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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wine Staging 2.19 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2017 - 9:59am
Story Success! Beelink S1 Running Linux – Courtesy of the Open Source Community Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2017 - 9:45am
Story LXQt 0.12.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Support for HiDPI Displays Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2017 - 7:55am
Story GNOME 3.27.1 RELEASED Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2017 - 7:53am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:12pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 9:11pm
Story Tried Elementary OS 0.4.1 Loki again - Negatory Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 7:56pm
Story 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger Mohd Sohail 21/10/2017 - 1:28pm
Story How To Install Wine And Run Windows Apps In Linux Mohd Sohail 21/10/2017 - 1:25pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2017 - 1:24pm

Ubuntu: NEC, Ubuntu 17.10, Lubuntu 17.10, Xubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mastodon 2.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then?

Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements.

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Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

Filed under
Red Hat
  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server

    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.

  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps

    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.

  • Red Hat to Cover Open Source Collaboration at Gov’t Symposium; Paul Smith Comments

    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) is set to hold its annual symposium on federal information technology on Nov. 9 where the company will host discussions on open source collaboration and its potential benefits for government, GovCon Executive reported Oct. 11.

  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.

  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Oct 17 Filed by: Kelly Michael A
  • Taking a Fresh Look at Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

Filed under
Security
  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know

    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.

  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software.

    The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.

  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

15 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark"

Filed under
Ubuntu

​The New Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" launch with GNOME3 has brought a big change and got a lot of people excited to try it as soon as they can. If you don't know yet the new stuff in Ubuntu 17.10, read the article we published today.

Read<br />
more

Anarchy Linux Dispels Fear of Arch

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Arch-Anywhere/Anarchy Linux is one of the nicest Arch-based distributions I have encountered. However, Anarchy Linux still requires familiarity with terminology and processes that usually are not needed to install Linux distros from a fully-functioning live session installation disk. Not having a demo mode to preview how the OS runs on your particular hardware can be a time-consuming setback.

However, once you have Anarchy Linux up and running, it will give you a very pleasing computing experience. Much of what happens after installation depends on the desktop environment you selected.

If you have a desktop preference or prefer one of the included window manager environments instead, you can forget about the sullied reputation that comes with Arch Linux distros. For many reasons, Anarchy Linux is a winning choice.

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Intel Graphics Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the Ubuntu 17.10 release this week and its massive desktop changes from GNOME Wayland to Mesa/kernel upgrades, we've been busy benchmarking this new Ubuntu OS release. Complementing the Radeon Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10 gaming comparison are now some OpenGL/Vulkan benchmarks when using Intel Kabylake graphics hardware on Ubuntu 17.04, 17.10 with X.Org and Wayland, and the performance if upgrading against Linux/Mesa Git.

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Room for Improvement: Areas Where Open Source Can Get Even Better

Filed under
OSS

Open source software delivers a huge amount of value. But it stands to offer even more. Here's a list of the ways open source can evolve to meet the needs of developers and organizations even better than it does today.

Opportunities for continued evolution and improvement in open source include:

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Why it's pointless to criticize Amazon for being 'bad' at open source

Filed under
OSS

Apparently AWS is B-A-D because it's a net consumer of open source software. You know, like every single company on earth, inside or outside of tech, probably even including Red Hat. The simple truth is that everyone consumes far more open source software than they contribute. It's just how the world works.

For those trying to keep score, however, and paint Amazon Web Services (AWS) as a bad open source citizen, the question is "Why?" Accusations of open source parsimony don't seem to have damaged developers' love for AWS as a platform, so exactly what are critics hoping to accomplish? Is it simply a matter of "paying a tax," as some suggest? If we've been reduced to inventing taxes to be paid, with no apparent reason for imposing them, we're doing open source wrong.

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Running Android on Top of a Linux Graphics Stack

Filed under
Android
Linux
Interviews

Traditional Linux graphics systems (like X11) mostly did not use planes. But modern graphics systems like Android and Wayland can take full advantage of it.

