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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Motorola’s ‘Shamu’ the rumored Nexus 6 surfaces Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:31am
Story Small banks turn to open source solutions to cut costs Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:24am
Story The Gentle Art of Muddying the Licensing Waters Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:23am
Story Librarian Council, NITDA Train Professionals in Open Source Software Application Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:17am
Story CoreOS Acquires Quay.io for Private Docker Repositories Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:39am
Story Upgrading libraries to open source Koha system Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Galaxy Alpha: Samsung Puts Pedal to Metal Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:57am
Story Debian Installer Images Now In Beta For 8.0 Jessie Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:51am
Story Thanks KDE Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:43am
Story 2038 Kernel Summit Discussion Fodder Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:32am

Five things to know when you switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you have just installed GNU/Linux on your computer, and have only ever used Windows before, here are five things you need to know to get going rapidly.

Gentoo on PS3 Installation Procedure

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

there are several things you need to download before you begin. get a usb mass storage device (formatted as fat32) and make a directory called PS3 and inside PS3 make a directory called otheros. put the kboot.bld and the otheros.self files in otheros. it will also be convenient to burn that live cd, and toss the portage tree and stage 3 on the usb mass storage device. you may also want to burn the cell addon disc...

Chris Tyler's Fedora Linux: The Best Book on FC so far!

Filed under
Reviews

Remember what posted ten weeks ago? Review: Two RHEL4 and FC5 Books, Face To Face. It was about Christopher Negus' and Mark G. Sobell's books. Well, unless you're running RHEL4 or CentOS4, you might as well forget about them. Fedora Core users should consider Chris Tyler's book as their first choice. Obviously for a book issued in October 2006, it is dedicated to FC6 only.

Parsix 0.85 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Parsix GNU/Linux 0.85 Test 3 is now out. New in this third test release is the inclusion of GNOME 2.16.1, OpenOffice.org 2.0.4, Firefox 2.0, and fixed a number of bugs. The final release of Parsix 0.85 should be out in early December. Phoronix has some Screenshots of Test 3.

How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

Filed under
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Backup and Restore Your Ubuntu System using Sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called “sbackup”

Howto Bypass Ubuntu Login Screen

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

I think many of you who has installed Ubuntu, must hava encountered a login screen before you actually can use the Ubuntu desktop. However there’s a way to enable automatic login to your desktop and completely bypass the login screen.

Open source start-ups speak out

Filed under
OSS

Entrepreneurs attending a recent forum in Germany showed how they plan to use clever open source products — commercially — to compete with proprietary software companies.

Vim Tips & Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

You can execute the vim command, while opening files with vim with option -c. While I wanna replace a string from a huge file, first I need to check whether I can do it with sed or not. That means my replace string must be unique, so that it won’t affect others line thatI might not want to replace.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Racoon Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall). This is one of the most interesting and today most needed scenarios in business environment. This tutorial shows how to configure Racoon Roadwarrior.

http://www.howtoforge.com/racoon_roadwarrior_vpn

Authenticating on the network

Filed under
HowTos

Usually, I get annoyed at having to authenticate myself to each and every service I set up; after all, my passwords are the same everywhere, since I make sure of that myself. On Windows, I wouldn’t have to do that; once I log in, Windows is able to communicate credentials to each and every service that asks for them. But something similar is impossible on GNU/Linux, right? Wrong.

GNOME Interface for YUM: 0.1.5

Filed under
Software

This is the first time for me to hear about gnome-yum, the GNOME interface for YUM, by András Tóth. Version 0.1.5 was just released on Nov. 16, and it doesn't bring much of a change over the older 0.1.2.

Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

Filed under
Misc

Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday. "Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! "

how to check the CPU and mem usage of current running process?

Filed under
HowTos

We may curious some times why our computer running so slow, and we suspect that must be some programs (process) is running and uses a lots of CPU. We wanna know which process is it, and we have top. But some how top is not so interactive, where there is another program call htop.

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Install: Day 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

Since my last post in this series, I’ve been busy customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu, which I find is the funnest part of using Ubuntu! There are so many options and themes and icons and window borders and wallpapers…

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Means and ends in open source

Filed under
OSS

One thing that makes analysis of business strategies in open source difficult (even for professionals) is a confusion of means and ends.

Get Crontab Output in Ubuntu via E-mail

Filed under
HowTos

Having troubles getting your crontab’s output in Ubuntu? Constantly checking your email for a non-existent email? Turns out you might just be missing a message.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
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NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
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    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
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    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
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  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.

New Release of GNU Parallel and New FSF-Endorsed Products From ThinkPenguin

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    The Free Software Foundation has announced the latest batch of hardware it has certified for "Respecting Your Freedom" as part of its RYF program. Seven more devices from Linux-focused e-tailer Think Penguin have been certified for respecting your freedoms and privacy in that no binary blobs are required for use nor any other restrictions on the hardware's use or comprising the user's privacy.