Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Happy birthday, GNOME: 8 reasons to love this Linux desktop

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME has been my favorite desktop environment for quite some time. While I always make it a point to check out other environments from time to time, there are some aspects of the GNOME desktop that are hard to live without. While there are many great desktop environments out there, GNOME feels like home to me. Here are some of the features I enjoy most about GNOME.

Read more

KDE and GNOME GSoC: Falkon, WikiToLearn, Nautilus and Pitivi

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • The Joy of GSoC Smile

    Wooo... this is the last day of coding phase of GSoC. I am writing this blog to share my experience and work done in the coding phase. I want to specially thank my mentor David Rosca for his help, suggestions and reviews. This was my first exposure to the KDE community and I am proud that it was great. I really enjoyed the whole program from proposal submission - intermediate evals - then now this final evaluation. Also, I had learned a lot working on my project. Frankly speaking, I didn't knew about i18n and l10n much but with the help of my mentor now I have a quite good understanding of how these works and are implemented. I can truly say this was one of my best summer vacations.

  • What’s next for WikiToLearn?

    Google Summer of Code is finishing and many things have been done on WikiToLearn since previous post. A little recap is needed.

    Talking with mentors has been crucial because they told me to focus on finishing CRUD interaction with API backend instead of working on “history mode” viewer.

  • GSoC 2018 Final Evaluation

    As GSoC is coming to an end, I am required to put my work altogether in order for it to be easily available and hopefully help fellow/potential contributors work on their own projects. 

    [...]

    At its prestige, through this project we will have tests both for most critical and used operations of Nautilus, and for the search engines we use. Further on, I’ll provide links for all of my merge requests and dwell a bit on their ins and outs while posting links to my commits:

  • GTK+ 4 and Nautilus </GSoC>

    Another summer here at GNOME HQ comes to an end. While certainly eventful, it unfortunately did not result in a production-ready Nautilus port to GTK+ 4 (unless you don’t intend to use the location entry or any other entry, but more on that later).

  • Pitivi Video Editor Gains UI Polish, Video Preview Resizing

    The latest Google Summer of Code 2018 is allowing some excellent work to be done on some excellent open source projects.

    Among them Pitivi, the non-linear video editor built using GTK and Gstreamer and offering up a basic video editing feature set.

    Over the past few months, Harish Fulara, a Computer Science student, has worked on improving the application’s greeter dialog and on adding support dynamic resizing of the video preview box.

KDE and GNOME: CMake, CPU Usage and Student Work on Pitivi

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Qt1 CMake port and more Akademy crazyness

    So, my plans was always finish the full KDE1 port, and now on Akademy i have some time to get back to this pet project. Starting on Qt1 porting entirely to CMake because the experience on Qt2 was so good that i decided going back to that and do some of the same love on Qt1.

    KDE 1 for that new port next. For now, i’m working on github, so https://github.com/heliocastro/qt1

  • KDE Plasma 5.14's Lock Screen Will No Longer Eat Your CPU Resources On Old Hardware

    With KDE Plasma 5 right now it turns out that if you have relied upon CPU-based software rendering, when hitting Plasma's lock-screen it would actually go CPU-wild -- as far as maxing out the CPU to 100% utilization, thereby consuming a lot of power and generating excess heat. That will be fixed for KDE Plasma 5.14.0.

    Since May has been a bug report about the KScreenLocker greeter process going to 100% CPU usage and needing to wait 5~10 seconds after entering the user password before the screen would actually unlock. Several others also reported similar issues of this lock-screen managing to consume a lot of the CPU resources, including on ARM boards and older hardware.

  • [GSoC’18] Pitivi’s UI Polishing – Final Report

    As part of Google Summer of Code 2018, I worked on the project Pitivi: UI Polishing. This is my final report to showcase the work that I have done during the program.

  • Pitivi's User Interface Is Getting Better Thanks To GSoC, Plus Other GNOME Improvements

    If you have been less than satisfied with the user-interface of the Pitivi non-linear open-source video editor for Linux, you may want to try out their next release.

    Student developer Harish Fulara spent his summer working on polishing the open-source video editor's interface as part of Google Summer of Code 2018.

GSoC: KDE and GNOME Final Reports

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018: Final week

    Coming to the last week, the activity Note_names is finally developed and being tested on different platforms.

