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Thursday, 24 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" Released with Patched APT Package Manager

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Debian

A security vulnerability affects the APT package manager on Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu, as well as other derivatives from the two, allowing a remote attacker to install malicious packages users' machines. APT considered the packages as valid, thus allowing the attacker to execute code as root and possibly crash the host.

Both Debian and Ubuntu released patched versions of APT in their supported distributions, but the Debian Project also respined their installation and live images by releasing the Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" point release to avoid any complications in new deployments of their operating system.

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Also:Updated Debian 9: 9.7 released

Debian 9.7 Released To Address APT Security Issue

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Best Chromebooks to Buy In 2019

    Advancements in technology over the past few decades has been all about shrinking down computers. We’ve also seen manufacturers cramming as much power in them as humanly possible. This has led us to the creation of small form factor desktop PCs, portable yet powerful gaming laptops and even handhelds.

    Despite the fact that a faster computer is almost always appreciated, a lot of people don’t need all that power most of the time. Especially when responding to e-mails, or writing up text documents. In this scenario, a lot of people can get away with using a Chromebook every day.

    Chromebooks are different from your traditional Windows laptops. They run on Google’s own version of desktop OS, known as ChromOS. These affordable machines have especially gained popularity among students. This is mainly because of their workflow, most of the time they are writing up essays or watching videos. That is why Chromebooks are so popular in the first place. They are affordable, portable and long-lasting laptops. So, if you’re thinking about getting a Chromebook for yourself, keep on reading to figure out which one is best suited for you.

  • Open-Source Linux Driver Published For Habana Labs' "Goya" AI Processor

    Today they published initial open-source Linux kernel driver patches for review to potentially include in the mainline kernel moving forward.

  • Creating a template in Proxmox VE with cloud-init support
  • Project Trident 18.12 overview | A TrueOS based desktop-focused operating system.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Project Trident 18.12 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch

    My name is Sarah Julia Kriesch. I am 31 years old and a work-experienced Student in Computer Science with a pre-education as a Computer Science Expert for System Integration. I had worked as a Linux System Administrator for an ISP and a Linux Systems Engineer at a Cloud Computing Provider for 4 years.

  • Fedora – I’m coming back…..

    It’s been a while since I’ve done anything Fedora, but I’ve decided that my sabbatical has to end. With this in mind, I’m going to start slowly coming back to the Fedora ecosystem, it’ll be slow to start with, but I’ve missed it, I need to come back. I hope you’ll have me.

  • Orange Pi 3 single-board computer sells for $30 and up

    Shenzhen Xunlong Software has been selling single-board computers under the Orange Pi brand for years. The name is obviously inspired by the most famous low-cost, low-power SBC, the Raspberry Pi. But while Orange Pi devices don’t have the same level of community support as their Raspberry Pi rivals, they often make up for it by offering a decent set of features at an affordable price.

    Case in point: the company’s new Orange Pi 3 models sell for between $30 and $40 and offer offer a number of features (some optional, some standard) that you don’t get with the latest Raspberry Pi models.

  • We Need Open Hosting Platforms

    I think he’s starting with a reasonable, positive call: we can’t just decry the state of things, we have to make things. And we have to make good things. The open web should be better.

    I fear a moralizing approach to advocacy pushes people away, makes it harder for people to care about the values we are espousing. When we frame something as depressing or hopeless we encourage people to pay attention to other things. So yes: the open web should be the best web.

    But ignoring my advice, I’m going to point out a depressing fact: open source products aren’t successful. Open source is not in line to be part of any solution.

    Open Source has done a lot for developers, but it’s not present on the surface of the web – the surface that people interact with, and that defines the “open web”. Actual sites. Actual interfaces. Open source is used everywhere except at the point of interaction with actual people.

  • FOSDEM 2019

    In just over a week's time, Collabora will be heading to Brussels to take part in the 2019 edition of FOSDEM, a two-day event organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software. Taking place at the ULB Solbosch Campus on February 2 & 3, FOSDEM is widely recognized as the best and biggest conference of its kind in Europe.

