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Monday, 25 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian/Ubuntu: Google Money, Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu on the New Jetson Nano

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Bits from Debian: Google Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19

    We are very pleased to announce that Google has committed to support DebConf19 as a Platinum sponsor.

    "The annual DebConf is an important part of the Debian development ecosystem and Google is delighted to return as a sponsor in support of the work of the global community of volunteers who make Debian and DebConf a reality" said Cat Allman, Program Manager in the Open Source Programs and Making & Science teams at Google.

    Google is one of the largest technology companies in the world, providing a wide range of Internet-related services and products as online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, software, and hardware.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 571
  • Hands On With Nvidia’s New Jetson Nano

    Until recently, experimenting with AI-driven robots has been limited to those with substantial training and resources. Nvidia has done as much as any other company to change that. Its latest effort is the new Jetson Nano developer kit. Built around a 128-core Maxwell GPU and quad-core ARM A57 CPU running at 1.43 GHz and coupled with 4GB of LPDDR4 memory, the Nano developer kit packs a rich set of I/O capabilities through the included carrier card.

Games: Aeon of Sands and DiRT 4 Coming Soon

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Security Onion OS, ARPwatch and Helpsystems

Filed under
Security
  • Peeling the Onion — Security Onion OS

    In a world where security threats feel out of control, the security professional needs some help to do their job. Security tools are an important part of the armory for those professionals. But there is quite a bit of choice, including open-source enterprise toolkits. The question being asked is do you build your own setup, or do you look to other solutions to give you what you need to tackle cyberthreats?

    Security Onion is a Linux distro that is based on Ubuntu and contains a wide spectrum of security tools. It is so named because these tools are built as layers to provide defensive technologies in the form of a variety of analytical tools. When you install Security Onion, you are effectively building a defensive threat-hunting platform.

  • Network Awareness Using ARPwatch | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

    Unless you already have a network access control (NAC) solution in place, most of you probably don’t know when a new device is put on your network. Yes, we know the dangers that exist, such as rogue DHCP servers or “drop boxes” that attackers leave behind to gain a foothold inside your network. The question remains, how can we identify when something new is put on our network without spending a ton of money and time on a NAC? One word: ARPwatch.

    So, what is ARPwatch and what does it do? ARPwatch is a tool that watches for ARP traffic on a network and then records every MAC address it sees in a database. Every time it sees a new MAC address, it can send you an email alert to let you know there’s a new device on the network. It’s a great tool for identifying not only new devices but also ARP spoofing and network flip/flops, for which you’ll receive email notifications.

  • Episode 17: Be Afraid. Be Very Afraid.

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Bob Erdman, Security Product Manager for Helpsystems about Linux security threats.

Programming: GCC, py3status, Mu and More Python

Filed under
Development
  • GCC 9 Will Be Released Soon With AMD Zen 2 Support, Radeon GCN Back-End, D Language

    GNU Compiler Collection 9 (GCC 9) will be formally released in the coming weeks as version 9.1.

  • py3status v3.17

    I’m glad to announce a new (awaited) release of py3status featuring support for the sway window manager which allows py3status to enter the wayland environment!

  • An Intro to Threading in Python

    Python threading allows you to have different parts of your program run concurrently and can simplify your design. If you’ve got some experience in Python and want to speed up your program using threads, then this tutorial is for you!

  • Mu 1.1.0-alpha.1 Released

    We have just released the first “alpha” of the upcoming 1.1 version of Mu. To try it, follow the links on Mu’s download page. Mu is a team effort, so many thanks to all the volunteers who have contributed in innumerable ways to make this happen.

    This is the first of several “alpha” releases for the next version of Mu. Over the coming weeks we intend to release newer versions based upon feedback from you, our users. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have comments, suggestions or have found a problem (bug). The more feedback we get, the better. While we carefully read all feedback, we can’t always respond to nor address such feedback (remember, we’re all volunteers). If you’re interested in what we’re up to, all our development work happens in the open on GitHub and you can even chat directly with us (we’re friendly, so come say, “Hi”).

