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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft: GPL or GTFO Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:53am
Story Bits from Debian Med team (by Andreas Tille) Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 8:13am
Story Secure Distros and Top Desktops Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 6:05am
Story Get your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP, says Google Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 6:01am
Story GCC 5 at Phoronix Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:52am
Story CS:GO & TF2 Extensively Tested On The Newest Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:48am
Blog entry Vacation Photos Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:38am
Story 6 tips for adopting open source Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:36am
Story AMD's HSA Run-Time Library Is Now Open-Source Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:28am
Story Shrunken SODIMM-style Cortex-A9 COM delivers the goods Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:22am

OpenOffice bundles Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Future versions of OpenOffice.org will come bundled with Mozilla's Thunderbird email client and Lightning calendar application.

How to change your login screen in Ubuntu/Gnome

Filed under
HowTos

I don’t know why but the phrase eye-candy always makes me think of accidentally getting pixie stick contents blown into my eye. Ouch! Anyway, here’s another eye-candy (wipes tears away) trick for your box. Say you want to change your login screen. You’re tired of the brown look, or the defaults just aren’t cutting it for you. Well there’s a simple way to do this.

Is Linux vs. Windows a Religious Decision?

Filed under
Linux

Dick Federle is a highly experienced IT systems manager and architect, having designed and supervised many custom development jobs. Along the way, Federle has noticed an odd phenomenon in the world of IT. He’s seen many managers make one of their most critical decisions – whether to opt for Windows or for Linux – on strictly personal grounds.

Kubuntu not quite right for a Tablet PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux is known for running well (or at least running) on older hardware and exotic platforms. I attempted to install Kubuntu Dapper Drake (6.10) on a Compaq TC1000 Tablet PC. I discovered that while Linux may install on nearly every platform, and run faster than its proprietary competition, it may not always be the best-fitting choice for every environment.

Use the source, Luke?

Filed under
Gentoo

I love Gentoo, I also hate it with a vengeance. I’m not talking small time peeves here, like the way Krispy Kremes icing gets all over your fingers (and by extension, clothes). I’m talking the type of frustration that is expressed in multitudes of expletives, some of which would make the profinsaurus cry.

Virtually Speaking: Simplifying the Infrastructure

Filed under
Software

There are many well-documented advantages to virtualization. Now that the technology is deployed throughout the data center, the disadvantages are starting to surface. One such disadvantage is rising complexity.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

Filed under
Reviews

SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux) has been talked about for quite a while and been written about for almost as long. What is surprising is that there has never really been a book written that functions as a hands-on guide for its implementation in the real world. This despite the fact that it is supported in Red Hat, Debian, Gentoo, and others. SELinux by Example fills that void and does so admirably.

Nano editor tutorials

Filed under
HowTos

nano is a small, free and friendly editor which aims to replace Pico,the default editor included in the non-free Pine package. Rather than just copying Pico’s look and feel, nano also implements some missing (or disabled by default) features in Pico, such as “search and replace” and “go to line number”.

Integration of dbus and KDE: starting and stopping the session part of dbus with KDM

Filed under
HowTos

Since some time now a lot of applications make use of D-BUS. This is the case with KDE 3.5, the current stable release of KDE. With the upcomming KDE 4, D-BUS is getting more important, replacing DCOP. In this howto I want to describe a way to start and stop the user and session dependent part of dbus.

Python slithers to 'significant' release

Filed under
Software

The open source community this week hailed the most significant update to Python in five years. Python 2.5 contains major improvements in reliability, performance and efficiency, according to release manager Anthony Baxter.

Recall proposal puts Debian leader in dunc-tank

Filed under
Linux

Debian Project Leader (DPL) Anthony Towns may face a recall vote over his involvement with Dunc-Tank, a non-official group that proposes to collect donations to pay Debian release managers to ensure that Debian etch is in early December as scheduled.

Boot Linux faster

Filed under
HowTos

This article shows you how to improve the boot speed of your Linux system without compromising usability. Essentially, the technique involves understanding system services and their dependencies, and having them start up in parallel, rather than sequentially, when possible.

GNOME plans October Boston summit

Filed under
Software

The GNOME development will host its sixth Boston Summit Oct. 7-9 at the MIT Media Lab. The Boston Summit is a three-day "hackfest" for GNOME developers and contributors, the team said on its website.

Interview: Elizabeth Krumbach of LinuxChix

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

As women become more involved with open source communities, it's important that their voices be heard. The dot is beginning a new series of interviews with women who contribute to F/OSS. Our first interviewee is Elizabeth Krumbach, who is the coordinator for the Philadelphia area LinuxChix chapter.

Research Looks at How Open Source Software Gets Written

Filed under
OSS

Computer software systems are now among the most complex, expensive artifacts ever created by humans, and some of the most sophisticated are being built by teams of volunteers as "open source" projects, where any programmer can read the code and suggest changes.

Hands on: Making Ubuntu even easier

Filed under
Ubuntu

In this article, we expand on a previous article that examined the update of a fresh Ubuntu Dapper Drake installation to make it more desktop and multimedia-friendly, by looking at the automated options. In addition, we take a closer look at Ubuntu’s KDE offspring, Kubuntu.

