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Friday, 14 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Handling mailing lists easily

Filed under
HowTos

If you're a Debian user it is likely that you're subscribed to several of the mailing lists which the project uses for discussion, development coordination, etc. There are a lot of lists available, some quiet, and some very busy. If you're subscribed to several of them you might be looking for a simple way of organizing them, thankfully procmail makes it easy.

Boson 0.12 released

Filed under
Gaming

Boson 0.12, a real time strategy game for Linux, has been released. This version includes support for shadows, completely new radar system, new resources and much more. Some new screenshots are also available. The download is available here.

Win a copy of “User Mode Linux”

Filed under
Linux

This week freesoftware magazine is giving away a copy of User Mode Linux by Jeff Dike. All you need to do to enter is:
1) Read our terms and conditions.
2) Answer this question:

Kubuntu and Parallels

Filed under
Mac

While I was away, Parallels brought out the release candidate of the virtual machine software for Mac OS X. Now I think I might have found the perfect Linux OS to run within a Parallels VM.

CLI Magic: Executing jobs once

Filed under
HowTos

You know you can schedule recurring jobs with the cron command. What if you want to run a certain command just once, or a limited number of times, but still at times when it is inconvenient to type in the command interactively? You could always add the command to the crontab and then remove it later. But there is also a tool that is made for this job: the at command.

RubyGems

Filed under
HowTos

RubyGems is a system for managing Ruby software libraries. Ruby code packaged in this manner is called a gem. When you find Ruby software you want to use in a project, gems offer a means of downloading, installing and managing the software.

Some changes brought by SuSE 10.1 and why they're bad

Filed under
SUSE

A couple of days ago I was very upset with the way my upgrade from 10.0 to 10.1 was like. Now I have more info about some of the changes, the rationale behind them, and why I'm not happy with SuSE 10.1.

Running VMware Workstation 5.5 on SUSE 10.1

Filed under
HowTos

As I had VMware Workstation running on my previous SUSE distros, I decided to install the latest available version 5.5 on my SUSE 10.1 desktop. I usually use VMware Workstation to run WindowsXP, as there are few applications that I need to get my job done, as well as to test and see various Linux distributions.

Enterprise-level Ubuntu Linux due this week

Filed under
Ubuntu

The developers of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution plan to make a new landmark version of the software widely available this week.

PostgreSQL Fix Could Break Applications

Filed under
Software

PostgreSQL users have been put in a potentially sticky situation by a serious security flaw made public last week. The flaw allows for SQL injection attacks, and affects all versions of PostgreSQL, aside from fixed versions released this week. However, the fix, PostgreSQL developers admit, will break many users' applications.

Open source audio applications: A rebuttal

Filed under
Linux

I just spotted this article over on digg: Open source audio applications need to learn from listeners. After reading the first few paragraphs, I had to ask myself a question: What the heck is the editor talking about?

Also: Sound Recording using GNU/Linux

Rotten Effort

Filed under
Microsoft

It's bad enough when Microsoft strong-arms other software vendors into submission as a means of thwarting competition. But when it engages in underhanded tactics to intimidate users in order to land a software deal, we have a very disturbing situation on our hands. And someone needs to have the guts to speak out about it.

SUSE Linux 10.1 Review

Filed under
SUSE

Novell's SUSE Linux operating system has consistently gained momentum for years. Since I started reviewing it at version 8.1, I've found each new release to have more options, better autoconfiguration, and expanded hardware support, all while maintaining a high level of stability. But after having extensively tested SUSE Linux 10.1 for x86 and AMD64, I must say that the positive trend has faltered, and my expectations were not met with this release. While some things are clearly improved in 10.1, others have taken a step backward.

Open-source GP2X gaming and media portable review

Filed under
Gaming

While neither Sony nor Nintendo really embrace the homebrew scene with their handhelds, there is a large and dedicated group of followers who rarely buy official games for the PSP or DS. Likewise, with a few choice programs and a flash-linker, running emulators and homebrew software on the DS is a simple thing. What if there was a console that made all this easy for you?

Users want more details on open-source Java

Filed under
OSS

While users welcomed Sun Microsystems’ plan to release Java to open source, they say a lack of details about the announcement makes it difficult to determine the impact of whatever the company is aiming to do.

Windows Vista vs. Linux: Why Vista Might Lose the Battle

Filed under
OS

The opening of Beta 2 testing at WinHEC for Windows Vista has once again raised serious questions about Microsoft's ability to keep its promises.

How to Build a Linux Router

Filed under
HowTos

This guide will show you how to setup a Linux router with the Fedora Core 4 Linux operating system and an old computer in about 3 hours worth of time. Since many retail routers have been having trouble keeping up with the modern user with their loads of P2P apps, I’ve decided to write up this multi-part guide to help YOU setup a basic Linux-based router. If your router is slow, resetting, or stopping internet access when you're doing torrents or downloading from other P2P sources, the router you will make from this guide will take care of all your problems.

RISC OS found on Pocket PC PDA

Filed under
OS

It's a sight that will stun many users. To run RISC OS on a PDA is something we've been crying out for. Here, RISC OS can be seen running on a PocketPC PDA, with no Microsoft software in sight.