    What exactly do we mean by “alpha”..?

  • R vs Python | Best Programming Language for Data Science and Analysis
  • A Quick Python Check-in With Naomi Ceder
  • Plot the Aroon Oscillator values with python

Fedora and Red Hat: SuperIO, Microsoft Mono, Fedora Modularity, NeuroFedora, OpenShift and 'Data Economy' (Spying)

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Even more fun with SuperIO

    There were a few slight hickups, in that when you read the data back from the device just one byte is predictably wrong, but nothing that can’t be worked around in software. Working around the wrong byte means we can verify the attestation checksum correctly.

    Now, don’t try flashing your EC with random binaries. The binaries look unsigned, don’t appear to have any kind of checksum, and flashing the wrong binary to the wrong hardware has the failure mode of “no I/O devices appear at boot” so unless you have a hardware programmer handy it’s probably best to wait for an update from your OEM.

  • Mono 5 Might Come For Fedora 30 While Other Fedora 31 Features Discussed

    Earlier this month was the feature proposal for Fedora 31 to finally upgrade to Mono 5, which has been out for nearly two years for this open-source .NET environment. This feature request has been approved for Fedora 31 while it's also been decided to allow it into Fedora 30 if it can land within the next week.

    The transition from Mono 4 to Mono 5 was blocked due to the build process depending upon some binary references that complicated the process for distributions like Fedora and Debian. But they've now overcome those challenges and are ready to introduce Mono 5 to Fedora users.

  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Day for Fedora Modularity

    Modularity lets you keep the right version of an application, language runtime, or other software on your Fedora system even as the operating system is updated. You can read more about Modularity in general on the Fedora documentation site.

    The Modularity folks have been working on Modules for everyone. As a result, the Fedora Modularity and QA teams have organized a test day for Tuesday, March 26, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read on for more information on the test day.

  • NeuroFedora update: 2019 week 13
  • OpenShift Commons AIOps SIG Kick off Meeting Recap (Video & Slides included)

    OpenShift Commons hosted the first AIOps SIG meeting today with guest speakers from Red Hat, Siscale and Prophetstor. This AIOps SIG group will be meeting on the last Monday of each month. Please join the AIOps google group to receive notices of upcoming meetings and events.

  • Data explosion, or data implosion?

    Data. It’s here. It’s everywhere. It is, as I’ve said before, the dawn of the Data Economy. With data permeating our lives—and business—it makes sense to say that data, and the ability to use it wisely for insights, is important to many organizations’ success. In this post, I’ll examine some of the barriers organizations face in the Data Economy and how they’re overcoming them.

LOCKDOWN Aiming To Be In Linux 5.2 For Tightening Up Hardware/Kernel Access

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

Google developer Matthew Garrett recently took over work on the long-standing "LOCKDOWN" kernel patches with a goal of preventing the running kernel image from being modified and strengthen the boundary between UID 0 and the kernel. These patches, which have been around for years and shipped by some Linux distributions, didn't make it into the recent Linux 5.1 merge window but now a pull request has been issued in trying to ship it with Linux 5.2.

Read more

openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

Filed under
SUSE
Obits

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life.

We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community.

Read more

Obituary: Peter T. Linnell

Top 15 Econometric Software and Statistical Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

Today’s article is specifically designed for those who work or studies in the statistics field. This field is quite tough and in order to preserve the data and calculation, some software may come to great help to you. To ease your burden and to take care of all your information, Linux has come up with some prodigious software which will work as your helping hand and will lead you to the right track.

As you know that econometric software and statistical software almost belong to the same category, that is why in this article, you will find an amalgamation and combination of this two Linux software. By doing this, it will also be easier for you to search the software easily.

Read more

Also: PlantUML for text based UML diagram modelling - nice free software

World’s first Zynq UltraScale+ based SMARC module runs Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

MSC’s rugged “MSC SM2S-ZUSP” SMARC module features a Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC with 4x Cortex-A53, 2x Cortex-R5, GPU, and FPGA plus up to 8GB DDR4 and 64GB eMMC and optional WiFi/BT and carrier.