  • GitKraken

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: GitKraken

  • The LLVM Codebase Is Moving Past C++11 This Year, Likely To C++14

    As was discussed in 2018 and has largely reached consensus, the LLVM code-base and its sub-projects like Clang will move past being bound by C++11 and will moving to a newer C++ standard so they can begin making use of newer language features in the development of this compiler stack. 

  • We all love bonking to pay, but if you bonk with a Windows Phone then Microsoft has bad news

    Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to honour the memory of yet another Windows mobile technology. The rabidly unpopular Microsoft Wallet for the much beloved Windows Phone is for the chop.

    Microsoft has quietly updated its Microsoft Pay page to reflect the demise of the tap-happy mobile technology, though it broke developments to the masses in an odd way.

    "Breeze through checkout by using your Windows phone. Just tap, pay, and you're on your way. Starting on Feb. 28, 2019, the Microsoft Wallet app will be officially retired."

  • Too Late for Jenkins? | Coder Radio 341

    Mike and Wes are back to debate the state of developer tools and ask where Jenkins fits in 2019.

    Plus some some anger at Apple, and Mike reveals the latest language that’s caught his eye.

  • mintCast 300.6 interview 6 Isaac

Software: DICOM Viewers, gotop and Cockpit

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Software
  • Top 11 Free Linux DICOM Viewers for Doctors

    DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and it is the international open image format for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical images.

    Medical images are used in the identification and examination of physical injuries and diseases via procedures like Xrays, CT scans, etc.

    This article lists the best free Linux applications used for processing images generated by DICOM devices.

  • gotop: Graphical System Monitor For The Command Line

    gotop is a terminal-based (TUI) system monitor for Linux and macOS. The software is inspired by gtop and vtop, but while these 2 utilities use Node.js, gotop is written in Go.

    The command line tool supports mouse clicking and scrolling, comes with vi-keys, and it displays the CPU, memory and network usage history using colored graphs, while also displaying their current values.

    gotop also shows the disk usage, temperatures and a top process list, which includes CPU and memory usage.

  • Cockpit 186

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 186.

Netrunner's Unique Blackbird Soars to New Heights

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Reviews

Blackbird, Netrunner's version 19.01 release, hit the download servers on Jan. 14, and this distro deserves to be considered bleeding-edge.

Netrunner is a step ahead of other KDE distros, thanks to its solid integration of classic KDE desktop performance with Web-based applications and cloud services. That said, if you aren't fondness of the K Desktop, Netrunner may leave you wanting more desktop simplicity.

For that you must look elsewhere. KDE is the only desktop available from the Germany-based Blue Systems development team. Blackbird is based on Debian's "Testing" branch. Its developer brings some aggressive updates to the distro that propel it ahead of other distros' regular development cycles.

The main updates include KDE Plasma 5.14.3, KDE Frameworks 5.51, KDE Applications 18.08 and Qt 5.11.3 for its essential security updates. Linux Kernel 4.19, Firefox Quantum 64.0 and Thunderbird 60.3 push the envelope as well.

One of the more noticeable new features in Blackbird is its new Netrunner Black theme. This theme is based on a dark-toned contrasting visual. It uses the Kvantum theme engine, plus the Alpha-Black Plasma theme, to produce a more 3D-looking design.

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Mozilla Masking 'Content', ffsend and New Accountant or Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Brussels Mozilla Mornings – Disinformation and online advertising: an unhealthy relationship?

    On the morning of 19 February, Mozilla will host the second of our Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments. This session will be devoted to disinformation and online advertising.

    Our expert panel will seek to unpack the relation between the two and explore policy solutions to ensure a healthy online advertising ecosystem.

  • ffsend – Easily And Securely Share Files From Linux Command Line Using Firefox Send Client

    Linux users were preferred to go with scp or rsync for files or folders copy.

    However, so many new options are coming to Linux because it’s a opensource.

    Anyone can develop a secure software for Linux.

    We had written multiple articles in our site in the past about this topic.

    Even, today we are going to discuss the same kind of topic called ffsend.

  • Welcome Roxi Wen, our incoming Chief Financial Officer

    I am excited to announce that Roxi Wen is joining Mozilla Corporation as our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) next month.

    As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, the Mozilla Corporation, with over 1,000 full-time employees worldwide, creates products, advances public policy and explores new technology that give people more control over their lives online, and shapes the future of the global internet platform for the public good.

