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  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
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    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
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    Variscite
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    neilheaney

Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has come a long way since its ‘Warty Warthog’ days. The distro is by far the most popular Linux flavor in the market right now. According to W3Techs.com, Ubuntu leads the pack with 37.4% of the market, while Debian is a close second at 21.2%.

This is a far cry from the 8.9% popularity that Ubuntu garnered when W3Techs.com first began tracking such data in January 2010. Ubuntu was the 5th most popular Linux distro back then, behind Debian, CentOS, Red Hat, and Fedora, respectively.

Not only is Ubuntu the favorite of many users, but it is also now in the workplace as well, World-wide. Many companies and individuals choose Ubuntu as their distro of choice. The top users of Ubuntu reside in the United States. However, there are also a significant number of Ubuntu users in the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, India, and the Netherlands.

Since its birth almost 14 years ago, Ubuntu has spawned many successful forks such as Linux Mint, elementary OS, Zorin OS, Pop!_OS, and KDE neon. This list does not even include some of Ubuntu’s derivatives, including Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Budgie.

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LWN on Kernel: pidfd, printk and security

Filed under
Linux
  • Adding the pidfd abstraction to the kernel

    One of the many changes in the 5.4 kernel is the completion (insofar as anything in the kernel is truly complete) of the pidfd API. Getting that work done has been "a wild ride so far", according to its author Christian Brauner during a session at the 2019 Kernel Recipes conference. He went on to describe the history of this work and some lessons for others interested in adding major new APIs to the Linux kernel.
    A pidfd, he began, is a file descriptor that refers to a process — or, more correctly, to a process's thread-group leader. There do not appear to be any use cases for pidfds that refer to an individual thread for now; such a feature could be added in the future if the need arises. Pidfds are stable (they always refer to the same process) and private to the owner of the file descriptor. Internally to the kernel, a pidfd refers to the pid structure for the target process. Other options (such as struct task_struct) were available, but that structure is too big to pin down indefinitely (which can be necessary, since a pidfd can be held open indefinitely).

    Why did the kernel need pidfds? The main driving force was the problem of process-ID (PID) recycling. A process ID is an integer, drawn from a (small by default) pool; when a process exits, its ID will eventually be recycled and assigned to an entirely unrelated process. This leads to a number of security issues when process-management applications don't notice in time that a process ID has been reused; he put up a list of CVE numbers (visible in his slides [SlideShare]) for vulnerabilities resulting from PID reuse. There have been macOS exploits as well. It is, he said, a real issue.

    Beyond that, Unix has long had a problem supporting libraries that need to create invisible helper processes. These processes, being subprocesses of the main application, can end up sending signals to that application or showing up in wait() calls, creating confusion. Pidfds are designed to allow the creation of this kind of hidden process, solving a persistent, difficult problem. They are also useful for process-management applications that want to delegate the handling of specific processes to a non-parent process; the Android low-memory killer daemon (LMKD) and systemd are a couple of examples. Pidfds can be transferred to other processes by the usual means, making this kind of delegation possible.

    Brauner said that a file-descriptor-based abstraction was chosen because it has been done before on other operating systems and shown to work. Dealing with file descriptors is a common pattern in Unix applications.

    There are, he said, quite a few user-space applications and libraries that are interested in using pidfds. They include D-Bus, Qt, systemd, checkpoint-restore in user space (CRIU), LMKD, bpftrace, and the Rust "mio" library.

  • Why printk() is so complicated (and how to fix it)

    The kernel's printk() function seems like it should be relatively simple; all it does is format a string and output it to the kernel logs. That simplicity hides a lot of underlying complexity, though, and that complexity is why kernel developers are still unhappy with printk() after 28 years. At the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, John Ogness explained where the complexity in printk() comes from and what is being done to improve the situation.
    The core problem, Ogness began, comes from the fact that kernel code must be able to call printk() from any context. Calls from atomic context prevent it from blocking; calls from non-maskable interrupts (NMIs) can even rule out the use of spinlocks. At the same time, output from printk() is crucial when the kernel runs into trouble; developers do not want to lose any printed messages even if the kernel is crashing or hanging. Those messages should appear on console devices, which may be attached to serial ports, graphic adapters, or network connections. Meanwhile, printk() cannot interfere with the normal operation of the system.