MSC Technologies — a brand of Avnet Integrated Solutions — has launched the world’s first SMARC 2.0 form-factor module with Xilinx’s Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. The 82 x 50mm SMARC “Short” style MSC SM2S-ZUSP joins other Zynq UltraScale+ based modules such as iWave’s iW-RainboW-G30M, Enclustra‘s Mars XU3 and Mercury+ XU1, Trenz’s TE0808 UltraSOM+, and Iveia’s Atlas-II-Z8 and Atlas-III-Z8 COMs. SBCs include Avnet’s 96Boards compatible Ultra96.

Read more

Puppy Linux 8.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Puppy Linux is one of the tiniest Linux distros. It loads into RAM and runs from it making it faster than most Linux distributions. Puppy Linux 8.0 "Bionicpup" came out yesterday with a couple of new features and latest software.
As the codename 'Bionicpup" suggests, this release is based on Ubuntu 18.04.

Read more

Meanwhile in Sparky Linux (lightweight):

  • Sway

    There is a new, small desktop available for Sparkers: Sway

    [...]

    If you don’t want to install gdm3 (and gnome-shell), you can use other display managers, such as LightDM, SDDM, etc., but they can run Sway in Xorg session with Xwayland (xwayland package has to be installed).

The 6 Best Linux Bandwidth Monitoring Tools in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Knowledge is power! Consequently, knowing what the bandwidth utilization of the network you manage will give you power by allowing you to be proactive and by ensuring that network congestion is avoided as much as possible. To accomplish that, what you need are bandwidth monitoring tools. And since Linux is a popular platform with many network administrators, let’s have a look at some of the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools available. Considering that most of them are free and open source, they will allow you to start monitoring bandwidth at no other cost than the time you’ll spend installing and configuring them. As you’ll soon find out, many of these tools are as good as some of the best Windows tools.

We’ll begin our exploration by having an overview of bandwidth monitoring. We’ll explain what it is and, more importantly, how it works. This will lead us to discuss the Simple Network Management Protocol, the basis of most monitoring tools. Then, we’ll briefly discuss Linux in general and also what it means to use it as a platform for monitoring tools. Once we’re all on the same page, we’ll be ready for the core of our subject, the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools.

Read more

NuTyX 11 available with cards 2.4.96

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I'm very please to announce the new NuTyX 11 release.

The NuTyX 11 is a complete recompilation of all the available binaries on NuTyX.

Since everything has been recompiled, most of the packages have been update as well.

The base of NuTyX comes with the new kernel LTS 4.19.28 and the very new kernel 5.0.3.

The toolchain is completely rebuild around glibc 2.29, gcc 8.3.0 and binutils 2.32.

The graphical server is now in xorg-server 1.20.4, the mesa lib in 18.3.4, gtk3 3.24.3, qt 5.12.1.

The python 3.7.2 and 2.7.16 are updated as well

Read more

Also new: Feren OS 19.03 Run Through

Deb Nicholson Nets FSF Award, Christine Hall of FOSS Force Takes Seat at OSI's Board

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • Deb Nicholson Receives the Award for the Advancement of Free Software

    Deb receives the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for her work to bring free software to artists and musicians with GNU MediaGoblin as a Community Liaison and as a founding board member of Open Hatch, whose mission was to build a welcoming committee for free software. She's also a founding organizer of the annual Seattle GNU/Linux (SeaGL) conference which is committed to surfacing new voices and she works with Conservancy's many projects to help them achieve their goals. She became part of the free software movement in 2006, when she accepted a job with the Free Software Foundation in downtown Boston.

    Deb joined the Conservancy team a little less than a year ago. "Free software is critically important for autonomy, privacy and a healthy democracy -- but it can't achieve that if it is only accessible for some, or if it is alienating for large swathes of people. That's why it's so important that we continue surfacing new voices, making room for non-coders and welcoming new contributors into the free software community. I also find that in addition to helping us build a better, bigger movement, the work of welcoming is extremely rewarding." said Nicholson.