    Principle: This activity aims to teach sight reading the musical notes and their position on the staff by presenting several notes one-by-one with animation from the right of the staff sliding to the right of the clef image. The user will get the combination of all the notes he has learned previously and the current targetted notes from the dataset. Only the reference notes are colored as red and the user is made to learn the notes around it using it as a leverage. One has to correct enough notes to get a 100% and advance to next stage.

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: It's a Wrap

    As probably most of you already know, or recently found out, at the beginning of this week the GSoC coding period officially ended, and it is time for us, GSoC students, to submit our final evaluations and the results we achieved thus far. This blog post, as you can probably tell from the title, will be a summary of all of the work I put into modernising Five or More throughout the summer months.

    My main task was rewriting Five or More in Vala since this simple and fun game did not find its way to the list of those included in the Games Modernisation Initiative. This fun, strategy game consists of aligning, as often as possible, five or more objects of the same shape and color, to make them disappear and score points.

  • The end of GSoC

    After three months of hard work and a lot of coding the Google Summer of Code is over. I learned a lot and had a lot fun. GSoC was an amazing experience and I encourage everybody to participate in future editions. At this point I’ve been a contributor to GNOME for nearly a year, and I plan on sticking around for a long time. I really hope that other GSoC students also found it so enjoyable, and keep contributing to GNOME or other Free Software Projects.

GNOME Pomodoro: A Time Utility Tool That Increases Productivity

Filed under
GNOME

Hello readers, today I’ll be covering on how to increase your productivity and this applies to all types of computer users, especially Linux, just kidding. Tongue Believe me most of us who work on computers have suffered back pain, eye strain, stress, and then end up getting frustrated. However, did you know that one can fix all those issues by managing time in intervals and a short break in between? Yes, that’s right, read on below how you can go about that using GNOME Pomodoro.

Read more

Budgie Desktop, KDE and GNOME

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Summertime Solus | The Roundup #7

    For those that missed our announcements of last week’s Hackfest, you can watch it via the video embedded below. Most of this roundup will cover the work that has been done since the last roundup (in the specific sections in this blog) as well as the Hackfest, so if you don’t want to sit through the 10 hours of content, feel free to just keep reading.

  • Solus Linux & Its Budgie Desktop Seeing Summer 2018 Improvements

    The Solus Project has shared some of the work they've been engaged in this summer with their Linux distribution as well as their GTK3-based Budgie Desktop Environment.

  • Community Data Analytics Are Going to Akademy

    If you are interested in community data analytics, you will have several opportunities to discuss them during Akademy.

    Firstly, there will be my talk titled Bringing Community Data Analysis Back to KDE (why the hell did I use "Analysis" there... I only used "Analytics" everywhere so far, odd). It will happen on Saturday at 15:30 in room IE7. The slot is a bit small for the topic, but I'll try my best to create interest. Indeed you can catch me around talks to chat about it, and...

    Secondly, there will be a BoF "Discussing Community Data Analytics" on Monday at 10:30 in room 127. We hope to see people coming up with interesting questions to explore or willing to lend a hand in those explorations. See you there!

  • The birth of a new runtime

    Runtimes are a core part of the flatpak design. They are a way to make bundling feasible, while still fully isolating from the host system. Application authors can bundle the libraries specific to the application, but don’t have to care about the lowlevel dependencies that are uninteresting (yet important) for the application.

    Many people think of runtimes primarily as a way to avoid duplication (and thus bloat). However, they play two other important roles. First of all they allow an independent stream of updates for core libraries, so even dead apps get fixes. And secondly, they allow the work of the bundling to be shared between all application authors.

    [...]

    This runtime has the same name, and its content is very similar, but it is really a complete re-implementation. It is based on a new build system called BuildStream, which is much nicer and a great fit for flatpak. So, no more Yocto, no more buildbake, no multi-layer builds!

    Additionally, it has an entire group of people working on it, including support from Codethink. Its already using gitlab, with automatic builds, CI, etc, etc. There is also a new release model (year.month) with a well-defined support time. Also, all the packages are much newer!

    Gnome is also looking at using this as the basics for its releases, its CI system and eventually the Gnome runtime.

GNOME’s Ace Retro Gaming App Just Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
GNOME
Gaming

Forget Super Smash Bros Ultimate; the best gaming related revelations this week concern the epic GNOME Games app.

The next version of this handy arcade front will let you navigate the GUI using your gamepad, browse and play MSX and Nintendo Virtual Boy games, and load your ROM library faster than a Sonic game can scream ‘SEAAAGAAA!’.

