Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.16.1 is now available only one week after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment series, a major version that adds numerous new features and improvements, including a totally revamped notifications system, new look and feel for the login, lock, and logout screens, better Wayland support, as well as numerous other desktop enhancements.

Consisting of a total of 21 bug fixes, the KDE Plasma 5.16.1 maintenance update is here to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable by addressing various issues reported by users lately, including an issue that broke the Sleep/Suspend command, and the ability for the Plasma Discover package manager to show when Flatpak updates are fetched.

Read more

Study the Elements with KDE's Kalzium

Filed under
KDE

I've written about a number of chemistry packages in the past and all of the computational chemistry that you can do in a Linux environment. But, what is fundamental to chemistry? Why, the elements, of course. So in this article, I focus on how you can learn more about the elements that make up everything around you with Kalzium. KDE's Kalzium is kind of like a periodic table on steroids. Not only does it have information on each of the elements, it also has extra functionality to do other types of calculations.

Kalzium should be available within the package repositories for most distributions. In Debian-based distributions, you can install it with the command...

Read more

Plasma/KDE Usability & Productivity, KDE Frameworks 5.60 Bringing More Baloo Optimizations, KMyMoney and Konsole Updates

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 75

    Week 75 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative is here! It’s a little lighter than usual because we’re all feverishly preparing for the dual Plasma and Usability & Productivity sprints nest week in Valencia, Spain. I’ll be there, as well as the whole Plasma team, a bunch of VDG people, and a number of folks who have stepped up to work on apps for the U&P initiative. Sprints like these promise the kind of face-to-face contact needed for big projects, and should be a fantastically awesome and productive time! I’d like to offer a special thanks to Slimbook (makers of the KDE Slimbook II laptop) for hosting the sprint!

  • KDE Frameworks 5.60 Bringing More Baloo Optimizations

    Making KDE's Baloo file indexing/searching framework really efficient appears to be a never-ending task. Baloo is already much less bloated recently than it's been hungry for resources in the past and with KDE Frameworks 5.60 will be slightly more fit.

    Baloo's indexing process with KDE Frameworks 5.60 will now pay attention to when extended attributes on folders change, no longer does unnecessary work when a folder is renamed, is faster now at un-indexing files, and is less intensive running on laptops with battery power. All of these Baloo improvements will be in the next KDE Frameworks monthly update.

  • International number formats

    KMyMoney as a financial application deals with numbers a lot. As a KDE application, it supports internationalization (or i18n for short) from the very beginning. For accuracy reasons it has internal checks to verify the numbers a user can enter.

    The validation routine has a long history (I think it goes back to the KDE3 days) and we recently streamlined it a bit as part of the journey to use more and more Qt standard widgets instead of our own.

    This led to the replacement of the KMyMoneyEdit widget with the newer AmountEdit widget. Everything worked great for me (using a German locale) until we received notifications that users could only enter integer numbers but no fractional part. This of course is not what we wanted. But why is that?

    The important piece of information was that the user reporting the issue uses the Finland svenska (sv_FI) locale on his system. So I set my development system to use that locale for numbers and currencies and it failed for me as well. So it was pretty clear that the validation logic had a flaw.

    Checking the AmountValidator object which is an extension of the QDoubleValidator I found out that it did not work as expected with the said locale. So it was time to setup some testcases for the validator to see how it performs with other locales. I still saw it failing which made me curious so I dug into the Qt source code one more time, specifically the QDoubleValidator. Well, it looked that most of the logic we added in former times is superfluous meanwhile with the Qt5 version. But there remains a little difference: the QDoubleValidator works on the symbols of the LC_NUMERIC category of a locale where we want to use it the LC_MONETARY version. So what to do? Simply ignore the fact? This could bite us later.

  • The state of Terminal Emulators in Linux

    Now it has more developers and more code flowing, fixing bugs, improving the interface, increasing the number of lines of code flowing thru the codebase. We don’t plan to stop supporting konsole, and it will not depend on a single developer anymore.

    We want konsole to be the swiss army knife of terminal emulators, you can already do with konsole a lot of things that are impossible in other terminals, but we want more. And we need more developers for that.

    Konsole is, together with VTE, the most used terminal out there in numbers of applications that integrate the technology: Dolphin, Kate, KDevelop, Yakuake, and many other applications also use konsole, so fixing a bug in one place we are helping a lot of other applications too.

    Consider joining a project, Consider sending code.