    In other words, he summarized, printk() is seemingly simple and definitely ubiquitous, but it has to be wired deeply into the system.

  • What to do about CVE numbers

    Common Vulnerability and Exposure (CVE) numbers have been used for many years as a way of uniquely identifying software vulnerabilities. It has become increasingly clear in recent years that there are problems with CVE numbers, though, and increasing numbers of vulnerabilities are not being assigned CVE numbers at all. At the 2019 Kernel Recipes event, Greg Kroah-Hartman delivered a "40-minute rant with an unsatisfactory conclusion" on CVE numbers and how the situation might be improved. The conclusion may be "unsatisfactory", but it seems destined to stir up some discussion regardless.
    CVE numbers, Kroah-Hartman began, were meant to be a single identifier for vulnerabilities. They are a string that one can "throw into a security bulletin and feel happy". CVE numbers were an improvement over what came before; it used to be impossible to effectively track bugs. This was especially true for the "embedded library in our product has an issue" situation. In other words, he said, CVE numbers are good for zlib, which is embedded in almost every product and has been a source of security bugs for the last fifteen years.

    Since CVE numbers are unique, somebody has to hand them out; there are now about 110 organizations that can do so. These include both companies and countries, he said, but not the kernel community, which has nobody handling that task. There also needs to be a unifying database behind these numbers; that is the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). The NVD provides a searchable database of vulnerabilities and assigns a score to each; it is updated slowly, when it is updated at all. The word "national" is interesting, he said; it really means "United States". Naturally, there is now a CNNVD maintained in China as well; it has more stuff and responds more quickly, but once an entry lands there it is never updated.

Work on and concerns about libinput in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • An update on the input stack

    The input stack for Linux is an essential part of interacting with our systems, but it is also an area that is lacking in terms of developers. There has been progress over the last few years, however; Peter Hutterer from Red Hat came to the 2019 X.Org Developers Conference to talk about some of the work that has been done. He gave a status report on the input stack that covered development work that is going on now as well as things that have been completed in the last two years or so. Overall, things are looking pretty good for input on Linux, though the "bus factor" for the stack is alarmingly low.

    High-resolution mouse scrolling

    High-resolution mouse-wheel scrolling should be arriving in the next month or two, he said. It allows for a different event stream that provides more precision on the movement of the mouse wheel on capable devices. Instead of one event per 15-20° of movement, the mouse will send two or four events in that span. Two new event types were added to the 5.0 kernel (REL_WHEEL_HI_RES and REL_HWHEEL_HI_RES) to support the feature. The old and new event streams may not correlate exactly, so they probably should not be used together, he cautioned.

    Likewise, libinput has added a new event type (LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_AXIS_WHEEL) for high-resolution scrolling; it should be handled with its own event stream as with the kernel events. That code is sitting on a branch; it works but it has not been merged into the master yet. For Wayland, a new event type was also added in a now-familiar pattern. He pointed to a mailing list post where all the gory details of high-resolution scrolling for Wayland was explained.

  • A Vast Majority Of Linux's Input Improvements Are Developed By One Individual

    While there is an ever increasing number of open-source developers focusing on the Linux graphics stack with the GPU drivers and related infrastructure, it's quite a different story when it comes to the Linux input side. It's basically one developer that has been working on the Linux input improvements for the past number of years.

    [...]

    As he has pointed out, should anything ever happen to him the libinput library would be in bad shape. While there have been 76 contributors in total to libinput in the past two years, only 24 of them have had more than one commit while only six contributors have had more than five commits. One would just need around 50 commits to become the second-from-the-top contributor to the project.

Devices Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Khadas VIM3L (Amlogic S905D3) Benchmarks, Settings & System Info

    Khadas VIM3L is the first Amlogic S905D3 SBC on the market and is sold as a lower-cost alternative to the company’s VIM3 board with a focus on the HTPC / media player market.

  • Semtech SX1302 LoRa Transceiver to Deliver Cheaper, More Efficient Gateways
  • In-vehicle computer supports new MaaS stack

    Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “UST100-504-FL” automotive PC runs Ubuntu 18.04 or Windows on 6th or 7th Gen Intel chips, and offers SATA, HDMI, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 3x mini-PCIe, a slide-rail design, and the new AMS/AXView for MaaS discovery.