Desktop Linux distributions -- from A to Z

Filed under
Linux

There are hundreds of Linux distributions. This handy reference guide includes the ones we think are especially interesting for desktop Linux users -- from Arch Linux to Zenwalk -- and we plan to update the list on an ongoing basis.

Letter from Linuxland -- Part 3

Filed under
Linux

If you've been at all interested in Ubuntu, you'll have read what it's like to use when you first install it. You've got the world's best browser, some damn fine office software, a few games, a nice clean windowing interface and almost everything you need right there on the desktop. All that's true.

All you ever wanted to know about apt for Ubuntu/Debian Linux

Filed under
HowTos

If you’re like me, which is a debian/ubuntu user who likes to instal new and use(ful)(less) software all the time, then apt will be an important part of your life. It’s time too look into a powerful program used in the Debian world. Apt.

Where are the Linux Workplaces?

Filed under
Linux

Looks like most reasons Linux is not being adopted in the workplace are based on false assumptions and incorrect perceptions. How can we promote Linux adoption in the workplace? Seems to me the answer lies in educating and informing the "powers that be" in IT departments.

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More in Tux Machines

Introducing ‘Stealing Ur Feelings,’ an Interactive Documentary About Big Tech, AI, and You

The six-minute documentary explains the science of facial emotion recognition technology and demystifies how the software picks out features like your eyes and mouth to understand if you’re happy, sad, angry, or disgusted. While it is not confirmed whether big tech companies have started using this AI, “Stealing Ur Feelings” explores its potential applications, including a Snapchat patent titled “Determining a mood for a group.” The diagrams from the patent show Snapchat using smartphone cameras to analyze and rate users’ expressions and emotions at concerts, debates, and even a parade. The documentary was made possible through a $50,000 Creative Media Award from Mozilla. The Creative Media Awards reflect Mozilla’s commitment to partner with artists to engage the public in exploring and understanding complex technical issues, such as the potential pitfalls of AI in dating apps (Monster Match) and the hiring process (Survival of the Best Fit). “Stealing Ur Feelings” is debuting online alongside a petition from Mozilla to Snapchat. Viewers are asked to smile at the camera at the end of the film if they would like to sign a petition demanding Snapchat to publicly disclose whether or not it is already using facial emotion recognition technology in its app. Once the camera detects a smile, the viewer is taken to a Mozilla petition, which they can read and sign. Read more

Today in Techrights

Games: OSK, ATOM RPG, Battle Royale Tycoon and More

  • Race through a dying world as a squirrel in the climbing platformer OSK, out now

    OSK from the single-person studio Diax Game is officially out and it has a really beautiful style to it. In OSK the world is dying, some sort of cataclysmic event is happening below and as a squirrel you're just doing what you know—climbing. To get away from the absolute chaos, the game has you climb an enormous tree while you also solve puzzles and avoid enemies.

  • ATOM RPG had another massive update recently adding in an Isometric mode

    ATOM RPG, the game inspired by the likes of Fallout and Wasteland continues to get some big free updates with an Isometric mode out now giving you a new way to play. While the team is currently working on the Trudograd standalone, it was originally a feature meant for that but they decided to give it to everyone free—awesome!

  • Build and run your own Battle Royale park in Battle Royale Tycoon out now

    Not quite the usual Battle Royale, here you're the one in charge. Battle Royale Tycoon is like a more violent and simple version of Parkitect. Note: Key provided to our Steam Curator. After being in Early Access since December last year, Endless Loop Studios (Ninja Tycoon, Blueprint Tycoon, Hyper Knights) decided this month it was time to remove the EA sticker and let everyone jump in.

  • Historical turn-based 4X strategy game 'BOC' sounds intriguing and it's coming to Linux

    Planned to released on Steam and GOG (if GOG approve) after an upcoming Kickstarter campaign, BOC seems like a very interesting turn-based 4X coming to Linux. Interesting for more reasons than just style and gameplay, as developer Code::Arts say they've worked on their own multi-platform OpenGL/Vulkan game engine they've called the Deus Ex Machina engine. Their aim with it, is to have a game engine that focuses on "performance and the efficient use of resources" so that it could "run on a toaster". Starting development back in 2018, their current aim is to have something playable and ready for Early Access next year.

  • Running DOSBox games from Steam on Linux just got better with a fresh release of Boxtron for Steam Play

    Love your classic games? Have a lot of those classics on Steam? You need to grab Boxtron, the unofficial Steam Play tool that allows you to use a native DOSBox with Steam games even if they don't have a Linux build up. As a quick refresher Boxtron improves the experience by giving lower input lag, better fullscreen support, Steam Overlay and other Steam feature support and so on. Compared to running games through Proton or messing about with a manual DOSBox configuration it makes things nice and simple.

  • Snowtopia: Ski Resort Tycoon is heading to Steam next year, early build to try on itch.io

    Up for playing another building and management tycoon game? Snowtopia: Ski Resort Tycoon is one we talked about briefly back in January and it seems to be progressing along nicely. We've had standard theme park building sims, we've had a Battle Royale building sim, city builders and so much more. A Ski Resort you build up yourself though? That's something we haven't really seen before on Linux, not something that's exactly common on any platform though either.

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