KBibTeX 0.9 released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Finally, KBibTeX 0.9 got released. Virtually nothing has changed since the release of beta 2 in May as no specific bugs have been reported. Thus ChangeLog is still the same and the details on the changes since 0.8.2 as shown on the release announcement for 0.9-beta2.

Read more

Meet Kdenlive: Free Open Source NLE That Aims for Professionals

Filed under
KDE
Movies

As the battle of the NLEs continues between the big four (Premiere Pro, FCPX, Avid, and DaVinci Resolve), there are a few underdogs that aim to conquer the market. One of them is Kdenlive.

It’s important to mention that this NLE is not new. The project was started by Jason Wood in 2002 and is now maintained by a small team of developers. Being an open source project constitutes as a significant advantage since it’s backed up by a massive community of contributors that have the privilege of improving and making the software to be more sharpened from an R&D point of view.

Read more

New features for kde.org

Filed under
KDE

The application page now contains some additional metadata information. This can help search engines to better understand the content of the webpage.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.16 Released

KDE: Site Description Update, Boost and Meeting KDE in València

Filed under
KDE
  • Jonathan Riddell: KDE.org Description Update

    The KDE Applications website was a minimal possible change to move it from an unmaintained and incomplete site to a self-maintaining and complete site. It’s been fun to see it get picked up in places like Ubuntu Weekly News, Late Night Linux and chatting to people in real life they have seen it get an update. So clearly it’s important to keep our websites maintained. Alas the social and technical barriers are too high in KDE. My current hope is that the Promo team will take over the kde-www stuff giving it communication channels and transparancy that doesn’t currently exist. There is plenty more work to be done on kde.org/applications website to make it useful, do give me a ping if you want to help out.

  • Done with boost

    One of the so called pillar of the c++ world, boost, sucks a lot when it comes to documentation, I wouldn’t have to write more than one blog post if they had their documentation in place. It has been almost a month that I have started working on the Magnetic Lasso and I wasted most of the time fighting with boost instead of working on my algorithm. Okay, fine I am getting paid for it, I shouldn’t complain.

  • Meet KDE in València

    During the next days, we’ll be having several sprints in València.

June 2019 Krita Development Update

Filed under
KDE

Time for another development update. The last one was in April. We skipped reporting on May, because doing a release takes a lot of time and effort and concentration! And then we had to do a bugfix release in the first week of June; the next release, Krita 4.2.2, will be out by the end of this month.

We’re still fixing bugs like crazy, helped by long-standing community member Ivan Yossi, who started fixing bugs full-time in May, too.

But then, we’re also getting a crazy number of bug reports. Honesty compels us to say that many of those reports are not so very valuable: there are many people with broken systems who report problems that we cannot solve in Krita, and many people report bugs without telling us anything at all. Hence we created a manual page on reporting bugs! But there are also many helpful bug reports that give us a chance to improve things.

Read more

KDE neon 5.16 Out

Filed under
KDE

KDE neon 5.16 is out featuring Plasma 5.16. Download the ISO now or upgrade your installs.

With Diversity in mind this edition features an Ice Cold themed wallpaper to make those in the southern hemisphere feel included.

Read more

KDE and GNOME: Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo, KDE GSoC Projects, Kate & C++ Developer Survey and Sumaid Syed's GSoC Work on GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo

    With the completion of my first milestone for my GSoC project: Nextcloud Integration on Plasma Mobile, plasma mobile accounts settings now enables the users to add their nextcloud accounts via webview.

    Well! didn’t accounts setting already provide the method to add nextcloud/owncloud accounts? Yes, this functionality was already implemented by the owncloud plugin in kaccounts-providers project. Then, why did I re-implement the same thing?

    As I mentioned, now accounts can be added via webview.

  • First week of GSOC, Piece Table Implement

    Hi! Last week was start of the GSOC coding period. So I started my project. Also I opened my code on the KDE git. https://cgit.kde.org/scratch/songeon/kmarkdownparser.git/

    If you are interested in my project feel free to look and give me some advices.

  • KIOFuse: 32-bit Support

    The first two weeks of the GSoC coding period are now over.

    Firstly, a mapping between KIO errors and FUSE errors has now been established. Previously all KIO Job errors were simply sent back to FUSE as EIO, which isn’t entirely accurate. The mapping now provides more accurate error replies.

    A major new addition is 32-bit support. KIOFuse did not compile on 32-bit but these compilation errors have now been alleviated. They mostly stemmed from the fact that size_t has a different size on different architectures, and that file sizes should always be represented as off_t anyway.