    John Sullivan, Executive Director at the Free Software Foundation adds, "I couldn't be happier about this opportunity for the FSF to publicly honor and appreciate Deb Nicholson. In the many years I've known Deb, I have seen her directly make so many positive changes in the free software movement that I can't keep track: successfully connecting institutional and financial resources with free software projects that need them, organizing impactful conferences, driving program user interface improvements, and many other initiatives that have both brought more users and developers to free software and helped everyone get more work done in critical areas."

  • Run-off Election Results

    Christine's victory places her into the fourth open Individual Member seat, joining Hong Phuc Dang, Elana Hashman, and Carol Smith. These winners of Individual Member seats join, Pamela Chestek and Molly de Blanc, who were elected by the Affiliate Membership.

    Voting in OSI elections is open to all OSI Individual Members, and the (one) representative of each OSI Affiliate Member. Only Individual Members may vote in the election of Individual Member seats. Only Affiliate Member Representatives may vote in the election of Affiliate Member seats. Five Directors of the Board are appointed based on Individual Members' votes (2 year term, maximum 3 consecutive terms). Five Directors of the Board are appointed based on Affiliate Members' votes (3 year term, maximum 2 consecutive terms). One seat on the Board of Directors is dedicated to the General Manager, ex officio, with the term to last the length of employment.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Kubernetes 1.14: Production-level support for Windows Nodes, Kubectl Updates, Persistent Local Volumes GA

Filed under
Server
OSS

We’re pleased to announce the delivery of Kubernetes 1.14, our first release of 2019!

Kubernetes 1.14 consists of 31 enhancements: 10 moving to stable, 12 in beta, and 7 net new. The main themes of this release are extensibility and supporting more workloads on Kubernetes with three major features moving to general availability, and an important security feature moving to beta.

More enhancements graduated to stable in this release than any prior Kubernetes release. This represents an important milestone for users and operators in terms of setting support expectations. In addition, there are notable Pod and RBAC enhancements in this release, which are discussed in the “additional notable features” section below.

Let’s dive into the key features of this release:

Read more

What to expect from Ubuntu 19.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's March and that means we're one month away from the release of yet another iteration of Ubuntu Linux. This time around, we're looking at an interim release (aka a non-Long Term Support release), which means support for 19.04 will extend only to 2020. It is important to remember that interim releases introduce new capabilities from Canonical as well as upstream open source projects, and serve as a proving ground for these new capabilities. That means these non-LTS releases don't enjoy the same level of stability, but they also tend to be a bit more exciting—as far as releases are concerned.

Does that mean we can look forward to Canonical bringing back the thrill of old-school releases? I wouldn't hold your breath. However, Ubuntu 19.04 does have a few nifty tricks up its sleeve.

Read more

Tiny, octa-core Arm module targets AI on the edge

Filed under
Android

Intrinsyc’s 50 x 25mm, $225 “Open-Q 660 μSOM” runs Android 9.0 on the high-end Snapdragon 660 and offers 802.11ac, BT 5.1, 4GB LPDDR4, and 32GB eMMC plus support for 4K DP, 2x MIPI-DSI, 3x MIPI-CSI, and high-end digital audio.

Qualcomm’s octa-core Snapdragon 660 appeared on Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 660 HDK Mini-ITX dev kit back in 2017 and also showed up on an Inforce 6560 Pico-ITX SBC announced in February. Now Intrinsyc has returned with a tiny compute module implementation. The $225 Open-Q 660 µSOM (micro System on Module) measures only 50 x 25mm.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Open Source Extension Displays Hidden Google Search Results

    Google receives tonnes of requests from copyright holders daily for removing infringing content. The company then analyzes the received requests and removes the content that violates copyright claims. The number of DMCA notices received by Google has increased manifold over time. As reported by TorrentFreak, content creators have asked Google to remove over four billion pirate links till date.