    Axiomtek announced a rugged in-vehicle PC that runs Ubuntu 18.04, Windows 10, or Windows 7 on Intel’s Skylake or Kaby Lake processors. The UST100-504-FL is aimed at “in-vehicle edge computing and video analytics applications,” and is especially suited for police and emergency vehicles, says Axiomtek. There’s also a new Agent MaaS Suite (AMS) IoT management suite available (see farther below).

  • Google Launches the Pixel 4 with Android 10, Astrophotography, and Motion Sense

    Google officially launched today the long rumored and leaked Pixel 4 smartphone, a much-needed upgrade to the Pixel 3 and 3a series with numerous enhancements and new features.

    The Pixel 4 smartphone is finally here, boasting upgraded camera with astrophotography capabilities so you can shoot the night sky and Milky Way without using a professional camera, a feature that will also be ported to the Pixel 3 and 3a devices with the latest camera app update, as well as Live HDR+ support for outstanding photo quality.

  • Repurposing A Toy Computer From The 1990s

    Our more youthful readers are fairly likely to have owned some incarnation of a VTech educational computer. From the mid-1980s and right up to the present day, VTech has been producing vaguely laptop shaped gadgets aimed at teaching everything from basic reading skills all the way up to world history. Hallmarks of these devices include a miserable monochrome LCD, and unpleasant membrane keyboard, and as [HotKey] found, occasionally a proper Z80 processor.

    [...]

    After more than a year of tinkering and talking to other hackers in the Z80 scene, [HotKey] has made some impressive headway. He’s not only created a custom cartridge that lets him load new code and connect to external devices, but he’s also added support for a few VTech machines to z88dk so that others can start writing their own C code for these machines. So far he’s created some very promising proof of concept programs such as a MIDI controller and serial terminal, but ultimately he hopes to create a DOS or CP/M like operating system that will elevate these vintage machines from simple toys to legitimate multi-purpose computers.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: FLOSS Weekly, Containers, Linux Headlines, Arch Linux Openbox Build and GhostBSD 19.09

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 551: Kamailio

    Kamailio is an Open Source SIP Server released under GPL, able to handle thousands of call setups per second. Kamailio can be used to build large platforms for VoIP and realtime communications – presence, WebRTC, Instant messaging and other applications.

  • What is a Container? | Jupiter Extras 23

    Containers changed the way the IT world deploys software. We give you our take on technologies such as docker (including docker-compose), Kubernetes and highlight a few of our favorite containers.

  • 2019-10-16 | Linux Headlines

    WireGuard is kicked out of the Play Store, a new Docker worm is discovered, and Mozilla unveils upcoming changes to Firefox.

  • Showing off my Custom Arch Linux Openbox Build
  • GhostBSD 19.09 - Based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE and Using MATE Desktop 1.22

    GhostBSD 19.09 is the latest release of GhostBSD. This release based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE while also pulling in TrueOS packages, GhostBSD 19.09 also has an updated OpenRC init system, a lot of unnecessary software was removed, AMDGPU and Radeon KMS is now valid xconfig options and a variety of other improvements and fixes.

MX-19 Release Candidate 1 now available

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

We are pleased to offer MX-19 RC 1 for testing purposes.

As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos.

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The Linux Mint 19.2 Gaming Report: Promising But Room For Improvement

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

When I started outlining the original Linux Gaming Report, I was still a fresh-faced Linux noob. I didn’t understand how fast the ecosystem advanced (particularly graphics drivers and Steam Proton development), and I set some lofty goals that I couldn’t accomplish given my schedule. Before I even got around to testing Ubuntu 18.10, for example, Ubuntu 19.04 was just around the corner! And since all the evaluation and benchmarking takes a considerable amount of time, I ended up well behind the curve. So I’ve streamlined the process a bit, while adding additional checkpoints such as out-of-the-box software availability and ease-of-installation for important gaming apps like Lutris and GameHub.