  • Kate & C++ Developer Survey

    While browsing the ISO C++ homepage I stumbled over the results PDF of the Second Annual C++ Foundation Developer Survey “Lite”.

    I was astonished that Kate made it into the “Which development environments (IDEs) or editors do you use for C++ development?” results.

    ;=) Seems not only I use it as my normal editor for working on C++ code.

  • Sumaid Syed: First Two Weeks

    Jean Felder ( My mentor for GSoC project) and Marinus Schraal (GNOME Music Maintainer) suggested that I propose a plan of the whole project. Now trust me! This is the much more difficult than actual coding!
    I usually work on my personal projects and start working from scratch, but here the project involves so many different libraries, so I really struggled with making a plan with a proper timeline.

  • What is my Project?

    In this case, all we need to do is extract those mbids and store them in tracker. Tracker is a file indexing and search framework, which GNOME Music relies on. Hence it’s necessary to extract and index mbids in tracker from file.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Linux Changes, Certifications, Graphics, PCI Express 6.0 and Bug

  • PowerCap/RAPL Code To Support Icelake Desktop / X / Xeon D With Linux 5.3
    While as of Linux 5.2 the support for Intel's Icelake CPUs appear production ready with all of the bits in place from new IDs to the much enhanced "Gen 11" graphics, there are a few stragglers of items to land with the upcoming Linux 5.3 merge window though could be back-ported to current series. Fortunately, we haven't found anything major to be missing. One of the latest bits of Icelake Linux support is handling of these next-generation processors within the PowerCap / RAPL (Running Average Power Limit) driver code. In particular, the desktop/workstation Icelake parts. This is the code for reading the estimated CPU package power consumption based on hardware performance counters and the ability to artificially limit the power draw of the processor via software.
  • Six Niche Linux Certifications
  • AMD Navi GPU stack bares all in Linux graphics driver update
    Eight Navi GPU variants have been spotted in Linux driver code. AMD’s next-gen RDNA graphics chips are set for launch on July 7, 2019 within the RX 5700 XT and RX 5700, but the red team has plenty of silicon in store for a range of applications. Including console, laptops, desktop, and mobile phones. The GPU codenames were spotted within Linux display drivers after the additional code was submitted and signed off by two AMD employees. The code adds support for Display Core Next, or DCN2, which “is the display block for Navi10.” Each entry following adds the necessary ASIC IDs for each Navi chip in the stack, starting with Navi 10 and down to Navi 21 LITE.
  • Nouveau Driver Picking Up NVIDIA TU116 GPU Support For Linux 5.3
    Building off the initial Turing mode-setting bits that were in place since Linux 5.0 and have continued stepping along to support newer variants on successive kernel releases, the Linux 5.3 kernel is slated to add support for the TU116 graphics processor.
  • PCI-SIG® Announces Upcoming PCI Express® 6.0 Specification to Reach 64 GT/s
  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced With 4-Times The Bandwidth Of PCIe 4.0
    With the increasing demand for bandwidth across a wide range of devices used in consumer and enterprise domains, PCI Express, the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard has also evolved over the years. PCI Special Interest Group, a body that sets standards for PCIe, has announced PCI Express 6 that promises four times the bandwidth offered by PCIe 4.0 and twice of PCIe 5.0.
  • PCI Express 6.0 Announced For Release In 2021 With 64 GT/s Transfer Rates
    While PCI Express 4.0 up to this point has only been found in a few systems like Talos' POWER9 platforms and coming soon with the new AMD graphics cards and chipsets, the PCI SIG today announced PCI Express 6.0. PCI Express 5.0 was only announced last month with 32GT/s transfer rates while already the PCI SIG announced PCI Express 6.0.
  • Netflix researcher spots TCP SACK flaws in Linux and FreeBSD
  • TCP SACK Panic Flaw Could Compromise Production Linux Machines

rga: Search Text In PDF, Ebooks, Office Documents, Archives And More (ripgrep Wrapper)

rga (or ripgrep-all) is a command line tool to recursively search all files in a directory for a regex pattern, that runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. It's a wrapper for ripgrep, the line-oriented recursive search program, on top of which it enables search in a multitude of file types like PDF, DOCX, ODT, EPUB, SQLite databases, movies subtitles embedded in MKV or MP4 files, archives like ZIP or GZ, and more. rga is great when you want to search for some text from a file available in a folder with many documents of various file types, even if some of them are available in archives. Read more

Security: Updates, Containers, Compilers and More

today's howtos