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Wednesday, 21 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Configure an amateur radio gateway with a Raspberry Pi

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The APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System) is a worldwide digital communications network for amateur radio, providing a single national channel where people can monitor what is happening in the surrounding area.

APRS uses packet radio (AX.25), which Tom Karpiniec described in his excellent article "Packet radio lives on through open source software," as the transport layer.

The basic idea of APRS is to communicate information in the context of the location of an amateur radio operator, such as other stations' position information (whether mobile or fixed), repeater systems, weather information, or events. Amateur radio operators can, in addition, send direct messages to other amateurs via the network. As packets are sent, they include location information that can be displayed on a map. This provides an immediate view of activity in an area.

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Software: Goto, Dry, QEMU, GStreamer

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  • Goto – Quickly Navigate to Aliased Directories with Auto-Completion Support

    In a recent article, we talked about Gogo – a tool to create shortcuts for long paths in a Linux shell. Although gogo is a great way to bookmark your favorite directories inside a shell, however, it has one major limitation; it lacks an auto-completion feature.

    Because of the above reason, we went all out to find a similar utility with auto-completion support – where the shell can prompt with suggestions of the available aliases (shortcuts to long and complicated paths) and luckily, after crawling through Github, we discovered Goto.

  • Dry – An Interactive CLI Manager For Docker Containers

    Docker is a software that allows operating-system-level virtualization also known as containerization.

    It uses the resource isolation features of the Linux kernel such as cgroups and kernel namespaces, and others to allows independent containers to run within a single Linux instance.

    Docker provides a way to run applications securely isolated in a container, packaged with all its dependencies and libraries.

  • QEMU 2.12 Release Candidates Begin, GTK2 Support Deprecated

    The first release candidate of QEMU 2.12 is now available as the next feature release for this important piece of the Linux virtualization stack.

    QEMU 2.12 has been working on deprecating a lot of older CLI options that are no longer relevant, s390 architecture enhancements, SMP support by the tiny code generator (TCG) is now considered "non-experimental", PCI support in TCG, QEMU on KVM now supports systems larger than 7.999TB, QMP monitoring improvements, and the GTK2 support by QEMU is now officially deprecated in favor of the existing GTK3 code. QEMU 2.12 is also working on allowing host NVMe controllers to be directly driven via QEMU with VFIO.

  • GStreamer Major Release, OpenBMC Project, Playerunknown's Battlegrounds Free Mobile Version and More

    GStreamer, the cross-platform multimedia framework, announced a new major stable release yesterday. The new version 1.14.0 has lots of new features and bug fixes, including WebRTC support, "experimental support for the next-gen royalty-free AV1 video codec", Video4Linux encoding support and more. See the release notes for more info.

  • GStreamer 1.14 released
  • GStreamer 1.14.0 new major stable release

    The GStreamer team is proud to announce a new major feature release of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

    The 1.14 release series adds new features on top of the previous 1.12 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

Games Chronicon, BROKE PROTOCOL, Internet Archive

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  • 2D action RPG 'Chronicon' to arrive on Linux with the next big update

    The colourful action RPG Chronicon [Steam, Official Site] should arrive on Linux with the next big update, the developer has said.

  • BROKE PROTOCOL is like a low-poly GTA Online and it's coming to Linux

    BROKE PROTOCOL [Steam], a low-poly open-world action game that's a little like GTA Online and it's coming to Linux.

  • The Internet Archive Just Uploaded a Bunch of Playable, Classic Handheld Games

    The non-profit Internet Archive is perhaps best known for its Wayback Machine that takes snap shots of web sites so you can see what they looked like in the past. However, it also has a robust side project where it emulates and uploads old, outdated games that aren’t being maintained anymore. Recently, the organization added a slew of a unique kind of game that’s passed into memory: handheld LCD electronic games.

    The games–like Mortal Kombat, depicted above–used special LCD screens with preset patterns. They could only display the exact images in the exact place that they were specified for. This meant the graphics were incredibly limited and each unit could only play the one game it was designed to play. A Game Boy, this was not.

