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CutiePi Open Source Tablet uses Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The announcement of the CutiePi, an open source tablet-based on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 comes a bit late for the Pi-based tablet/laptop space.

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More on CutiePi

  • CutiePi is an open source Raspberry Pi-based tablet (coming in late 2019?)

    The CutiePi is hardly the first tablet built around one of Raspberry Pi’s tiny, low-cost computers. But it’s a pretty nifty looking addition to the category that combines an 8 inch touchscreen display with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite, a custom carrier board, and software to make the Linux-based Raspbian operating system touch-friendly.

    CutiePie’s developers have a working prototype and hope to begin selling the tablet later this year. But the whole project is open source, so anyone who wants to build their own can check out the code and hardware design files and give it a try.

  • CutiePi open source Raspberry Pi tablet unveiled

    Unfortunately, no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet for the CutiePi, but as soon as information comes to light, we will keep you updated as always.

A Raspberry Pi Based Open Source Tablet is in Making

A challenger appears: Taiwanese devs' answer to Gemini PDA

  • A challenger appears: Taiwanese devs' answer to Gemini PDA wraps a Raspberry Pi in a tablet

    A team of Taiwanese engineers is planning to release an eight-inch tablet based on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+.

    The CutiePi, as it's called, has a MIPI DSI (Display Serial Interface) 1,280x800 pixel touch-enabled display, a gyroscope and temperature sensor, 4,800mAh battery, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, a single USB port, an HDMI port, and a microSD slot.

    It runs Raspbian, the Raspberry Pi Linux distro based on Debian. The hardware schematic and even the bill of materials is open source on Github. The size is touted to be 124(W) x 209(H) x 12(D) mm.

    The team, which describes itself as "a group of experienced engineers and designers", is about to embark on the Design Validation Test (DVT) phase of product development and hopes to release CutiePi by the end of 2019 with a price "in the $150-$250 range".

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