTK+ that the GNOME developers are currently preparing to unleash the first Beta version of the GNOME 3.24 desktop.

    Since yesterday, a lot more apps and core components from the GNOME Stack have appeared on the project's FTP servers, including the Nautilus file manager, which is used by default in numerous Linux-based operating systems that use the GNOME Stack, including Ubuntu, Fedora Workstation, Solus, and many others.

  • GNOME Calendar App to Finally Add a Week View in GNOME 3.24, Flatpak Support

    As part of the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.24 Beta version, due later today or by the end of the week, the GNOME Calendar applications received its first development release.

    We've already told you that the GNOME developers are working hard these days to give us the first Beta preview of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, due for release on March 22, and we recommend reading our in-depth stories about what's coming new in Nautilus (Files), GTK+ 4, and GNOME Software components.

  • GParted 0.28 Begins Read-Write LUKS Encrypted File-System Support

    For those using GParted as a way to visually manage your Linux disk partitions/file-systems, GParted 0.28 was released as a Valentine's Day present for Linux users.

    The primary change with GParted 0.28 is that it adds partial read-write support for LUKS-encrypted file-systems. GParted 0.28 is now able to copy/resize/manipulate file-systems within LUKS volumes as well as moving closed LUKS sub-volumes. However, this GNOME Partition Editor isn't yet able to create, open, or close LUKS encryption volumes.

  • GParted 0.28.0 Adds Partial Read/Write Support for LUKS Encrypted Filesystems

    Curtis Gedak announced today the general availability of GParted 0.28.0, a new stable update of the widely-used open-source partition editor for Linux-based operating systems.

    GParted 0.28.0 comes approximately four months after the release of GParted 0.27.0, and the most important feature it introduces is partial read/write support for LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) encrypted filesystems, allowing users to resize or copy a file system enclosed in a LUKS volume. Additionally, it allows the move of closed LUKS volumes.

  • Watch: the New, Revamped Users Panel of the GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment

    As we reported last year, the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will come with a revamped GNOME Control Center component, and GNOME developer Felipe Borges now gives us a sneak peek into the new Users panel.

    GNOME Control Center's Users panel got a new design recently, which represents the developers' first attempt to move away from the old two-column panel and implement a single page concept, as you can see in the video attached below.

  • GTK+ 3.89.4 Released With More Vulkan Work, Wayland Fixes

    Matthias Clasen has issued the newest GTK4 development release with more feature work.

Vala Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Vala is not a Programming Language

    Vala provides you a way to write C/GObject/GInterface code using a different syntax. Vala doesn’t require to develop a “core library” in order to provide its features. Its “compiler” is not a compiler, is a C code generator.

    Vala can’t be compared with Rust, Go, Python, Java or C#, all of them provide their own “core library” in order to provide most of their features, allows you to create modules (like a library) to extend the language for their users consume. Their core generally is written in C, for very basic features, but almost in the language itself.

  • Vala 1.0?

    Yes is time to consider a Vala 1.0 release. Vala 0.34 code generator and bindings support LTS versions of GTK+ 3.22 and GLib 2.50. Next stable version of GTK+ will be 4.0 and GLib 2.x, but they have to traverse through 3.9x versions and any GLib 2.x on the way. Reaching that point we can consider Vala 2.0 release.

GNOME/GTK News

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Development
GNOME
  • GTK+ Implements Window Focus Tracking and Window Properties for Ubuntu's Mir

    The GTK+ development team just released a few moments ago a new stable and development release of the widely-used GTK+ open-source toolkit for GNOME and GNOME-based desktop environments and related apps.

    GTK+ 3.22.8 is now the most stable and advanced build of the toolkit, and will soon be available for most GNU/Linux distributions that use it. While it's only a small maintenance update, it adds a few interesting improvements for Ubuntu's Mir display server, such as window focus tracking, window properties, and modal hint support.

  • On Vala

    Of course, and with reason, I’ve been called out on this by various people. Luckily, it was on Twitter, so we haven’t seen articles on Slashdot and Phoronix and LWN with headlines like “GNOME developer says Vala is dead and will be removed from all servers for all eternity and you all suck”. At least, I’ve only seen a bunch of comments on Reddit about this, but nobody cares about that particular cesspool of humanity.

  • A GNOME Developer's Arguments On Vala Being A "Dead" Language

    Longtime GNOME developer Emmanuele Bassi has pleaded his case that Vala is a "dead" language and that new applications/developers should look at alternatives or first work on improving this GNOME-centered language.

    There's previously been efforts to use more Rust code in GNOME than C/Vala and developers expressing their disappointment/frustrations in Vala. Emmanuele Bassi recently tweeted, "PSA: if you want to write a new @gnome application, don't use Vala; if you're already using it, consider porting to a non-dead language."

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