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Monday, 21 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Carmack going mobile with Doom RPG

Filed under
Gaming
Sci/Tech

Following the release of Doom 3, many speculated what project its creator John Carmack would take on next. However, few would have guessed that project would be...a mobile phone game?

'Matrix Online' a new virtual reality

Filed under
Web
Gaming

You've watched the movies. Now you can jack in and play it - no cranial implants required. After months of testing and two years since the sequels, the persistent virtual reality of "The Matrix Online" is available for U.S. gamers.

Gentoo 2005.0 All About Security

Filed under
Gentoo
Reviews

Sean Michael Kerner has written up a nice article on internetnews.com about Gentoo 2005.0 with quotes from Chris Gianelloni including future plans for embedded devices and such. A nice read.

Cingular, AT&T Wireless ring up most complaints

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Cingular Wireless and Redmond-based AT&T Wireless, which merged late last year to form the nation's largest cellular carrier, together had the worst complaint record in 2004, according to information obtained by Consumers Union and released yesterday.

Spam King bankrupted by Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Legal

A Colorado company sued by Microsoft Corp. under anti-spam laws has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

At a Glance: MGM v. Grokster

Filed under
Web
Legal

On March 29, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. v. Grokster Ltd., a landmark case that specifically addresses the legality of peer-to-peer Internet file-sharing services, but has broad implications for any technology that could potentially be used to infringe on copyrighted materials.

Opteron Memory Timings Tested

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When building any modern computer, the choice of which memory to use is a major consideration. After all, why spend a mint on the latest CPU and motherboard, only to slow it down a bit with anything but the best memory available?

Nvidia working on 90 series of drivers

Filed under
Software

WE LEARNED that Nvidia is working on a fresh set of drivers codenamed series 90. The company just released its 70 series of drivers that brought features such as Pure Video and better SLI compatibility.

Safety Cheat Sheet

Filed under
Security
Web

If people didn't fall for online scams, online scammers would take up another line of work. And really, it isn't terribly hard to protect yourself. If you do one thing today, print out the following list and tape it to your computer.

This Week's Movies: Hostage and Cursed

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

When siblings discover they are now werewolves, they must look deep inside and to each other to save themselves from the returning monster and being "Cursed".

"Hostage" negotiator Jeff Talley must once again try and talk young criminals into releasing a family before anyone get hurts. Only this time there's more at stake than just strangers.

First Details on Next-Gen UT

Filed under
Gaming

The May 2005 issue of Computer Gaming World magazine contains the first screenshots and information on the next, Unreal Engine 3 powered Unreal Tournament game, including incredible revelations about the massive new Conquest gametype.

Game Rush hosts Doom 3 midnight sale

Filed under
Gaming

Members of Texas-based id software, Doom3's developer, will be on hand at the Game Rush store, Blockbuster's gaming branch, on 6437 Hillcrest Avenue in Dallas to meet fans, sign autographs, and give away Doom 3-related merchandise.

Stolen laptop exposes data of 100,000

Filed under
Security

A thief recently walked into a University of California, Berkeley office and swiped a computer laptop containing personal information about nearly 100,000 alumni, graduate students and past applicants, highlighting a continued lack of security that has increased society's vulnerability to identity theft.

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Firm beats Intel to 10Gbit CMOS photonics chip

Filed under
Hardware

A CALIFORNIA FIRM claimed that it has put a fibre optic interface directly onto a silicon chip. That means, according to Luxtera, that one day we'll have CPUs with optical buses shuffling huge amounts of data in and out of the heap.

Legal row over iTunes domain name

Filed under
Web
Legal

An internet entrepreneur is taking legal action against computer giant Apple over the iTunes domain name.

ISPs join to 'fingerprint' Internet attacks

Filed under
Security
Web

Leading global telecommunications companies, Internet service providers and network operators will begin sharing information on Internet attacks as members of a new group called the Fingerprint Sharing Alliance, according to a published statement from the new group.

howto: put linux on a zipit handheld

Filed under
Linux

aibohack of all places has come up with quite an interesting hack. turns out someone actually can make good use of the $100 zipit instant messaging device. Installing Linux.

IRS may consider eBay sales taxable income

Filed under
Web

In tax law, there is no clear, bright line that separates fun from profit, or a hobby from a business. But IRS instructions make it clear that all income - a category that includes bribes, gambling winnings, kickbacks and money made in illegal activities - can be taxed.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Purely objective information about security issues is becoming one of the scarcest commodities in the tech industry.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt

  • LHS Episode #266: #$%&! Net Neutrality
    Welcome to the first episode of Linux in the Ham Shack for 2019. In this episode, the hosts discuss topics including the 2018 RTTY Roundup using FT-8, Cubesats and wideband receivers in space, the ORI at Hamcation, Wekcan, Raspberry Pi-based VPN servers, the LHS Linux distributions, CW trainers and much more.
  • LHS Episode #267: The Weekender XXII
    Welcome to the 22nd edition of the LHS Weekender. In this episode, the hosts discuss upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, Open Source events in the next fortnight, Linux distributions of interest, news about science, technology and related endeavors as well is dive into food, drink and other hedonistic topics.
  • Linux Action News 89
    Another troubling week for MongoDB, ZFS On Linux lands a kernel workaround, and 600 days of postmarketOS. Plus our thoughts on the new Project Trident release, and Mozilla ending the Test Pilot program.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 130 - Chat with Snyk co-founder Danny Grander
  • The ACME Era | TechSNAP 395
    We welcome Jim to the show, and he and Wes dive deep into all things Let’s Encrypt.

Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku. With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful. Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time. Read more

This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!
  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag
    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.
  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020
    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform. The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process. "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.