  • Internet Archive emulator brings dozens of handheld games back from obscurity

    Over the weekend, the Internet Archive announced it was offering a new series of emulators. This time, they’re designed to mimic one of gaming’s most obscure artifacts — handheld games.

    When I say a “handheld game,” I don’t mean the Game Boy or the PSP — those are handheld consoles. These are single-game handheld or tabletop devices that look and feel more like toys. The collection includes the very old, mostly-forgotten games sold in mini-handhelds from the 80s onward.

Linux Foundation Videos and Projects

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LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, this weekend at MIT, March 24-25

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This weekend, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) present the tenth annual LibrePlanet free software conference in Cambridge, March 24-25, 2018, at MIT. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels.

LibrePlanet's tenth anniversary theme is "Freedom Embedded." Embedded systems are everywhere, in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies. We've come to expect that proprietary software's sinister aspects are embedded in software, digital devices, and our lives, too: we expect that our phones monitor our activity and share that data with big companies, that governments enforce digital restrictions management (DRM), and that even our activity on social Web sites is out of our control. This year's talks and workshops will explore how to defend user freedom in a society reliant on embedded systems.

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Also: FSF Blogs: Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: March 23rd starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC


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With the first beta release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS available and the stable released planned on 26 April 2018, now is a great time to take a closer look at what you can expect to see in the latest version of Canonical’s Linux distribution.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS has been codenamed Bionic Beaver by the founder of Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth, who provided the following explanation for the curious name on his personal blog: “It’s builders that we celebrate – the people that build our upstream applications and packages, the people who build Ubuntu, and the people who build on Ubuntu. In honor of that tireless toil, our mascot this cycle is a mammal known for its energetic attitude, industrious nature and engineering prowess. We give it a neatly nerdy 21st-century twist in honor of the relentless robots running Ubuntu Core. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you 18.04 LTS, the Bionic Beaver.”

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Latest on Radeon/AMDGPU Graphics

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  • Radeon Pro 18.Q1.1 Enterprise Edition Released For Linux Workstations

    AMD on Monday quietly released their quarterly update to the Radeon Pro Software Enterprise Edition Linux driver that is derived from their AMDGPU-PRO stack for FirePro / Radeon Pro class hardware.

    Like with AMDGPU-PRO, Radeon Pro Software Enterprise Edition 18.Q1.1 remains focused on supporting the enterprise Linux distributions including Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS and RHEL/CentOS 6 (6.9) and 7 (7.4).

  • AMDGPU DC's Latest 34 Patches Provide More Fixes

    Another week, another code drop derived from AMD's internal driver code-base providing an updated DC display code stack.

    This week's collection of 34 AMDGPU DC patches are mostly comprised of general fixes. Surprisingly no mentions of Raven Ridge (and only one patch mentioning DCN), so it's looking like at least from the display side things are calming down for those Vega+Zen APUs -- I've been running tests the past day and will have an update later today or tomorrow on the situation.

Mozilla: Privacy Violations, Privacy Rants, Development and More

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  • Mozilla's opt-out Firefox DNS privacy test sparks, er, privacy outcry

    Mozilla's plan to test a more secure method for resolving internet domain names – known as Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) via DNS over HTTPs (DoH) – in Firefox Nightly builds has met with objections from its user community due to privacy concerns.

    The browser maker's intentions appear to be beneficial for Firefox users. As Patrick McManus, one of the Mozilla software engineers conducting the test, explains in a note posted this week to one of the company's developer forums, DoH can make DNS communication more secure.

  • Mozilla Statement, Petition: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica

    The headlines speak for themselves: Up to 50 million Facebook users had their information used by Cambridge Analytica, a private company, without their knowledge or consent. That’s not okay.

  • Enough is enough. Let’s tell Facebook what we want fixed.