    As our CFO Roxi will become a key member of our senior executive team with responsibility for leading financial operations and strategy as we scale our mission impact with new and existing products, technology and business models to better serve our users and advance our agenda for a healthier internet.

Security: apt/apt-get, Blockchains and More

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Security

Programming: Qt, Git, Django, Rust and Python

Filed under
Development

A day in the office ... without Office

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LibO
Reviews

First, let me give you a brief overview of my typical "office" setup. Normally, I write fiction in LibreOffice Writer, and by that I mean books and short stories, not website content. There's no need for any great embellishment, just text. When I do need to send these files to editors, agents and alike, they are rinsed through Microsoft Word 2010 (the best of the bunch, including the more recent versions).

Non-fiction work, i.e. technical books fall into two buckets: 1) LaTeX and LyX for entirely self-published items 2) the likes of my Problem Solving and System Administration Ethics titles are done and conceived almost entirely in Microsoft Word, because they require a lot more precision and focus, and ultimately, they need to be easily accessible by the publisher. This is a no-nonsense constraint. I cannot have any styling lost converting files between different formats.

If I need to do graphics (including diagrams and alike), I will use all sorts of tools, including even something like Octave, but also Powerpoint, GIMP, and other programs. Equations are best done either using the built-in editor, or the aforementioned LaTeX. Now that covers the writing part. There's also collaboration.

Here, I decided to try a bold thing - which is part of this experiment. On the System Administration Ethics book, I am collaborating with a friend in a different country, so we are using the Internetz to communicate. We also decided to use Google Docs to share files, comment and edit each other's writing and such. Then, I've also recently configured a Slimbook Pro2 & Kubuntu setup, i.e. Linux, i.e. not Windows. That means that such a system cannot use locally installed Microsoft software - the cloud-based Microsoft Office Online is a really great option though, plus, as luck would have it, it also works just fine on Linux. Now there.

And so, LibreOffice and Google Docs gain even more focus due to these Linux-based restrictions, but not only. Finally, you have the full context for this experiment. Spurred by actual usage needs - and with meaningful, months-long projects at hand - I decided to examine the tech landscape, and you're now enjoying the fruits of my labor. Also worth reading Slimbook reports in parallel, that is.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Top 10 Free Open Source Documents Management Platforms

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Server
OSS

Document management platforms are software systems that enable individuals and businesses to control different versions of documents and records, schedule meetings, employee appointments, and to regulate user access among other functions in a user-friendly environment while making sure that security and data collection standards are not compromised.

There are so many document management platforms that you can choose from but I have done the job of filtering them into a list of the best options that are free, open source and run on Linux.

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Linux 4.20.4, 4.19.17, 4.14.95, and 4.9.152

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Linux

Debian News: Debian 9.7, Personal Stories and Events

Filed under
Debian
  • Updated Debian 9: 9.7 released

    The Debian project is pleased to announce the seventh update of its stable distribution Debian 9 (codename stretch). This point release incorporates the recent security update for APT, in order to help ensure that new installations of stretch are not vulnerable. No other updates are included.

  • Debian 9.7 Released To Address APT Security Issue

    Debian 9.7 was just announced by the Debian developers and it contains a sole update compared to 9.6: an updated APT. Going public yesterday was an APT security vulnerability that would open the package manager up to possible man-in-the-middle attacks. This MITM attack could then open up users to unknowingly installing invalid APT packages. There is an APT command option to disable HTTP redirects to close off this vulnerability or to update to the latest APT package. Details on that vulnerability via this security advisory.

  • Epilepsy, Javascript, Security and Debian

    This would be quite a long post so would request everybody to relax, have their favorite hot/cold drink in their hand, kick up their feet and relax as it’s going to take time.

    The first update I wanna share is about my epilepsy. For those who didn’t know I suffered a series of epileptic seizures about a year and a half back. I stayed in an hospital for about 3 months, luckily medicines helped me and didn’t had to go for brain surgery (which was a real possibility), needed a month and a half of physiotherapy to regain balance and muscular movement. It is still not 100% but can move around which is more than enough to be thankful for.