    Whenever Google removes links from its search results, it displays a notice at the bottom with the number of results removed from a search page. Google also provides links to the DMCA notices on LumenDatabase which led to the removal of links.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: EU copyright reform: a missed opportunity

    We’ve been engaged in the discussions around the EU Copyright directive since the very beginning. During that time, we deployed various tools, campaigns, and policy assessments to highlight to European lawmakers the importance of an ambitious copyright reform that puts the interests of European internet users and creators at the centre of the process. Sadly, despite our best efforts – as well as the efforts of academics, creator and digital rights organisations, internet luminaries, and over five million citizens – our chances of reversing the EU’s march towards a bad legislative outcome diminished dramatically last September, after the draft law passed a crucial procedural milestone in the European Parliament.

    Over the last several months, we have worked hard to minimise the damage that these proposals would do to the internet in Europe and to Europeans’ rights. Although the draft law is still deeply flawed, we are grateful to those progressive lawmakers who worked with us to improve the text.

  • Mozilla’s Firefox Send File Sharing Service Now Available As Android App

    Mozilla recently introduced its file-sharing service, Firefox Send, which was initially available on the web. As promised previously, the service now has an Android app, currently available in the form of a beta.

    Firefox Send allows users to share files with other users, in a secure and end-to-end encrypted form.

  • Jelmer Vernooij: Breezy evolves

    Last month Martin, Vincent and I finally released version 3.0.0 of Breezy, a little over a year after we originally forked Bazaar.

    When we started working on Breezy, it was mostly as a way to keep Bazaar working going forward - in a world where Python 2 has mostly disappeared in favour of Python 3).

  •  

Linux Foundation and Servers Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • How Open Source Is Accelerating NFV Transformation

    Red Hat is noted for making open source a culture and business model, not just a way of developing software, and its message of open source as the path to innovation resonates on many levels.

    In anticipation of the upcoming Open Networking Summit, we talked with Thomas Nadeau, Technical Director NFV at Red Hat, who gave a keynote address at last year’s event, to hear his thoughts regarding the role of open source in innovation for telecommunications service providers.

    One reason for open source’s broad acceptance in this industry, he said, was that some very successful projects have grown too large for any one company to manage, or single-handedly push their boundaries toward additional innovative breakthroughs.

  • Why The CDF Launch From Linux Foundation Is Important For The DevOps And Cloud Native Ecosystem

    Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) has become an essential building block of modern application lifecycle management. This technique allows business to increase the velocity of delivering software to users. Through CI/CD, what was once confined to large, web-scale companies became available to early-stage startups and enterprises.

  • Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift

    Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed to deliver a superior user experience. In-memory Data Grid has a variety of use cases in today’s environment, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies, among many others. With containers getting more attention, the need to have Data Grid running on a container platform like OpenShift is clear, and we are seeing more and more customers aligning their architecture with a datastore running natively on a container platform.

    In this article, I will talk about multiple layers of security available while deploying Data Grid on OpenShift. The layers of security offer a combination of security measures provided by Data Grid as well as by OpenShift/Kubernetes.

  • Rebooting UUCP to redecentralize the net

    UUCP (Unix-to-Unix Copy Protocol) is a venerable, non-hierarchical networking protocol that was used as transport for early email and Usenet message boards; its intrinsic decentralization and its cooperative nature (UUCP hosts store and forward messages for one another) make it a kind of symbol of the early, decentralized robustness that characterized the early net and inspired so much optimism about a fundamentally distributed arrangement of peers rising up to replace the top-down phone companies and other centralized systems.

    As part of the decentralized web movement, UUCP has been rebooted by Dataforge, a Fort Worth, Texas-based "hybrid shell provider/tilde server" whose proprietor Wesley "praetor" Banderia uses his decades of Unix systems administration to keep the system running on a cluster of lovingly maintained vintage SGI machines with a Google Cloud VPS for backup.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: GCC, py3status, Mu and More Python