Android has the most mature implementation of plane support in HWComposer, and its graphics stack is a bit different from the usual Linux desktop graphics stack. On desktops, the typical compositor just uses the GPU for all composition, because this is the only thing that exists on the desktop.

Most embedded and mobile chips have specialized 2D composition hardware that Android is designed around. The way this is done is by dividing the things that are displayed into layers, and then intelligently feeding the layers to hardware that is optimized to handle layers. This frees up the GPU to work on the things you actually care about, while at the same time, it lets hardware that is more efficient do what it does best.

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Why and how you should switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

When you start comparing computers, you probably pit Windows against macOS—but Linux rarely gets a mention. Still, this lesser-known operating system has a strong and loyal following. That's because it offers a number of advantages over its competitors.

Whether you're completely new to Linux or have dabbled with it once or twice already, we want you to consider running it on your next laptop or desktop—or alongside your existing operating system. Read on to decide if it's time to make the switch.

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Purism disables Intel's flawed Management Engine on Linux-powered laptops

Filed under
Linux

LINUX PC MAKER Purism has devised a process to disable the flawed Intel Management Engine.

The company's line of Librem laptops, which run flexible open-source firmware Coreboot, are now running with Intel's management service completely disabled.

As a core part of Intel Active Management Technology (AMT), the management engine is present in all the company's CPUs and is capable of powering a computer, even when it is powered off.

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Ubuntu 17.10: Hands-on with Artful Aardvark

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark, has now been officially released. I have not been much of an Ubuntu fan for a long time now, but this release includes a lot of significant changes, many of which might address some of my most serious objections about Ubuntu. So I think I should take a closer look at it than I normally do.

The release announcement mentions the major updates and changes - including the biggest of all, the switch from Unity back to Gnome 3 / Gnome Shell for the desktop. As I have not liked Unity from the very first time I saw it (that's a polite way to phrase it), I am very, very pleased with this change.

The release notes (for all versions) give a more complete list of packages updated, and a list of known issues. It also includes a statement that I know some users will not be pleased with:

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New Wine and GNU/Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

ZTE Axon M – The Phone With Two Displays

Filed under
News

Haven’t we all loved the good old flip-phones? But the year is 2017 and just a flip phone isn’t going to work. So ZTE, the company behind the highly successful Blade series of Phones has a new offering called Axon M.

Read<br />
more

10 Major Updates In Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

Filed under
Ubuntu

[IMAGE URL

So there you have it finally, Ubuntu 17.10. The release which we have been talking about because of its switch to Gnome from Unity. We've talked about most its features in a previous article here but let's again look at the final version of Ubuntu 17.10. At the end of this article, do take a poll and tell us if you're going to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10 or not.

Read<br />
more

Linux Tiny Box PCs and DeX

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux Tiny Box PCs: Quad-core i.MX6 Dual Lite

    Kingdy's new ultra-compact tiny embedded platform for space limited solution, based on the ARM Cortex-A9TM iMX6 Dual Lite / Quad Core processor, delivers optimum I/O design for maximum connectivity with Pre-install Yocto 1.8 on eMMC.

  • Samsung to Give Linux Desktop Experience to Smartphone Users

    Samsung on Thursday announced a new app, Linux on Galaxy, designed to work with its DeX docking station to bring a full Linux desktop experience to Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphone users.

    Samsung earlier this year introduced DeX, a docking station that connects to a monitor to give Galaxy smartphone users a desktop experience.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout
    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.
  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3
    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver. Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.
  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!
    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!
  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms
    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.
  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations
    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions. The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.
  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance
    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?
  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall
    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos
    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.
  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3
    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

Android Leftovers

GNOME 3.28 Linux Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME developer Javier Jardón is kicking off the development of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.27.1, which is now available for public testing. Read more