    Last month, after coming from the Kerala trip, took the brave step of getting an MRI and a battery of tests. While the expenditure of the tests and MRI was expensive ( INR 25k), I was more apprehensive if it would result in a further stay in hospital which I was really afraid of. Thankfully, the doctors had said that 99% of the issue is gone. While I am supposed to visit him once every few months, he has advised to take another similar test around 6 months to a year from now but that’s upto us. The moment the doctor shared this, I felt like an unimaginary weight I had been putting on my shoulders had been lifted.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: A Cold BSP

    Sadly for us, the Montreal Bug Squashing Party was also taking place that weekend. I have to say I was worried people wouldn't show up, but we ended up being fourteen on Saturday and eight on Sunday!

    On Saturday morning, I arrived pretty early, bootstrapped networking and installed an apt proxy. Turns out it's surprisingly easy to setup. Anarcat then gave a quick "BSP 101" workshop and we started to work on fixing bugs.

    On Sunday Anarcat gave another workshop, "Packaging 101" this time. Even though I've been there the last 3 times he gave that workshop, it was the first time I had time to attend it. Debian packaging is now much clearer for me!

KDE: GCompris, KookBook, KDE Plasma 5.14.90

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KDE

Linux Graphics Work by Intel and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Lands Transform Feedback Support In Their Vulkan Driver For Mesa 19.0

    Ahead of the Mesa 19.0 feature freeze coming up at month's end for this next quarterly feature release, Intel's open-source developers today merged support for the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension that is important for Linux gamers with DXVK for mapping Direct3D 11 atop Vulkan and similar graphics API translation libraries.

    VK_EXT_transform_feedback was added to the Vulkan spec a few months back for transform feedback support in Vulkan drivers for helping efforts like DXVK for running Direct3D 10/11 and other APIs on top of Vulkan. The VK_EXT_transform_feedback is needed for efficiently implementing Direct3D Stream-Out support and has been used by DXVK since then, VKD3D is also now using it now, and obviously for OpenGL-over-Vulkan efforts it could be used for providing GL transform feedback itself.

  • Intel Is Working On A Vulkan Overlay Layer, Inspired By Gallium3D HUD

    Aside from some out-of-tree experiments last year by one of Valve's developers on a RADV Vulkan HUD of similar nature to the popular Gallium HUD option, it turns out an Intel developer has recently been working on a Vulkan overlay layer to provide "Gallium HUD" inspired information.

    Lionel Landwerlin is the open-source Intel developer that has begun working on this Intel Vulkan driver "heads-up display" implemented as a Vulkan overlay layer. The code is intended to provide Vulkan swapchain information and various statistics of use to Vulkan driver developers and game developers.

  • AMD Radeon VII Will Have Excellent Linux Support From Day 1

    AMD Radeon VII was one of the biggest announcements made at the CES 2019; it even got featured in our top highlights of CES video. This 2nd-gen Vega graphics card will be launching in early February and it’s also generating lots of questions.

    One such doubt that many open source enthusiasts might be having is regarding the state of Linux support for Radeon VII. Well, the answer to this question is a big yes, according to Forbes.

  • Libdrm 2.4.97 Released With AMDGPU Updates, Other Minor Work

    Libdrm 2.4.97 was released today by AMD's Marek Olšák as the newest version of this Mesa DRM library. The main feature of this list is a newer, faster buffer object list API for the AMDGPU code.

    Libdrm releases these days tend not to be too exciting and for v2.4.97 are just over a dozen changes. Many of the changes are AMDGPU related and include some test updates and updating the list of GPU marketing names but most notably is a faster buffer object (BO) list API. Aside from the AMDGPU additions, there is a fix for Android to avoid 32-bit apps from crashing in 64-bit Android, build system fixes, and other minor changes.

  • AMDGPU DC Code Improvements Bring Better Page-Flipping

    The once notorious AMDGPU "DC" code (formerly known as DAL) saw a fresh round of patches on Tuesday further improving this display stack shared between the Windows and Linux drivers for advanced functionality from FreeSync to HDMI/DP audio and much more.