  • GCC 9 Will Be Released Soon With AMD Zen 2 Support, Radeon GCN Back-End, D Language
    GNU Compiler Collection 9 (GCC 9) will be formally released in the coming weeks as version 9.1.
  • py3status v3.17
    I’m glad to announce a new (awaited) release of py3status featuring support for the sway window manager which allows py3status to enter the wayland environment!
  • An Intro to Threading in Python
    Python threading allows you to have different parts of your program run concurrently and can simplify your design. If you’ve got some experience in Python and want to speed up your program using threads, then this tutorial is for you!
  • Mu 1.1.0-alpha.1 Released
    We have just released the first “alpha” of the upcoming 1.1 version of Mu. To try it, follow the links on Mu’s download page. Mu is a team effort, so many thanks to all the volunteers who have contributed in innumerable ways to make this happen. This is the first of several “alpha” releases for the next version of Mu. Over the coming weeks we intend to release newer versions based upon feedback from you, our users. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have comments, suggestions or have found a problem (bug). The more feedback we get, the better. While we carefully read all feedback, we can’t always respond to nor address such feedback (remember, we’re all volunteers). If you’re interested in what we’re up to, all our development work happens in the open on GitHub and you can even chat directly with us (we’re friendly, so come say, “Hi”). What exactly do we mean by “alpha”..?
  • R vs Python | Best Programming Language for Data Science and Analysis
  • A Quick Python Check-in With Naomi Ceder
  • Plot the Aroon Oscillator values with python

Fedora and Red Hat: SuperIO, Microsoft Mono, Fedora Modularity, NeuroFedora, OpenShift and 'Data Economy' (Spying)

  • Even more fun with SuperIO
    There were a few slight hickups, in that when you read the data back from the device just one byte is predictably wrong, but nothing that can’t be worked around in software. Working around the wrong byte means we can verify the attestation checksum correctly. Now, don’t try flashing your EC with random binaries. The binaries look unsigned, don’t appear to have any kind of checksum, and flashing the wrong binary to the wrong hardware has the failure mode of “no I/O devices appear at boot” so unless you have a hardware programmer handy it’s probably best to wait for an update from your OEM.
  • Mono 5 Might Come For Fedora 30 While Other Fedora 31 Features Discussed
    Earlier this month was the feature proposal for Fedora 31 to finally upgrade to Mono 5, which has been out for nearly two years for this open-source .NET environment. This feature request has been approved for Fedora 31 while it's also been decided to allow it into Fedora 30 if it can land within the next week. The transition from Mono 4 to Mono 5 was blocked due to the build process depending upon some binary references that complicated the process for distributions like Fedora and Debian. But they've now overcome those challenges and are ready to introduce Mono 5 to Fedora users.
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Day for Fedora Modularity
    Modularity lets you keep the right version of an application, language runtime, or other software on your Fedora system even as the operating system is updated. You can read more about Modularity in general on the Fedora documentation site. The Modularity folks have been working on Modules for everyone. As a result, the Fedora Modularity and QA teams have organized a test day for Tuesday, March 26, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read on for more information on the test day.
  • NeuroFedora update: 2019 week 13
  • OpenShift Commons AIOps SIG Kick off Meeting Recap (Video & Slides included)
    OpenShift Commons hosted the first AIOps SIG meeting today with guest speakers from Red Hat, Siscale and Prophetstor. This AIOps SIG group will be meeting on the last Monday of each month. Please join the AIOps google group to receive notices of upcoming meetings and events.
  • Data explosion, or data implosion?
    Data. It’s here. It’s everywhere. It is, as I’ve said before, the dawn of the Data Economy. With data permeating our lives—and business—it makes sense to say that data, and the ability to use it wisely for insights, is important to many organizations’ success. In this post, I’ll examine some of the barriers organizations face in the Data Economy and how they’re overcoming them.

LOCKDOWN Aiming To Be In Linux 5.2 For Tightening Up Hardware/Kernel Access

Google developer Matthew Garrett recently took over work on the long-standing "LOCKDOWN" kernel patches with a goal of preventing the running kernel image from being modified and strengthen the boundary between UID 0 and the kernel. These patches, which have been around for years and shipped by some Linux distributions, didn't make it into the recent Linux 5.1 merge window but now a pull request has been issued in trying to ship it with Linux 5.2. Read more

openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life. We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community. Read more Obituary: Peter T. Linnell