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Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Open source threat model aims to make enterprise safer with less work Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 8:08pm
Story Deepin 2014.3 Is a Top Contender for the Most Beautiful OS in the World Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:56pm
Story CUDA in Fedora Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:54pm
Story Kong goes open source: Mashape dubs it the first microservices management layer Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:52pm
Story Canonical Is Focusing on Ubuntu Desktop Once More Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:31pm
Story A Brief Update On Fwupd For Linux Firmware Updating Of Devices Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:29pm
Story VMware Draws on Open Source to Manage Cloud Micro Services Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:26pm
Story Plasma 5.3 Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 7:07pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 28/04/2015 - 12:13pm
Story Atom Shell is now Electron Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 9:06pm

desktop zooming

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: our three level desktop zooming is now working in plasma. wee! the idea is this: plasmoids (launchers, icons, widgets, games, mini-apps, etc) exist in groups. a group can be displayed to take up the full area of the screen. when you zoom out, you see these various groups and the plasmoids within them shrink to mere icons.

Ingimp's tools may improve FOSS usability

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Since May, ingimp, a modified version of the GIMP, has collected daily logs on what users do with the program in the hope of improving its usability. What ingimp is really designed to do is develop the software and practices to put free and open source software usability testing on a professional footing "without placing an undue burden on either the developers or users."

hardinfo on Fedora

Filed under
Software

liquidat: I just discovered hardinfo in the Fedora repositories while I was checking for some data about my own packages and was curious what the program is capable of. And judging from the first looks the tool is indeed very helpful.

stellarium, A real-time realistic planetarium

Filed under
Software

linux by example: Stellarium is an education tools for those who enjoy astronomy. Stellarium present you the starry sky in different period of time, different locations and different directions in 3D.

Installation of Google Earth on the Inspiron E1505N

Filed under
Software

about.com: Today I installed and test drove the latest version of Google Earth on my Dell Inspiron E1505 running Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn). The process was remarkably pleasant and straight-forward.

Easing Configuration with Java

Filed under
News

Configuration can be a maintenance mess and add to a developer's burden. This article introduces a framework with which developers can define their application's configuration in terms of high-level interface.

Ten commandments for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Asay: I ended my presentation by suggesting that the Ubuntu community "make Ubuntu better, not simply a clone of yesterday's mistakes." To get there, I warned Canonical/Ubuntu to:

AWN Applet Dialog test case

Filed under
Software

aarobone: Here's a quick video of my first test case of a "Topaz" style dialog in my AWN Monitor applet. I had to create a patch for the core AWN codebase in order to get the position tracking stuff to work...its not perfect but it works.

OSI Approves New Open-Source License

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: The Open Source Initiative approved on July 25 its first new license in quite some time: the Common Public Attribution License, which is essentially the Mozilla Public License with a new attribution clause.

What Do We Really Want From Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: In my last blog post about the real-world cost of Linux, I was struck by the contrast between my words and fellow InformationWeek blogger Alexander Wolfe’s take on all this. He’s lamented the broad variety of distributions out there, and found fault with the way those who create Linux distributions seem unwilling to accept what users really want.

GPL whiz Moglen nails Web 2.0 O'Reilly on 'frivolous' charges

Filed under
OSS

the register: O'Reilly invited Free Software Foundation lawyer Eben Moglen to participate in a discussion about "licensing in the Web 2.0 era" at this week's OSCON. The conference organizers did their best to fix the conversation. Even though everyone laughs at O'Reilly's Web 2.0 moniker to his face, the conference promoter still takes the phrase very seriously and expects others to do the same.

So You Want to Be a Linux Developer - Part 1

Filed under
OSS

Linux Insider: Are you driving progress forward? Are you presenting papers educating your peers at open source events? Can you write papers explaining what you do and how to use your code? Do you participate in a wide variety of activities that enhance open source? Those things are all important to consider and something the Linux Foundation looks at closely.

Linux Bible 2007 Edition: Install/Run 10+ GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

Every Flavor Bean: The Wiley book, Linux Bible - 2007 Edition, by Christopher Negus, the author of popular book Red Hat Linux Bible, got at least one thing right: it gives the reader an option to select one of many GNU/Linux distributions available today according to his or her requirements/taste.

A first look at Tracker 0.6.0

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Tracker 0.6.0 was released earlier this week. The latest version of the open source search and indexing system includes an assortment of long-awaited features. I tested Tracker 0.6.0 on my desktop computer, which runs Ubuntu 7.04.

On Debian Maintainers

Filed under
Linux

No Title: I suppose most of our New Maintainers will aim to become a Debian Maintainer just to bridge the time until they’re full Debian Developers. And I predict that this is also the major target audience for this new Debian Maintainers class.

Fuzz testing with zzuf

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Fuzz testing, which uses random input to test software for bugs, has been the biggest thing to happen in IT security in quite awhile. Now you can quickly and easily direct your own fuzz testing ops, thanks to a cool little program called zzuf.

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On CentOS 5.0

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine.

The inadvertent Linux user

Filed under
Linux

ITPro: While Linux is still taking off relatively slowly in the desktop world, the same is not true in the mobile space where many are predicting that we will be presented with a mobile Linux Odyssey in 2012.

Jim Zemlin touts the 'second phase' of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

computerworld: In January, two of the most established Linux and open-source advocacy groups, the Open Source Development Lab and the Free Standards Group, merged, forming the San Francisco-based Linux Foundation. Yesterday, Zemlin spoke with Computerworld at the Ubuntu Live Conference, discussing what his group will focus on as Linux and other open-source applications continue to be embraced by corporate IT departments.

Linux: It's Not Just for Servers Anymore

Filed under
Linux

wired.com: After years of being relegated to server racks and the desktops of ultrageeks, Linux is finally making some headway as a viable alternative to Windows on the consumer desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more