    With this latest round of AMDGPU DC patches, improving the page-flipping process was a motivation. This new work resulted in the introduction of a DC VM interface to allow virtual memory to be used for flipping to surfaces that are not contiguously allocated. This DC VM interface will allow for better memory efficiency and security.

Custom Linux Installations

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Debian

Customize your Linux installation and gain working knowledge of your system at the same time.

Most Linux users are content with a standard installation of their distribution of choice. However, many prefer a custom installation. They may simply prefer to do things their way without dozens of post-install tweaks. Others may want to know exactly what they are installing as a requirement for security. Still others may want a consistent installation for multiple machines or to learn more about their operating system step by step. Linux offers tools for all these purposes.

Admittedly, most of these tools are for major distributions. A survey of these tools shows that many are for time-tested distros like Debian or openSUSE. If you want a custom install of, say, KDE neon or Puppy Linux, you may not find a ready-made solution. But among the major distributions, you are like to find multiple solutions. Read on for some of the main options.

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GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
GNOME
  • The Big App Icon Redesign

    As you may have heard, GNOME 3.32 is going to come with a radical new icon style and new guidelines for app developers. This post aims to give some background on why this was needed, our goals with the initiative, and our exciting plans for the future.

  • WORA-WNLF

    I started my career writing web applications. I had struggles with PHP web-frameworks, javascript libraries, and rendering differences (CSS and non-CSS glitches) across browsers. After leaving that world, I started focusing more on the backend side of things, fleeing from the frontend camp (mainly actually just scared of that abomination that was javascript; because, in my spare time, I still did things with frontends: I hacked on a GTK media player called Banshee and a GTK chat app called Smuxi).

    So there you had me: a backend dev by day, desktop dev by night. But in the GTK world I had similar struggles as the ones I had as a frontend dev when the browsers wouldn’t behave in the same way. I’m talking about GTK bugs in other non-Linux OSs, i.e. Mac and Windows.

    See, I wanted to bring a desktop app to the masses, but these problems (and others of different kinds) prevented me to do it. And while all this was happening, another major shift was happening as well: desktop environments were fading while mobile (and not so mobile: tablets!) platforms were rising in usage. This meant yet more platforms that I wished GTK supported. As I’m not a C language expert (nor I wanted to be), I kept googling for the terms “gtk” and “android” or “gtk” and “iOS”, to see if some hacker put something together that I could use. But that day never happened.

  • Gnome MPV 0.16 Released, How to Install it in Ubuntu 18.04

    Gnome MPV, GTK+ frontend for mpv video player, released version 0.16 a day ago. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04 and higher.

10 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Some of the distributions that have not been reviewed yet may be worthy of consideration due to their great potential. Keep in mind that they may never make it to the front page ranking due to lack of time or Distrowatch resources to review them.

For that reason, we will share a list of what we consider the 10 most promising new distros for 2019 and a brief review on each of them.

Since the Linux ecosystem is a live being, you can expect this article to be updated from time to time, or perhaps be radically different next year.

That said, let’s take a look!

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Essential System Tools: nmon – Curses based Performance Monitor

Filed under
Software

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at nmon, a free and open source performance monitor. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

Nmon is short for “Nigel’s Monitor”. It’s a systems administrator, tuner, and benchmark all wrapped up in an easy-to-use tool. The utility displays performance information on the CPU, memory, network, disks (mini graphs or numbers), filesystems, NFS, top processes, resources (Linux version & processors) and more.

The software aims to be as frugal as possible, as it’s self-defeating for a performance monitor to consume large chunks of CPU cycles and memory.

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Programming: Node.js, Micro:bit, L4Re, Python, Go and More

Filed under
Development
  • 14 Best NodeJS Frameworks for Developers in 2019

    Node.js is used to build fast, highly scalable network applications based on an event-driven non-blocking input/output model, single-threaded asynchronous programming.

    A web application framework is a combination of libraries, helpers, and tools that provide a way to effortlessly build and run web applications. A web framework lays out a foundation for building a web site/app.

    The most important aspects of a web framework are – its architecture and features (such as support for customization, flexibility, extensibility, security, compatibility with other libraries, etc..).