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Something exciting is coming with Ubuntu 19.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

ZFS is a combined file system and logical volume manager that is scalable, supplying support for high storage capacity and a more efficient data compression, and includes snapshots and rollbacks, copy-on-write clones, continuous integrity checking, automatic repair, and much more.

So yeah, ZFS is a big deal, which includes some really great features. But out of those supported features, it's the snapshots and rollbacks that should have every Ubuntu user/admin overcome with a case of the feels.

Why? Imagine something has gone wrong. You've lost data or an installation of a piece of software has messed up the system. What do you do? If you have ZFS and you've created a snapshot, you can roll that system back to the snapshot where everything was working fine.

Although the concept isn't new to the world of computing, it's certainly not something Ubuntu has had by default. So this is big news.

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Pack Your Bags – Systemd Is Taking You To A New Home

Filed under
Linux

Home directories have been a fundamental part on any Unixy system since day one. They’re such a basic element, we usually don’t give them much thought. And why would we? From a low level point of view, whatever location $HOME is pointing to, is a directory just like any other of the countless ones you will find on the system — apart from maybe being located on its own disk partition. Home directories are so unspectacular in their nature, it wouldn’t usually cross anyone’s mind to even consider to change anything about them. And then there’s Lennart Poettering.

In case you’re not familiar with the name, he is the main developer behind the systemd init system, which has nowadays been adopted by the majority of Linux distributions as replacement for its oldschool, Unix-style init-system predecessors, essentially changing everything we knew about the system boot process. Not only did this change personally insult every single Perl-loving, Ken-Thompson-action-figure-owning grey beard, it engendered contempt towards systemd and Lennart himself that approaches Nickelback level. At this point, it probably doesn’t matter anymore what he does next, haters gonna hate. So who better than him to disrupt everything we know about home directories? Where you _live_?

Although, home directories are just one part of the equation that his latest creation — the systemd-homed project — is going to make people hate him even more tackle. The big picture is really more about the whole concept of user management as we know it, which sounds bold and scary, but which in its current state is also a lot more flawed than we might realize. So let’s have a look at what it’s all about, the motivation behind homed, the problems it’s going to both solve and raise, and how it’s maybe time to leave some outdated philosophies behind us.

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Canonical Is At Around 437 Employees, Pulled In $99M While Still Operating At A Loss

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's financial numbers for the period through the end of 2018 are now available, which is a shortened nine month period after changing around their fiscal year to coincide with the end of the calendar year rather than 31 March.

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Programming: C++, Python, LLVM and More

Filed under
Development
  • Theory: average bus factor = 1

    Two articles recently made me realize that all my free software projects basically have a bus factor of one. I am the sole maintainer of every piece of software I have ever written that I still maintain. There are projects that I have been the maintainer of which have other maintainers now (most notably AlternC, Aegir and Linkchecker), but I am not the original author of any of those projects.

    Now that I have a full time job, I feel the pain. Projects like Gameclock, Monkeysign, Stressant, and (to a lesser extent) Wallabako all need urgent work: the first three need to be ported to Python 3, the first two to GTK 3, and the latter will probably die because I am getting a new e-reader. (For the record, more recent projects like undertime and feed2exec are doing okay, mostly because they were written in Python 3 from the start, and the latter has extensive unit tests. But they do suffer from the occasional bitrot (the latter in particular) and need constant upkeep.)

    Now that I barely have time to keep up with just the upkeep, I can't help but think all of my projects will just die if I stop working on them. I have the same feeling about the packages I maintain in Debian.

  • What Can AI Teach Us about Bias and Fairness?

    As researchers, journalists, and many others have discovered, machine learning algorithms can deliver biased results. One notorious example is ProPublica’s discovery of bias in a software called COMPAS used by the U.S. court systems to predict an offender’s likelihood of re-offending. ProPublica’s investigators discovered the software’s algorithm was telling the court system that first-time Black offenders had a higher likelihood of being repeat offenders than white offenders who had committed multiple crimes. They also found only 20% of the individuals predicted to commit a violent crime did so. Discoveries like these are why ethical AI is top-of-mind in Silicon Valley and for companies around the world focused on AI solutions.