Read more

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Will Finally Bring Automatic Updates, but Only for Flatpaks

Filed under
GNOME

One of the coolest, long-anticipated feature coming to the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment this fall is automatic updates. Yes, you're reading it right, the GNOME Project is enabling automatic software updates for you so you won't have to worry about if you're running the latest version of a software or not, but only for Flatpaks at this time.

According to Richard Hughes, the new automatic updates feature has been implemented in the GNOME Software package manager and will be available as part of the GNOME 3.30 release this fall, enabled by default only for Flatpak apps, the universal binary format for Linux-based operating systems, along with an option in preferences to disable it.

Read more

GNOME Development Updates

Filed under
GNOME
  • libgepub + rust

    In 2010 I was working with evince, the gnome PDF document viewer, trying to add some accessibility to PDF files. That was really hard, not because GTK+ or ATK technology but because the PDF format itself. The PDF format is really cool for printing because you know that the piece of paper will look the same as the PDF doc, and because it's vector it scales and don't loose quality and files are smaller than image files, but almost all PDF files have not any metadata for sections, headings, tablets or so, this depends on the creation tool, but it's really hard to deal with PDF content text, because you don't know event if the text that you're reading is really in the same order that you read from the PDF.

    After my fight against the PDF format hell and poppler, I discovered the epub format that's a really simple format for electronic books. An epub is a zip with some XML files describing the book index and every chapter is a xhtml and xhtml is a good format compared to PDF because you can parse easily with any XML lib and the content is tagged and well structured so you know what's a heading, what's a paragraph, etc.

    So I started to write a simple C library to read epub files, thinking about add epub support to evince. That's how libgepub was born. I tried to integrate libgepub in evince, I've something working, rendering with webkit, but nothing really useful, because evince needs pages and it's not easy to split an xhtml file in pages with the same height, because xhtml is continuous text and it adapts to the page width, so I give up and leave this branch.

  • My final report for GSoC 2018

    The Google Summer of Code 2018 is coming to an end for me, so it means that it’s time for the final report!

    [...]

    I’ve created a media (although for now it only works with pictures) viewer for Fractal. Its purpose is to easily have a better view of the images within a room, to be able to zoom in and out of them, to navigate between the different images of the room in the chronological order, to enter in a full screen mode and to save a copy of the media in the filesystem. I made a first implementation and then had to do a lot of other improvements. I’ve spent about a month working on it.

    There is still the need to improve the zoom of the media viewer as the pictures are a little bit blurred and it’s not possible to zoom beyond 100%. There are optimizations to do as the application becomes very slow when trying to zoom beyond 100% on large pictures.

  • GUADEC 2018

    A few weeks ago I attended GUADEC in Almeria, Spain. The travel was a bit of an adventure, because Julian and I went there and back from Italy by train. It was great though, because we had lots of time to hack on Fractal on the train.

    [...]

    On Monday I attended the all-day Librem 5 BoF, together with my colleagues from Purism, and some community members, such as Jordan and Julian from Fractal.

    We talked about apps, particularly the messaging situation and Fractal. We discussed what will be needed in order to split the app, make the UI adaptive, and get end-to-end encryption. Daniel’s work on the database and Julian’s message history refactor are currently laying the groundwork for these.

    On the shell side we talked through the design of various parts of the shell, such as keyboard, notifications, multitasking, and gestures. Though many of those things won’t be implemented in the near future, we have a plan for where we’re going with these, and getting designers and developers in one room was very productive for working out some of the details.

    We also discussed a number of exciting new widgets to make it easier to get GNOME apps to work at smaller sizes, such as a new adaptive preferences window, and a way to allow modal windows to take up the entire screen at small sizes.

Richard Hughes: GNOME Software and automatic updates

Filed under
GNOME

For GNOME 3.30 we’ve enabled something that people have been asking for since at least the birth of the gnome-software project: automatically installing updates.