    I had one big loud thought pounding in my head as I read the Cambridge Analytica headlines this past weekend: it’s time for Facebook users to say ‘enough is enough‘.

  • Crash-Stop, an extension to help handle crashes on Bugzilla

    Crash-stop is a webextension I wrote for Bugzilla to display crash stats by builds and patch information.

    The goal is to have enough information to be able to decide if a patch helped (hence its name) and, if needed, uplift it to the Beta/ESR/Release trains as appropriate.

    This project was initially meant to assist release-managers but it’s been useful for developers who fix/monitor crashes or for folks doing bug triage.

  • New features in Notes v3

    Today we are updating TestPilot Notes to v3.1! We have several new user-facing features and behind the scenes changes in this v3 release. The focus of this release was discoverability, speed and a bit of codebase cleanup.

    We heard your feedback about “Exporting notes…” and with this release we have added the first export related feature. You can now export the notepad as HTML using the menu. We are still playing around with Markdown and other exporting features.

  • compare-locales 3.0 – GSOC

    There’s something magic about compare-locales 3.0. It comes with Python 3 support.

    It took me quite a while to get to it, but the writing is on the wall that I had to add support for Python 3. That’s just been out for 10 years, too. Well, more like 9ish.

    We’re testing against Python 2.7, 3.5, and 3.6 now.

  • Multilingual Gecko Status Update 2018.1

    As promised in my previous post, I’d like to do a better job at delivering status updates on Internationalization and Localization technologies at Gecko at shorter intervals than once per year.

    In the previous post we covered recent history up to Firefox 58 which got released in January 2018. Since then we finished and shipped Firefox 59 and also finished all major work on Firefox 60, so this post will cover the two.

  • Bringing interactive examples to MDN
  • March Add(on)ness: Ghostery (2) Vs Decentraleyes (3)

CAVO Promotes Open Source Voting in Documentary and Legislation

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"The Real Activist" slated for release this summer will include an interview with Brent Turner of OSI Affiliate Member CAVO, as well as coverage of the groups work to promote open source software within US elections' voting systems. The documentary highlights Turner's efforts and CAVO's mission to secure the United States election systems through GPL licensed open source software. Famed narrator Peter Coyote also stars in the film along with former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and many political notables.

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Security: Updates, Synopsys/Black Duck FUD, and Software Security Over Convenience

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  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • With Much of the Data Center Stack Open Source, Security is a Special Challenge [Ed: Black attacking FOSS again in order to sell its proprietary products; does proprietary software have no security issues? Which cannot be fixed, either?]
  • Synopsys reveals its open-source rookies of the year [Ed: Anti-FOSS company Black Duck, which markets its proprietary software by attacking FOSS (it admitted being anti-GPL since inception, created by Microsoft employee), wants the public to think of it as a FOSS authority]
  • Software security over convenience

    Recently I got inspired (paranoid ?) by my boss who cares a lot about software security. Previously, I had almost the same password on all the websites I used, I had them synced to google servers (Chrome user previously), but once I started taking software security seriously, I knew the biggest mistake I was making was to have a single password everywhere, so I went one step forward and set randomly generated passwords on all online accounts and stored them in a keystore.

MIPI-CSI camera kit runs Linux on Apollo Lake

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Congatec’s rugged, Linux-driven “Conga-CAM-KIT/MIPI” camera kit combines its Intel Apollo Lake based Conga-PA5 SBC with a MIPI-CSI 2 camera from Leopard Imaging and other components.

Congatec announced a Conga-CAM-KIT/MIPI camera kit, also referred to as the MIPI-CSI 2 Smart Camera Kit. The kit runs a Yocto Project based Linux distribution on Congatec’s Conga-PA5, a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel’s Apollo Lake Atom, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs. Also included is a MIPI-CSI 2 camera (LI-AR023Z-YUV-MIP) from Leopard Imaging based on ON Semiconductor’s AR0237 HD sensor. Extended temperature ranges are supported.