  • KDAB at C++ Russia, Saint Petersburg

    C++ Russia is the premier C++ conference in East Europe which alternates between Moscow and Saint Petersburg. The conference lasts for two days starting October 31st. It will be held in the Park Inn by Radisson Pulkovskaya Hotel in the heart of Saint Petersburg.

  • How to Add Time Delays to Your Code

    Have you ever needed to make your Python program wait for something? Most of the time, you’d want your code to execute as quickly as possible. But there are times when letting your code sleep for a while is actually in your best interest.

    For example, you might use a Python sleep() call to simulate a delay in your program. Perhaps you need to wait for a file to upload or download, or for a graphic to load or be drawn to the screen. You might even need to pause between calls to a web API, or between queries to a database. Adding Python sleep() calls to your program can help in each of these cases, and many more!

  • Python 3.7.4 : Test the DHCP handshakes.
  • LLVM Clang RISC-V Now Supports LTO

    With the recent release of LLVM 9.0 the RISC-V back-end was promoted from an experimental CPU back-end to being made "official" for this royalty-free CPU ISA. Work though isn't over on the LLVM RISC-V support with new features continuing to land, like link-time optimizations (LTO) most recently being enabled within the Clang 10 code.

    Within the latest Clang code this week, LTO (link-time optimizations) are now enabled for Clang targeting RISC-V. LTO, of course, is important for performance with being able to exploit more performance optimizations by the compiler at link-time.

  • PyCon 2019: Open Spaces

    And, yeah, I realize it was nearly six months ago. But there have been some things that have been lingering in my thoughts that I need to share.

  • Sharing Your Labor of Love: PyPI Quick and Dirty

    This is another huge update after its initial release in 2013 and catches up with the latest developments (a lot happened!) since the last big update in 2017. Additionally, I have removed the parts on keyring because I stopped using it myself: it’s sort of nice to double-check before uploading anything. If you want to automate the retrieval of your PyPI credentials, check out glyph’s blog post Careful With That PyPI.

Mozilla: web-ext, Facebook-like business model and Rust at Microsoft GitHub

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Developing cross-browser extensions with web-ext 3.2.0

    The web-ext tool was created at Mozilla to help you build browser extensions faster and more easily. Although our first launch focused on support for desktop Firefox, followed by Firefox for Android, our vision was always to support cross-platform development once we shipped Firefox support.

  • Get recommended reading from Pocket every time you open a new tab in Firefox

    Thousands of articles are published each day, all fighting for our attention. But how many are actually worth reading? The tiniest fraction, and they’re tough to find. That’s where Pocket comes in.

  • This Week in Rust 308

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Codename Has Been Revealed…

Filed under
Ubuntu

Following Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’, the next version of Ubuntu will, as expected, be based around the letter “F”.

But it’s not going to be Feral Ferret, Famous Fox or Finicky Falcon. No, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is codenamed the “Focal Fossa“.

And I think it’s a fabulously fitting title.

Most of us have barely had time to explore the exuberant excesses of the Eoan Ermine release and yet, development never stops.

As convention dictates, each Ubuntu codename combines an adjective and an animal (real or otherwise), alliteratively.

And for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS that combination is “focal”, and “fossa” — but what do these words mean?

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Required update to recent libarchive

    The compression algorithm zstd brings faster compression and decompression, while maintaining a compression ratio comparable with xz. This will speed up package installation with pacman, without further drawbacks.

    The imminent release of pacman 5.2 brings build tools with support for compressing packages with zstd. To install these packages you need libarchive with support for zstd, which entered the repositories in September 2018. In order for zstd compressed packages to be distributed, we require all users to have updated to at least libarchive 3.3.3-1. You have had a year, so we expect you already did update. Hurry up if you have not.

  • openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

    The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

    Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

    The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

    Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

    The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

  • Khronos Opens Door For Allowing More Open-Source Drivers To Reach Conformance Status

    Khronos president Neil Trevett was at this month's XDC2019 conference in Montreal and he clarified their position on accepting conformance submissions by the open-source drivers.

    He clarified that any of the open-source driver projects working on a conformant implementation for OpenGL / OpenCL / Vulkan can indeed submit to Khronos without paying any vendor fees, etc. That includes all drivers, just not those part of (or not) Khronos Group members.