This of course comes with some caveats. Since it’s still not safe to auto-update packages (trust me, I triaged the hundreds of bugs) we will restrict automatic updates to Flatpaks. Although we do automatically download things like firmware updates, ostree content, and package updates by default they’re deployed manually like before. I guess it’s important to say that the auto-update of Flatpaks is optional and can easily be turned off in the GUI, and that you’ll be notified when applications have been auto-updated and need restarting.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

L1TF/Foreshadow News and Benchmarks

  • Three More Intel Chip Exploits Surface
  • Spectre-like “Foreshadow” Flaw In Intel CPUs Can Leak Your Secrets
  • QEMU 3.0 Brings Spectre V4 Mitigation, OpenGL ES Support In SDL Front-End
    QEMU 3.0 is now officially available. This big version bump isn't due to some compatibility-breaking changes, but rather to simplify their versioning and begin doing major version bumps on an annual basis. As an added bonus, QEMU 3.0 comes at a time of the project marking its 15th year in existence. QEMU 3.0 does amount to being a big feature release with a lot of new functionality as well as many improvements. Changes in QEMU 3.0 include Spectre V4 mitigation for x86 Intel/AMD, improved support for nested KVM guests on Microsoft Hyper-V, block device support for active mirroring, improved support for AHCI and SCSI emulation, OpenGL ES support within the SDL front-end, improved latency for user-mode networking, various ARM improvements, some POWER9 / RISC-V / s390 improvements too, and various other new bits.
  • How the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerability affects Linux systems
    Announced just yesterday in security advisories from Intel, Microsoft and Red Hat, a newly discovered vulnerability affecting Intel processors (and, thus, Linux) called L1TF or “L1 Terminal Fault” is grabbing the attention of Linux users and admins. Exactly what is this vulnerability and who should be worrying about it?
  • An Early Look At The L1 Terminal Fault "L1TF" Performance Impact On Virtual Machines
    Yesterday the latest speculative execution vulnerability was disclosed that was akin to Meltdown and is dubbed the L1 Terminal Fault, or "L1TF" for short. Here are some very early benchmarks of the performance impact of the L1TF mitigation on the Linux virtual machine performance when testing the various levels of mitigation as well as the unpatched system performance prior to this vulnerability coming to light.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.2 M2 Released With Offline Improvements, L1TF/Foreshadow Reporting
    The second development snapshot of the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 8.2-Rakkestad to benchmark to your heart's delight on Linux, macOS, Windows, Solaris, and BSD platforms from embedded/SBC systems to cloud and servers.
  • The Linux Benchmarking Continues On The Threadripper 2950X & 2990WX
    While I haven't posted any new Threadripper 2950X/2990WX benchmarks since the embargo expired on Monday with the Threadripper 2 Linux review and some Windows 10 vs. Linux benchmarks, tests have continued under Linux -- as well as FreeBSD. I should have my initial BSD vs. Linux findings on Threadripper 2 out later today. There were about 24 hours worth of FreeBSD-based 2990WX tests going well albeit DragonFlyBSD currently bites the gun with my Threadripper 2 test platforms. More on that in the upcoming article as the rest of those tests finish. It's also been a madhouse with simultaneously benchmarking the new Level 1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) vulnerability and the performance impact of those Linux mitigations on Intel hardware will start to be published in the next few hours.

Mozilla: WebTorrent, Bitslicing, Firefox Security Add-on and Time Dilation

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 42
  • Dweb: Building a Resilient Web with WebTorrent
    WebTorrent is the first torrent client that works in the browser. It’s written completely in JavaScript – the language of the web – and uses WebRTC for true peer-to-peer transport. No browser plugin, extension, or installation is required. Using open web standards, WebTorrent connects website users together to form a distributed, decentralized browser-to-browser network for efficient file transfer. The more people use a WebTorrent-powered website, the faster and more resilient it becomes.
  • Bitslicing, An Introduction
    Bitslicing (in software) is an implementation strategy enabling fast, constant-time implementations of cryptographic algorithms immune to cache and timing-related side channel attacks. This post intends to give a brief overview of the general technique, not requiring much of a cryptographic background. It will demonstrate bitslicing a small S-box, talk about multiplexers, LUTs, Boolean functions, and minimal forms.
  • Firefox Security Add-on on 222k Devices Found Sending Browsing Data to Remote German Server
    There is a popular browser add-on which is installed by 222,746 Firefox users according to Mozilla’s own statistics of add-on downloads. According to a German security blogger, Mike Kuketz, and the author of uBlock Origin, Raymond Hill, this particular add-on has been spying on users’ activity by tapping into their browser histories and keeping track of the web pages that they visit. This add-on is the Web Security extension for the Mozilla Firefox browser. Web Security is designed to protect users from online phishing and malware attacks that could potentially steal personal information. This comes across as ironic as the extension is found to be unethically keeping tabs (pun intended) on your own information, evading your privacy without your consent. The reason that this news is hitting the stands so massively is that the add-on was publicized by Mozilla itself in a blog post just last week. The add-on boasts fantastic reviews and that’s why it is used so widely by so many people too.
  • Time Dilation
    I riffed on this a bit over at twitter some time ago; this has been sitting in the drafts folder for too long, and it’s incomplete, but I might as well get it out the door. Feel free to suggest additions or corrections if you’re so inclined. You may have seen this list of latency numbers every programmer should know, and I trust we’ve all seen Grace Hopper’s classic description of a nanosecond at the top of this page, but I thought it might be a bit more accessible to talk about CPU-scale events in human-scale transactional terms. So: if a single CPU cycle on a modern computer was stretched out as long as one of our absurdly tedious human seconds, how long do other computing transactions take?