Also: ROX desktop in new Debian package

The Importance of Configuration Management in Open Source Deployments

As anyone who has used Linux systems for production systems knows all too well, there's an art to arriving at a stable configuration with all dependencies met. Linux distributors do an excellent job of delivering systems that meet this criteria, and keeping them there through their update processes as functionality updates, bug fixes, and security updates get laid on top of the out-of-the-box system.

Linux Helps FAA Monitor Air Traffic

Filed under
Linux

Graham Beasley, a federal business development manager at SGI, said the FAA is unusual in deploying Linux on desktop PCs. However, "open source is a lot easier in terms of maintenance," he said.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Metropolisim, Monster Prom, Kingdom Two Crowns and Lots More

  • Metropolisim aims to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever, will have Linux support
    Metropolisim from developer Halfway Decent Games is releasing next year, with a pretty bold aim to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever.
  • Monster Prom, the dating sim that won me over is now available on GOG
    Visual novels and dating sims aren't something I'm usually into, however Monster Prom is actually funny and worth playing and it's now available on GOG. I know we have a number of GOG fans here, so hopefully this will be interesting for you. As always, we try to treat all stores equally with release info.
  • Kingdom Two Crowns will be coming to Linux after all with the Quality of Life update
    Kingdom Two Crowns, the third in the Kingdom series released recently for Windows and Mac. It looked like we weren't getting it, but it's now confirmed to be coming. In their new roadmap post on Reddit and Steam, under the "QoL #01 Update" (Quality of Life Update) they noted that they will add "Add SteamOS (Linux) Support". This update is due out sometime early next year. This is really nice news, it's good to know they didn't give up on supporting Linux after all.
  • Steam Link for the Raspberry Pi is now officially available
    After a rather short beta period, the Steam Link application for the Raspberry Pi is now officially out.
  • Valve in it for the 'long haul' with Artifact, first update out and a progression system due soon
    Artifact, the big new card game from Valve isn't doing so well but Valve won't be giving up any time soon. The first major update is out, with a progression system due soon. At release, it had around sixty thousand people playing and that very quickly dropped down hard. Harder than I expected, a lot worse than Valve probably thought it would too.
  • Bearded Giant Games open their own store with a 'Linux First Initiative'
    Bearded Giant Games, developer of Ebony Spire Heresy have announced their new online store along with a 'Linux First Initiative'. I know what you're thinking already "not another store", but fear not. For now, it's mainly going to be a place for them to sell their games directly. Speaking about it in a blog post, they mentioned how they hate having to check over multiple forums, channels, emails and so on to stay up to date and they wish "to spend more time giving love to my projects instead of updating 4 different distribution channels, translating pages, writing different press releases and making separate builds"—can't argue against that.
  • The Forgotten Sanctum, the final DLC for Pillars of Eternity II is out along with a patch
    Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire expansions come to a close with the release of The Forgotten Sanctum along with a major update now out.
  • Pre-order Meeple Station for instant beta access, what the developers say is like Rimworld in space
    Meeple Station, the space station building sim that the developers say is like Rimworld in space can now be pre-ordered with instant beta access. While we don't like the idea of pre-orders, getting access to the beta right away is a decent way to do it. Sadly, their Kickstarter campaign actually failed which I didn't notice. Making sure that wasn't the end of it, the developer Vox Games decided to go the Early Access route. They weren't left out in the cold of space though, as they also recently announced that Indie DB will be publishing their game. Under the label of Modularity, this will be the first title published by Indie DB.
  • Heroes of Newerth drops support for Linux and Mac
    Heroes of Newerth, the MOBA originally from S2 Games which is now handled by Frostburn Studios has dropped Linux and Mac support. [...] I'll be honest here, I couldn't care less about it personally. The last time i tried it, it was the single most toxic experience I've ever had in an online game. I've played a lot of online games and even so it was still at a level I had not seen before. I tried to go back to it a few times, never with a happy ending. Still, sad for any remaining Linux (and Mac) fans of the game. Looking over some statistics, it's not popular with viewers either. Around 180 on Twitch compared with nearly 100K for League of Legends and over 50K for Dota 2.
  • Unity 2018.3 With HDR Render Pipeline Preview, Updated PhysX & More
    Unity Tech is ending out the year with their Unity 2018.3 game engine update that brings a number of new features and improvements to its many supported platforms.

Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
  • Just when you think you can stop drinking, Wine 4.0 has another release candidate available
    Just before the weekend hits you in the face like a bad hangover when you realise it's Monday already, there's another bottle of Wine ready for you. Of course, we're not talking about the tasty liquid! Put down the glass, it's the other kind of Wine. The one used to run your fancy Windows programs and games on Linux. Doing their usual thing, developer Alexandre Julliard announced that the Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2 is officially out the door today. While this release is nothing spectacular it is an important one, the more bugs they're able to tick off the list the better the 4.0 release will be for more people to use it.

Android Leftovers

A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it's time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year. For getting a look at the performance, on four different systems (two Xeon boxes, a Core i5, and Core i7 systems), the performance was compared from Clear Linux at the end of 2017 to the current rolling-release state as of this week. Read more