  • TURNIP Vulkan Driver Gets MSAA Working

    Mesa's TURNIP Vulkan driver that provides open-source Vulkan API support for Qualcomm Adreno hardware in recent weeks has been back to seeing new activity and this week more useful contributions are being made.

    On Tuesday a number of TURNIP commits were made by Jonathan Marek as well as Eric Anholt. The latest work includes a number of fixes, adding the ASTC texture compression format layout, VK_KHR_sampler_mirror_clamp_to_edge, and ultimately getting basic MSAA working. The multi-sample anti-aliasing support for this open-source TURNIP driver for Adreno graphics has been described as "not perfect but gets through some tests."

Proprietary Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software
  • Google launches the $649 Pixelbook Go Chromebook

    At its annual hardware event, Google today announced the launch of the Pixelbook Go, the latest iteration of its first-party Chromebook lineup. Starting at $649, the Pixelbook Go marks a return to the standard laptop format after last year’s Pixelbook with a 180-degree hinge and the Pixel Slate 2-in-1.

    The Go will come with a 16:9 13.3-inch touch screen and either an HD or 4K display, two USB-C ports, a built-in Titan-C security chip, up to 16GB of RAM and up to 256GB of storage. It’s powered by Intel Core CPUs, starting with an m3 chip at the low end and an i7 at the top end. Available colors are black and “not pink” and pre-orders start now, but only for the black version. “Not pink” is coming soon.

  • BGH Capital backs major new cyber security player

    Former national cyber security adviser Alastair MacGibbon and former Optus Business managing director John Paitaridis joined forces to create the country's largest pure cyber security company, with 400 staff and backing from private equity firm BGH Capital.

    Led by Mr Paitaridis, CyberCX brings together 12 niche cyber security players to form one large company.

  • Malware That Spits Cash Out of ATMs Has Spread Across the World [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Part of the security issue for ATMs is that many of them are, in essence, aged Windows computers.

  • Migration Complete – Amazon’s Consumer Business Just Turned off its Final Oracle Database

    We migrated 75 petabytes of internal data stored in nearly 7,500 Oracle databases to multiple AWS database services including Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Aurora, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS), and Amazon Redshift. The migrations were accomplished with little or no downtime, and covered 100% of our proprietary systems. This includes complex purchasing, catalog management, order fulfillment, accounting, and video streaming workloads. We kept careful track of the costs and the performance, and realized the following results: [...]

Open Hardware: DS3231 and CHIPS Alliance

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • i2c clock : DS3231

    Like any clock, the DS3231 must be set at the 1st start. The registers listed in Figure 4 are accessible for reading and writing. This allows us to program the exact time and date at the time of initialization. Then the DS3231 operates autonomously, with leap years up to 2100 Wink To compensate for the power failure, a CR1220 battery can be added to the back of the Adafruit ADA3013.

  • CHIPS Alliance Growth Continues With New Members and Design Workshop this November
  • CHIPS Alliance growth continues with new members and design workshop this November

    CHIPS Alliance, the leading consortium advancing common, open hardware for interfaces, processors and systems, today announced Codasip GmbH and Munich University of Applied Science have joined the CHIPS Alliance. In addition, on November 14–15, CHIPS Alliance will be joining the university for a workshop on open source design verification.

    CHIPS Alliance is a project hosted by the Linux Foundation to foster a collaborative environment to accelerate the creation and deployment of open SoCs, peripherals and software tools for use in mobile, computing, consumer electronics, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. The CHIPS Alliance project develops high-quality open source Register Transfer Level (RTL) code relevant to the design of open source CPUs, RISC-V-based SoCs, and complex peripherals for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and custom silicon.

    Codasip is a leading supplier of configurable RISC-V® embedded processor IP. Codasip provides a portfolio of various RISC-V implementations along with a suite of processor developers tools to allow for rapid core customization, and will contribute to working groups on verification platforms and open cores.

    “Codasip has years of processor development experience and has shown its dedication to open platforms by its contributions to open source compiler and compliance projects. We welcome their participation in the CHIPS Alliance to facilitate the adoption of open architectures,” said Zvonimir Bandić, senior director of next-generation platforms architecture at Western Digital and Chairman, CHIPS Alliance.

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