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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 18 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NVIDIA ships wine libraries to support native DirectX!

Filed under
Humor

Our plans include shipping pre-compiled libraries to affect DirectX handling in wine. In other words: We would like to give you native support for the DirectX API.

how to backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Filed under
HowTos

i recently ran into the problem of not having enough hard drive space on my slackware linux laptop, but was lucky enough to have a much bigger drive sitting around from before and wanted a way to perform a hassle free seamless upgrade. i had this idea and it worked pretty well so i thought i would share it.

Tuttle Taylor Talks Trash

Filed under
Linux

Taylor said that he didn't understand why so many people were concerned about an e-mail exchange between two people. "This is just a bunch of freaks out there that don't have anything better to do," he said. "[CentOS is] a free operating system that this guy gives away, which tells you how much time he's got on his hands."

Ubuntu Bug #37579 - Not enough bugs

Filed under
Humor

OpenSource and FreeSoftware is all about contributing and fixing bugs that you find annoying, developping softwares because nobody else want to do it. With Ubuntu, it becomes a huge problem because there are too few bugs and more and more users just use it and like it !

Computing History 1968-Present

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Here's a wonderful chart of some of the major milestones in computer history, including unix/linux, organized by years and technology/company. Interesting, informative and bookmarkable.

Overview of the ten major Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

A GNU/Linux operating system is made of a Linux kernel, a set of GNU tools, an installation program, a package management system and a lot of other software components. This article is dedicated to the 10 most famous and popular: Debian, Slackware, Fedora, Mandriva, Suse, Ubuntu, Knoppix, Gentoo, Mepis and Xandros.

Firefox Explorer

Filed under
Humor

In a press release on the Mozilla Web site, and announced on several news Web sites as well, a statement from the Mozilla foundation declared that Internet Explorer will be in the hands of Mozilla with immediate effect.

Enabling and disabling services during start up in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

In any Linux distribution, some services are enabled to start at boot up by default. Usually, it is prudent to disable all services that are not needed as they are potential security risks and also they unnecessarily waste hardware resources. So how do you disable these services so that they are not started at boot time?

April 2006 of TUX, Issue 12

Filed under
Linux

The April 2006 issue of TUX is now available to download. This month's highlights include:

  • Distribution Smackdowns: SuSE Linux 10.0, Ubuntu/Kubuntu, Mandriva, Mepis, and more

  • TUX Explains: Fluxbox
  • Diversions: The Battle of Wesnoth

Microsoft Buys OpenOffice.org!

Filed under
Humor

For an undisclosed sum reputed to be in the billions, Microsoft's Bill Gates has personally bought the leading open-source desktop project. Saying he "was sick and tired of open-source eating away at his profits," the world's richest man decided to put an end to the nuisance and simply buy OpenOffice.org.

Syncing Websites to Your Palm for Offline Reading

Filed under
HowTos

This is a brief tutorial on how to sync websites to your palm for offline reading. The websites are stored in Plucker format. You will need to install the Plucker viewer for palm.

Introducing Foreskin Linux

Filed under
Humor

If you like changing the look of your desktop every 5 minutes, then a new distribution might just be for you.

Six Options For Open-Source Support

Filed under
OSS

Commercial software can be costly in more ways than one. As if hefty license fees weren't bad enough, product support is limited to whatever services the vendor agrees to sell you, at a price that's tough to negotiate. Of course, you could fix program bugs yourself if you had access to the source code-but the typical software maker doesn't provide this. So how do you break the cycle of vendor dependency? One popular choice is to explore open-source alternatives.

My Desktop OS: OpenVMS with CDE

Filed under
Humor

Call me a dodo bird, but my desktop OS is OpenVMS, an operating system that's secure, reliable, and low-cost, with consistent performance and desirable functionality.

Digging Secure Tunnels with IPsec

Filed under
HowTos

The Internet was born using plain text and no encryption. For a long time the TCP/IP protocol suite had no mechanism for cryptographically protecting transported data. Encryption was added at the application layer — Netscape's Secure Socket Layer (SSL) being a famous example. The design process of IPv6 incorporated encryption into the protocol itself, and the IPsec (IP security) framework came into existence.

Windows Hasta La Vista - Ironclad Security

Filed under
Humor

It has been three long years to the day since we last looked at that unusual distribution called Windows. Although at that time it was considered by many to be little else than a bizarre joke (who on earth would design an operating system that doesn't provide a way to grep files?), a recent rumour about a new release has piqued our curiosity.

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More in Tux Machines

Compact Jetson TX2 computer has eight USB 3.0 ports

Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-8150AI” computer runs Linux on a Jetson TX2 module and features 2x HDMI ports and 8x USB 3.0 ports for hooking up cameras for on-site edge AI analytics. Like the quad-GbE Boxer-8120AI, the Boxer-8150AI uses an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and its CUDA-enabled AI libraries to analyze visual information from connected cameras. In this case, the cameras don’t run over Ethernet, but USB 3.0. Like the Boxer-8120AI and Aaeon’s stripped down Boxer-8110AI spinoff, this is a fanless, rugged, Linux-driven device with a compact form factor, in this case measuring 153 x 101 x 45mm. Read more

Android Leftovers

Android Low-Memory Killer--In or Out?

One of the jobs of the Linux kernel—and all operating system kernels—is to manage the resources available to the system. When those resources get used up, what should it do? If the resource is RAM, there's not much choice. It's not feasible to take over the behavior of any piece of user software, understand what that software does, and make it more memory-efficient. Instead, the kernel has very little choice but to try to identify the software that is most responsible for using up the system's RAM and kill that process. The official kernel does this with its OOM (out-of-memory) killer. But, Linux descendants like Android want a little more—they want to perform a similar form of garbage collection, but while the system is still fully responsive. They want a low-memory killer that doesn't wait until the last possible moment to terminate an app. The unspoken assumption is that phone apps are not so likely to run crucial systems like heart-lung machines or nuclear fusion reactors, so one running process (more or less) doesn't really matter on an Android machine. Read more

today's leftovers