  • Debian now got everything you need to program Micro:bit

    I am amazed and very pleased to discover that since a few days ago, everything you need to program the BBC micro:bit is available from the Debian archive. All this is thanks to the hard work of Nick Morrott and the Debian python packaging team. The micro:bit project recommend the mu-editor to program the microcomputer, as this editor will take care of all the machinery required to injekt/flash micropython alongside the program into the micro:bit, as long as the pieces are available.

    There are three main pieces involved. The first to enter Debian was python-uflash, which was accepted into the archive 2019-01-12. The next one was mu-editor, which showed up 2019-01-13. The final and hardest part to to into the archive was firmware-microbit-micropython, which needed to get its build system and dependencies into Debian before it was accepted 2019-01-20. The last one is already in Debian Unstable and should enter Debian Testing / Buster in three days. This all allow any user of the micro:bit to get going by simply running 'apt install mu-editor' when using Testing or Unstable, and once Buster is released as stable, all the users of Debian stable will be catered for.

  • Some Ideas for 2019

    Well, after my last article moaning about having wishes and goals while ignoring the preconditions for, and contributing factors in, the realisation of such wishes and goals, I thought I might as well be constructive and post some ideas I could imagine working on this year. It would be a bonus to get paid to work on such things, but I don’t hold out too much hope in that regard.
    In a way, this is to make up for not writing an article summarising what I managed to look at in 2018. But then again, it can be a bit wearing to have to read through people’s catalogues of work even if I do try and make my own more approachable and not just list tons of work items, which is what one tends to see on a monthly basis in other channels.
    In any case, 2018 saw a fair amount of personal focus on the L4Re ecosystem, as one can tell from looking at my article history. Having dabbled with L4Re and Fiasco.OC a bit in 2017 with the MIPS Creator CI20, I finally confronted certain aspects of the software and got it working on various devices, which had been something of an ambition for at least a couple of years. I also got back into looking at PIC32 hardware and software experiments, tidying up and building on earlier work, and I keep nudging along my Python-like language and toolchain, Lichen.
    Anyway, here are a few ideas I have been having for supporting a general strategy of building flexible, sustainable and secure computing environments that respect the end-user. Such respect not being limited to software freedom, but also extending to things like privacy, affordability and longevity that are often disregarded in the narrow focus on only one set of end-user rights.

  • 5 Best Python IDEs You Can Get in 2019

    If you’re taking Python lessons online, you will eventually need a good IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to write better code. The command line interface can only prove so useful. At Python.com you can download a native IDE called IDLE (Integrated Development and Learning Environment). However, it is rather basic in scope, and debugging can consume more time than necessary. With this in mind, here are a few of the best IDEs for Python which add to your productivity.

  • Python’s Requests Library (Guide)
  • Factorial one-liner using reduce and mul for Python 2 and 3
  • Sample Chapters from Creating wxPython Applications Book
  • Migrating from Pelican 3 to Pelican 4
  • Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q4 2018 [Ed: Python Software Foundation has many Microsoft employees in it now. Not good. Microsoft has been using money to filtrate just about everything, including its competition. This isn't so new a strategy and many examples of it exist.]
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #352 (Jan. 22, 2019)
  • Why Don't People Use Formal Methods?

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code.

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code.

    For clarity purposes, I will divide verification into code verification (CV) and design verification (DV), and similarly divide specification into CS and DS. These are not terms used in the wider FM world. We’ll start by talking about CS and CV, then move on to DS and DV.

  • Learning C as an uneducated hobbyist

    V=Programming, however, is conscious. It’s an activity in which you have to think in order to act. Unlearning bad practice in programming takes no energy at all apart from that spent being told that the practice is bad and coming to understand and remember it. Once you’ve done that, it’s almost impossible to make the same mistake again.

    That’s why you shouldn’t be afraid of learning “along the way”, “as you go” or “in an ad-hoc manner” because “you might learn bad practice”. If you learn the wrong thing, you can learn the right thing later. After all, you’re not a professional programmer. It doesn’t matter very much if you make a mistake; your job doesn’t depend on it.

  • Demystifying Pointers in Go

    If you’ve never worked with a language that exposes pointers, it could be a little confusing. But the good news is pointers don’t need to be scary. In fact, pointers can be pretty straightforward. Here are the basics of pointers in Go:

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