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Latest on webOS

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Ubuntu: Mir 0.31 Released, Server and LXD Status Reports

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  • Mir 0.31 Officially Released

    Mir 0.31 is now available as the latest version of the Canonical-developed display stack that continues implementing support for Wayland's protocols.

    Mir 0.31 has been in development for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with several new features and today the release surfaced as v0.31.0.1, as an apparent brown paper bag release hours after v0.31.0 was tagged.

  • Server development summary – 20 March 2018

    If you have a server that you are using for Bionic testing, please look in /etc/netplan and give netplan a run through. Note that only new installs of Artful+ will be enabled for netplan.

  • LXD weekly status #39

    The focus for this week was on CEPH and LXD clustering, trying to get the last few remaining pieces to work together properly. We’ve tagged a couple more betas as we went through that.

A new era for Linux's low-level graphics - Part 1

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Over the past couple of years, Linux's low-level graphics infrastructure has undergone a quiet revolution. Since experimental core support for the atomic modesetting framework landed a couple of years ago, the DRM subsystem in the kernel has seen roughly 300,000 lines of code changed and 300,000 new lines added, when the new AMD driver (~2.5m lines) is excluded. Lately Weston has undergone the same revolution, albeit on a much smaller scale.

Daniel Vetter's excellent two-part series on LWN covers the details quite well, but in short atomic has two headline features. The first is better display control: by grouping all configuration changes together, it is possible to change display modes more quickly and more reliably, especially if you have multiple monitors. The second is that it allows userspace to finally use overlay planes in the display controller for composition, bypassing the GPU.

A third, less heralded, feature is that the atomic core standardises user-visible behaviour. Before atomic, drivers had very wide latitude to implement whatever user-facing behaviour they liked. As a result, each chipset had its own kernel driver and its own X11 driver as well. With the rewrite of the core, backed up by a comprehensive test suite, we no longer need hardware-specific drivers to take full advantage of hardware features. With the substantial rework of Weston's DRM backend, we can now take full advantage of these. Using atomic gives us a smoother user experience, with better performance and using less power, whilst still being completely hardware-agnostic.

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MX Linux Review – Version 17 – An Excellent All Around Linux Distribution

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MX Linux is a popular and fast Linux distribution based on Debian stable that is currently in version 17.1. Today, I'm going to take you through my MX Linux Review to see why this distribution is so popular.

One of the best things about MX Linux is the variety of custom tools that have been built to make the life of the user easier. The team of devs at MX Linux have really outdone themselves making every single possible need as easy as possible with their MX apps.

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Top 7 Remote Access Apps For Linux

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A common misconception among Linux users is that it is near impossible to remote into your Linux PC over the Internet. In truth, there are a number of remote apps available for Linux. In this article, I'll share my most recommended remote apps for Linux.

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Raspberry Pi CM3 carrier has an Artik MCU for offline Bluetooth

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Linux’s fleet-oriented “Fin” carrier runs its Docker-friendly ResinOS and IoT framework on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module. It offers RPi 3 like ports, plus a mini-PCIe slot and an Artik 020 MCU for offline Bluetooth links., the company behind the Linux/Javascript-based IoT framework for deploying applications as Docker containers, as well as the related ResinOS 2.0 Linux distribution, has announced its first hardware product. Due to ship later this Spring for about $129, its Project Fin carrier board expands upon the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite to support fleet operations.

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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 9:05am
Story Configure an amateur radio gateway with a Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:57am
Story Software: Goto, Dry, QEMU, GStreamer Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:52am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:50am
Story Games Chronicon, BROKE PROTOCOL, Internet Archive Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:49am
Story Linux Foundation Videos and Projects Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:23am
Story LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, this weekend at MIT, March 24-25 Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:14am
Story Ubuntu 18.04 LTS NEW FEATURES Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 8:12am
Story Latest on Radeon/AMDGPU Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 5:03am
Story Mozilla: Privacy Violations, Privacy Rants, Development and More Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2018 - 5:01am