Programming: Go, Agile, and Literature

  • File Indexing In Golang
    I have been working on a pet project to write a File Indexer, which is a utility that helps me to search a directory for a given word or phrase. The motivation behind to build this utility was so that we could search the chat log files for dgplug. We have a lot of online classes and guest session and at time we just remember the name or a phrase used in the class, backtracking the files using these are not possible as of now. I thought I will give stab at this problem and since I am trying to learn golang I implemented my solution in it. I implemented this solution over a span of two weeks where I spent time to upskill on certain aspects and also to come up with a clean solution.
  • How Agile helps non-technical teams get things done
    What are the best ways for governments to improve effectiveness and efficiency? At San Jose City Hall, we’re getting traction with an unconventional approach: agile for non-technical teams. Public servants who do everything from emergency management to parks programs are finding that Agile methods help them with that most basic of challenges: Getting things done amid frequent interruptions and evolving priorities. Last September, I proclaimed, "Scrum is the best thing that’s happened to our government team." Our innovation team of five had discovered that planning and delivering work in small increments enables us to stay focused, aligned, and continuously improving. We didn’t yet know if our experience would be replicable by other teams in our organization. We offered Agile training for 10 colleagues to see what would happen. Nine months later, 12 teams and more than 100 staff members throughout our organization are using Agile methods to organize their work. Notably, the spread of Agile among city teams has been largely organic, not driven by top-down mandates.
  • Top Linux developers' recommended programming books
    Without question, Linux was created by brilliant programmers who employed good computer science knowledge. Let the Linux programmers whose names you know share the books that got them started and the technology references they recommend for today's developers. How many of them have you read? [...] Linux was developed in the 1990s, as were other fundamental open source applications. As a result, the tools and languages the developers used reflected the times, which meant a lot of C programming language. While C is no longer as popular, for many established developers it was their first serious language, which is reflected in their choice of influential books. “You shouldn't start programming with the languages I started with or the way I did,” says Torvalds. He started with BASIC, moved on to machine code (“not even assembly language, actual ‘just numbers’ machine code,” he explains), then assembly language and C. “None of those languages are what anybody should begin with anymore,” Torvalds says. “Some of them make no sense at all today (BASIC and machine code). And while C is still a major language, I don't think you should begin with it.” It's not that he dislikes C. After all, Linux is written in GNU C. "I still think C is a great language with a pretty simple syntax and is very good for many things,” he says. But the effort to get started with it is much too high for it to be a good beginner language by today's standards. “I suspect you'd just get frustrated. Going from your first ‘Hello World’ program to something you might actually use is just too big of a step."

Railway computer runs Linux on Kaby Lake

Lanner’s rugged, Linux-friendly “R6S” railway computer runs on an Intel 7th Gen Core i7-7600U chip and offers 10x M12 PoE ports, 3x mini-PCIe slots, and EN 50155 and EN 45545 certification. The R6S uses the same dual-core, Kaby Lake Core i7-7600U CPU as Lanner’s recent V6S vehicle surveillance NVR computer and similarly offers 10x GbE ports with Power-over-Ethernet (PoE). Yet, the R6S is more specifically targeted at trains. It offers compliance with ISO 7637-2, EN 50155, and EN 45545 certifications, and has passed EN 61373/MIL-STD-810G shock and vibration resistance certifications. It also supports a wider set of applications, including “rolling stock control and monitoring, infotainment, video surveillance and fleet management.” Read more