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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Calibre 2.7 Gets Kindle Voyage Support Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 9:40am
Story Canonical Splits Ubuntu Touch RTM and Ubuntu Touch Vivid Vervet Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 9:30am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 9:28am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 9:28am
Story HTC One M8, One M7 to get Android 5.0 OS Lollipop update in Jan. or Feb. 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 9:15am
Story Season of KDE 2014 Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:24pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.10 Receives Its Twelfth and Final Update Pack Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:27pm
Story Test drive Linux with nothing but a flash drive Rianne Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 5:37pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2014 - 10:43am
Story Linux computer program brings a smile where it's least expected Roy Schestowitz 28/10/2014 - 9:35am

Book review: The Starfish and the Spider

Filed under
Reviews

Intelligent people can and should disagree. So when we read The Starfish and the Spider, it’s no surprise that we had varied opinions. And when it was time to publish a review, no one could quite agree on which review we should publish. In the spirit of intelligent discourse, here are two reviews of the same book.

Interview with David Korn

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Interviews

David Korn received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from RPI in 1965 and his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in 1969. After working on computer simulations of transsonic air foils, he switched fields to computer science and became a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories in 1976. He is the creator of the KornShell, a command language for the UNIX environment, as well as UWIN, an X-Open library for Windows NT and Windows 95. In 1984, he was inducted as a Bell Labs fellow. He currently works for AT&T Research in Florham Park, NJ and graciously agreed to take a few moments and answer a few questions for our readers.

Gentlemen, start your engines!

Filed under
Gaming

Those of you that are fans of car racing will probably recognize this post's title as the famous phrase that gives the official start to the Indianapolis 500. If it happens that you are a fan of both car racing and free software, you may well be interested in TORCS (The Open Racing Cars Simulator).

Get Involved! Second openSUSE community meeting 2007-02-11

Filed under
SUSE

This is the second ever community meeting taking place, and it is run by
openSUSE Community members who are not employed by Novell/SUSE.

Foresight Is a Linux Distro to Watch

Filed under
Linux

It seems as if a new Linux-based operating system is born every day, with each facing the challenge of justifying its existence in a field that's already rather crowded with mature Linux distributions boasting active user bases and organized bodies to back them. But one relatively young Linux distribution worth keeping an eye on is Foresight Linux.

Free/Open Source Software recommended for use in developing countries

Filed under
OSS

Over 130 IT professionals of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from more than 27 countries had gathered at Sukabumi, Indonesia for a nine-day Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) training camp called "ASIA SOURCE II." The key objective was to promote the use of FOSS for social and economic development and to build a network of FOSS practitioners and trainers with Asia.

An approach to parental control for Firefox

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Moz/FF

Every day more and more parents face the need to make the decision on whether allow their children to access the internet and its extensive resources to raise better informed and connected persons or surrender to equally extensive and invasive contents that just don’t fit their parenting ways and keep them away of a computer.

Is Novell losing Linux? No, it's just bad reporting

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OS

Commentary: Blame Jim Finkle at Reuters, I suppose. His story is the one that started this large dung-ball of misinformation rolling around the Internet. You know the one, about Novell losing the right to distribute Linux.

The hunt for a Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

Where can the average South African consumer get their hands on a new PC loaded with Linux instead of Windows? Not a lot of places, as it turns out.

One man can end the Microsoft-Linux feud

Filed under
OS

Bill Gates. And I think he will. I don't think it's a coincidence, or a mere marketing choice, that caused Gates to pop up as the public face of the Windows Vista launch last week, after publicly retiring six months earlier.

Preview of Beryl 0.2.0

Filed under
Software

Beryl is simply creating some of the most exciting and innovative work on any computing platform. Amazingly, Beryl came into existence only 6 months or so ago. The Beryl project orginally forked from the Compiz 3d desktop group around September of 2006. At the time I had a hard time understanding why we needed another 3d desktop project, but now that I have had a chance to watch Beryl develop, their decision makes a whole lot of sense.

Is E-Commerce Ready for Open Source?

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OSS

Thirty-seven percent of North American enterprises that sell products or services online will purchase a new e-commerce platform, according to Forrester Research. The options available to them include a considerable amount of open source applications. However, while open source is clearly making an impact in the e-commerce space, it is not yet fully integrated.

Free Software Magazine Issue 16

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OSS

Highlights:

  • Paper is dead - has PDF followed suit?
  • Freeing an old game
  • The free Tron Universe—Armagetron
  • The lazy user’s guide to OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Vega Strike
  • Configuring a Linux home internet gateway
  • A media center based on GNU/Linux

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 188

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Analysis: Mandriva - a slow financial demise?

  • News: Fedora's forgettable Test1 release, Mandriva adds non-free repository, Ubuntu defers Beryl plans, interview with Red Hat's Matthew Szulik, Adriane Knoppix
  • Released last week: DragonFly BSD 1.8, Annvix 2.0

  • Donations: GQview and Kaffeine receive US$500
  • New additions: NimbleX, Trisquel GNU/Linux
  • New distributions: CowMet, CDriveBack
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu Live Conference

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Live conference is coming to Portland, Oregon (US) between July 22 and July 24, 2007. The Ubuntu Live conference will coincide with the O’Reilly 2007 Open Source Convention (OSCON). The call for participation for Ubuntu Live is now open until February 14.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Beryl + Ubuntu = Beauty

  • Secure your Ubuntu Desktop Using Firestarter Firewall
  • Ubuntu Networking Configuration Using Command Line
  • Change Font Colour in Gnome Panels
  • Command line media editing
  • Why do we sudo in Ubuntu, and who is Charlie Root?

  • Gumstick Gentoo
  • How To Make Your Ubuntu Speak
  • Unattended SSH login / public key authorization / ssh automatic login
  • VirtualBox On FC6 / CentOS 4 / OpenSuSE 10.2

Of video encoding and changing methods

Filed under
Software

I guess my previous post was a bit premature; for shorts, I was saying then that some Free softwares for video editing on Windows were good, but had no equivalent in the Free software world. While I was not wrong stricto sensus, I hammered a few of them during the last few weeks. Thus, I’ll now write about the various free video treatment softwares I know and the slight shift in method this entails.

SCALE 5x - Linux Expo in Los Angeles This Weekend

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Google
Software
OSS
SUSE
BSD
Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

SCALE 5x, the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo will be held in Los Angeles, CA this weeken On Feb 9-11, 2007. It will include: 50+ seminars, 70+ exhibitors, BoFs, and more. Highlighted speakers will include Chris Dibona, Don Marti, Ted Haeger, Jono Bacon, and others. Exhibitors include: Dell, IBM, Verio, Redhat, GroundWork Open Source, ReactOS, Haiku OS, and PostgreSQL. One lucky attendee will win a Dual Xeon 1U Rackmount Server from Silicon Mechanics. Two other conference to be held on Friday Feb 9th include: Women In Open Source, and Open Source Health Care Summit.

KDE at FOSDEM

Filed under
KDE

As every year, FOSDEM is again in 3 weeks (24-25 February, in Brussels). Bart Coppens has been busy preparing KDE dev room schedule at FOSDEM and together with Pascal Bleser they put it online.

Linux Gazette: February 2007 (#135) Issue

Filed under
Linux

Highlights:

  • Nomachine NX server

  • Configuring IPCop Firewalls (Book Review) CIF.RVW 20070116
  • TCP and Linux' Pluggable Congestion Control Algorithms
  • Debugging WiFi
  • HelpDex

  • The Geekword Puzzle
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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more